PBS News, TED Talks, DW Documentary, My Modern Met, Thisiscolossal, and National Geographic

PBS News: January 19 – 23, 2020, Shields and Brooks on Trump impeachment evidence, Democratic debate, How Trump’s USDA wants to change rules around school nutrition, Australian ecosystems left vulnerable in wake of bushfire catastrophe, Kim Phuc’s Brief but Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness,  News Wrap: Virginia becomes 38th state to ratify Equal Rights Amendment, How war and misinformation are complicating the DRC’s Ebola battle, and Disease threatens Italy’s once booming olive oil industry

TED Talks: Shubhendu Sharma An engineer’s vision for tiny forests everywhere?, and Mitchell Joachim Don’t build your home grow it?

DW Documentary:  Avocado – a positive superfood trend?

My Modern Met: Colorful Solo Show Titled “Peace” by Eduardo Kobra

Thisiscolossal: Stunning Photographs from 2019 Ocean Art Contest Explore Depths of Aquatic Life Around the World and Scientists Discover the First Biofluorescent Reptile, a ‘Glowing’ Hawksbill Sea Turtle

National Geographic: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 23, 2020

Jan 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump continues, with House managers turning their prosecution to the charge of abuse of power. Plus: PBS NewsHour co-founder Jim Lehrer, a giant of American journalism, dies at age 85, and remembering Lehrer with his news partner Robert MacNeil, Justice Stephen Breyer and Sharon Percy Rockefeller. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 22, 2020

Started streaming 2 hours ago PBS NewsHour   

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Senate has formalized the rules for the impeachment trial of President Trump, and House managers have begun laying out their case for removing him from office. Plus: Reactions to opening arguments from the impeachment prosecution, Chinese officials race to contain a deadly virus outbreak and the UN says Saudi Arabia’s crown prince may have helped hack Jeff Bezos. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Fiery rules debate over, House managers start prosecution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKmdJ… Former Rep. Bob Barr on ‘fatally flawed’ case against Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQFbi… Analyzing the prosecution in Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xuno… News Wrap: At Davos, Trump urges Europe to liberalize trade https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fb-vO… What we know about deadly coronavirus — and what we don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW3ux… Did Saudi crown prince help to hack Jeff Bezos’ phone? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvqL1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 21, 2020

Jan 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump officially begins. Plus: The latest impeachment reporting from the Senate, impeachment trial analysis from political experts and former Senate staffers, what President Trump is saying at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, Syrian refugees suffer in Idlib province and an exhibit on the history of the Polaroid camera. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Senate amends impeachment trial rules, defers on witnesses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0lDJ… What we learned in 1st day of Trump Senate impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T43Oi… In Davos, Trump hails U.S. ‘economic boom,’ downplays trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBP12… News Wrap: China’s viral pneumonia spreads to the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJmTz… Why refugees in Syria’s Idlib have nowhere else to go https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQWvu… How Polaroid pioneered the instant photography revolution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhOja… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 20, 2020

Jan 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team releases its first official defense of the president as his Senate impeachment trial nears. Plus: A Virginia gun-rights rally sparks new debate, Australia’s ongoing bushfire disaster, former Defense Sec. William Cohen’s unique impeachment view, 2020 Democrats join together on the campaign trail, Politics Monday and Hollywood agent Nina Shaw. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS What to expect in Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6whnr… News Wrap: 3 dead, dozens injured in Baghdad protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wjelr… Vir. gun control protests heavily armed but peaceful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWHxg… Could bushfires erode Australia’s climate change ‘inertia’? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_cf5… Former Defense Sec. William Cohen on impeachment evidence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jsku6… How 2020 Democrats are making final push before Iowa caucus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Nyss… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Iowa, impeachment politics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_L4a… Nina Shaw on driving ‘real change’ on diversity, inclusion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEYwS… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 19, 2019

Jan 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, January 19, the Trump administration responds to House impeachment filings as the Senate trial is set to begin, violent clashes continue in Hong Kong and Lebanon, and a NewsHour Weekend special on Ukraine, a country caught in the crosshairs of conflict at home and the impeachment inquiry in the United States. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on Trump impeachment evidence, Democratic debate

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the opening of President Trump’s Senate trial and the announcement of his legal team, public opinion on impeachment, 2020 Democrats’ final debate before the Iowa caucuses and Michael Bloomberg’s remarkable ad spend. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How Trump’s USDA wants to change rules around school nutrition

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Improving school meals was among Michelle Obama’s key initiatives during her tenure as first lady. Since then, the Trump administration has rolled back Obama-era school nutrition policies they argued went too far and were ineffective. Now, the Department of Agriculture has made additional major changes. Crystal FitzSimons of the Food Research and Action Center joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Australian ecosystems left vulnerable in wake of bushfire catastrophe

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Firefighters in Australia are finally getting some help from nature, in the form of lower temperatures and rain. But many fires are still burning, and millions of acres have been lost. The blazes have also caused tremendous damage to the surrounding ecosystems and wildlife — some of which don’t exist anywhere else in the world. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Kim Phuc’s Brief but Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness

Jan 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A photograph of Phan Thi Kim Phuc as a nine-year-old girl enduring a napalm attack became a defining image of the Vietnam War. Healing has been a decades-long process. Now living in Canada, Kim Phuc shares her Brief But Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

News Wrap: Virginia becomes 38th state to ratify Equal Rights Amendment

Jan 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

In our news wrap Wednesday, Virginia became the crucial 38th state to ratify the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex. Three-quarters of the states now approve the amendment. Also, Russia’s government abruptly resigned after President Vladimir Putin proposed sweeping constitutional changes that could keep him in power after his current term ends in 2024. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How war and misinformation are complicating the DRC’s Ebola battle

Jan 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

1.6M subscribers

An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has plagued Democratic Republic of Congo for nearly a year and a half, with more than 3,000 people getting sick and 2,000 dead. Major medical advances in prevention and treatment have kept the disease’s toll from rising, but ongoing war — and attacks on medical teams — have forced the response to a standstill. Special correspondent Monica Villamizar reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Disease threatens Italy’s once booming olive oil industry

Jan 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

More than a third of olive oil in the U.S. comes from Italy, which has kept a longstanding reputation for quality. But the quantity of olive oil made in the south of Italy has been in sharp decline. A disease in the region of Puglia has been attacking olive trees, decimating the industry and causing Italy to import olive oil for the first time. Special correspondent Christopher Livesay reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

A forest planted by humans, then left to nature’s own devices, typically takes at least 100 years to mature. But what if we could make the process happen ten times faster? In this short talk, eco-entrepreneur (and TED Fellow) Shubhendu Sharma explains how to create a mini-forest ecosystem anywhere.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Shubhendu Sharma · Eco-entrepreneur

Shubhendu Sharma creates afforestation methods that make it easy to plant maintenance-free, wild and biodiverse forests.

More Resources

Further reading

How to grow a tiny forest really, really fast

In an article on Medium, Shubhendu Sharma gives a first-hand account of how he is reforesting the world, one tiny patch at a time.

More at medium.com ?

TED Fellow and urban designer Mitchell Joachim presents his vision for sustainable, organic architecture: eco-friendly abodes grown from plants and — wait for it — meat.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Mitchell Joachim · Architect, designer

Soft cars, jet packs and houses made of meat are all in a day’s work for urban designer, architect and TED Fellow Mitchell Joachim.

TED2010 | February 2010

Avocado – a positive superfood trend? | DW Documentary

May 1, 2018  DW Documentary

From avocado toast to guacamole, this superfood has stolen the hearts of foodies and the health conscious around the world. But where do avocados come from? Avocados have become a huge food trend in the Western world, where the creamy fruit has become readily available in shops, cafes and restaurants. The avocado is considered a superfood and is popular in Europe because of its nutritional value. Avocados are high in calories, contain mostly monounsaturated fat and are good for cholesterol. The fruit is full of essential nutrients, including potassium and vitamin C. But there’s a darker side to the fashionable fruit popular on toast or in salads. In Chile, one of the world’s largest suppliers, avocado cultivation has dramatic consequences and has been linked to water shortages, human rights violations and an environmentally damage. The province of Petorca has a long tradition of avocado farming. Once grown by small farmers, production has been soaring since the global avocado boom of the 1990s. Big landowners now dominate the avocado market there. And their business requires large amounts of water. It takes up to 1000 liters of water to grow one kilo of the fruit (about three avocados) – a lot more than for a kilo of tomatoes or potatoes. The region is suffering an acute water shortage, exacerbated by climate change. The riverbeds dried up years ago. Trucks bring tanks of water to families in need, while thousands of hectares of avocado groves just next door are watered with artificial reservoirs. Rodrigo Mundaca founded the NGO Modatima. He fights for the right to water – a right that’s guaranteed by the UN and that Chile has committed to. An aerial survey in 2012 revealed that 64 pipelines were diverting river water underground, apparently to irrigate the avocado fields. When the Modatima activists publicly voiced their criticism, they received death threats. Water became a commodity in Chile in 1981 under the Pinochet dictatorship, meaning it’s privatized. Those who offer the most money get water licenses, even for life, regardless of the potential consequences for the ecosystem. The avocado also has a pretty dire environmental footprint. They’re packaged to prevent damage and transported in air-conditioned cargo ships to Europe. The fruit then ripens in a factory in Rotterdam, before it’s sent “ready to eat” to German supermarkets. “Europe wants to eat healthily – at our expense,” says Mundaca. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary… For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category   Education

Colorful Solo Show Titled “Peace” by Eduardo Kobra

By Katie Hosmer on May 7, 2014


It’s not difficult to identify a mural that has been completed by Eduardo Kobra. The Sao Paulo-based street artist has a signature approach filled with vibrant colors and geometric shapes that merge together to form the portraits of many very prominent figures. He uses a combination of painting, airbrush, and spray paint to produce the enormous works filled with a lively spirit.

His most recent large-scale work will be featured as a solo show, entitled Peace, beginning on May 9, 2014 through June 25, 2014 at Rome’s Dorothy Circus Gallery. The selected portraits will feature people like Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, Albert Einstein, and the Dalai Lama.

Through his signature style of textured layers, strong lines, and fragmented sections, Kobra gives new life to these very important historical figures and topics which, according to the gallery, include “the fight against pollution, global warming, deforestation, and war, but also the ‘makeover’ of some icons of the time.”


Eduardo Kobra’s website
Dorothy Circus Gallery website
via [Hi-Fructose]

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Stunning Photographs from 2019 Ocean Art Contest Explore Depths of Aquatic Life Around the World

January 15, 2020  Grace Ebert

“Crab-Eater Seal” by Greg Lecoeur, Best of Show. All images © Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition 2019, shared with permission

A 2019 contest organized by the Underwater Photography Guide has collected some of the best photographs of aquatic life around the globe, from an image capturing a seal maneuvering through a chunk of ice in Antarctic waters to another depicting an octopus resting on the ocean floor. This year’s Ocean Art Underwater Photo Contest drew thousands of entires from 78 countries that were judged by renowned underwater photographers Tony Wu, Martin Edge, and Marty Snyderman, along with Underwater Photography Guide publisher Scott Gietler. It also handed out more than $85,000 to entrants.

We’ve included some of our favorite photographs from across the 17 categories, including marine life behavior, portrait, conservation, and reefscapes, although a full list of winners can be found on the contest’s site. Stay tuned for information on the 2020 contest in September.

“Biodiversity” by Greg Lecoeur, Reefscapes

“Gigantic Aggregation of Munk Devil Rays in Baja California Sur” by Jason Clue, Marine Life Behavior

“Larval tripod fish” by Fabien Michenet, Blackwater

“Radiography” by Stefano Cerbai, Macro

“Strange Encounters” by Hannes Klostermann, Marine Life Behavior

“A friendly ride” by Paula Vianna, Marine Life Behavior

“Leopard Shark” by Jake Wilton, Novice Wide Angle

“Treats from Maloolaba River” by Jenny Stock, Nudibranchs

“Coconut Octopus” by Enrico Somogyi, Compact Wide Angle

“The Hypnotist” by Dave Johnson, Macro

“Eye of the Tornado” by Adam Martin, Wide Angle

“Under the Pier” by Jose Antonio Castellano, Wide Angle

Scientists Discover the First Biofluorescent Reptile, a ‘Glowing’ Hawksbill Sea Turtle

September 28, 2015  Christopher Jobson

No, this isn’t a clip from the latest Miyazaki anime, this is the first sighting of a real fluorescent turtle. Marine biologist David Gruber of City University of New York, was recently in the Solomon Islands to film a variety of biofluorescent fish and coral, when suddenly a completely unexpected sight burst into the frame: a glowing yellow and red sea turtle. The creature is a critically endangered hawksbill sea turtle, and until this sighting last July, the phenomenon had never been documented in turtles, let alone any other reptile.

Biofluorescence is the ability for an organism to reflect blue light and re-emit it as a different color, not to be confused with bioluminescence, where organisms produce their own light.

Many undersea creatures like coral, sharks, and some shrimp have shown the ability to show single green, red, or orange colors under the right lighting conditions, but according to National Geographic, no organisms have shown the ability to emit two distinct colors like the hawksbill. As seen in the video, the coloring appears not only in mottled patterns on the turtle’s shell, but even extends within the cracks of its head and feet. Gruber mentions this could be a mixture of both glowing red glowing algae attached to the turtle, but the yellow fluorescence is undoubtedly part of the animal.

Watch the video above to see the moment of discovery and learn more on Nat Geo.

EXCLUSIVE: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered | National Geographic

Sep 28, 2015  National Geographic

While filming coral off the Solomon Islands, David Gruber, a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, encountered a “bright red-and-green spaceship.” This underwater UFO turned out to be a hawksbill sea turtle, which is significant because it’s the first time that biofluorescence has ever been seen in reptiles, according to Gruber. Gruber is now excited to learn more about this critically endangered species and how it is using biofluorescence. ? Subscribe: https://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #SeaTurtles #Biofluorescence About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: https://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: https://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: https://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: https://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta David Gruber: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/exp… Click here to read more: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/20… BIOFLUORESCENCE VIDEOGRAPHER: David Gruber SENIOR PRODUCER: Jeff Hertrick EDITOR: Jennifer Murphy EXPEDITION FUNDED BY: TBA21 TBA21 CINEMAPHOTOGRAPHER: Barry Broomfield TBA21 PRODUCERS: Francesca Von Habsburg and Markus Reymann TBA21 LINE PRODUCER: Lauren Matic ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: National Geographic Creative and Pawel Achtel EXCLUSIVE: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered | National Geographic https://youtu.be/9kmE7D5ulSA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Category  Entertainment

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