Remembering former astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn

Remembering former astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn

Former astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn

Died on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016

 

John Glenn Memorial

A portrait of Sen. John Glenn and a memorial wreath stand at the Heroes and Legends exhibit hall at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex before a ceremony remembering the iconic astronaut who passed away Dec. 8, 2016 at age 95.

Remembering former astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn died on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. 

Glenn, who served four terms as a U.S. senator from Ohio, was one of NASA’s original seven Mercury astronauts. His flight on Friendship 7 on Feb. 20, 1962, showed the world that America was a serious contender in the space race with the Soviet Union. It also made Glenn an instant hero.

Glenn’s official portrait as one of NASA’s original seven Mercury astronauts.

Credits: NASA

 

Mercury Astronauts John Glenn, Gus Grissom and Alan Shepard

S61-00239 (1961) — Mercury astronauts John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil I. Grissom and Alan B. Shepard Jr. standing by the Redstone rocket in their spacesuits.

Image Credit: NASA

 Boosting Morale: Guenter Wendt, the original pad leader for NASA’s manned space program, coaxes a smile out of astronaut John Glenn after the MA-6 mission was scrubbed.

Image Credit: NASA

 John Glenn and President Kennedy:

Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. gives a double thumbs-up as he and President John F. Kennedy arrive at the Cape Canaveral Missile Test Annex in Florida. Glenn’s Mercury Atlas 6 mission lifted off from Launch Complex 14, in the background, on Feb. 20, 1962.

Photo Credit: NASA

Celebrating John Glenn’s Legacy:

Cleveland State University Master of Music Major James Binion Jr. sings a musical tribute as former Astronaut Steve Lindsey, left, Sen. John Glenn, and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, seated right, look on at an event celebrating John Glenn’s legacy and 50 years of Americans in orbit held at the university’s Wolstein Center on Friday, March 3, 2012 in Cleveland. Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth in 1962.
Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

 Astronaut John Glenn inspects artwork that will be painted on the outside of his Mercury spacecraft, which he nicknamed Friendship 7. On Feb. 20, 1962, Glenn lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas (MA-6) rocket to become the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

Image Credit: NASA

John Glenn climbs inside the Mercury capsule he dubbed “Friendship 7” on Feb. 20, 1962, before launching into space.

Credits: NASA

Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. With Mercury ‘Friendship 7’ Spacecraft

 Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury Atlas 6 (MA-6) spaceflight, poses for a photo with the Mercury “Friendship 7” spacecraft during preflight activities. On Feb. 20, 1962, Glenn piloted the Mercury-Atlas 6 “Friendship 7” spacecraft on the first manned orbital mission of the United States. Launched from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., he completed a successful three-orbit mission around the earth, reaching a maximum altitude (apogee) of approximately 162 statute miles and an orbital velocity of approximately 17,500 miles per hour. Glenn’s “Friendship 7” Mercury spacecraft landed approximately 800 miles southeast of KSC in the vicinity of Grand Turk Island. Mission duration from launch to impact was 4 hours, 55 minutes, and 23 seconds.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: July 30, 2015

Editor: Sarah Loff

Tags:  Mercury (Human Spaceflight Program), Mercury Atlas 6 (Friendship 7), NASA History

Friendship 7

Jan. 31, 2014

An Historic Meeting

John Glenn, standing next to his Friendship 7 capsule in which he made his historic orbital flight, meets with President John F. Kennedy. Mrs. Glenn stands next to her husband. Earlier that day, President Kennedy presented the NASA Distinguished Service Award to Glenn.

Image credit: NASA 

JohnGlennStandingNextTohisFriendship7capsuleWithPresidentKennedy

Last Updated: July 30, 2015

Editor: NASA Administrator

Glenn, who served four terms as a U.S. senator from Ohio, was one of NASA’s original seven Mercury astronauts. His flight on Friendship 7 on Feb. 20, 1962, showed the world that America was a serious contender in the space race with the Soviet Union. It also made Glenn an instant hero.

U.S. President John F. Kennedy Pays Tribute to Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr.

 

On Feb. 23, 1962, U.S. President John F. Kennedy pays tribute to astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. for his February 1962 flight aboard Friendship 7. The Mercury-Atlas 6 mission marked the free world’s first orbital manned flight. Vice-President Lyndon Baines Johnson (for whom the Manned Spacecraft Center was later to be named), NASA Administrator James Webb and Glenn family members are among others also in the scene. 

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: July 30, 2015

Editor: NASA Administrator


May 29, 2012, Sen. John Glenn Receives Presidential Medal of Freedom

President Barack Obama congratulates former United States Marine Corps pilot, astronaut, and United States Senator John Glenn after presenting him with a Medal of Freedom, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington.

For more information please visit the following link

https://www.nasa.gov/content/profile-of-john-glenn

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Hope for Humanity, Women’s March in Washington and around the World

Hope for Humanity, Women’s March in Washington and around the World

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered for the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Women’s march in Washington and around the world for our hope for Human Rights and Humanity as a whole

January 21, 201711:19 AM ET

Women’s March Floods Washington, Sparking Rallies Worldwide

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, several U.S. territories and countries around the world. They have tried to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump’s agenda, and support of women’s rights and human rights in general.

Given the quirks of time zones, many of those marches kicked off before the event that inspired them. In Sydney, London, New Delhi, and other cities, demonstrators broke out their signs and pink hats before even their compatriots in D.C. could.

Straight from NPR and member station reporters on the ground: Here’s a glimpse of the marches Saturday — across the country, and around the world.

For more Information please visit the following link:

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/21/510940708/womens-march-on-washington-goes-worldwide-snapshots-from-around-the-globe

Protesters in New York City during the Women’s March.                                         Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Tens of thousands gather in Civic Center Park for the Women’s March on Denver.   Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

Protesters participate in the Women’s March in Chicago, Illinois.                             John Gress/Getty Images

Protesters at the start of the Women’s March on Main Street in Park City, Utah.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

“Women’s March on Main” during the 2017 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.   Arthur Mola/Invision/AP

Protesters make their way through Chicago during the city’s women’s march.

Participants hold signs as they wait for the start of the women’s march in Los Angeles.

Thousands of participants converge on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza and Second Avenue during the women’s March in New York City.  NY Daily News via Getty Images

Crowds gather for the women’s march on Main Street during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

de Trocadero in Paris in solidarity with supporters of the Women’s March in Washington.   Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators take part in the Women’s March on London on Saturday.                         Tim Ireland/AP

Activists hold a banner that reads “Women’s March Against Fascism” during the Women’s March rally in Belgrade, Serbia, on Saturday.   Darko Vojinovic/AP

A woman wearing an American flag as a headscarf attends a protest for women’s rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington in front of Brandenburger Tor in Berlin, Germany.   Steffi Loos/Getty Images

Women hold placards during an demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Athens, Greece in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington.                               Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators make their way during the Women’s March in Barcelona, Spain. The Women’s March originated in Washington, D.C. but soon spread to become a global event.   David Ramos/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate for women’s rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington in Sydney.  Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

Indian women in New Delhi participate in a nationwide “I Will Go Out” march to raise questions about safe access for women and marginalized communities in public spaces across India.  Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Tens of thousands participated in the BostonWomen’s March In cluding Sen ElizabethWarren & Mayor MartyWalsh (bottom right). Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Women’s March Floods Washington, Sparking Rallies Worldwide

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Remembering Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon

Remembering Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon

Died on Monday, January 16, 2017

Eugene Cernan in Lunar Module

Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene Cernan inside the lunar module on the moon after his second moonwalk of the mission. His spacesuit is covered with lunar dust

“We leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.” — Cernan’s closing words on leaving the moon at the end of Apollo 17

Eugene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, died Monday, Jan. 16, surrounded by his family.

Cernan, a Captain in the U.S. Navy, left his mark on the history of exploration by flying three times in space, twice to the moon. He also holds the distinction of being the second American to walk in space and the last human to leave his footprints on the lunar surface.

He was one of 14 astronauts selected by NASA in October 1963. He piloted the Gemini 9 mission with Commander Thomas P. Stafford on a three-day flight in June 1966. Cernan logged more than two hours outside the orbiting capsule.

In May 1969, he was the lunar module pilot of Apollo 10, the first comprehensive lunar-orbital qualification and verification test of the lunar lander. The mission confirmed the performance, stability, and reliability of the Apollo command, service and lunar modules. The mission included a descent to within eight nautical miles of the moon’s surface.

In a 2007 interview for NASA’s oral histories, Cernan said, “I keep telling Neil Armstrong that we painted that white line in the sky all the way to the Moon down to 47,000 feet so he wouldn’t get lost, and all he had to do was land. Made it sort of easy for him.”

 Apollo 17 Commander Eugene A. Cernan and the U.S. flag on the lunar surface.

Apollo 17 commander Eugene A. Cernan is holding the lower corner of the American flag during the mission’s first EVA, December 12, 1972. Photograph by Harrison J. “Jack” Schmitt.   Image Credit: NASA

 

Cernan and Evans in Apollo 17  Credits: NASA

Cernan concluded his historic space exploration career as commander of the last human mission to the moon in December 1972. En route to the moon, the crew captured an iconic photo of the home planet, with an entire hemisphere fully illumnitated — a “whole Earth” view showing Africa, the Arabian peninsula and the south polar ice cap. The hugely popular photo was referred to by some as the “Blue Marble,” a title in use for an ongoing series of NASA Earth imagery.

Apollo 17 established several new records for human space flight, including the longest lunar landing flight (301 hours, 51 minutes); longest lunar surface extravehicular activities (22 hours, 6 minutes); largest lunar sample return (nearly 249 pounds); and longest time in lunar orbit (147 hours, 48 minutes).

Cernan and crewmate Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt completed three highly successful excursions to the nearby craters and the Taurus-Littrow mountains, making the moon their home for more than three days. As he left the lunar surface, Cernan said, “America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow. As we leave the moon and Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.”

 

 Apollo 17 astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt sing while walking on the moon during the last Apollo lunar landing mission.  NASA.gov Video “I Was Strolling on the Moon One Day” the link on YouTube is as the following: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl_VdN6rfrQ

“Apollo 17 built upon all of the other missions scientifically,” said Cernan in 2008, recalling the mission as the agency celebrated its 50th Anniversary. “We had a lunar rover, we were able to cover more ground than most of the other missions. We stayed there a little bit longer. We went to a more challenging unique area in the mountains, to learn something about the history and the origin of the moon itself.”

On their way to the moon, the Apollo 17 crew took one of the most iconic photographs in space-program history, the full view of the Earth dubbed “The Blue Marble.” Despite it’s fame, the photograph hasn’t really been appreciated, Cernan said in 2007.

This classic photograph of the Earth was taken on December 7, 1972.

Credits: NASA

“What is the real meaning of seeing this picture? I’ve always said, I’ve said for a long time, I still believe it, it’s going to be — well it’s almost fifty now, but fifty or a hundred years in the history of mankind before we look back and really understand the meaning of Apollo. Really understand what humankind had done when we left, when we truly left this planet, we’re able to call another body in this universe our home. We did it way too early considering what we’re doing now in space. It’s almost as if JFK reached out into the twenty-first century where we are today, grabbed hold of a decade of time, slipped it neatly into the (nineteen) sixties and seventies (and) called it Apollo.”

On July 1, 1976, Cernan retired from the Navy after 20 years and ended his NASA career. He went into private business and served as television commentator for early fights of the space shuttle.

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2017

Editor: Brian Dunbar

Tags:  NASA History

 Jan. 16, 2017

RELEASE 17-007

NASA Administrator Reflects on Legacy of Last Man to Walk on Moon

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on the passing of Gemini and Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan:

“Gene Cernan, Apollo astronaut and the last man to walk on the moon, has passed from our sphere, and we mourn his loss. Leaving the moon in 1972, Cernan said, ‘As I take these last steps from the surface for some time into the future to come, I’d just like to record that America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow.’ Truly, America has lost a patriot and pioneer who helped shape our country’s bold ambitions to do things that humankind had never before achieved.

“Gene first served his country as a Naval Aviator before taking the pilot’s seat on the Gemini 9 mission, where he became the second American to walk in space and helped demonstrate rendezvous techniques that would be important later. As a crew member of both the Apollo 10 and 17 missions, he was one of three men to have flown twice to the moon. He commanded Apollo 17 and set records that still stand for longest manned lunar landing flight, longest lunar surface extravehicular activities, largest lunar sample return, and longest time in lunar orbit.

“Gene’s footprints remain on the moon, and his achievements are imprinted in our hearts and memories. His drive to explore and do great things for his country is summed up in his own words:

We truly are in an age of challenge. With that challenge comes opportunity. The sky is no longer the limit. The word impossible no longer belongs in our vocabulary. We have proved that we can do whatever we have the resolve to do. The limit to our reach is our own complacency.’

“In my last conversation with him, he spoke of his lingering desire to inspire the youth of our nation to undertake the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) studies, and to dare to dream and explore. He was one of a kind and all of us in the NASA Family will miss him greatly.”

For more information about Cernan’s NASA career, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/cernan

-end-

Bob Jacobs
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1600
bob.jacobs@nasa.gov

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2017

Editor: Allard Beutel

Tags:  NASA History

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Gemini IXA Splashes Down

The Gemini IXA spacecraft, with command pilot Tom Stafford and pilot Eugene Cernan aboard, splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean on June 6, 1966, less than one mile from the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. It was the first time a spacecraft descending on its parachute was shown on live television

 Looking Back at the Gemini IX Spacecraft                         “What a beautiful spacecraft,” said Gemini IX pilot Eugene Cernan during his two hour, eight minute spacewalk on June 5, 1966. He took this wide-angle photograph looking back at the window where command pilot Tom Stafford was watching.

 

 Gemini IXA Pilot Eugene Cernan Spacewalk

During his two hour, eight minute spacewalk on June 5, 1966, Gemini IXA pilot Eugene Cernan is seen outside the spacecraft. His experience during that time showed there was still much to be learned about working in microgravity.

 

 Gemini IXA Astronauts at Launch Pad 19                                                                               

After two postponements, Gemini IXA astronauts Eugene Cernan, left, and Tom Stafford, center, arrive in the white room atop Launch Pad 19 at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station on June 3, 1966. Stafford is presenting a large match to McDonnell Aircraft Corporation’s pad leader Gunter Wendt, far right.

 

 Apollo 10 Launch                                                                                                                         The Apollo 10 (Spacecraft 106/Lunar Module 4/Saturn 505) space vehicle with crew members Eugene Cernan, John Young and Thomas Stafford on board is launched from Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center at 12:49 p.m., May 18, 1969.

 

Apollo 10 Rollout                                                                                                                     Apollo 10 rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Complex 39B. This mission launched on May 18, 1969. The crew of Tom Stafford, Gene Cernan and John Young  

flew the “dress rehearsal” for the first human landing on the moon.

 

 Apollo 10 Lunar Module Ascends                                                                                                     After dropping down to 47,400 feet above the moon’s surface, Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan aboard the ascent stage of Apollo 10 lunar module, return to John Young in the command module on May 22, 1969.

 

Apollo 10 Crew

The crew of Apollo 10, from the left, Eugene Cernan, John Young and Thomas Stafford are photographed while at the Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Apollo 10 space vehicle on Launch Pad 39 B, The three crewmen had just completed a Countdown Demonstration Test exercise on May 13, 1969.

41 Years Ago this Week – Apollo 17

During the second spacewalk on December 12, 1972, Apollo 17 Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan is standing near the lunar rover designed by Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Apollo 17 Launch

The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A., Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 12:33 a.m. (EST), Dec. 7, 1972.

Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission in NASA’s Apollo program, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V launch vehicle.

 

 Apollo 17 Mission Commander Eugene Cernan Drives Lunar Roving Vehicle                     

Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene Cernan drives the lunar roving vehicle during the early part of the first moonwalk at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Lunar Module is in the background.

 

  Gene Cernan at Armstrong Memorial  

 Apollo 17 mission commander Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, looks skyward during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong at the Washington National Cathedral, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82.

 

 Gene Cernan Speaks at Armstrong Memorial Service                                                                                                    Apollo 17 astronaut Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, speaks during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong at the Washington National Cathedral, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82.

 

 Apollo 17 Splashdown                                                                                                                          The Apollo 17 spacecraft, containing astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt, glided to a safe splashdown at 2:25 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 1972, 648 kilometers (350 nautical miles) southeast of American Samoa.

House Hearing on NASA Human Spaceflight Plan

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong, left, and retired Navy Captain and commander of Apollo 17 Eugene Cernan, confer prior to testifying at a hearing before the House Science and Technology Committee, Tuesday, May 26, 2010, at the Rayburn House office building on Capitol Hill in Washington. The hearing was to review proposed human spaceflight plans.

 Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference                           On July 20, 2009, Apollo astronauts from left, Walt Cunningham (Apollo 7), James Lovell (Apollo 8 Apollo 13), David Scott (Apollo 9 Apollo 15), Buzz Aldrin (Apollo 11), Charles Duke (Apollo 16), Thomas Stafford (Apollo 10) and Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17) are seen during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission press conference.

 

Apollo 10 40th Anniversary Program                                   NASA Apollo 10 Astronaut Gene Cernan, right, answers questions from the Newseum’s distinguished journalist-in-residence, Nick Clooney during a Newseum TV program celebrating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 10, Monday, May 18, 2009, in Washington.

Suited Up for Apollo 10 Mission – May 1969                            Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 10 lunar module pilot, is suited up at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a Countdown Demonstration Test during preparations for his scheduled lunar orbit mission. The other two crew members are astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander, and John W. Young, command module pilot.

Apollo 17 Launch                                                                                                                     A Saturn V rocket streaks toward space on the night of December 17, 1972, carrying the Apollo 17 crew, the last astronauts to explore the moon. Leaving the lunar surface, Commander Gene Cernan said “we leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.”              

Apollo 17 Launch                                                                                                    The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 12:33 a.m. (EST), Dec. 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission in NASA’s Apollo program, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V.

Apollo 17’s Moonship                                                                                    Awkward and angular looking, Apollo 17’s lunar module Challenger was designed for flight in the vacuum of space. This picture, taken from the command module America, shows Challenger’s ascent stage in lunar orbit. Small reaction control thrusters are at the sides of the moonship with the bell of the ascent rocket engine itself underneath.

Apollo 17 Crew                                                                                                                          On Dec. 19, 1972, the Apollo 17 crew returned to Earth. Apollo 17 was the sixth and last Apollo mission in which humans walked on the lunar surface. On Dec. 11, Lunar Module Pilot Harrison H. Schmitt and Commander Eugene A. Cernan, landed on the moon’s Taurus-Littrow region in the Lunar Module. 

 Driving on the Moon                                                                                                          Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene A. Cernan makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the early part of the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view of the lunar rover prior to loadup was taken by Harrison H. Schmitt, Lunar Module pilot.

Apollo 17 – The Last Moon Shot

In 1865, Jules Verne wrote a science fiction story entitled, “From the Earth to the Moon.” The story outlined the author’s vision of a cannon in Florida so powerful that it could shoot a “Projectile-Vehicle” carrying three adventurers to the moon. More than 100 years later NASA produced the Saturn V rocket and from a spaceport in Florida.

Reflections of the Moon                                                                                                             The surface of the moon is reflected in the command and service module as it prepares to rendezvous with the lunar module in this December 1972 image from the Apollo 17 mission.

  Training for the Apollo 17 Mission                                       Two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission participate in training at the Kennedy Space Center. Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt (foreground), lunar module pilot, simulates scooping up lunar sample material. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (background), commander, holds a sample b

 Blue Marble – Image of the Earth from Apollo 17                                           

View of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew — astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander; astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot — traveling toward the moon. This translunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica South polar ice cap.

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President Barack Obama’s photographer presents his last year in review

President Barack Obama’s photographer presents his last year in review

February: “This photograph evokes the President in deep thought, which is not always an easy mood to convey. He was prepping with his national security staff before a teleconference with European leaders.”  Pete Souza / White House Image caption

BBC News’ article on 30 December 2016, from the section In Pictures

“It’s been the honour of a lifetime to be a witness to history these past eight years.”The president’s photographer, Pete Souza, has selected the finest photos from inside the White House and beyond for his final annual review, before the Obama administration is replaced in January.“The editing for this project is both subjective and personal,” he said. “Yes, there are some historic moments included but mostly I was looking for behind-the-scenes moments that give people a more personal look at the president and first lady.”

We have reproduced a selection, with insights from behind the lens by Mr Souza.

February: “President Obama reacts as his putt falls just short during an impromptu hole of golf with staffers Joe Paulsen, left, and Marvin Nicholson” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

February: “I had my eye on this youngster while President Barack Obama spoke during a reception at the White House celebrating African American History Month. When the president started greeting audience members along the rope line, I bent down in front of the young man and captured this moment of the president touching his face before he too bent down to greet him. Afterwards, I tracked down his name – Clark Reynolds – and had the president sign a copy for him.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

March: “What an honour to watch these girls grow up. Malia, foreground, and Sasha were both invited guests for the State Dinner in honour of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada and Mrs Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau. Following the actual sit-down dinner in the East Room, they made their way down the Great Hall to the State Dining Room for the musical entertainment.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

March: “It just happened spontaneously one afternoon as the president began dancing in the Outer Oval with Personal Aide Ferial Govashiri. As I recall, he was helping her practise for her upcoming wedding.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

March:”The First Lady watches as President Obama gives a hug to Caprina Harris before the annual Easter Egg Roll. Caprina had burst out in tears when she was told by her family that Obama would no longer be president; the resulting YouTube video went viral and President Obama responded to her on Facebook and said he wasn’t going anywhere. They finally had a chance to meet here.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption March

April: “Originally it was unclear whether I would be permitted to photograph the president meeting Prince George. But the night before, our advance team called and said they had gotten word from Kensington Palace that they would allow me access to make candid photographs during their visit. Afterwards, this photograph garnered the most attention but at the time all I could think was how the table at right was hindering my ability to be at the optimum angle for this moment.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

June: “The vice-president chases children and members of the press with a super soaker during the 2016 Biden Beach Boardwalk Bash held at the Naval Observatory Residence in Washington DC.” David Lienemann / White House Image caption

June: “The great thing about children is you just don’t know what they will do in the presence of the president. So when David Axelrod stopped by the Oval Office with one of his sons’ family, Axe’s granddaughter, Maelin, crawled onto the vice-president’s seat while the president continued his conversation with the adults. Then at one point, Maelin glanced over just as the president was looking back at her.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

July: “German Chancellor Angela Merkel reacts when she thought they were somehow going to squeeze the entire press corps into a small hallway in Warsaw, Poland, to do a group photo with all of the European leaders. Instead, they were just being lined up in the order that they were supposed to walk into the room where the press was already prepositioned.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

August: “With some staff watching in the background, President Obama blows out candles after the vice-president surprised him with some birthday cupcakes.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

August: “President Obama watches a virtual reality film captured during his trip to Yosemite National Park earlier this summer as Personal Aide Ferial Govashiri continues working at her computer.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

September: “The president had gone for a hike with daughter Malia at Great Falls National Park, Virginia, and sat down on a rock overlooking the Potomac River.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

September: “After a meeting with actor and human rights activist George Clooney, the president invited him and three of his colleagues to shoot hoops on the White House basketball court. This photo garnered a lot of attention when it was hung on the walls of the West Wing.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

September: “The first lady goes shopping at a CVS Pharmacy in preparation for life after the White House during a segment taping for the Ellen DeGeneres Show in Burbank, California.” Lawrence Jackson / White House Image caption

September: “Following the official opening of the African American Museum, the Bonner family wanted to have their picture taken with former President George W Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush. President Bush took the Bonner’s family smart phone and looking around for someone to snap the picture tapped President Obama on the shoulder and asked him to do the honours. The Bonner Family are fourth generation descendants of Elijah B. Odom, a young slave who escaped to freedom. The Bushes were instrumental in the creation of the museum, with Laura Bush serving on the board of directors.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

October: “The White House was hosting South by South Lawn, an event based on the infamous South by Southwest event in Austin, Texas. Just before lunch that day, the president was checking out the setup from a window in the Oval Office before the gates were opened. ‘Hey Pete,’ he said to me, ‘let’s go take a picture with the Lego men.’ And so we did.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

October: “There was almost no light remaining at the end of the day when the president and first lady walked out to the South Lawn for a ‘Fourth Quarter’ toast to White House staff.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

October: “Bill Murray stopped by the White House to be honoured as the recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. When the president opened the door to the Oval Office, he laughed that Bill was in full Chicago Cubs regalia just before the Cubs were to begin the World Series. After the presentation, Murray demonstrated his prowess in putting, ‘sinking’ several putts into a White House drinking glass, all while doing a public service announcement to sign up for the Affordable Care Act.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

October: “The president was about to welcome local children for Halloween trick-or-treating when he ran into Superman Walker Earnest, son of Press Secretary Josh Earnest, in the Ground Floor Corridor of the White House. ‘Flex those muscles,’ he said to Walker.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

November: “It was the morning after the election and the president wanted to speak to press secretary Josh Earnest about how to characterise his thoughts to the press. When he heard Josh was meeting with his team, the president sent word to bring the team with him, thinking it was just a few others. But it turned out that Josh had the entire communications, speechwriting and research team in his office and they all filtered in to the Oval, some for the first time.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

November: “A good respite from the day after the election was the visit of Alex Myteberi. The six-year-old boy from New York had written a letter to President Obama after seeing a heart-breaking photograph of Syrian refugee Omran Daqneesh sitting silently in an ambulance, covered in blood and dust, after an air strike on Aleppo. In his letter, Alex wrote to the president: ‘Can you please go get him and bring him to my home. We’ll be waiting for you guys with flags, flowers, and balloons. We will give him a family and he will be our brother. The president was so touched by the letter that he read excerpts from it at the United Nations in September. Alex and his family were invited to the Oval Office so the president could tell him in person how much the letter had meant to him.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

November: “Bruuuuuce! The president reaches out to shake hands with Bruce Springsteen in the Blue Room of the White House prior to the Presidential Medal of Freedom ceremony. I’m so happy for Bruce, having been a fan of his for almost 30 years during which I’ve seen at least 35 of his concerts.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

 December: “When I first posted this photograph and told the story about the prank in moving four snowmen so they were peeking into the Oval Office, some took this to mean that I had been the one to execute the prank. But it was not me, and as I previously wrote, the staff that pulled this off will remain nameless, unless Brian decides he wants to come forward with saying who helped him. Whoops.” Pete Souza / White House Image caption

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New Year celebrations Around the World Welcome 2017

New Year celebrations Around the World Welcome 2017

 

Singapore celebrates the New Year

Large crowds gathered for the fireworks display at Auckland’s Sky Tower

 

Fireworks ring in the New Year in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Buddhists light candles at Jogye Buddhist temple in Seoul, South Korea

North Koreans gathered at Kim Il Sung square in Pyongyang

So-called “bearded men” parade through the streets of Slawatycze in Poland’s Lublin region as part of a local tradition

 

Fireworks lit up the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai

 Fireworks explode over the Kremlin, in Moscow, Russia

London brings the New Year with fireworks along the Thames

Paris’s Arc de Triomphe was lit up with pictures

Fireworks explode over the Brandenburg gate in Berlin, Germany

As midnight struck in New York, Times Square was deluged with confetti

Fireworks light up the sky over Nairobi, Kenya

People watch a fireworks display from the water off Copacabana beach, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Greece welcomes 2017 with a fireworks display over the Parthenon temple

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