PBS News, TED Talks, Washington Post, Best Documentary, Global News, ABC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: December 31, 2019 and January 1 – 7, 2020, Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many, Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

TED Talks: The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live – David Brooks, How to escape education’s death valley, Bring on the learning revolution!,   Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit,  – Sir Ken Robinson, Guy Winch How to turn off work thoughts during your free time,

Washington Post: On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.,

Best Documentary: A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Global News: In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

ABC News: The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost

Thisiscolossal: VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside, The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

PBS NewsHour live episode, Jan 7, 2020

Started streaming 42 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 6, 2020

Jan 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Iran mourns Gen. Qassem Soleimani, killed by the U.S. in an airstrike on Friday. Plus: Possible political and military repercussions of the Soleimani killing, a Senate impeachment trial in limbo, 2020 Democrats focus on foreign policy amid Iran tensions, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer, political upheaval in Venezuela and refugee artists in exile in France. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Iranians unite to mourn military giant Qassem Soleimani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Srd… Iranian ambassador on revenge for Soleimani’s death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4TE-… News Wrap: Pelosi to introduce war powers resolution on Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjMS7… What killing of Iranian general means for U.S., nuclear deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBQPB… What Pelosi, McConnell are saying about impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdGje… Iran tensions put foreign policy in focus for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_nxV… Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer on Soleimani death, Iowa polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Wku… Venezuela’s political crisis roiled by chaos in parliament https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKBXl… In Europe, can art change the conversation around refugees? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlIm2… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 5, 2020

Jan 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 5, tensions escalate in the Middle East amid an outpouring of grief over the killing of Iran’s top military leader by a U.S. airstrike. Also, our ongoing series “Peril & Promise” examines the impact of climate change on communities along the Mississippi River in Louisiana and Missouri. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode January 4, 2020

Jan 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 4, the diplomatic fallout over the killing of Iranian military leader Qassim Suleimani, wildfires rage out of control in Australia, and the first part of our ongoing Peril and Promise series explores how climate change is impacting communities along the Mississippi River. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode Jan. 3, 2020

Jan 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a targeted U.S. attack in Baghdad kills a top Iranian general, raising ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Iran to new heights. Plus: American lawmakers respond to the killing of Qassam Soleimani, what’s next for the U.S. and Iran after Soleimani’s death, disinformation on the 2020 campaign trail and Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the week’s political news. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Who was Qassam Soleimani, and what does his death mean? https://youtu.be/Y1Ih9abqb6w Kaine says Trump’s Iran policy is hurting U.S. allies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8zyB… Risch says Soleimani was ‘ratcheting up’ attacks on the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhHJF… Why the U.S. targeted Soleimani — and how Iran might react https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1u2f7… News Wrap: Senate still divided on impeachment trial process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejXH-… How 2020 candidates are grappling with online disinformation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syCEN… Shields and Brooks on Soleimani’s death, 2020 fundraising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX5ID… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 2, 2020

Jan 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Australia is still burning amid a record fire season that has destroyed millions of acres and killed 17 people. Plus: Financing the 2020 presidential race, President Trump’s support among evangelical Christians, why millennials are leaving organized religion, what’s in the huge 2020 federal spending bill, Carlos Ghosn flees Japan and psycholinguist Jean Berko Gleason. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 1, 2020

Jan 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a standoff outside the U.S. Embassy in Iraq ends — but tensions over American involvement in the country remain high. Plus: What North Korea’s nuclear decision means for relations with the U.S., new laws go into effect as 2020 begins, Antarctic penguins warn of climate change consequences, the decline of local newspapers and harvesting water from fog. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Death in Australian wildfires rises to 17 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LE2U… Crisis at Baghdad embassy is over, but tensions remain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vl9wR… Amid stalled U.S. talks, Kim Jong Un’s ‘major policy shift’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ocQU… How state laws are changing in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAtFe… What America is losing as local newsrooms shutter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSVIX… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 31, 2019

Streamed live on Dec 31, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, 2020

Dec 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week’s political news, including the battle between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over rules for a Senate impeachment trial, how the presidential primary race is shaping up among 2020 Democrats and the year’s most surprising political developments. Sream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many

Dec 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

British painter J.M.W. Turner was both prolific and peripatetic, producing more than 30,000 watercolors during a lifetime in which he traveled throughout Europe. But these works are extremely susceptible to light damage and can be shown only once in a generation. Now, they’re on view at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut — their only North American stop. Jared Bowen of WGBH reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

Dec 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

By almost any measure, 2019 was a year of especially sobering news on climate change, with grim warnings about what could happen in the future along with extreme weather events occurring now. The year also saw a global protest movement, initiated by young people, arise to try to tackle the problem. But as Miles O’Brien reports, the call for action was often divorced from political reality. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live | David Brooks

Jul 3, 2019   TED

Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy. Get TED Talks recommended just for you! Learn more at https://www.ted.com/signup. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here: https://media-requests.ted.com/ Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category   People & Blogs

How to escape education’s death valley | Sir Ken Robinson

May 10, 2013  TED

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category   Education

Bring on the learning revolution! | Sir Ken Robinson

May 24, 2010  TED

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate. Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/tednews Checkout our Facebook page for TED exclusives https://www.facebook.com/TED

Category   Education

Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit

Aug 13, 2018   Better Together: California Teachers Summit

At the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit, Sir Ken Robinson, a leading education and creativity expert, delivered the keynote address from the Summit’s headquarters at Cal State Fullerton. Sir Ken’s thought-provoking speech challenged California’s teachers to transform our education system by building personal relationships and developing the appetite and curiosity of learners. Because, as he put it, “when the conditions are right, miracles happen everywhere.”

Category   Education

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Guy Winch · Psychologist, author

Guy Winch asks us to take our emotional health as seriously as we take our physical health — and explores how to heal from common heartaches.

More Resources

How to Fix a Broken Heart

Guy Winch

TED Books (2018)

Emotional First Aid

Guy Winch

Plume (2014)

Buy now ?

About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | November 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

2°C: Beyond the limit

On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.

By Darryl Fears  Photos by Bonnie Jo Mount
Graphics by John Muyskens and Harry Stevens Dec. 27, 2019

BRUNY ISLAND, Tasmania — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia’s ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Rodney Dillon noticed the day he squeezed into a wet suit several years ago and dove into Trumpeter Bay to catch his favorite food, a big sea snail called abalone. As he swam amid the towering kelp forest, he saw that “it had gone slimy.” He scrambled out of the water and called a scientist at the University of Tasmania in nearby Hobart. “I said, ‘Mate, all our kelp’s dying, and you need to come down here and have a look.’

“But no one could do anything about it.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/img/1800/ECE6XKHZEMI6THQCDVC4WPP2R4.jpg

Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined. Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making.

Climate change had arrived at this island near the bottom of the world, and the giant kelp that flourished in its cold waters was among the first things to go.

Over recent decades, the rate of ocean warming off Tasmania, Australia’s southernmost state and a gateway to the South Pole, has climbed to nearly four times the global average, oceanographers say.

More than 95 percent of the giant kelp — a living high-rise of 30-foot stalks that served as a habitat for some of the rarest marine creatures in the world — died.

Giant kelp had stretched the length of Tasmania’s rocky east coast throughout recorded history. Now it clings to a tiny patch near Southport, the island’s southern tip, where the water is colder.

“This is a hot spot,” said Neil Holbrook, a professor who researches ocean warming at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “And it’s one of the big ones.”

Click any temperature underlined in the story to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit

Climate scientists say it’s essential to hold global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times to avoid irreversible damage from warming.

The Tasman Sea is already well above that threshold.

The Washington Post’s examination of accelerated warming in the waters off Tasmania marks this year’s final installment of its global series “2C: Beyond the Limit,” which identified hot spots around the world. The investigation has shown that disastrous impacts from climate change aren’t a problem lurking in the distant future: They are here now.

Nearly a tenth of the planet has already warmed 2 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century, and the abrupt rise in temperature related to human activity has transformed parts of the Earth in radical ways.

In the United States, New Jersey is among the fastest-warming states, and its average winter has grown so warm that lakes no longer freeze as they once did. Canadian islands are crumbling into the sea because a blanket of sea ice no longer protects them from crashing waves. Fisheries from Japan to Angola to Uruguay are collapsing as their waters warm. Arctic tundra is melting away in Siberia and Alaska, exposing the remains of woolly mammoths buried for thousands of years and flooding the gravesites of indigenous people who have lived in an icy world for centuries.

Australia is a poster child for climate change. Wildfires are currently raging on the outskirtsof itsmost iconic city and drought is choking a significant portion of the country.

Nearly 100 fires are burning in New South Wales, nearly half of them out of control. Residents of the state, where Sydney sits, wear breathing masks to tolerate the heavy smoke, which has drifted more than 500 miles south to the outskirts of Melbourne.

This is happening even though average atmospheric temperatures in Australia have yet to increase by 2 degrees Celsius.

The ocean is another story.

A stretch of the Tasman Sea right along Tasmania’s eastern coast has already warmed by just a fraction below 2 degrees Celsius, according to ocean temperature data from the Hadley Center, the U.K. government research agency on climate change.

Sea surface temperature change in a region off the coast of Tasmania

Trend

1900195019802018-202ºF above 1900-2018average-101ºC above 1900-2018average

+1.9ºCAnnual average for the region

Source: Met Office Hadley Center for Climate Science and Services

As the marine heat rises and the kelp simmers into goo, Dillon and other descendants of Tasmania’s first people are losing a connection to the ocean that has defined their culture for millennia.

Aboriginals walked to present-day Tasmania 40,000 years ago during the Stone Age, long before rising sea levels turned the former peninsula into an island.

Cut off from Aboriginals on the mainland, about a dozen nomadic tribes were the first humans to live so close to the end of the Earth, fishing amid the giant kelp for abalone, hunting kangaroo and mutton birds, turning bull kelp into tools, and fashioning pearlescent snail shells into jewelry for hundreds of generations.

But that was before British colonizers took their land and deployed an apartheid-like system to wipe them out.

Now, as descendants try to finally get full recognition as the first people and original owners of Tasmania, climate change is threatening to remove the marine life that makes so much of their culture special.

Two of the most severe marine heat waves ever recorded struck back to back in recent years.

In the first, starting in 2015, ocean temperatures peaked at nearly 3 degrees Celsius above normal in the waters between Tasmania and New Zealand. A blob of heat that reached 2 degrees Celsius was more than seven times the size of Tasmania, an island the size of Ireland.

The region’s past heat waves normally lasted as long as two months. The 2015-2016 heat wave persisted for eight months. Alistair Hobday, who studied the event, compared it to the deadly 2003 European heat wave that led to the deaths of thousands of people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/heat-wave-map-2-medium.jpg?v=5

Marine heat waves, Feb. 1, 2016

MAINLAND

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

Mild heat wave

Moderate

TASMANIA

Severe

Extreme

100 MILES

Source: Robert Schlegel, Ocean Frontier Institute

“Except in this case, it’s the animals that are suffering,” said Hobday, a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, a government agency.

South of the equator, Australia’s summer stretches from December to February — and soaring temperatures turned the mainland deadly this year. An estimated 23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of that species’s population in Australia — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April.

The bats, called flying foxes, cannot survive temperatures above 42 degrees Celsius. Another 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into meadows, backyard gardens and swimming pools.

A month later, more than 100 ringtail possums fell dead in Victoria when temperatures topped 35 degrees Celsius for four consecutive days.

The warming waters off Tasmania are not just killing the giant kelp, but transforming life for marine animals.

Warm-water species are swimming south to places where they could not have survived a few years ago. Kingfish, sea urchins, zooplankton and even microbes from the warmer north near the mainland now occupy waters closer to the South Pole.

“There’s about 60 or 70 species of fish that now have established populations in Tasmania that used not to be here,” said Craig Johnson, who leads the ecology and biodiversity center at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “You might see them occasionally as sort of vagrants, but they certainly did not have established populations.”

But the region’s indigenous cold-water species have no place to go. Animals such as the prehistoric-looking red handfish are accustomed to the frigid water closer to the shore. They cannot live in the deep-water abyss between the bottom tip of Tasmania and Antarctica.

“It’s a geographic climate trap,” Johnson said. Marine animals unique to Australia — the wallabies and koalas of the deep — could easily vanish. “So there’s going to be a whole bunch of species here that we expect will just go extinct.

“You know, it’s not a happy story.”

Genocide

Every time he dives for abalone, Rodney Dillon plays his part in what is arguably Tasmania’s saddest story of all.

At 63, he’s getting too old for the occasional plunge. Before a dive on a windy day in September, two people had to wrestle his wet suit over a thick athlete’s body softened by time.

Dillon persists because diving puts a favorite food on the family table, and, more important, it carries on a dying Aboriginal custom nearly ended by the British crown and the Australian governors it appointed.

A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Jun 3, 2017  Best Documentary

Enduring raging winds and icy waters with minimal protection, he enters the intimacy of elephant seals and orcas using clever ethological analyses and gets them used to his presence. Then comes the extraordinary: meet a man who communicates with penguins with body language, calms young seals and turns them into live pillows, lies underwater with 8 ton orcas or mature male seals…

Category   Pets & Animals

In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

Dec 31, 2019  Global News

Global News looks back at the exceptional individuals we said goodbye to in 2019, with a retrospective produced by Global National’s Eric Sorensen and videographer Trevor Owens. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #2019PeopleWeLost #GlobalNews #2019InMemoriam

Category   News & Politics

The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost l ABC News

Dec 23, 2019  ABC News

We lost many legends this year, from actress Valerie Harper to “Beverly Hills 90210” star Luke Perry, fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt and ABC News’ own Cokie Roberts. #ABCNews #ValerieHarper #BH90210 #LukePerry #CokieRoberts #GloriaVanderbilt

Category News & Politics

VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside

March 24, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects / Hiroyuki Oki

Blurring the line between the interior and exterior, Vo Trong Nghia Architects designed and built a three-level residential home in Ho Chi Minh City that is overflowing from within with fiddle leaf fig plants, various palms, and winding vines. Going beyond arrangements of potted house plants, the architects integrated the flora into the physical structure. Corridors, staircases, and rooms are lined with natural dividers that add color, block sunlight, and ventilate the space.

The latest project in the firm’s “House for Trees” series, the Stepping Park House is a commentary on environmental issues in Vietnam caused by a lack of green spaces. Views of the exterior show that the driveway, balconies, and perimeter fence have also sprouted leaves. The top floor of the building has an open slatted design with spaces that are filled with even more greenery, which further connects the home with the surrounding environment, and in particular to the rare park nearby. (via Jeroen Apers)

The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

September 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

A sinuous new gallery and bridge reaches across the Randselva River in Jevnaker, Norway. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the aluminum-clad structure joins north and south river fronts on the campus of Kistefos Sculpture Park. 15,000 square feet of space allows visitors to explore Kistefos’s large art collection while also taking in the surrounding landscape through floor-to-ceiling windows. The Twist opened to the public on September 18th, with an exhibition featuring the work of conceptual artist Martin Creed and painter Howard Hodgkin. Kistefos Sculpture Park has  ticketed admission, which includes entry to The Twist, and is open seasonally from the end of May to mid-November. (via Design Milk)

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