Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs and Restore Damaged Cultural Sites Around the World

Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs and Restore Damaged Cultural Sites Around the World

 

HAVE A HAPPY HOLIDAY EVERYONE

MAY PEACE BE WITH ALL OF US ALWAYS

From Ing, John and family, Friday, December 23, 2022

Colossal: Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

MARCH 23, 2018 LAURA STAUGAITIS

Parthenon, Greece

Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs. In a matter of seconds, centuries of natural and intentional damage and decay are reversed to reveal a rare glimpse at what the original structures would have looked like. The creative contractors behind the labor-intensive renderings are Maja Wro?ska (previously) and her husband Przemek Sobiecki, who works as This Is Render.  (via designboom)

 Pyramid of the Sun, Mexico

 Temple of Largo Argentina, Rome

 Nohoch Mul Pyramid (Coba), Mexico

 Temple of Luxor, Egypt

  Temple of Jupiter, Italy

 Hadrian’s Wall, England

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2018/03/ancient-ruins-reconstructed-with-architectural-gifs/

Colossal: Architectural Gifs Restore Damaged Cultural Sites Around the World

JULY 28, 2020 GRACE EBERT 

 Hatra, Al-Jaz?rah, Iraq

Evoking a bit of time-travel, NeoMam (previously) recently animated a series of gifs that restore impressive, human-made structures around the globe to pristine condition. Although the six landmarks are now in some form of decay and have made UNESCO’s list of endangered world heritage, the short clips digitally reconstruct the sites to show what they’d look like had they not faced the ravages of time

Included in this round of restoration are a remnant of Hatra, a large fortified city that was capital of the first Arab Kingdom, and the hundreds of islets that make up Nan Modol in Micronesia. UNESCO designated these landmarks in danger because of natural and human-generated threats like earthquakes, military conflict, and urbanization. Dig into the history behind the six restorations, which were completed in partnership with BudgetDirect and architect Jelena Popovic, in addition to other at-risk locations on UNESCO’s site.

Nan Madol, Temwen Island, Federated States of Micronesia

  Leptis Magna, District of Khoms, Libya

 Jerusalem, Israel

Palmyra, Tadmur, Homs Governorate, Syria

 Fort San Lorenzo, Province of Colon, District of Cristobal, Panama

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2020/07/neomam-unesco-gifs/

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In 2022, AP photographers captured pain of a changing planet, NBC News, and TEDMED

In 2022, AP photographers captured pain of a changing planet, NBC News, and TEDMED

In 2022, AP photographers captured pain of a changing planet

Associated Press Photographs 1-50 0f 153

In 2022, Associated Press photographers captured signs of a planet in distress as climate change reshaped many lives.

That distress was seen in the scarred landscapes in places where the rains failed to come. It was felt in walloping storms, land-engulfing floods, suffocating heat and wildfires no longer confined to a single season. It could be tasted in altered crops or felt as hunger pangs when crops stopped growing. And taken together, millions of people were compelled to pick up and move as many habitats became uninhabitable.

2022 will be a year remembered for destruction brought on by a warming planet and, according to scientists, was a harbinger for even more extreme weather.

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Israeli police clash with mourners as they carry the coffin of slain Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh during her funeral in east Jerusalem, on May 13, 2022. Abu Akleh, a Palestinian-American reporter who covered the Mideast conflict for more than 25 years, was shot dead two days earlier during an Israeli military raid in the West Bank town of Jenin. (AP Photo/Maya Levin)

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Wind whips embers from a burning tree during a wildfire near Hemet, Calif., on Sept. 6, 2022. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

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Arsha Begum receives the Covishield vaccine for COVID-19 from Fozia, a healthcare worker, during a COVID-19 vaccination drive in Budgam, southwest of Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, on Jan. 11, 2022. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

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Matej Svancer of Austria trains ahead of the men’s freestyle skiing big air qualification round of the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing on Feb. 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

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A Taliban fighter stands guard at the site of an explosion in front of a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, on April 19, 2022. It was one of several deadly explosions that have targeted educational institutions in Afghanistan’s capital. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

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Children play in the Catia neighborhood of Caracas, Venezuela, on Jan. 2, 2022. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix)

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A man recovers items from a burning shop following a Russian attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on March 25, 2022. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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People throng President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s official residence in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on July 11, 2022, the day after it was stormed by protesters demanding his resignation amid the country’s worst economic crisis in recent memory. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

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A boy cools off in a public fountain in Vilnius, Lithuania, during a heat wave on June 26, 2022. (AP Photo/Mindaugas Kulbis)

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Jennica Secuya swims in her mermaid suit during a mermaiding class in Mabini, Batangas province, Philippines, on May 22, 2022. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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Revelers dressed as “Mascaritas” take part in a traditional carnival celebration in the small village of Luzon, Spain, on Feb. 26, 2022. Preserved records from the fourteenth century document Luzon’s carnival, but the real origin of the tradition could be much older. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

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Motria Oleksiienko, 99 years old and traumatized by the Russian occupation, is comforted by her daughter-in-law, Tetiana Oleksiienko, in a room without heating in the village of Andriivka, Ukraine, as heavy fighting continues between Russian and Ukrainian forces, on April 6, 2022. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

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President Joe Biden walks to his motorcade after speaking to reporters at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., on Jan. 28, 2022. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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Vehicles rest on a bridge in Pittsburgh following its collapse on Jan. 28, 2022. Rescuers had to rappel nearly 150 feet (45 meters), while others formed a human chain to help rescue people from a dangling bus. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

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Ukrainian emergency workers and volunteers carry an injured pregnant woman from a maternity hospital damaged by an airstrike in Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 9, 2022. The woman was taken to another hospital, but did not survive. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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A paper cut-out of a horse peeks out from a stand of prickly pear cactus at a park in Tel Aviv on Feb. 5, 2022. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

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A young boy runs towards a United Nations helicopter carrying Under-Secretary-General for Peace Operations Jean Pierre Lacroix before it lands in Bunia, eastern Congo, on Feb. 22, 2022. (AP Photo/Moses Sawasawa)

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Communist party supporters hold portraits of Josef Stalin and Vladimir Lenin as they gather during the national celebration of the “Defender of the Fatherland Day” near the Kremlin in Moscow’s Revolution Square on Feb. 23, 2022. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

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People from the Donetsk and Luhansk regions, the territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russia separatist governments, watch Russian President Vladimir Putin’s address at their temporary place in Russia’s Rostov-on-Don region on Feb. 21, 2022. (AP Photo/Denis Kaminev)

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A girl uses a kerosine oil lamp to attend online lessons during a power cut brought on by a fuel shortage in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on March 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

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Firefighters wait for water as a fire rage in the low-income neighborhood of Laguna Verde, in Iquique, Chile, on Jan. 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Ignacio Munoz)

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Bodies are lowered into a mass grave on the outskirts of Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 9, 2022, as people cannot bury their dead because of the heavy shelling by Russian forces. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

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A jet ski steers away from a crashing wave during a big wave surfing session at Praia do Norte, or North Beach, in Nazare, Portugal, on Feb. 25, 2022. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)

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Workers clean oil from Cavero beach in Ventanilla, Callao, Peru, on Jan. 18, 2022. The Peruvian Civil Defense Institute said the eruption of an undersea volcano in Tonga created high waves that moved a ship loading oil into La Pampilla refinery, causing the oil to spill. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

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Goats graze in east Jerusalem with Israel’s separation barrier in the background, surrounding Shuafat refugee camp, on March 8, 2022. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

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A woman shouting anti-government slogans holds an umbrella surrounded by clouds of smoke during a demonstration in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to protest the government’s agreement with the International Monetary Fund to refinance some $45 billion in debt on March 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

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Tom Cruise, center, gestures upon arriving at the premiere of the film “Top Gun: Maverick” at the 75th international film festival in Cannes, France, on May 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

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A woman adjusts her hat before the 148th running of the Kentucky Derby horse race at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky, on May 7, 2022, (AP Photo/ Charlie Riedel)

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A civilian wear a Vladimir Putin mask as a spoof, while a Ukrainian soldier stands atop a destroyed Russian tank in Bucha, Ukraine, outside of Kyiv, on April 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

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Mahtab, an 8-year-old Hazara Shiite student, poses for a photo in her classroom at the Abdul Rahim Shaheed School in Kabul, Afghanistan, on April 23, 2022, days after a bombing attack at the school. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

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A girl has her make up done before the “Las llamadas” carnival parade in Montevideo, Uruguay, on Feb. 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

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Ukrainians huddle under a destroyed bridge as they try to flee by crossing the Irpin River on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, on March 5, 2022. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

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The body of an unidentified man lies on a road barrier near a village retaken by Ukrainian forces on the outskirts of Kharkiv, Ukraine, on April 30, 2022. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

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An injured protester cries in pain after police fired tear gas to disperse an anti-government protest in Colombo, Sri Lanka, on May 19, 2022. The protesters were demanding the resignation of President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, holding him responsible for the country’s worst economic crisis in recent memory. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

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Women, one wearing a traditional Basutu hat, take a selfie during a visit to the Afriski ski resort near Butha-Buthe, Lesotho, on July 30, 2022. Afriski in the Maluti Mountains is Africa’s only operating ski resort south of the equator. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

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Supporters of former President Donald Trump line up behind Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, to pose for photos during a book signing at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Dallas, on Aug. 5, 2022. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

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Villagers gather during a visit by Martin Griffiths, the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, in the village of Lomoputh in northern Kenya on May 12, 2022. Griffiths visited the area to see the effects of the drought which the U.N. says is a severe climate-induced humanitarian emergency in the Horn of Africa. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)

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JoAnn Daniels, left, accompanied by Kayla Jones, second from right, Donell Jones, right, and other family members, takes a moment to gather her thoughts during an interview with The Associated Press about her sister Celestine Chaney, who was killed in Saturday’s shooting at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., Monday, May 16, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

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The body of a dead addict lies covered by a shawl in an area inhabited by drug users under a bridge in Kabul, Afghanistan, on June 15, 2022. Drug addiction has long been a problem in Afghanistan, the world’s biggest producer of opium and heroin. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

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The body of Palestinian Muhammad Hassouna, who was killed in an Israeli airstrike, is prepared for his funeral at a hospital in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip, on Aug. 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Fatima Shbair)

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Workers put a dead crane into a bag at the Hula Lake conservation area in northern Israel on Jan. 2, 2022. A bird flu outbreak killed thousands of migratory cranes in what authorities say was the deadliest wildlife disaster in the nation’s history. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

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Pope Francis is aided as he leaves the parish community of Sacred Heart in Edmonton, Alberta, after a meeting with Indigenous peoples on July 25, 2022. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

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Lexie Stroiney, 6, curls up in the plethysmography chamber during a break in her pulmonary function test at Children’s National Hospital in Washington on Jan. 26, 2022. Lexie had COVID-19 and is part of a NIH-funded multi-year study to look at impacts of COVID-19 on children’s physical health and quality of life. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Scotland’s Micky Yule reacts after a successful lift during the men’s heavyweight para powerlifting final at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England, on Aug. 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

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Rescue workers observe as a Russian Orthodox believer dips into icy water during a traditional Epiphany celebration in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Jan. 18, 2022. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

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A woman looks at the ruins of a Palestinian house demolished by the Jerusalem municipality in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah on Jan. 19, 2022. Israeli police evicted Palestinian residents from the disputed property and demolished the building, days after a tense standoff. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

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A young cowboy wearing a mask as a precaution against the spread of COVID-19 looks at other competitors during the Boyeros Cattlemen’s fair rodeo at the International Agricultural Fair Fiagrop 2022 in Havana, Cuba, Friday, April 8, 2022. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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Anti-abortion advocates celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022, following the court’s decision to end constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Spectators watch from a classic Citroen 2CV car as the pack passes during the second stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 202.5 kilometers (125.8 miles) with start in Roskilde and finish in Nyborg, Denmark, Saturday, July 2, 2022. (AP Photo/Daniel Cole)

By The Associated Press

December 6, 2022

Taken together, they can convey the feeling of a world convulsing — 150 Associated Press images from across 2022, showing the fragments that make up our lives and freezing in time the moments that somehow, these days, seem to pass faster than ever.

Here: a man recovering items from a burning shop in Ukraine after a Russia attack. Here: people thronging the residence of the Sri Lankan president after protesters stormed it demanding his resignation. Here: medical workers trying to identify victims of a bridge collapse in India. And here: flames engulfing a chair inside a burning home as wildfires sweep across Mariposa County, Calif.

As history in 2022 unfolded and the world lurched forward — or, it seemed sometimes, in other directions — Associated Press photographers were there to bring back unforgettable images. Through their lenses, across the moments and months, the presence of chaos can seem more encircling than ever.

A year’s worth of news images can also be clarifying. To see these photographs is to channel — at least a bit — the jumbled nature of the events that come at us, whether we are participating in them or, more likely, observing them from afar. Thus do 150 individual front-row seats to history and life translate into a message: While the world may surge with disorder, the thrum of daily life in all its beauty continues to unfold in the planet’s every corner.

There is grief: Three heart-shaped balloons fly at a memorial site outside the elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, where 19 children and two teachers were killed by a gunman.

There is determination: Migrants in a wooden boat float across the Mediterranean Sea south of an Italian island, trying to reach their destination.

There is fear: A man looks skyward over his shoulder, an expression of trepidation on his face, as he walks past homes damaged by a rocket attack in Ukraine.

There are glimpses into calamity: Villagers gather in northern Kenya, in an area stricken by climate-induced drought.

There is perseverance: A girl uses a kerosene oil lamp to attend online lessons during a power cut in the Sri Lankan capital.

Don’t be blinded by all of the violence and disarray, though, which can drown out other things but perhaps should not. Because here, too, are photos of joy and exuberance and, simply, daily human life.

A skier soaring through the air in Austria, conquering gravity for a fleeting moment. Chris Martin of the band Coldplay, singing toward the sky in Rio de Janeiro. A lone guard marching outside Buckingham Palace days after the death of Queen Elizabeth II. An 8-year-old Afghan girl, her eyes locked with the camera, posing for a photo in her classroom in Kabul, days after a bombing attack at her school. Women taking a selfie at a ski resort in Lesotho.

Finally, allow a moment to consider one of those pauses in humanity’s march: a boy drenching himself in a public fountain in a heat wave-stricken Vilnius, Lithuania, reveling in the water and the sun and the simple act of just being. Even in the middle of a year of chaos on an uneasy planet, moments of tranquility manage to peek through.

— By Ted Anthony, AP National Writer

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://apnews.com/article/2022-photos-of-the-year-928cfe1089c6969527941c1310ad932a

Context

Climate change 

United Nations

Climate change refers to long-term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns, mainly caused by human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels.

Scorched: East Africa’s Climate Crisis

NBC News 1,312 views Dec 20, 2022 #NBCNews #EastAfrica #ClimateChange

East Africa is ground zero for climate change. In Kenya where community leaders tell NBC News Chief International Correspondent Keir Simmons of fertile lands just a decade ago that now looked to me a lot like dessert. These are not the people who caused climate change, yet they are suffering from global warming that has nothing to do with them. But it’s not just climate – conflict around the world is also driving food insecurity. “Scorched: East Africa’s Climate Crisis” looks at the global forces at play and asks how we can address these issues.

» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #EastAfrica #ClimateChange

1,325,116 views | Rahwa Ghirmatzion and Zelalem Adefris • Countdown

Community-powered solutions to the climate crisis

Climate change is the epic challenge of our lives, and community leaders like Rahwa Ghirmatzion and Zelalem Adefris are already working on sustainable, resilient solutions. Through their organizations in Buffalo and Miami, they’re focused on durable, affordable housing for under-resourced communities, the most vulnerable to the instability of climate change. Watch for a lesson on how we can work alongside our neighbors to address climate catastrophe and social inequality. (Narrated by Don Cheadle)

307,156 views | Cheryl Holder • TEDMED 2020

The link between climate change, health and poverty

For the poor and vulnerable, the health impacts of climate change are already here, says physician Cheryl Holder. Unseasonably hot temperatures, disease-carrying mosquitoes and climate gentrification threaten those with existing health conditions, while wealthier people move to higher ground. In an impassioned talk, Holder proposes impactful ways clinicians can protect their patients from climate-related health challenges — and calls on doctors, politicians and others to build a care system that incorporates economic and social justice.

Climate Change

Global Issues

Social Change

Health

Health Care

Community

Activism

Poverty

Humanity

TEDMED

Human Rights

This talk was presented at an official TED conference. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

Learn more about the social determinants of health.

Learn

About the speaker

Cheryl Holder

Physician

See speaker profile

Cheryl Holder advocates for comprehensive medical prevention and care strategies for poor communities impacted by climate change.

2,196,281 views | Rishi Manchanda • TEDSalon NY2014

What makes us get sick? Look upstream

Rishi Manchanda has worked as a doctor in South Central Los Angeles for a decade, where he’s come to realize: His job isn’t just about treating a patient’s symptoms, but about getting to the root cause of what is making them ill—the “upstream” factors like a poor diet, a stressful job, a lack of fresh air. It’s a powerful call for doctors to pay attention to a patient’s life outside the exam room.

Health Care

Read transcript

This talk was presented at an official TED conference. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

Learn how to get better care from your doctor.

Learn

About the speaker

Rishi Manchanda

Physician

See speaker profile

Rishi Manchanda is an “upstreamist.” A physician and public health innovator, he aims to reinvigorate primary care by teaching doctors to think about—and treat—the social and environmental conditions that often underly sickness.

Learn more

The Upstream Doctors

Rishi Manchanda | TED Books (2013)

An uphill battle for an upstream approach

Legendary physician and anthropologist Paul Farmer answers some commonly asked questions about Rishi Manchanda’s work, including: Why should we care?

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NASA’s Artemis I: Image of the Day, Orion Comes Home to Earth and Axios Space

NASA’s Artemis I: Image of the Day, Orion Comes Home to Earth and Axios Space

At 12:40 p.m. EST, Dec. 11, 2022, NASA’s Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a 25.5 day mission to the Moon. Orion will be recovered by NASA’s Landing and Recovery team, U.S. Navy and Department of Defense partners aboard the USS Portland.

Orion Comes Home to Earth

At 12:40 p.m. EST, Dec. 11, 2022, the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a 25.5-day mission to the Moon.

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At 12:40 p.m. EST, Dec. 11, 2022, the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a 25.5-day mission to the Moon. Flight controllers in mission control at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston spent about two hours performing tests in open water to gather additional data about the spacecraft. Orion was then recovered by NASA’s Landing and Recovery team, U.S. Navy and Department of Defense partners aboard the USS Portland. Recovery personnel also spent time collecting detailed imagery of the spacecraft before beginning to pull the capsule into the USS Portland’s well deck. The ship will soon begin its trip back to U.S. Naval Base San Diego, where engineers will remove Orion from the ship in preparation for transport back to Kennedy Space Center in Florida for post-flight analysis. Orion is expected to arrive to shore Dec. 13.

Follow Orion’s travels on Earth by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA/James M. Blair

Last Updated: Dec 12, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is seen illuminated by spotlights after sunset atop the mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continue, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems. Launch of the uncrewed flight test is targeted for Nov. 14 at 12:07 a.m. EST. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

Artemis I Glows After Sunset

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard was seen lit by spotlights atop the mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continued Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

View Image Feature

NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard is illuminated by spotlights atop the mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continued Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SLS and Orion arrived at the launch pad on Friday, Nov. 4, after a nearly nine-hour journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building.

Artemis I is the first integrated test of our deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems. Launch of the uncrewed flight test is targeted for Nov. 14 at 12:07 a.m. EST. See the full launch coverage schedule.

Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Last Updated: Nov 7, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  ArtemisArtemis IImage of the DayKennedy Space CenterMoon to MarsOrion SpacecraftSpace Launch System

The Moon is seen rising above NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continue, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems. Launch of the uncrewed flight test is targeted for no earlier than Nov. 16 at 1:04 a.m. EST. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Moonlit Launch Preparations at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

The Moon is seen rising above NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft aboard at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continue, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

View Image Feature

The Moon is seen rising above NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft at Launch Pad 39B as preparations for launch continue, Monday, Nov. 14, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch of the uncrewed flight test is targeted for no earlier than Nov. 16 at 1:04 a.m. EST. Coverage begins with cryogenic fueling of the SLS at 3:30 p.m. EST on Nov. 15; launch coverage begins at 10:30 p.m. EST on Nov. 15.

NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and supporting ground systems.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Last Updated: Nov 15, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the DayKennedy Space CenterMoon to MarsOrion SpacecraftSpace Launch System

NASA’s Space Launch System rocket carrying the Orion spacecraft launches on the Artemis I flight test, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022, from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s Artemis 1:47 a.m. EST mission is the first integrated flight test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and ground systems. SLS and Orion launched at 1:47 a.m. EST, from Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

We Are Going: Artemis I Launches

Our Space Launch System (SLS), the most powerful rocket in the world, carrying the Orion spacecraft launches on the Artemis I flight test, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022, from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 1:47 a.m. EST.

View Image Feature

Our Space Launch System (SLS), the most powerful rocket in the world, carrying the Orion spacecraft launches on the Artemis I flight test, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022, from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 1:47 a.m. EST.

Artemis I is the first integrated flight test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, and ground systems. The mission is a critical part of our Moon to Mars exploration approach—an important test before flying astronauts on the Artemis II mission.

View more photos of Artemis I.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Last Updated: Nov 16, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis I, Image of the Day, Moon to Mars, Orion Spacecraft, Space Launch System

Orion’s Optical Navigation Camera Captures Earth

NASA’s uncrewed Orion spacecraft snapped this black and white photo of Earth on Nov. 17, 2022, the second day of the 25.5-day Artemis I mission.

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NASA’s uncrewed Orion spacecraft snapped this black and white photo of Earth on Nov. 17, 2022, the second day of the 25.5-day Artemis I mission. The optical navigation camera is used to capture imagery of the Earth and the Moon at different phases and distances, which help establish its effectiveness as a way of determining its position in space for future missions under differing lighting conditions.

Follow Orion’s journey by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Nov 22, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IEarthImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft

DCIM100GOPROGOPR1303.

Orion Approaches Moon

On Nov. 20, the fifth day of the 25.5-day Artemis I mission, a camera mounted on the tip of one of Orion’s solar array wings captured this footage of the spacecraft and the Moon as it continued to grow nearer to our lunar neighbor.

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On Nov. 20, the fifth day of the 25.5-day Artemis I mission, a camera mounted on the tip of one of Orion’s solar array wings captured this footage of the spacecraft and the Moon as it continued to grow nearer to our lunar neighbor.

The spacecraft entered the lunar sphere of influence at 2:09 p.m. EST, making the Moon, instead of Earth, the main gravitational force acting on the spacecraft. Orion completed its first flyby on the morning of Nov. 21, 2022.

Follow Orion’s journey by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Nov 22, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IEarth’s MoonImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft

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Snoopy Hitches Ride to Space Aboard Artemis I

Snoopy, the zero-gravity indicator for NASA’s Artemis I flight test, floating in space Nov. 20, 2022, while attached to his tether in the Orion spacecraft.

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Snoopy, the zero-gravity indicator for NASA’s Artemis I flight test, floats in space on Nov. 20, 2022, while attached to his tether in the Orion spacecraft. In this enhanced image, Snoopy stands out in a custom orange spacesuit, while Orion’s interior has been shaded black and white for contrast. The character’s spacesuit is modeled after the suit astronauts will wear during launch and reentry in Orion on future missions to the Moon. NASA has shared an association with Charles M. Schulz and Snoopy since the Apollo missions and the relationship continues under Artemis. Snoopy was selected as the zero-gravity indicator for the flight because of the inspiration and excitement the character has provided for human spaceflight for more than 50 years.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Nov 23, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft

Orion’s Moon Crater Close-up

On the sixth day of the Artemis I mission, Nov. 21, 2022, the Orion spacecraft’s optical navigation camera captured black-and-white images of craters on the Moon below.

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On the sixth day of the Artemis I mission, Nov. 21, 2022, the Orion spacecraft’s optical navigation camera captured black-and-white images of craters on the Moon below. This photo and others captured are the closest photos of the Moon from a human-rated vessel since Apollo. The optical navigation camera takes black-and-white imagery of the Earth and the Moon at different phases and distances; this technology demonstration will help prove its effectiveness for future missions with crew.

Follow Orion’s journey by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 1, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IEarth’s MoonImage of the DayOrion Spacecraft

 Orion Approaches Moon for Outbound Powered Flyby

A portion of the far side of the Moon looms large just beyond the Orion spacecraft in this image taken Nov. 21, the sixth day of the Artemis I mission, by a camera on the tip of one of Orion’s solar arrays.

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A portion of the far side of the Moon looms large just beyond the Orion spacecraft in this image taken Monday, Nov. 21, the sixth day of the Artemis I mission, by a camera on the tip of one of Orion’s solar arrays. The darkest spot visible near the middle of the image is Mare Orientale.

Image Credit: NASA

See more images from Orion’s flight in our Flickr gallery.

Get daily mission updates from our Artemis I blog.

Last Updated: Nov 28, 2022

Editor: Michael Bock

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the Day 

The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is seen floating along in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022, in New York City. The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is flying in New York City at the same time that Snoopy also flies around the Moon in the Orion spacecraft as a zero gravity indicator for the Artemis I mission. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Astronaut Snoopy ‘Lands’ in New York

The annual Thanksgiving event was held Nov. 24, 2022.

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The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is seen floating along in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022, in New York City. The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is flying in New York City at the same time that Snoopy also flies around the Moon in the Orion spacecraft as a zero gravity indicator for the Artemis I mission.

Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Last Updated: Nov 25, 2022

Editor: Brian Dunbar

Tags:  Image of the Day   

Orion, Earth, and the Moon

In this image, Orion captures a unique view of Earth and the Moon, seen from a camera mounted on one of the spacecraft’s solar arrays.

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On Monday, Nov. 28, 2022, NASA’s Orion spacecraft reached its maximum distance from Earth during the Artemis I mission—268,563 miles away from our home planet, farther than any spacecraft designed to send humans to space and back has gone before. In this image, Orion captures a unique view of Earth and the Moon, seen from a camera mounted on one of the spacecraft’s solar arrays.

Image credit: NASA

Watch a  live video stream from the Orion spacecraft.

Track NASA’s Artemis I mission in real time.

Last Updated: Nov 29, 2022

Editor: Michael Bock

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the Day   

 

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Home to Earth

Orion Approaches Moon Before Return Flyby

On the 19th day of the Artemis I mission, Dec. 4, 2022, a camera mounted on the Orion spacecraft captured the Moon just in frame as Orion prepared for its return powered flyby on Dec. 5, when it passed approximately 79 miles above the lunar surface.

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On the 19th day of the Artemis I mission, Dec. 4, 2022, a camera mounted on the Orion spacecraft captured the Moon just in frame as Orion prepared for its return powered flyby on Dec. 5, when it passed approximately 79 miles above the lunar surface.

Orion performed the return powered flyby burn at 11:43 a.m. EST, changing the velocity of the spacecraft by approximately 655 mph (961 feet per second). The return powered flyby is the last large maneuver of the mission, with only smaller trajectory corrections to target Earth remaining.

Follow Orion’s journey by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 5, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft  

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Orion Gazes at Moon Before Return to Earth

On flight day 20 of the Artemis I mission, Dec. 5, 2022, Orion captured the Moon on the day of return powered flyby, the final major engine maneuver of the flight test.

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On flight day 20 of the Artemis I mission, Dec. 5, 2022, Orion captured the Moon on the day of return powered flyby, the final major engine maneuver of the flight test. The burn, which used the spacecraft’s main engine on the European-built service module, lasted 3 minutes, 27 seconds, and changed the velocity of the spacecraft by about 655 mph (961 feet per second). It also committed the spacecraft to a Dec. 11 splashdown, which will air live on NASA Television, our website, and the NASA app.

Follow Orion’s journey by visiting the Artemis I blog.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 9, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Artemis IEarth’s MoonImage of the DayMoon to MarsOrion Spacecraft 

Liftoff! Successful Launch for JPSS-2, LOFTID

The Moon makes a stunning backdrop for the successful launch of the third in a series of polar-orbiting weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and our Low-Earth Orbit Flight Test of an Inflatable Decelerator (LOFTID) on Nov. 10 at 1:49 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California.

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The Moon makes a stunning backdrop for the successful launch of the third in a series of polar-orbiting weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and our Low-Earth Orbit Flight Test of an Inflatable Decelerator (LOFTID) on Nov. 10 at 4:49 a.m. EST from Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carried the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-2 and LOFTID.

JPSS-2 will circle the globe 14 times a day 512 miles above Earth, providing forecasters the benefit of three polar-orbiting satellites operating simultaneously, joining its predecessors Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) and NOAA-20.

Following JPSS-2’s deployment, the LOFTID heat shield autonomously inflated and re-entered Earth’s atmosphere, splashing down about 500 miles off the coast of Hawaii just over two hours and ten minutes after launch.

Image Credit: United Launch Alliance

Last Updated: Nov 14, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  ClimateImage of the DaySpace Tech 

Pioneer 10 Flies by Jupiter

In this illustration by Rick Giudice from August 1973, the Pioneer 10 spacecraft passes by the gas giant planet Jupiter.

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In this illustration by Rick Giudice from August 1973, the Pioneer 10 spacecraft passes by the gas giant planet Jupiter. The spacecraft’s primary goal was to explore Jupiter, its satellites, its magnetic field, and trapped radiation belts. Pioneer 10 was the first satellite to pass through an asteroid belt and the first spacecraft to obtain detailed images of Jupiter and its moons. Between 1972 and 1974, the Deep Space Network ground stations tracked the Pioneer 10 for over 21,000 hours. Pioneer 10 fell silent on its 30-year anniversary in 2002.

Learn more about the Pioneer missions.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 8, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Image of the DayJupiterPioneer   

Apollo 17 Astronauts Capture Iconic Blue Marble 50 Years Ago

This classic photograph of the Earth was taken on Dec. 7, 1972, by the crew of the final Apollo mission, Apollo 17, as they traveled toward the moon on their lunar landing mission.

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This classic photograph of the Earth was taken on Dec. 7, 1972, by the crew of the final Apollo mission, Apollo 17, as they traveled toward the moon on their lunar landing mission. For the first time, the Apollo trajectory made it possible to photograph the south polar ice cap, shown here along with heavy cloud cover in the Southern Hemisphere.

The Apollo 17 crew consisted of astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander; Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the lunar module to explore the moon, astronaut Evans remained with the command and service modules in lunar orbit.

Read about the Apollo 17 launch.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 7, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Apollo 17EarthImage of the Day       

Endeavour Crew Make Repairs to Hubble

In this Dec. 1993, onboard view from Space Shuttle mission STS-61 shows astronauts Story Musgrave and Jeffrey Hoffman’s Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) to repair the Hubble Space Telescope.

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In this Dec. 1993, onboard view from Space Shuttle mission STS-61 shows astronauts Story Musgrave and Jeffrey Hoffman’s Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) to repair the Hubble Space Telescope. STS-61 was the first service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.

On flight day four, Dec. 4 at 10:46 p.m. EST, Musgrave and Hoffman began the first spacewalk. For five days, they or another pair would exit the airlock at around the same time each evening and spend between six and eight hours in the payload bay.

Learn more about Space Shuttle Endeavour.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Dec 6, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Humans in SpaceImage of the DayNASA HistorySpace ShuttleSTS-61         

Hubble Spies Emission Nebula-Star Cluster Duo

This whole collection is NGC 1858, an open star cluster in the northwest region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way that boasts an abundance of star-forming regions. NGC 1858 is estimated to be around 10 million years old.

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Against a backdrop littered with tiny pinpricks of light glint a few, brighter stars. This whole collection is NGC 1858, an open star cluster in the northwest region of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way that boasts an abundance of star-forming regions. NGC 1858 is estimated to be around 10 million years old.

Open clusters are a type of star cluster with loose gravitational attraction between the stars, which causes the cluster to be irregularly shaped and its stars to be spread out. NGC 1858 is also an emission nebula, which is a cloud of interstellar gas that has been ionized by ultraviolet wavelengths radiating off of nearby stars. The gas of the nebula emits its own light at visible wavelengths, seen here as a faint cloud that populates the middle and bottom right of the image.

The stars within this young cluster are at different phases of their evolution, making it a complex collection. Within NGC 1858, researchers have detected a protostar, a very young, emerging star, indicating that star formation within the cluster may still be active or has stopped very recently. The presence of an emission nebula also suggests that star formation recently occurred here, since the radiation required to ionize the gas of the nebula comes from stars that only live a short time.

NGC 1858 is located about 160,000 light-years away in the constellation Dorado and contains multiple massive stars, which can be seen shining brightly throughout the center of the image. The cluster is located in a crowded area of the sky, and the large number of stars around the cluster makes it difficult to study alone. To survey these distant stars, scientists relied on the Hubble Space Telescope’s unique resolution and sensitivity at visible and infrared wavelengths.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA and G. Gilmore (University of Cambridge); Processing: Gladys Kober (NASA/Catholic University of America)

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940

Last Updated: Dec 2, 2022

Editor: Andrea Gianopoulos

Tags:  Goddard Space Flight CenterHubble Space TelescopeImage of the DayStarsUniverse 

Kamala Harris and French President Macron Meet at NASA Headquarters

Vice President Kamala Harris delivers remarks prior to meeting with French President Emmanuel Macron and NASA Administrator Bill Nelson for an Earth Science briefing, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, at the Mary W. Jackson NASA Headquarters building in Washington.

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French President Emmanuel Macron (far left) delivers remarks prior to meeting with Vice President Kamala Harris (second from left) and NASA Administrator Bill Nelson (far right) for an Earth Science briefing, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022, at the Mary W. Jackson NASA Headquarters building in Washington. Also shown is Phil Gordon, national security advisor to the vice president.

Administrator Nelson and Vice President Harris met with Macron to highlight space cooperation between the United States and France.

Photo Credit: NASA/Keegan Barber

Last Updated: Nov 30, 2022

Editor: Michael Bock

Tags:  Image of the Day     

A small, dense cloud of gas and dust called CB 130-3 blots out the centre of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. CB 130-3 is an object known as a dense core, a compact agglomeration of gas and dust. This particular dense core is in the constellation Serpens, and seems to billow across a field of background stars. Dense cores like CB 130-3 are the birthplaces of stars, and as such are of particular interest to astronomers. During the collapse of these cores enough mass can accumulate in one place to reach the temperatures and densities required to ignite hydrogen fusion, marking the birth of a new star. While it may not be obvious from this image, a compact object teetering on the brink of becoming a fully fledged star is embedded deep within CB 130-3. Astronomers used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to better understand the environment surrounding this fledgling star. As this image shows, the density of CB 130-3 isn’t constant; the outer edges of the cloud consist of only tenuous wisps, whereas at its core CB 130-3 blots out background light entirely. The gas and dust making up CB 130-3 affect not only the brightness but also the colour of background stars, with stars towards the centre the cloud appearing redder than their counterparts at the outskirts of this image. Astronomers used Hubble to measure this reddening effect and chart out the density of CB 130-3, providing insights into the inner structure of this stellar nursery. [Image description: The image shows an irregularly-shaped bright orange object composed of dense gas and dust, which appears darker and more compact at the centre. This dense cloud, called CB 130-3, is outlined by thinner gas and dust in light shades of blue. The background shows a multitude of bright stars against a black background.] Links Video of Clouded Vision

Hubble Views a Billowing Cosmic Cloud

A small, dense cloud of gas and dust called CB 130-3 blots out the center of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

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A small, dense cloud of gas and dust called CB 130-3 blots out the center of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. CB 130-3 is an object known as a dense core, a compact agglomeration of gas and dust. This particular dense core is in the constellation Serpens and seems to billow across a field of background stars.

Dense cores like CB 130-3 are the birthplaces of stars and are of particular interest to astronomers. During the collapse of these cores enough mass can accumulate in one place to reach the temperatures and densities required to ignite hydrogen fusion, marking the birth of a new star. While it may not be obvious from this image, a compact object teetering on the brink of becoming a star is embedded deep within CB 130-3.

Astronomers used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to better understand the environment surrounding this fledgling star. As this image shows, the density of CB 130-3 isn’t constant; the outer edges of the cloud consist of only tenuous wisps, whereas at its core CB 130-3 blots out background light entirely. The gas and dust making up CB 130-3 affect not only the brightness but also the apparent color of background stars, with stars toward the cloud’s center appearing redder than their counterparts at the outskirts of this image. Astronomers used Hubble to measure this reddening effect and chart out the density of CB 130-3, providing insights into the inner structure of this stellar nursery.

Text credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA & STScI, C. Britt, T. Huard, A. Pagan

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940

Last Updated: Nov 18, 2022

Editor: Andrea Gianopoulos

Tags:  Goddard Space Flight CenterHubble Space TelescopeImage of the DayNebulaeStarsUniverse     

First Nations Launch Teams Build Rockets

Stephanie Yazzie, Northern Arizona University student and NAU Space Jacks team member, poses with her team’s rocket in this photo from the 2019 NASA First Nations Launch (FNL) competition.

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Stephanie Yazzie, Northern Arizona University student and NAU Space Jacks team member, poses with her team’s rocket in this photo from the 2019 NASA First Nations Launch (FNL) competition.

In this competition, students from Tribal Colleges and Universities, Native American Serving Nontribal Institutions, and schools with American Indian Science and Engineering Society chapters demonstrated their engineering and design skills.

FNL 2022, an Artemis Student Challenge, called for faculty advisor-led teams of undergraduate students to conceive, design, fabricate, and fly dual deploy high-power rockets within three challenges with various technical requirements. Winners were chosen by a pool of Native American NASA and industry judges for the competition also included four FNL alumni who completed their STEM degrees and became engineers in the aerospace field.

Explore more Minority University Research and Education Project opportunities and resources here.

We’re celebrating Native American Heritage Month, highlighting the achievements of Native Americans at NASA, and bolstering the next generation of talent.

Image credit: Carthage College/Christine Bolz

Last Updated: Nov 17, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  ArtemisImage of the DayMoon to Mars    

Celebrating Native American Heritage Month with Jerry C. Elliott

Jerry Elliott, a former NASA physicist and one of the first Native Americans hired at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, speaks during Native American Heritage Month event in 2017 at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

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Jerry C. Elliott, a former NASA physicist and one of the first Native Americans hired at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, speaks during Native American Heritage Month event in 2017 at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

He joined NASA in April 1966, as a Flight Mission Operations Engineer at NASA’s Mission Control Center and held technical and managerial positions with highly successful accomplishments in many fields including spacecraft systems, mission operations, astronaut crew equipment, scientific experiments and technical management.

Elliott received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest U.S. civilian honor, for duties as Retrofire Officer at NASA Mission Control Center during the aborted Apollo 13 space mission with the safe return of the flight crew.

View the Native American Heritage Month Gallery.

Image Credit: Emmett Given

Last Updated: Nov 10, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Apollo 13Image of the Day  24

Astronauts Jessica Watkins and Bob Hines Study Farming in Space

In this image from June 24, 2022, NASA astronauts Jessica Watkins and Bob Hines work on the XROOTS space botany investigation, which used the International Space Station’s (ISS) Veggie facility to test soilless hydroponic and aeroponic methods to grow plants.

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In this image from June 24, 2022, NASA astronauts Jessica Watkins and Bob Hines, part of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-4, work on the XROOTS space botany investigation, which used the International Space Station’s (ISS) Veggie facility to test soilless methods to grow plants. The space agricultural study could enable production of crops on a larger scale to sustain crews on future space explorations farther away from Earth and could enhance cultivation of plants in terrestrial settings such as greenhouses, contributing to better food security for people on Earth.

Learn about the latest scientific research on the ISS.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: Nov 9, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Benefits to YouImage of the DayInternational Space Station (ISS)Space Station Research and Technology

This composite made from ten images shows the progression of the Moon during a total lunar eclipse above the Vehicle Assembly Building, Nov. 8, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Visible trailing the Moon in this composite is Mars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

Blood Moon Total Eclipse at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center

This composite made from ten images shows the progression of the Moon during a total lunar eclipse above the Vehicle Assembly Building, Nov. 8, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

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This composite made from ten images shows the progression of the Moon during a total lunar eclipse above the Vehicle Assembly Building, Nov. 8, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Visible trailing the Moon in this composite is Mars.

For North America, the partial eclipse began at 4:09 a.m. EST, with totality beginning at 5:16 a.m. One feature of a total lunar eclipse is the Moon’s red hue during totality. The red color occurs because of the refraction, filtering, and scattering of light by Earth’s atmosphere.

Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

Last Updated: Nov 8, 2022

Editor: Monika Luabeya

Tags:  Earth’s MoonImage of the DayKennedy Space Center

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

Artemis I Mission Highlights – Screenshots

At 12:40 p.m. EST, Dec. 11, 2022, NASA’s Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a 25.5 day mission to the Moon. Orion will be recovered by NASA’s Landing and Recovery team, U.S. Navy and Department of Defense partners aboard the USS Portland.

Orion Comes Home to Earth

At 12:40 p.m. EST, Dec. 11, 2022, the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a 25.5-day mission to the Moon.

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Artemis I Mission Highlights 24:10 mins

NASA Johnson 6,632 views Dec 11, 2022

From launch to splashdown, NASA’s Orion spacecraft completed its first deep-space mission with a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean, west of Baja California, at 9:40 a.m. PST (12:40 p.m. EST) Sunday. The record-breaking Artemis mission traveled more than 1.4 million miles on a path around the Moon and returned safely to Earth. Splashdown was the final milestone of the Artemis I mission, which began with a successful liftoff of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket Nov. 16, from Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Over the course of 25.5 days, NASA tested Orion in the harsh environment of deep space before flying astronauts on Artemis II. During the mission, Orion performed two lunar flybys, coming within 80 miles of the lunar surface. At its farthest distance during the mission, Orion traveled nearly 270,000 miles from our home planet, more than 1,000 times farther than where the International Space Station orbits Earth, to intentionally stress systems before flying crew. Prior to entering the Earth’s atmosphere, the crew module separated from its service module, which is the spacecraft’s propulsive powerhouse provided by ESA (European Space Agency). During re-entry, Orion endured temperatures of about 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit, half as hot as the surface of the Sun. Within about 20 minutes, Orion slowed from nearly 25,000 mph to about 20 mph for its parachute-assisted splashdown. During the flight test, Orion stayed in space longer than any spacecraft designed for astronauts without docking to a space station. While in a distant lunar orbit, Orion surpassed the record for distance traveled by a spacecraft designed to carry humans, previously set during Apollo 13. Select music courtesy of Gothic Storm Publishing

Parachutes: Bringing Orion Home 3:02 mins

NASA Johnson

3,358 views Dec 9, 2022

After Orion enters the Earth’s atmosphere at the conclusion of its 25.5-day mission, the spacecraft will rely on its rigorously tested parachute system to slow its speed and allow for a gentle splashdown. Koki Machin, chief engineer of Orion’s parachute assembly system, describes the process and the path to certification of the system. Follow the mission: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NASAArtemis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nasaartemis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NASAArtemis Get the latest from NASA weekly: www.nasa.gov/subscribe

Artemis All Access – Updates on Orion’s Journey in Space – 12/9/22 – 5:26 mins

NASA Johnson 17,631 views Dec 9, 2022

Artemis All Access – Episode 6 Artemis All Access is your look at the latest in Artemis I, the people and technology behind the mission, and what is coming up next. This uncrewed flight test around the Moon will pave the way for a crewed flight test and future human lunar exploration as part of Artemis. Learn more about the mission and track the Orion spacecraft’s current position at www.nasa.gov/trackartemis/ and on Twitter at @NASA_Orion. Live coverage of major events will air on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website at www.nasa.gov/live Download imagery in high-resolution here: https://go.nasa.gov/3K1voda Select music courtesy of Gothic Storm Publishing Follow the mission: Blog: https://blogs.nasa.gov/artemis/ Live footage from the Orion spacecraft: https://go.nasa.gov/ArtemisLive Twitter: https://twitter.com/NASAArtemis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nasaartemis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NASAArtemis Get the latest from NASA weekly: www.nasa.gov/subscribe

Flight Directors of Artemis I – 3:24 mins

NASA Johnson  1,998 views Dec 5, 2022

Artemis I, the first flight of a human-rated spacecraft to orbit the Moon in almost 50 years, is being controlled at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston by specialists who have trained for years to execute this vital test flight in the Artemis program to return American astronauts to the Moon. They’re doing that work under the leadership and guidance of flight directors who built the mission plan and now have the responsibility to execute that plan safely and successfully. Join Rick LaBrode and Judd Frieling for a quick explanation of the roles and the mission goals they’re executing right now. Follow the mission: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NASAArtemis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nasaartemis Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NASAArtemis Get the latest from NASA weekly: www.nasa.gov/subscribe

NASA’s Artemis I Mission Splashes Down in Pacific Ocean 3:56:20 

NASA 1,679,683 views Streamed live 12 hours ago

On Dec. 11, the Artemis I mission will conclude with the entry, descent, and splashdown of the Orion spacecraft. After 25.5 days in space, and a 1.3-million-mile (2.1-million-km) journey around the Moon, Orion is expected to splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California at 12:39 p.m. EST (17:39 UTC) on Sunday, Dec. 11. The exploration ground systems recovery team from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, working with the U.S. Navy, will recover the spacecraft. Live coverage for this event begins at 11 a.m. EST (16:00 UTC). Orion launched aboard the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket at 1:47 am EST (06:47 UTC) on Nov. 16 from historic Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The Artemis I mission is the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and Kennedy Space Center’s Exploration Ground Systems. More: https://www.nasa.gov/specials/artemis-i Credit: NASA

AXIOS: Space Launch Artemis1

Miriam Kramer, author of Axios Space

  1. Liftoff! NASA’s mightiest rocket 11.15.2022

Artemis launches early today from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Photo: Red Huber/Getty Images

NASA’s Space Launch System rocket took flight for the first time early this morning, ushering in a new era of exploration for the space agency, Axios Space author Miriam Kramer writes.

  • Why it matters:This uncrewed launch — called Artemis I — is expected to pave the way for NASA to one day send astronauts to the Moon for the first time since the end of the Apollo program in the 1970s.

The SLS — which took flight at 1:47 a.m. ET from Cape Canaveral — launched an Orion capsule that will journey around the Moon before coming back to Earth for a splashdown expected in December.

Photo: Chris O’Meara/AP

This is effectively a technology test before putting people on board.

  • NASA aimsto land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon using the SLS and Orion in 2025.

1 big thing: Tonight’s beacon of hope

11.15.2022 PM AXIOS

Source: NASA; Note: Not to scale and simplified for clarity; Graphic: Kavya Beheraj and Sarah Grillo/Axios

After multiple delays, NASA is set to launch its Artemis I mission in tonight’s wee hours on a trip to circle the Moon, Axios Space author Miriam Kramer reports.

Why it matters: It will be the first launch of the huge Space Launch System rocket, which is a key component of the space agency’s plans to one day return people to the surface of the Moon by 2025.

How to watch: The SLS is expected to take flight from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 1:04 a.m. ET.

·  You can watch the launch live starting at 10:30 p.m. ET via NASA TV.

Updated Nov 16, 2022 – Science

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Persepolis: Khan Academy, Persepolis Historical Facts and Pictures, Persian Architecture in Photos, and More

Persepolis: Khan Academy, Persepolis Historical Facts and Pictures, Persian Architecture in Photos, and More

Khan Academy

Persepolis: The Audience Hall of Darius and Xerxes

by Dr. Jeffrey Becker. Created by Smarthistory.

Growth of the Achaemenid Empire under different kings (underlying map © Google)

By the early fifth century B.C.E. the Achaemenid (Persian) Empire ruled an estimated 44% of the human population of planet Earth. Through regional administrators the Persian kings controlled a vast territory which they constantly sought to expand. Famous for monumental architecture, Persian kings established numerous monumental centers, among those is Persepolis (today, in Iran). The great audience hall of the Persian kings Darius and Xerxes presents a visual microcosm of the Achaemenid empire—making clear, through sculptural decoration, that the Persian king ruled over all of the subjugated ambassadors and vassals (who are shown bringing tribute in an endless eternal procession).

Kylix depicting a Greek hoplite slaying a Persian inside, by the Triptolemos painter, 5th century B.C.E. (National Museums of Scotland)

Persepolis would remain an important site until it was sacked, looted, and burned under Alexander the Great of Macedon in 330 B.C.E.

Plan of Persepolis (underlying image: Oriental Institute Museum via Google Arts and Culture)

Bull Capital from Persepolis, Ap?dana, Persepolis (Fars, Iran), c. 520–465 B.C.E. (National Museum of Iran) (photo: s1ingshot)

The Ap?dana palace is a large ceremonial building, likely an audience hall with an associated portico. The audience hall itself is hypostyle in its plan, meaning that the roof of the structure is supported by columns. Ap?dana is the Persian term equivalent to the Greek hypostyle (Ancient Greek: ????????? hypóst?los). The footprint of the Ap?dana is c. 1,000 square meters; originally 72 columns, each standing to a height of 24 meters, supported the roof (only 14 columns remain standing today). The column capitals assumed the form of either twin-headed bulls (above), eagles or lions, all animals represented royal authority and kingship.

Ap?dana, Persepolis (Fars, Iran), c. 520–465 B.C.E. (photo: Alan Cordova, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

19th century reconstruction of the Ap?dana, Persepolis (Fars, Iran) by Charles Chipiez (photo: Pentocelo~commonswiki, public domain)

East stairway, Ap?dana, Persepolis (Fars. Iran), c. 520–465 B.C.E.

The Ap?dana stairs and sculptural program

The monumental stairways that approach the Ap?dana from the north and the east were adorned with registers of relief sculpture that depicted representatives of the twenty-three subject nations of the Persian empire bringing valuable gifts as tribute to the king. The sculptures form a processional scene, leading some scholars to conclude that the reliefs capture the scene of actual, annual tribute processions—perhaps on the occasion of the Persian New Year–that took place at Persepolis. The relief program of the northern stairway was perhaps completed c. 500–490 B.C.E. The two sets of stairway reliefs mirror and complement each other. Each program has a central scene of the enthroned king flanked by his attendants and guards.

even reflecting events that took place within the Ap?dana itself.

An Armenian tribute bearer carrying a metal vessel with Homa (griffin) handles, relief from the eastern stairs of the Ap?dana in Persepolis: (Fars. Iran), c. 520–465 B.C.E.   (photo: Aryamahasattva, CC BY-SA 3.0)

The relief program of the Ap?dana serves to reinforce and underscore the power of the Persian king and the breadth of his dominion. The motif of subjugated peoples contributing their wealth to the empire’s central authority serves to visually cement this political dominance. These processional scenes may have exerted influence beyond the Persian sphere, as some scholars have discussed the possibility that Persian relief sculpture from Persepolis may have influenced Athenian sculptors of the fifth century B.C.E. who were tasked with creating the Ionic frieze of the Parthenon in Athens. In any case, the Ap?dana, both as a building and as an ideological tableau, make clear and strong statements about the authority of the Persian king and present a visually unified idea of the immense Achaemenid empire.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ap-art-history/ancient-mediterranean-ap/ancient-near-east-a/a/persepolis

Persepolis Historical Facts and Pictures

Situated 70 kilometers northeast from Shiraz city in Iran, the Persepolis was once the capital of the Achaemenid Empire. Now among one of the World Heritage Centers, Persepolis literally means “city of Persians”.

Persepolis Map

Persepolis Map

Persepolis Photos

Persepolis

Architecture

Now in a ruined condition, this historical structure exhibits Achaemenid architectural style.  This 40 ft. high and 100 ft. wide complex is occupied with multiple halls, a wide terrace, corridors and a symmetrical stairway leading to the top.  The stairway delineates various literal and metaphorical relief scenes. The terrace displays inscriptions that prove Darius the great was the initiator of building this historical complex.

Persepolis Images

Persepolis Pictures

Ruins

The wide terrace comprises a number of gigantic ruined buildings, composed of grey dark marble. These ruins, now known as Takht e Jamshid, were known as Chehel Minar (the 40 pillars) in the thirteenth century. Three catacombs of rock are located behind the Takht-e-Jamshid.

Perspolis Chehel Minar

Takht e Jamshid

Interiors of Persepolis

The complex contains various halls and chambers inside its structure that include the Hall of Apadana, Tachar, Hadish, Talar-i-Takht, Darwazeh-i-Mellal, the Khazaneh, and Naksh-e-Rustam. The most spectacular hall of the complex, the Apadana Hall, comprising 36 columns is also the largest hall within the structure. The structure was built with square based fluted columns and mud brick walls. Tachar was the private chamber of Darius the great. The later addition Hardish was the private chamber of emperor Xerexes the Great. Tala-i-Takht, comprising 100 columns, served as the hall of throne.  The royal treasury or Khazaneh is preserved in a palace complex that was later developed by Artaxerexes III. The Naksh-e-Rustam is occupied with the tombs of the kings.

Persepolis Darwazeh-i-Mellal

Persepolis Hall of Apadana

Persepolis Naksh-e-Rustam

Persepolis Tachar

The site of Persepolis is an embodiment of past grandeur. Although in a ruined state today this majestic structure still has no equivalence and represents a distinct quality of an ancient civilization.

Quick Info

Founded: 6th century BCE
Periods: Achaemenid Empire
Cultures: Persian
Location and Address: Fars Province, Iran
Type: Settlement
Condition: In ruins
Attributes: UNESCO World Heritage Site
Website: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/114

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thehistoryhub.com/persepolis-facts-pictures.htm

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://golshanhouse.com/index.php/tours/

University of Chicago

Oblique aerial view of the terrace of Persepolis from the northwest, taken during an aerial survey expedition in Iran.

View of the eastern stairway and columns of the Apadana (Audience Hall) at Persepolis, Iran, 5th century B.C.

Winged sphinx from the Palace of Darius, Persepolis, Iran, 5th century B.C

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://news.uchicago.edu/story/exhibit-features-archival-images-persepolis-royal-complex-ancient-persia

Persian Architecture in Photos: Reliefs of Persepolis

By IFP Editorial Staff

January 2, 2020

The reliefs that adorn the ancient palaces of Persepolis are considered to be among the most prominent remaining antiquities in the world.

Extensive study is required to discover the secrets of considerable quantity and quality of the ancient complex’ reliefs.

Up to this date, however, no valid stylistic analysis on them has been published.

What follows are Fars News Agency’s photos of Persepolis reliefs:

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://ifpnews.com/persian-architecture-in-photos-reliefs-of-persepolis/

More Photos from my site in Pinterest

Ing’s comments

“Persepolis would remain an important site until it was sacked, looted, and burned under Alexander the Great of Macedon in 330 B.C.E.” Khan Academy  

I was very impressed with the construction of Persepolis, especially the artwork created.  I can imagine how busy the workers, artists, architectures and others who were involved in building this monument must have been.  Undoubtedly there was a big ceremony for the opening of the beautiful and unique complex.  Music in the air, and entertainment performed, with laughter and happy conversations making Persepolis come alive for the festive occasion.    

As I studied Persepolis History and discovered that it was burned and destroyed by Alexander the Great of Macedon.  It is sad that humans learn to fight and destroy others in order to gain power and wealth from looting.  This is the same as the Burmese (Myanmar) king burning and looting Ayutthaya, the second capital of Siam (Thailand) in 1767. 

There are wars in every part of the world, especially now, between Russia and Ukraine.  Putin still behaves in a similar way to aggressive leaders of past civilizations.  His greediness makes him forget humanity.  Ukraine is being destroyed by Putin’s bombs. Ukrainian civilians and soldiers have been killed by the thousands.  Putin is sending his Russian soldiers to be killed in even greater numbers.  I do not see the sense of Putin’s behave.  He is the only one causing all this destruction and no one on earth can do anything about it.  I can hardly believe that such a human still exists in this 21st century.  Where is the UN organization and the individual countries that call themselves developed and civilized.  Putin has been able to cultivate, gather power, and wealth, for himself for more than 20 years.  No one in Russia can oppose Putin if they think differently to him.  Those who oppose him will be jailed or killed. 

In the United States, Trump who considered himself a good friend of Putin and Kim Jong-un, the dictator of North Korea, has similar hunger for absolute power and wealth.  This also may apply to some Republican law makers in Congress obey and follow Trump.  Even if Trump does not regain the presidency, these Republican lawmakers can still take the presidency, and gain sufficient control of the government to destroy American democracy forever.  

Do we vote for the price of food in super markets or for freedom to keep democracy for the country and for future generations?

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, December 5, 2022

A Brief History of the Ancient Ruins of Ayutthaya in Thailand

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/a-brief-history-of-the-ancient-ruins-of-ayutthaya-in-thailand/

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Afar: 11 Lost Cities, and Atlas Obscura: 14 Lesser-Known Ancient Sites

Afar: 11 Lost Cities, and Atlas Obscura: 14 Lesser-Known Ancient Sites

11 Lost Cities You Can Actually Visit

Rediscover these abandoned cities by traveling to see their ruins, where you can readily imagine their lost-to-time structures and civilizations.

Afar

Jen Rose Smith

More from Afar

The carvings and palace of Persepolis were rediscovered in the 20th century. Photo by Matyas Rehak/Shutterstock.

When the lost city of Kweneng, South Africa, was discovered, it wasn’t because someone found a fossil there or excavated it with a shovel. Instead, archaeologist Karim Sadr relied on LiDAR technology, which uses lasers to measure distance, to create detailed images of the surrounding Suikerbosrand hills, where Tswana-speaking people first built stone settlements in the 15th century.

It was a slow process that spanned more than two years, sort of a digital version of clearing vines from a hidden temple. Sadr pored over the data looking for patterns beneath the area’s thick brush. Rounded shapes emerged on the black-and-white LiDAR images, helping to reconstruct the lives of families who lived in the stone homesteads, herded cattle, and created ash heaps (typically the remainders of feasts) to flaunt their wealth. While scientists had long believed that the hills held a series of small, lost-to-time communities, Sadr’s finds extended far beyond the aboveground ruins already visible on the site. “There was no real ‘eureka’ moment,” said Sadr, “but it seems that one day I was looking at a collection of villages and the next day I saw a city.”

Cities such as Kweneng are forgotten for a variety of reasons, and their remains have always exerted a powerful draw on inquisitive travelers. While Kweneng’s visitor infrastructure isn’t quite as developed yet, there are plenty of other rediscovered cities to visit. Whether you’re among the dusty palaces at Xanadu or walking along ancient Troy’s battlements, you can channel your inner explorer while visiting these ruins, whose cultural breadth and evocativeness show how enduring lost cities can be.

Persepolis, Iran

Achaemenid Empire kings fortified a natural stone terrace into an imposing platform when they founded Persepolis in the 6th century B.C.E., leveraging the landscape to awe-inspiring effect and military advantage. After centuries in the sand, the delicate carvings, inscriptions, and palaces of Persepolis were excavated in the 20th century. Apadana Palace dominates the oldest part of the site, where travelers will see 13 of the original 72 towering stone columns—the only survivors of a 331 B.C.E. attack by Alexander the Great. If you travel to Iran, we recommend booking through a tour operator like Intrepid, which can help facilitate visas.

The architectural wonder of Petra is one of Jordan’s main attractions. Photo by Yongyut/Shutterstock.

Petra, Jordan

The entrance to Petra is designed for maximum impact, leading visitors from a shadowy gorge to views of soaring, tangerine-colored rock. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Petra was carved by Nabateans (who likely established it as the capital city in the 4th century B.C.E.) and is Jordan’s star attraction. It’s still easy enough to find solitude in the now-uninhabited desert site. Ditch the tour groups by climbing a steep pathway to the High Place of Sacrifice; its pair of monumental obelisks are believed to represent Nabatean gods.

Ciudad Perdida, a forest city in Colombia, takes five days to reach. Photo by Scott Biales/Shutterstock.

Ciudad Perdida, Colombia

Founded in the 9th century, this forest city developed a unique architectural plan of stone pathways, plazas, and houses over centuries, but dense jungle swallowed them shortly after the arrival of Europeans. The five-day trek to Ciudad Perdida (the only way to get there) is an adventure in and of itself. Brave the steep, muddy trail to reach ceremonial terraces and to meet Colombia’s indigenous Kogi and Wiwa people, who are some of the site’s modern-day guardians and live in the region.

Pompeii’s Temple of Apollo. Photo by Bahdanovich Alena/Shutterstock.

Pompeii and Herculaneum, Italy

Billowing ash from Mount Vesuvius dimmed the sky above Pompeii and Herculaneum in 79 C.E., then buried the cities for nearly 17 centuries. While history this ancient often requires leaps of imagination, the tragic past remains eerily vivid here. Take a transporting walk through the cities, which are about a 20-minute drive apart, to see brilliant frescoes, visit the site of an ancient brothel, see the petrified bodies, and pay your respects in the Temple of Apollo.

The Palace of the Minoans in Knossos. Photo by Constantinos Iliopoulos/Shutterstock.

Knossos, Greece

The Minoan palace at Knossos was already ancient when Homer wrote his Odyssey, and it has myth and history layered into its Bronze Age foundations. Archaeologist Arthur Evans began excavations of the site on Crete in 1900; he linked his findings of the remains of the palace to the mythological labyrinth where the minotaur—a half-man, half-bull born to a Cretan queen—lurked in darkness. While that story remains unproven, travelers can judge the creature’s legendary origins for themselves when visiting the palace’s east wing, which is adorned with a fresco that depicts three figures and a giant vaulting bull.

The Caana complex is the tallest structure in Belize. Photo by PRLLL/Shutterstock.

Caracol, Belize

Trees curl around Caracol’s stone pyramids, which the Belize jungle overtook after residents abandoned the site in the 11th century. Its architectural achievements are impressive even by modern standards: Caana, the temple complex at the heart of Caracol, remains the tallest structure in the country at 141 feet, and archaeologists believe the Maya metropolis would have dwarfed the area of today’s Belize City. Rediscovered in 1938, Caracol draws far fewer visitors than nearby Tikal—plan an early-morning visit and you might have it to yourself.

The remnant fortifications of Machu Picchu were found in 1911. Photo by Cezary Wojikowski/Shutterstock.

Machu Picchu, Peru

Carved high in the Andes, Machu Picchu was a fitting sanctuary for the Inca, who honored the turbulent gods of the mountains. Emptied by the fall of the Inca Empire in the 16th century, the gorgeous synthesis of peaks and fortifications have drawn adventurers to Peru since the citadel was rediscovered in 1911. Journey to Machu Picchu by footpath, bus, or luxury train, then trek to the neighboring peak of Huayna Picchu for classic views across the main site.

An archaeologist used Homer’s “Iliad” to find Troy in 1870. Photo by Lillac/Shutterstock.

Troy, Turkey

A dramatic setting for the ancient world’s most consequential love triangle, Troy has a 4,000-year history that merges with myth near Turkey’s Aegean coast. Discovering Troy was a driving passion for Heinrich Schliemann, an archaeologist who used Homer’s Iliad like a treasure map and found the site in 1870. After you walk through the ancient fortifications and palaces here, see the troves they once held in the Troy Museum, which opened in October with interactive exhibits highlighting gleaming jewelry, marble statues, and other treasures.

Ubar was untouched in the middle of the Arabian peninsula for nearly 1,000 years. Photo by Damian Ryszawy/Shutterstock.

Ubar, Oman

As camels laden with frankincense crossed the Empty Quarter of the Arabian peninsula, travelers gathered for dates and gossip at trading posts deep in the desert. Lost to the blowing sand for nearly 1,000 years, Ubar is one such site; it was found in 1992 using images taken from space. Located on the southernmost edge of Oman, Ubar is two hours inland from the Arabian Sea city of Salalah. Make the trip to see stone walls and fortifications that are rising from the dusty ground as excavations proceed.

Xanadu is surrounded by grasslands in every direction. Photo by beibaoke/Shutterstock.

Xanadu, China

Kublai Khan ruled his empire from the city of Xanadu, surrounded by a grassland steppe that stretched to the horizon in every direction. Located about five hours northwest of Beijing, this is where Mongolian and Han cultures mingled, and travelers debated philosophy in gracious palaces and gardens. Find the remains of that cosmopolitan capital in Xanadu’s excavated temples, stone walls, and tombs, which were abandoned to the windy plains in the 15th century.

The La Danta pyramid towers above the Guatemalan forests. Photo by Dennis Jarvis.

El Mirador, Guatemala

Only an adventurous few will reach the ancient Maya city of El Mirador, which dates back to 1,000 B.C.E. and is shrouded by the largest tropical forest north of the Amazon. There are only two ways to get here: Charter a helicopter or trek two days from the road’s end at the village of Carmelita. Make the journey to El Mirador to climb La Danta, a towering pyramid whose crest swells above the surrounding canopy.

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14 Lesser-Known Ancient Sites Worth Building a Trip Around

Check out Atlas Obscura readers’ favorite archaeological wonders.

Atlas Obscura

  • Eric Grundhauser

Read when you’ve got time to spare.

More from Atlas Obscura

The Valley of the Temples in Agrigento (including the more contemporary “fallen” Icarus statue by the Polish artist Igor Mitoraj) is just one of the world’s incredible ruin sites. Photo credit: Andrea Schaffer / CC BY 2.0.

The ruins of an ancient city, temple, or necropolis are often the centerpieces of an adventurous trip: Stonehenge, Chichen Itza, the Great Pyramids. And there are other, perhaps lesser-known (depending on who you ask, of course) sites that are every bit as spectacular and worth planning an itinerary around. These places can let you walk in the footsteps of ancient people—sometimes without the crowds—to get a sense of the depth and richness of human history that you can’t get from any book or film. Atlas Obscura asked readers in their community forums to share their favorite ruins and archaeological sites. Any one of these places could be the focus of your next adventure.

Check out some of the submissions below, and if you have a favorite ruin or archaeological site that more people should know about, head over to the forums and keep the conversation going!

Photo credit: Teomancimit/CC BY-SA 3.0.

Göbekli Tepe

?anl?urfa, Turkey

“I’ve seen quite a few ruins around the world. I’m always in awe of rock-cut structures such as Petra in Jordan, the churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia, and Geghard Monastery in Armenia. But in my mind, nothing in the world can compare with the carved stone structures at Göbekli Tepe in Turkey. We’re so used to using the pyramids or Stonehenge as our standard for ancient, but these ruins rewrite history. Göbekli Tepe has been dated to 10,000 B.C., and it would be almost 7,500 more years before the pyramids were built! We are closer now to the construction of the pyramids (4,500 years) than between the pyramids and Göbekli Tepe. The large carved stones would be buried and lost near 7,000 B.C. The age, the scale, the state of civilization at that time (pre-farming) … it’s all absolutely mind-boggling and truly without peer anywhere else on the planet (so far!).” MITFlunkie

Photo credit: McKay Savage/CC BY 2.0.

Moray Ruins

Maras, Peru

“I was awestruck visiting Moray in Peru, a sunken terrace extending down over 30 meters. Much less crowded than Machu Picchu and just as impressive!” vb9923

Photo credit: Jos Dielis/CC BY 2.0.

Valley of the Temples

Agrigento, Italy

“Feels like being in Greece!” elokyrmse

Photo credit: katiebordner/CC BY 2.0.

La Ciudad Perdida

Magdalena, Colombia

“Reached only after a grueling five-day trek through the Colombian jungle, it’s almost 1,000 years older than Machu Piccu and was built by the indigenous people who lived in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. It was abandoned after the Spanish conquest and only rediscovered in the 1970s.” vb9923

Photo credit: MM/Public Domain.

Acrocorinth
Corinth, Greece

“On my first visit to Greece in 1985 I explored the Acrocorinth, or Upper Corinth. Like the Acropolis in Athens, it was the formation overlooking the city. Unlike the Acropolis it was nearly deserted and basically open. I don’t remember if anyone else was even there, but sheep were roaming among the ruins. It made me feel how travelers to Greece in the 18th century must have felt in the then-village of Athens. I’ve been to Greece a number of times since, and driven by on my way to my family’s hometown, but haven’t been back. I’m afraid it would be less wild now.” gjg64

Photo credit: Bradley Weber/CC BY 2.0.

Ostia Antica

Rome, Italy

“After watching a documentary about the ancient port of Rome we decided to visit Ostia before leaving our two-week visit to Italy. Wow! Our first impression was how we had the site almost to ourselves. It was as if the port was sleeping and awaiting our arrival. Far more intimate than sites like Pompei with an amazing forum and arena and enormous mosaics still in the process of restoration. Magical!” Bob_L

Photo credit: Tours in Croatia/CC BY 2.0.

Diocletian’s Palace

Split, Croatia

“Roman Emperor Diocletian’s Palace in Split, Croatia, was a pretty awesome place. And there was a flower show inside!” bowmancheryl

Photo credit: Arian Zwegers/CC BY 2.0.

Uxmal Pyramid

Yucatán, Mexico

“It’s great to read about so many incredible ruins in Mexico, one of my favorite places to visit. During a trip to the Yucatán, we skipped Chichen Itza to explore some of the lesser-known sites. Uxmal was by far the most impressive. Wandering about this magical place, virtually alone, we could feel something indescribable, a spirit from the past perhaps. It’s something I can still feel today.” michwillshea

Photo credit: yeowatzup/CC BY 2.0.

Volubilis Archaeological Site

Meknes, Morocco

“Volubilis, Morocco. The ruins of the Roman city were amazing to explore. An earthquake in the 18th century destroyed many of the buildings, and it’s now a preserved archaeological site. Considered to be one of the most remote cities of the Roman Empire.” clantongraphics

Photo credit: Continentaleurope/CC BY-SA 4.0.

?a?ar Qim

Malta

“More ancient than Stonehenge. Older than the Pyramids of Giza. It’s ?a?ar Qim, among the oldest of structures. Mysterious? Yes, to us, as are the pyramids and Stonehenge. But were they mysterious to the people who built them and hung out there? Contemplating all of this as you walk and explore and imagine is the best part of being there.” penelopeashe

Photo credit: Steven dosRemedios/CC BY-ND 2.0.

Copán Ruins

Copán Department, Honduras

“It’s hard to pick, but I think I’d have to go with Copán in Honduras. It’s not the most vertically impressive Mesoamerican site I’ve been to (that would have to be Tikal) and it doesn’t have the best setting (I’d vote for Palenque), but it has some of the most amazing carvings—detailed, baroque, and full of meaning. There’s even a stairway covered in Mayan hieroglyphs. The site museum is also off the charts. You enter by descending into a reproduction of a gateway into the underworld, and the centerpiece is a reproduction of a beautiful red temple they found buried under later works. Go early in the day and the morning squawks and flights of scarlet macaws in the jungle trees will make it even more magical.” aeddubh

Photo credit: Jim Greenhill, U.S. Army/Public Domain.

Ruins of Jerash

Jerash, Jordan

“It’s the most intact Roman city outside of Italy. And because of its location, it is also partly Greek, Byzantine, and Nabatean. It was a crossroads and ancient artifacts from many cultures ave been found there. We had the place mostly to ourselves when we were there.” — BrettElliott

Photo credit: Kroelleboelle/CC BY-SA 3.0.

Norba Ruins

Lazio, Italy

“When wandering the Italian countryside, we randomly came upon the ruins of the Latium town of Norba, which was destroyed in 82 B.C. by Lucius Cornelius Sulla when he marched on Rome.” wynoochie

Photo credit: David Taylor/CC BY 2.0.

Gran Quivira

New Mexico

“I love ruins! I have visited sites all over—Asia, Middle East, Central/South America, Africa—my favorites are in Israel. But I have a great fondness for the ruins I visited earliest in my life, in New Mexico, especially Gran Quivira.” jedwardboring

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