Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland, Wales – Part 4

Street Art in Wales

A street artist is using art to help the homeless in Cardiff, Wales

 

 A street artist is using art to help the homeless in Cardiff
Award-winning Kyle Legall is working with a centre for the homeless
ABBIE WIGHTWICK
15:57, 13 NOV 2016
WalesOnline NEWS

Award-winning Butetown street artist Kyle Legall is using art to help homeless people in Cardiff get new skills to help them find jobs.
Street artist Kyle Legall
Kyle, who has been artist-in-residence for National Theatre Wales and produced street performance project The Butetown Rats, hopes he can pass on a love of creativity that will help homeless people develop skills to find employment.
Future projects will include turning external walls of the centre into works of art.
The Huggard Centre has more than 25,000 visits a year from homeless and vulnerable people and aims to provide help for training as well as immediate emergency help.
The 20-bed hostel has an emergency overnight stay unit and 14 shared houses with 53 tenants getting personal support from the centre.
As well as providing support, subsidised meals and substance misuse help, the centre also works to provide training and volunteering opportunities and it is hoped the new art initiative will eventually help people into work, Huggard chief executive Richard Edwards said.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/street-artist-using-art-help-12168592

 

The Huggard Centre
Cafe H is open to the public.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/street-artist-using-art-help-12168592

 

Meet the man behind some of Cardiff’s most eye-catching street art
It is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants but street artist Bryce Davies is changing that, one wall at a time
RUTH MOSALSKI
15:22, 28 AUG 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

‘You can explain it’
Social media is one of the factors Bryce cites as helping change attitudes to graffiti.

That has helped break down barriers and anabled people to understand the work that
There is now such a thing as
It is not long since graffiti was seen as uniquely the preserve of vandals and miscreants, a kind of harbinger of social disorder that had to be kept at bay.
In the US, a theory of crime dubbed
It led to graffiti being treated as a social evil, something to be battled by authorities fighting for safer, happier cities.
As a result, those who wanted to celebrate the counter-cultural, creative origins of modern graffiti, which emerged in the late
Mural of Gareth Bale by artist Bryce Davies on the changing rooms at Pontcanna Fields, Cardiff (Image:
Yet, whether it is to do with the commercial and cultural appeal of global stars like Banksy or just a more sympathetic understanding of how such work can make rundown areas more attractive, as well as contributing to a city
Authorities in cities like Cardiff and across the world now work with artists, both actively commissioning their work and providing tolerated
Unauthorised work, of whatever quality, on public and private buildings may still be taboo
As you walk around Cardiff, whether the city centre or suburbs, you can

Some of Bryce’s work
A work he painted on a boys
The Spy Booth work appeared overnight in April 2014 on the wall of a house in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, about three miles from the headquarters of Britain
From walls to vans
On Saturday, pictures were shared on social media showing the wall stripped back to its brickwork.
Alex Chalk, the Conservative MP for the town, described the possible loss of the work as
A stunning image of an owl by Bryce on the corner of Park Street in Cardiff city centre was painted over by a charity advert that was crude in comparison.

“It’s a warehouse where we have a graffiti exhibition every few months and people from different crews and communities come to exhibit. Legal walls are a really important thing to me. That’s where we can spend all day painting without having to look over our shoulders.”
As well as a safe place to paint, it’s also a way to learn from your peers and share ideas and tips.
“It’s one of the great things about graffiti – it’s the collaborative side of it,” he says.
‘You can explain it’
Social media is one of the factors Bryce cites as helping change attitudes to graffiti.
“Social media means people can not only put their work out there but also explain it,” he says.
That has helped break down barriers and anabled people to understand the work that’s gone into street art and the reasons behind it. Social media also means that work done on street corners can now travel the world digitally – turning graffiti into much more of a global medium.
There is now such a thing as “graffiti tourism”, in which artists travel and paint across the world.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674

 

It’s not just walls
Bryce said the work had been inspired by the Mabinogion tale of Blodeuwedd, who gets turned into an owl. He has since painted an entirely new bit of street art on the wall, depicting a fire-breathing red dragon.
Croeso i
On the wall on Park Street, it
When it came to creating the dragon, the background was the first step. He then sketched an outline in spray paint, and built up the image using layers and detailed techniques.
‘Shine or a pop’

 

An epic demonstration of his skills
Bryce started experimenting with graffiti as a teenager. He admits he wasn
‘I try to be original’
For that, he worked with a local primary school to come up with ideas for an old railway bridge which spanned the tracks of the old line that used to carry coal from the Universal pit.

An image of a piece of street art by Bryce Davies, who works under the name Peaceful Progress
Instead, this art is his life and income
Bryce says there is a distinction between street art, like Banksy
‘There’s a lot of styles’
There are murals in Cardiff of everything from dragons to footballers, as well as an entire boardwalk covered in colourful, luminous graffiti.
He explains:
And the age of those taking part is hugely varied.
As a rule, anything older should be painted over first. Or anything of a lower quality such as random tags or markings.
But when they walk away from a piece they
Bryce
But what next?

An artist collective lived inside, and it was a draw not just for artists, but tourists too. Nearer to home, in Bristol, Nelson Street has become a mecca for street art. The street spawned See No Evil, which became Europe
READ MORE

It is still listed as one of the places tourists should go to get a feel for the city

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/meet-man-behind-cardiffs-most-11810674

In Berlin, the Kunsthaus Tacheles was a huge building which was covered inside and out with graffiti-style murals.

 

What changed?
One of the city
He said:
As well as commercial deals with shops or councils, he is involved in projects such as the legal wall in Llandaff North
The Boilerhouse, a graffiti and street art gallery, started in Llandaff North but has now moved to Sanatorium Road.

Street art on Croft Street, Roath, Cardiff, by Kera
Sam said the mixed reaction to street art was interesting but that some people

Sam, who started this particular project on Monday, said larger wall murals tend to take less time than a smaller painting as they require less detail and more freedom.
Lucy, 19, a resident of Roath, said she liked and supported the work of street artists.

Street art on Croft Street, Roath, Cardiff, by Kera
WalesOnline: NEWS
Rachel Cable @Rachel Cable7
Today in Roath #Cardiff #graffiti #streetart #CF24
16:12 – 9 Mar 2016
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Sam said the mixed reaction to street art was interesting but that some people

Sam, who started this particular project on Monday, said larger wall murals tend to take less time than a smaller painting as they require less detail and more freedom.
Lucy, 19, a resident of Roath, said she liked and supported the work of street artists.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554

 

All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554

Musician Gwenno Saunders at the unveiling of a giant street art mural inspired by and featuring the Welsh Music Prize Winner at Clwb Ifor Bach in Womanby Street Cardiff
MILLIE THWAITES
18:00, 10 MAR 2016
UPDATED18:08, 10 MAR 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS
All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554

 

 The Dogs Trust launched a new street art campaign on Wood Street in Cardiff

 A colourful example of street art, spotted near the Millennium Stadium
MILLIE THWAITES
18:00, 10 MAR 2016
UPDATED18:08, 10 MAR 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554st piece of street art in Cardiff?

 

 The Gareth Bale mural in Whitchurch, Cardiff

 

This brilliant new street art has appeared on the side of a house in Cardiff
This new work of street art has appeared on a house in Cardiff but not everyone is happy about it

Sam, who goes by his artist alias of Colour Doomed, started this wall mural on the side of a house in Roath
MILLIE THWAITES
18:00, 10 MAR 2016
UPDATED18:08, 10 MAR 2016
WalesOnline: NEWS

All it takes is a stroll around Cardiff to see it
And this mural on Inverness Place in Roath is the latest in a long line which is being designed by Cardiff-based artist Sam, who goes by the artist alias Colour Doomed.
The artist and curator, who is one of the organisers of street art festival Empty Walls, has been decorating the streets of Cardiff with his art for nine years.
His latest wall mural covers the side wall of his friend
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/brilliant-new-street-art-appeared-11022554

 

 Brunei Graffiti Crew posted in Peaceful Progress

Brunei Graffiti trip..

Posted on January 18, 2018 by Bryce

During my recent stint in Asia I headed over to Brunei to visit some friends and paint some walls. Brunei has a fairly young but very talented and humble graffiti scene with a great ethos behind it. There are some great writers and artists out there, and hospitality was through the roof! If you ever find yourself there, head over to Stain, the Graffiti store and gallery, which incidentally was inspired by our own Graffiti gallery space here in Cardiff, The Boiler House. Various walls painted alongside Budi one, Nerd ink, and Nycer. Big shout out to Tag one and the other guys I met and hung out with!

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.peacefulprogress.org/

 

 Brunei Graffiti Angle 2 posted in Peaceful Progress

“Posted in Peaceful Progress

Bangkok – Common Ground

Posted on January 18, 2018 by Bryce

I was stoked to do a weeks guest spot in Common Ground in Bangkok in December. A great shop in the Silom area run by great people. Common Gound host a large number of guest artists form all over the world all throughout the year.. if your ever in Bangkok and looking for quality work, make sure you check them out!Â

Big thanks to Dillon, Jordi and co for having me. I’ll be seeing you again soon!”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.peacefulprogress.org/

Brunei Graffiti posted in Peaceful Progress

“Posted in Peaceful Progress

Sabah Graffiti

Posted on January 18, 2018 by Bryce

I had the opportunity to squeeze in a little bit of Graffiti in Sabah after the convention before heading to Brunei. This was alongside Cracko from Sabah, and my buddy from NZ.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.peacefulprogress.org/

 

 Posted in Peaceful Progress

NZ – Wales

Posted on November 16, 2017 by Bryce

Ok, you’d be forgiven for thinking this post is about Rugby… especially as these pieces were painted literally right by one the gates into the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. However, this is more about a reunion between 2 friends who live at the opposite ends of the earth. My buddy Tepid was on a tour of the UK and of course had to come pay a visit. The last time we painted together was in NZ back in 2012 in Wellington, and then Christchurch. It as my turn to repay the favour and show some hospitality. Hopefully see you again in another 5 years…Â

 

 Posted in Peaceful Progress

Go Compare

Posted on November 16, 2017 by Bryce

Go Compare approached me to create a mural in their offices to co-incide with the launch of their new 5 values. It was all a bit hush hush at the time, and I wasn’t allowed to post anything until they had launched the campaign. They even covered up the mural from their employees until the time was ready. This meant a long weekend in a corridor complete with fans, extraction fans and masks, working to complete the mural while the employees were off for the weekend. Only the security guard knew what was going on. It was a fun project to work on with good people, watch this space for more.Â

Posted in Peaceful Progress

Garden mural

Posted on November 16, 2017 by Bryce

A bit of classic Peaceful Progress garden muralism going down in Splott… landscapes to soften the urban environment.Â

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.peacefulprogress.org/

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