PBS News, The New York Times, DW Documentary, BBC Click, TED Talks, Bored Panda, and My Modern Met

PBS News: March 6 – 9. 2020, How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’, What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case, and How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

DW Documentary: Better brain health

BBC Click: Foldable Phones and Medical Tech

TED Talks: The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings – Renzo Piano, and Jill Seubert How a miniaturized atomic clock could revolutionize space exploration

Bored Panda:  NASA’s Curiosity Has Been on Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

My Modern Met: These Exotic Trees Transform into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

PBS NewsHour live episode, Mar 9, 2020

•Streamed live 83 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 8, 2020

Mar 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday March 8, the coronavirus outbreak spreads and Italy imposes strict travel restrictions, and after years of planning the 2020 census makes its debut this week. Also, a new approach in Louisiana for prison reform focuses on rehabilitation. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 7, 2020

Mar 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 7, concerns over coronavirus continue as the number of cases rise, the presidential democratic candidates rally ahead of the upcoming primaries, tensions escalate amid migrant push on Greece-Turkey border, and can women landowners in Iowa help conservation efforts? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 6, 2020

Mar 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump signs a bipartisan emergency spending deal to fund the government’s novel coronavirus response, as the global number of cases approaches 100,000. Plus: Questions about how to handle sick leave and medical bills amid the novel coronavirus outbreak, a conversation about women in politics, political analysis with Shields and Brooks and a music documentary. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Spread of novel coronavirus yields new global reality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEB94… News Wrap: February saw strongest U.S. hiring since 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIfKt… How lack of paid sick leave complicates U.S. virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JrYP… Are female presidential candidates held to higher standard? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNLVk… Shields and Brooks on Warren’s farewell, Biden’s surge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcP7u… Robbie Robertson on building The Band https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxRL7… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Amid the McCarthy hearings and the launch of the civil rights movement in the 1950s, painter Jacob Lawrence sought to frame early American history the way he saw it. His ensuing work, the sprawling series “Struggle,” has been reassembled and is now on a national tour, with its first stop at the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of WGBH visits the exhibit. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case about access to abortion doctors in Louisiana. The law in question is similar to a Texas one struck down by the Court in 2016 — but decided by a different group of justices. Lisa Desjardins talks to the National Law Journal’s Marcia Coyle and Mary Ziegler, professor and author of “Abortion and the Law in America: Roe v. Wade to the Present.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On Wednesday, California officials confirmed the state’s first death from novel coronavirus, as the number of infections nationwide continues to rise. But beyond the serious medical implications of the virus, it is also provoking fear, suspicion and ethnic stereotyping. Amna Nawaz reports from San Francisco, a city long known for its ties to China and the Chinese-American community. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

Monday, March 9, 2020 | View in browser
(Want to get this briefing by email? Here’s the sign-up.)
Good morning.
We’re covering updates in the coronavirus outbreak and the latest in the Democratic presidential race. We also explain a dispute over classified portions of the U.S. agreement with the Taliban.
 By Chris Stanford
A plunge in stocks to start the week
Global markets fell sharply today, and Wall Street looked set to follow suit, as the effects of the coronavirus outbreak deepened and Saudi Arabia cut oil prices nearly 10 percent over the weekend. Here are the latest market updates.
The Saudi decision was in retaliation for Russia’s refusal to join OPEC in a large production cut as the outbreak continues to slow the global economy.
In the U.S., the number of coronavirus cases has grown to more than 530. On Sunday, the country’s leading expert on infectious diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said regional lockdowns could become necessary and recommended that those at greatest risk — older adults and people with underlying health conditions — abstain from travel.
Here are the latest updates on the virus and a map of where it has spread.
Related: A cruise ship that has been held off California after 21 people aboard tested positive for the virus is set to dock today in Oakland. More than 3,500 passengers and crew members will be taken to military facilities around the country to be quarantined for 14 days. The State Department on Sunday advised Americans against traveling on cruise ships.
Closer look: Dr. Fauci has become the chief explainer of the epidemic, partly because other government scientists have either avoided the spotlight or been reined in by the Trump administration.
News analysis: President Trump, who seems at his strongest politically when he has a human target to attack, has found it harder to confront the threat of an invisible pathogen, our chief White House correspondent writes.
In other developments:
? State and federal officials have yet to require school closings, but more individual districts and schools are shutting down.
? Two members of Congress, including Senator Ted Cruz, said they would self-quarantine after interacting at the Conservative Political Action Conference with a person who tested positive for the virus. Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the meeting last week.
? One of the world’s leading tennis tournaments has been canceled. Qualifying matches for the BNP Paribas Open, known as Indian Wells, were to have begun today.
What to know: Here’s how to quarantine yourself if you need to and answers to questions about the virus.
Italians are urged to respect lockdown
As the site of the worst outbreak of the coronavirus outside Asia, Italy has announced strict measures that limit the movements of about a quarter of the population. To bolster the effort, the country’s leaders have appealed to Italians to reject “furbizia,” the sort of cleverness typically channeled into getting around bureaucracy.
“We are the new Wuhan,” one woman in the closed-off northern region of Lombardy said on Sunday.
Go deeper: The lockdown may save lives, but analysts say it will paralyze Italy’s economic heartland and almost certainly tip Europe into a recession.

Better brain health | DW Documentary

Mar 5, 2020  DW Documentary

Chocolate reduces stress. Fish stimulates the brain. Is there any truth to such popular beliefs? The findings of researchers around the world say yes: It appears we really are what we eat. A study in a British prison found that inmates who took vitamin supplements were less prone to violent behavior. And in Germany, a psychologist at the University of Lübeck has shown that social behavior is influenced by the ingredients consumed at breakfast. But what really happens in the brain when we opt for honey instead of jam, and fish rather than sausage? Scientists around the world are trying to find out. Neuro-nutrition is the name of an interdisciplinary research field that investigates the impact of nutrition on brain health. Experiments on rats and flies offer new insight into the effects of our eating habits. When laboratory rats are fed a diet of junk food, the result is not just obesity. The menu also has a direct influence on their memory performance. The role of the intestinal flora has been known for some time, but scientists are currently discovering other relationships. So-called “brain food” for example: The Mediterranean diet that’s based on vegetables and fish is said to provide the best nutrition for small grey cells. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, for example, protect the nerve cells and are indispensable for the development of the brain – because the brain is also what it eats! ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories

Category  Education

Foldable Phones and Medical Tech – BBC Click

Mar 8, 2020  BBC Click

Click checks out a new foldable phone, but is the technology worth the hype? Also, we meet a man having a microcomputer implanted into his heart. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings | Renzo Piano

Jul 13, 2018  TED

Legendary architect Renzo Piano — the mind behind such indelible buildings as The Shard in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the new Whitney Museum of Art in New York City — takes us on a stunning tour through his life’s work. With the aid of gorgeous imagery, Piano makes an eloquent case for architecture as the answer to our dreams, aspirations and desire for beauty. “Universal beauty is one of the few things that can change the world,” he says. “This beauty will save the world. One person at a time, but it will do it.” Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category  Science & Technology

Ask any deep space navigator like Jill Seubert what makes steering a spacecraft difficult, and they’ll tell you it’s all about the timing; a split-second can decide a mission’s success or failure. So what do you do when a spacecraft is bad at telling time? You get it a clock — an atomic clock, to be precise. Let Seubert whisk you away with the revolutionary potential of a future where you could receive stellar, GPS-like directions — no matter where you are in the universe.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxUCLA, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Jill Seubert · Interplanetary navigator

Jill Seubert navigates spacecraft throughout the solar system, exploring with robots where humans cannot yet go.

ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxUCLA | May 2019

NASA’s Curiosity Has Been On Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?  BoredPanda staff

For us, mere mortals, Mars is a no man’s land where survival seems like a distant dream. After all, no man has ever walked on its surface (as far as we know) and plans to send one to the red planet are only in the early stages of its development. However, humans have touched Mars through the durable wheels of Mars rovers. We’ve had 4 successful robotically operated Mars rovers (all of which were managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA) so far: Sojourner, Opportunity, Spirit, and Curiosity. 

As Opportunity’s mission was declared complete on February 13, 2019 when NASA lost all contact with the vehicle, Curiosity became the lone survivor on the red planet, rolling over its surface to examine and explore the unknown land all by itself. The spacecraft first landed on Mars on August 6, 2012 and started carrying out its objectives throughout the years. In fact, Curiosity did its job so well and held on for so long that its original mission duration of 687 days was expanded indefinitely. 

Here’s how Curiosity looked 7 years ago and now

#1 Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score:  102points 12 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

Curiosity is approaching its 8 year anniversary on Mars and while it is currently the only functional rover on the planet (after we all, unfortunately, had to say goodbye to Oppy), NASA has plans to send it some company in the shape of Mars 2020 rover. The 2020 mission is scheduled to start on 17 July to 5 August 2020 when the rocket carrying the rover will be launched. NASA also announced a student naming contest for the rover that was held in the fall of 2019. The final name will be announced in early March 2020, so we definitely have something to look forward to!

#2 Sunset Sequence In Mars’ Gale Crater

Sunset Sequence In Mars' Gale Crater

NASAReport

Final score:85points  21 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#3 Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

NASAReport

Final score:  84points  69 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#4 Curiosity’s Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

Curiosity's Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

NASAReport

Final score: 76points  29 Reply  View more comments

#5 Martian Rock ‘Harrison’ In Color, Showing Crystals

Martian Rock 'Harrison' In Color, Showing Crystals

NASAReport

Final score: 72points   27 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#6 Curiosity’s Dusty Selfie At Duluth

Curiosity's Dusty Selfie At Duluth

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 51 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#7 Jake Matijevic Rock

Jake Matijevic Rock

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 30 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#8 Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 64points 29 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#9 First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 63points  18 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#10 Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 63points 25 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#11 Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 13 Reply View more comments

#12 Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 26 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#13 Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

NASAReport

Final score: 59points  7 Reply View more comments

#14 Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score: 56points  52 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#15 Curiosity Visited An Area Named “Fracture Town” Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

Curiosity Visited An Area Named "Fracture Town" Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#16 Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  26 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#17 Wheel Scuff Mark At ‘Rocknest’

Wheel Scuff Mark At 'Rocknest'

NASAReport

Final score: 52points  25  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#18 Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

NASAReport

Final score: 49points  44  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#19 Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named “Gobabeb”, Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As “Bagnold”

Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named "Gobabeb", Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As "Bagnold"

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 48points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#20 View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At ‘Shaler’

View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At 'Shaler'

NASAReport

Final score: 47points 19 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#21 Mars Rover Curiosity In ‘Buckskin’ Selfie

Mars Rover Curiosity In 'Buckskin' Selfie

NASAReport

Final score: 45points  32 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#22 Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score:44points  1 Reply  View more comments

#23 Getting To Know Mount Sharp

Getting To Know Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 44points  7 Reply View more comments

#24 Curiosity Tracks In ‘Hidden Valley’ On Mars

Curiosity Tracks In 'Hidden Valley' On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 42points Reply View more comments

#25 Curiosity Rover’s View Of Alluring Martian Geology

Curiosity Rover's View Of Alluring Martian Geology

NASAReport

Final score: 41points 15 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#26 Curiosity Self-Portrait At ‘Windjana’ Drilling Site

Curiosity Self-Portrait At 'Windjana' Drilling Site

NASAReport

Final score: 41points  7 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#27 A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 41points 15  Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#28 Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

NASAReport

Final score: 39points 10 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#29 Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 38points 31 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#30 Resistant Features In ‘Pahrump Hills’ Outcrop

Resistant Features In 'Pahrump Hills' Outcrop

NASAReport

Final score: 37points 15 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

Note: this post originally had 44 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

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Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?

Author, BoredPanda staff

As a writer and image editor for Bored Panda, Giedr? crafts posts on many different topics to push them to their potential. She’s also glad that her Bachelor’s degree in English Philology didn’t go to waste (although collecting dust in the attic could also be considered an achievement of aesthetic value!) Giedr? is an avid fan of cats, photography, and mysteries, and a keen observer of the Internet culture which is what she is most excited to write about. Since she’s embarked on her journalistic endeavor, Giedr? has over 600 articles under her belt and hopes for twice as much (fingers crossed – half of them are about cats).

These Exotic Trees Transform Into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

By Jessica Stewart on January 31, 2020

Rainbow Eucalyptus Trees in Hawaii

Photo: Stock Photos from Danita Delmont/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus trees are most known for their fragrant leaves and for being the main food source for koalas, but did you know that they can also be quite colorful? In fact, Eucalyptus deglupta is so colorful that it’s known as the rainbow eucalyptus. When this incredible tree sheds its bark, it almost looks like a colored pencil being sharpened. This makes for a spectacle that is unforgettable.

Also known as the Mindanao gum or rainbow gum, the rainbow eucalyptus is a tall tree that is unique in that it’s the only eucalyptus to live in the rainforest and only one of four species found outside of Australia. It can be found in the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea, where it can soar up to 250 feet in the air. While its height is impressive, it’s really the tree’s multicolor bark that makes it stand out.

As the rainbow eucalyptus sheds, it first reveals a bright green inner bark. Over time, this ages into different colors—blue, purple, orange, and maroon. The colorful striations are created due to the fact that the tree doesn’t shed all at once. Slowly, over time, different layers fall off, while other exposed areas have already begun aging.

This process makes for a spectacular visual, with the rainbow eucalyptus looking like it could be pulled from Alice in Wonderland. Its unique appearance has also made it quite popular amongst garden enthusiasts. It can be found in botanical gardens around the world and is often planted as an ornamental tree in Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, and Southern California, where the frost-free climate allows it to thrive.

Interestingly, the rainbow eucalyptus also has a high commercial value that has nothing to do with its color. The tree is often found at tree plantations, as it’s an excellent source for pulpwood—the main ingredient in making white paper. So the next time you pull out a blank sheet, just remember that it may have originally been something much more colorful.

The rainbow eucalyptus gets its name from its colorful appearance.

Eucalyptus deglupta

Photo: Stock Photos from Sean D. Thomas/Shutterstock

Bark of the Rainbow Eucalyptus

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus deglupta takes on different colors as bark sheds and the inner bark slowly ages.

Rainbow Eucalyptus Tree
Rainbow Gum Tree

Photo: Stock Photos from Martina Roth/Shutterstock

Photo: Stock Photos from Ilya Images/Shutterstock

Mindanao gum tree

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

h/t: [Earthly Mission]

JESSICA STEWART

Jessica Stewart is a writer, curator, and art historian living in Rome, Italy. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London. She cultivated expertise in street art led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book ‘Street Art Stories Roma‘ and most recently contributed to ‘Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini‘. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 27, 2020

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, an infectious disease specialist on novel coronavirus transmission and severity. Plus: Virus fears cause economic instability, 2020 Democrats make their final pitches in South Carolina, a conversation with Mike Bloomberg, should foreign ISIS fighters return home for trial and a new book explores the reckless financial dealings that contributed to the 2008 economic crash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How Americans can prepare for broader outbreak of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhe78… What novel coronavirus might mean for 2020 global economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXOpz… News Wrap: Major military clash erupts between Turkey, Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cegP2… 2020 Democrats chase votes in SC, Super Tuesday states https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p5bO… Michael Bloomberg on crisis preparation, management skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWGC3… Kosovo offers Europe a test run for handling former jihadis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-Ava… New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zkzR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 26, 2020

Feb 26, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, China’s novel coronavirus outbreak has slowed, but the information battle between Chinese activists and the government continues. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a raucous Charleston debate ahead of the South Carolina primary, the medicine of migraine disease, a Silicon Valley whistleblower, the film “Seberg” and how U.S. officials are planning for possible pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Deadly shooting at Molson Coors in Milwaukee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtOyb… In China, critics of state virus response have disappeared https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dywyh… How 2020 Democrats are reacting to combative SC debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=houOy… Why migraine disease involves more than just a headache https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8K-7… How Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler took on toxic culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhc77… How American actress Jean Seberg became a target of the FBI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtj3G… Trump defends virus response, announces new measures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhUo3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 25, 2020

Feb 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. health officials express rising alarm over the possibility that novel coronavirus could become a global pandemic. Plus: Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak dies at age 91, previewing the 2020 Democrats’ South Carolina debate, conversations with a prosecutor and a defense attorney in the Harvey Weinstein sex crimes case and Venezuela’s crumbling health system. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Why U.S. officials are escalating concerns over COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKt5h… News Wrap: Trump criticizes Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC1uc… Polarizing former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak dies at 91 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjs3R… Is South Carolina still Joe Biden’s firewall?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wy3J… Manhattan DA on Weinstein conviction, prosecuting sex crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifaIn… Weinstein defense attorney says media ‘pressure’ swayed jury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLHdC… Sick Venezuelans lack power, water, medicine — and hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtmWa… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

India’s immigrant crackdown leaves nearly 2 million in limbo

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Immigration from Bangladesh into India’s northeastern state of Assam has long been a contentious issue, often boiling over into violence. Last year the government declared nearly 2 million people there to be non-citizens in an effort that has been widely criticized. Many now fear similar measures across the country. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Click At CES in Las Vegas – BBC Click

Jan 17, 2020  BBC Click

Click comes from CES in Las Vegas, the world’s largest tech show. With the latest announcements from the show and a look at trends for the year ahead. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Soyalism | DW Documentary

Feb 21, 2020  DW Documentary

Industrial agriculture is increasingly dominating the world market. It’s forcing small farmers to quit and taking over vast swathes of land. This documentary shows how destructive the lucrative agribusiness is. Whether in the USA, Brazil, Mozambique or China, agricultural giants rule the market. Food production has become a gigantic business as climate change and population growth continue. This is having devastating consequences for small farmers and for the environment. On the banks of North Carolina’s New River, there’s a vile stench. Clean water activist Rick Dove takes a flight to show us what’s causing the smell. Scores and scores of pigs are living upriver, in so many pens the farms look more like small towns. “We have eight to ten million pigs here. And the problem is that they are kept so close together and their excrement pollutes and threatens the water and natural life on the North Carolina coastline.” From above, you can see large cesspools everywhere, shimmering red-brown in the sun. Dove is giving us a bird’s-eye view of industrialized agriculture. In the late 1970s, companies in the US began to industrialize farming. Large corporations like Smithfield built entire value chains, from raising livestock to slaughter to packaging and sales. A Chinese holding company bought Smithfield a few years ago. Industrial meat production is supposed to support increased Chinese demand for meat as the country’s prosperity grows. Dan Basse is the head of a company analyses global agriculture. He says calorie demand will also increase in countries like India, Bangladesh and Nigeria in the next few years.” And with it, the demand for even more inexpensive meat of the kind agribusinesses produce and market. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia

Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity — Jim Al-Khalili BBC Horizon

•May 27, 2015  Trev M

Part 1 – Spark 0:00 Part 2 – The Age of Invention 58:30 Part 3 – Revelations and Revolutions 1:56:50 ——— In this three-part BBC Horizon documentary physicist and science communicator Jim Al-Khalili takes the viewer on a journey exploring the most important historical developments in electricity and magnetism. This documentary discusses how the physics (and the people behind the physics) changed the world forever. ——— BBC Horizon 2011

https://mymodernmet.com/heart-shaped-beehive/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=2020-02-21

Category  Science & Technology

Bees Create Heart-Shaped Hive When There Aren’t Frames Up to Guide Them

By Jessica Stewart on February 10, 2020

If you ever needed evidence that bees were artists, take a look at this incredible photograph posted by The National Trust. Left to their own devices, the bees at Bodiam Castle in Robertsbridge, United Kingdom made quite the spectacle. Within the structure of their hive, they created a delightful heart-shaped honeycomb that looks as sweet as it tastes.

This may seem like an odd sight, but that’s only because we’re used to beekeepers placing rectangular frames within the hive. The bees then deposit their honey and build a comb directly onto the frame, which can be easily taken out and harvested by the beekeeper. But the reality is, bees will use as much space as they have to store honey. In fact, natural hives can take on all shapes and sizes.

For instance, sugarbag bees, which are native to Australia, make hives that form large spiraling structures. In temperate climates, some bees will even form an “open colony” where the entire hive is exposed. These can hang off of trees, fences, or overhangs and take on impressive oblong shapes.

Still, the photograph from Bodiam Castle is fascinating because it was formed within the wood frame of a hive. Beekeeper gregthegregest2 mentioned on Reddit that this is a common occurrence when the bees are left a large gap between the top of the frames and the roof of the hive. Of course, it makes good sense that these hard workers would take advantage of every inch given to them. While the shape is beautiful, this can be a headache for beekeepers when looking to harvest their honey. They need to cut away the extra honeycomb in order to free the frames below.

Of course, the skill of bees is well known. In fact, even artists have taken advantage of their capabilities by working with bees to create everything from sculptures to embroidery. So the next time you see a honey bee buzzing from flower to flower, just imagine what interesting artistry might happen when it makes its way back to the hive.

When left to their own devices, bees are incredible architects.

They can create incredible shapes from their honeycomb, whether in boxes or out in nature.

How fast are you moving right now? – Tucker Hiatt

Jan 27, 2014  TED-Ed

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-fast-ar… “How fast are you moving?” seems like an easy question, but it’s actually quite complicated — and perhaps best answered by another question: “Relative to what?” Even when you think you’re standing still, the Earth is moving relative to the Sun, which is moving relative to the Milky Way, which is…you get the idea. Tucker Hiatt unravels the concepts of absolute and relative speed. Lesson by Tucker Hiatt, animation by Zedem Media.

Category  Education

Pop quiz: When does learning begin? Answer: Before we are born. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks through new research that shows how much we learn in the womb — from the lilt of our native language to our soon-to-be-favorite foods.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Annie Murphy Paul · Science author

Annie Murphy Paul investigates how life in the womb shapes who we become.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

How do babies learn so much from so little so quickly? In a fun, experiment-filled talk, cognitive scientist Laura Schulz shows how our young ones make decisions with a surprisingly strong sense of logic, well before they can talk.

Show 1 correction

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Laura Schulz · Cognitive scientist

Developmental behavior studies spearheaded by Laura Schulz are changing our notions of how children learn.

https://www.designbolts.com/2020/02/16/awe-inspiring-nokia-5g-paper-cut-creative-illustrations-by-eiko-ojala

TED2015 | March 2015

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Hey there guys! So, we are back with yet another interesting blog of ours and we are hopeful that you are going to love it as much as we do – mainly because it is one of our favorite topics to cover (and we are sure that you know this too!) and also because well, it feels so great to come across artists who put in their brain, heart and hands to create magic. Our today’s blog will cover Nokia 5G paper cut illustrations by Eiko Ojala and we would like to get started right now.

Before we start explaining what paper cut illustrations really are and introduce you guys with Eiko’s work, let’s have a look at Eiko Ojala as an illustrator first. So, he is an Estonian artist who was born in 1982 in Tallinn. He has studied interior design and it was prior to when he brought himself to the world of creating illustrations (read: stunning). Eiko knows how to create amazing digital paper cut illustrations by combining them with his traditional techniques and making sure that his work speaks volumes.

We would also like to share this here that Eiko has been working with The New York Times, the Harvard Business Review, the Weird Magazine and has also been associated with the V&A Museum. Oh, and just by the way the master of creating paper cut illustrations has also won a Young Illustrators award in 2013 and an ADC Young Gun award by the Art Directors Club.

Isn’t it just great that all the artists around the world stun us with their creativity, imagination and work on a daily basis and we share that here on our blog because we want to inspire you guys and to encourage you too so that you can also get into the field and see if that is working for you.

As far as the paper cut illustrations are concerned, we believe that, this technique requires a lot of time, efforts and patience especially when you are creating your illustrations on digital mediums. There are a number of layers involved in order to recreate the original idea by adding depth and meaning to the illustrations.

Now, we know that different artists have different tricks to work on what they love to create but about Eiko’s illustrations, one thing is for final that you will require a great deal of time to tell if the illustrations were made using paper or did Eiko created them using his digital editing skills. Yes, you read that right. That is how clean and real his illustrations are that you cannot differentiate between a paper one and a digital one.

You must be wondering that only a few artists could create paper cut illustrations as this requires time, skills and a lot more than that but believe us when we say this, that nothing is impossible or too difficult if we really want to do it for ourselves and once you find your peace and happiness in the things that you do and create then there is no going back. It becomes interesting, it becomes fun and you want to improve yourself in order to get to the bigger goal and that is how it should be.

We can bet that even Eiko must have created illustrations which he would not have considered anything, he must have also discarded a few of his creations here and a few of them there because well, we judge ourselves more than others do and while we are evaluating our work and thought process, we tend to exclude most of the stuff because we want perfection.

What we are trying to say here is that if you think that you have it in you to try out a new skill in 2020 then make it more about paper cut illustrations – both with actual paper as well as on digital platforms like Illustrator. In this way, you will be able to know if you can do it or not and although we know that you are going to ace it, we would also want to say that go easy on yourself and also be patient if you fail because that is going to help you in the longer run.

Coming back to Eiko’s illustrations, we love each one of them and we are sharing them in our blog as well but let’s take a cursory glance too before we leave you with the magical illustrations for you to look at in detail. The first one is the Nokia 5G one in which you can see the number and the alphabet and there is world in these two elements. Vehicles, humans, trees and birds as well as the scenery is making this illustration that has a story to tell.

Moving on, you can see multiple shapes and backgrounds on which Eiko has used his imagination to create illustrations that are significant and interesting to look at. And from building and monuments to human beings and their cars, trees, birds and clouds – we think that looking at these mind blowing illustrations is a treat for the eyes. So, feel free to share the blog with your friends and family members too and we are sure they are going to like it too.

Credit: be.net/eiko

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Pouring a Thermos of Hot Tea at -40°C Near the Arctic Circle

DECEMBER 21, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

ice-1

Ontario-based photographer Michael Davies timed this impressive shot of his friend Markus hurling a thermos of hot tea through the air yesterday in -40°C weather. At such frigid temperatures water freezes instantly to form a dramatic plume of ice. For the last decade Davies has worked as a photographer in the fly-in community of Pangnirtung in Canada’s High Arctic, only 20km south of the Arctic Circle, a place that sees about two hours of sunlight each day during the winter. He shares via email that almost nothing was left to chance in creating the photo, as so many things had to be perfectly timed:

Around 1pm I jumped on my skidoo along with my friend Markus and we drove 45 minutes to the top of a nearby mountain where the light (which is almost always pink near the solstice) would hit the hills. Prepared with multiple thermoses filled with tea, we began tossing the water and shooting. Nothing of this shot was to chance, I followed the temperature, watched for calm wind, and planned the shot and set it up. Even the sun in the middle of the spray was something I was hoping for, even though it’s impossible to control.

You can see more of Davies’ most recent photography over on Flickr.

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Underwater Footage Captures a Blanket Octopus Revealing Her Billowing Iridescent Membrane

FEBRUARY 24, 2020  GRACE EBERT

In a short clip captured during a blackwater night dive in the Lembeh Straita blanket octopus unfolds and displays a colorful web multiple times her original size. The aquatic animal’s iridescent body and

tentacles glow against the nighttime water before she releases her translucent blanket that connects her dorsal and dorsolateral arms. Only adult females are equipped with the lengthy membrane that reaches as long as six feet and dwarfs male octopi, which are less than an inch in size and most often die immediately after mating. Generally, the females only unfurl their color-changing blankets to appear larger and more intimidating to potential predators. Shared by NAD Lembeh Resort, the underwater video was taken on a RED Gemini with a 50 millimeter Zeiss Macro lens. You might also want to check out this footage of a blanket octopus in waters near the Philippines. (via The Kids Should See This)

The Blanket Octopus and it’s AMAZING Blanket!!

Mar 24, 2019  NAD Lembeh Resort

The Blanket Octopus, shot in the Lembeh Straits on a Blackwater Night Dive with NAD Lembeh. Footage shot on RED Gemini with 50mm Zeiss Macro lens. Copyright Simon Buxton 2019.

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, Ted Talks, Late Night with Seth Meyers, BBC Click, Design Photography, Thisiscolossal, AMKK000, and MikeUdine

PBS News: February 3 – 7, 2020 and WFP uses new tech to fight refugee food shortages in Jordan

Ted Talks: Lucy King How bees can keep the peace between elephants and humans and Emma  Bryce the case of the vanishing honeybees

Late Night with Seth Meyers: Paul Krugman Explains Why Cutting Taxes for the Wealthy Doesn’t Work

BBC Click: Made In Bangladesh and 3D Printing In Space

Design Photography: Dramatic Views of Worldwide Architecture Captured by Gareth Pon (with a Hidden Twist)

Thisiscolossal: 5 metres 80 giraffes Nicolas Deveaux and A Verdant Botanical Animation Takes a Macro View of Nature’s Cycles

AMKK000: Botanical animation “Story of Flowers” full ver.

MikeUdine: Mètres 5,80 – Giraffen Turmspringer – giraffes doing diving

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 7, 2020

Feb 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, China’s government struggles to contain public outrage over its handling of the novel coronavirus outbreak. Plus: Evaluating President Trump’s economic claims in light of a strong jobs report and other data, a conversation with former Amb. Bill Taylor, 2020 Democrats prepare for the New Hampshire primary, political analysis with Shields and Brooks and designing the future. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Impeachment witness Vindman fired from NSC post  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2c7yY… China’s virus outbreak is evolving into a political crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mkT4… Are Trump’s exuberant claims about the U.S. economy true? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQ3Ov…  Amb. Bill Taylor on why Americans should care about Ukraine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygbqs… How 2020 Democrats are preparing for New Hampshire primary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLsdK… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s acquittal, Iowa caucus chaos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtFi0… This Philadelphia exhibit explores designs for the future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmfkF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 6, 2020

•Feb 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial is over, but the animosity between him and House Democrats, and particularly House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, continues. Plus: China’s deadly novel coronavirus outbreak, Iowa caucus results, American political divisions in historical context, a film about the war in Syria, a space milestone and an artistic take on systemic racism. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Trump celebrates acquittal, criticizes Pelosi and Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhLHP… News Wrap: Violence in Middle East leaves at least 3 dead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBhgY… How China’s government is fighting deadly virus outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYG7L… How 2020 Democrats are responding to Iowa caucus chaos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQBoC… Today’s bitterly divided U.S. politics in historical context https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3ols… Documentary ‘For Sama’ finds love amid loss of Syrian war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hboc… Astronaut Christina Koch’s record-setting mission in space https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAnJ3… Artist Paul Rucker on systemic racism in America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwou4… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 5, 2020

Feb 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump concludes with a majority of senators voting to acquit him of both obstruction of Congress and abuse of power. Plus: Analysis of the Senate’s decision to acquit Trump of impeachment charges, evaluating the president’s State of the Union address and land management in Australia, where a devastating bushfire season continues. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Romney provokes Republican wrath by voting to convict Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7B6w4… Emotions flare at divided State of the Union https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZhO5… News Wrap: Buttigieg maintains lead in latest Iowa results https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK2Kh… Trump ‘acquitted forever,’ says Kellyanne Conway https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rcatv… Schiff lauds Romney’s ‘moral courage’ on conviction vote https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvTVn… What Trump’s impeachment, acquittal say about U.S. politics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUwm-… Australian bushfires prompt conversation on land management https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj-2Z… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 4, 2020

•Feb 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Iowa’s delay in reporting Democratic caucus results prompts questions and criticism and leaves candidates in limbo. Plus: What senators are saying ahead of Wednesday’s vote to acquit or convict President Trump of impeachment charges, how the novel coronavirus outbreak is affecting the global economy and what’s happening in the sexual assault trial of Harvey Weinstein. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

WFP uses new tech to fight refugee food shortages in Jordan

Feb 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Jordan is home to an estimated 3 million refugees, and the country’s harsh terrain makes supplying food for them difficult. But to combat the food shortages, the U.N. World Food Program is using technologies like iris scans to track refugee spending habits and hydroponics to grow livestock feed. Christopher Livesay reports as part of our “Future of Food” series with Pulitzer Center support. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk, zoologist Lucy King shares her solution to the rising conflict: fences made from beehives that keep elephants at bay while also helping farmers establish new livelihoods.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Lucy King · Human-elephant ambassador

Zoologist Dr. Lucy King helms the Human-Elephant Coexistence Program for the Kenyan research charity Save the Elephants.

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PARTICIPATE

Sponsor a rural farmer with a beehive fence to help reduce conflict with elephants.

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In the past decade, the US honeybee population has been decreasing at an alarming and unprecedented rate. While this is obviously bad news for honeypots everywhere, bees also help feed us in a bigger way — by pollinating our nation’s crops. Emma Bryce investigates potential causes for this widespread colony collapse disorder. [Directed by Lillian Chan, narrated by Derek Gebhart, music by John Poon].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

417,578 views

TED-Ed | March 2014

Paul Krugman Explains Why Cutting Taxes for the Wealthy Doesn’t Work

Feb 4, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Paul Krugman explains why economies are so difficult to predict and discuses an idea in politics that won’t die. Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se… LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/ Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. GET MORE NBC Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbctv Paul Krugman Explains Why Cutting Taxes for the Wealthy Doesn’t Work- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/Ndja2v3urV4 Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenight…

Category  Comedy

Made In Bangladesh – BBC Click

•Feb 3, 2020   BBC Click

Click is in Bangladesh to see how automation will impact over four million workers in the garment industry. Plus new ways data will help teams at the Superbowl. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

3D Printing In Space – BBC Click

•Jan 31, 2020  BBC Click

We’re in LA to meet the company with the biggest 3D printer in the world being used to print space rockets! Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category

Science & Technology

?Design Photography

Dramatic Views of Worldwide Architecture Captured by Gareth Pon (with a Hidden Twist)

JANUARY 27, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Ponte, Johannesburg. All images © Gareth Pon, shared with permission

Photographer Gareth Pon (previously) encourages his audience to join in his reinvention of Where’s Waldo. His architectural photography relies on depth, pattern, and symmetry, often framing a small piece of the city he’s visiting, like the water-covered street below Chicago’s “L” or a multi-colored building complex replete with balconies and air conditioners in Hong Kong. But every image has one signature twist: Pon hides a small rocket in each of his structural pieces. On his wildly popular Instagram, the photographer shares that his lifelong dream is space travel, perhaps explaining his use of the flying object. To join Pon’s ongoing game of spot the rocket, check out his Facebook.

Chicago, Illinois

Atlanta, Georgia

Chicago, Illinois

Hong Kong

Atlanta, Georgia

Hong Kong

Chicago, Illinois

OK, this is ridiculous, but in the best way possible. Spending too much time describing this short film by French animator Nicolas Deveaux would ruin it, so it’s probably best to just watch it. Created over a period of 1.5 years 5 Mètres 80 is a follow-up to a shorter animation he made 10 years ago about an elephant on a trampoline. Deveaux is widely known for his realistic animation of animals for both film and commercials, many more of which he shares on Vimeo. 5 Mètres 80 has toured film festivals around the world since 2013 picking up numerous awards and nominations including the Best in Show Award at SIGGRAPH Asia. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Mètres 5,80 – Giraffen Turmspringer – giraffes doing diving

Jan 18, 2015  MikeUdine

5.85K subscribers

Netter Kurzfilm über Giraffen Turnspringer im Hallenbad, ausgestrahlt auf arte HD am 31.12.2014. Von Auteur Réalisateur Nicolas Deveaux Cube Creative Productions – Orange – 2012 Nice short film about giraffes doing diving in an indoor swimming pool. Cortometraggio carino su giraffe tuffatrici in piscina coperta.

Category   Pets & Animals

Netflix “Disjointed” Season 1 Episode10 Animation

kanahebiPlus

Animation/Director: Hideki Inaba?
Music: Alexander Scriabin?
Creative Director: Dave Hughes?
Sound Design: Brent Busby

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hide.tokyo

A Verdant Botanical Animation Takes a Macro View of Nature’s Cycles

FEBRUARY 4, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Spanning from day to night and from sunshine to rain and wind, “Story of Flowers” shows the various stages of botanical growth and the help plants get along the way. The instructional project—which was illustrated by Katie Scott, animated by James Paulley, and directed by Azuma Makoto—depicts the interconnected networks within an ecosystem, like the organisms underground fertilizing the soil or a bumblebee landing atop and pollinating a pistil. Each stage of the germination process is shot with an enlarged view to magnify roots stretching out, sprouts poking through the ground, and flowers opening up to bloom. As rain falls, the petals drop and plants release their seeds, which then are embedded into the soil, beginning the cycle once again. Head to Instagram to check out more work from ScottPaulley, and Makoto. (via The Kids Should See This)

AMKK presents: Botanical animation “Story of Flowers” full ver.

May 20, 2017  AMKK000

AMKK Presents: Botanical animation “Story of Flowers” The animation was developed for kids to show the life cycle of flowers. -Story- Many different flowers are growing beautifully and strongly in this world. Taking their roots in the earth, sprouting, blooming, pollination by birds and insects, living on in spite of rain, wind and storms. They pass on the baton of life, rebirth and decay. Everything is so in a continuous, endless cycle. This is the story and message of this animation. Directed by : Azuma Makoto Illustration by : Katie Scott Animation by : James Paulley Visual Supervisor : Shunsuke Shiinoki Project Management by : Eri Narita

Category  Film & Animation

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PBS News, TED Talks, BBC Click, Pocket, New York Times, Thisiscolossal, Derek Hugger, Frist Art Museum, and Creators

PBS News: January 24 – 30, 2020, The extraordinary legacy and unique voice of Jim Lehrer, and Idlib is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing Assad — and it is barely livable,

TED Talks: Stuart Oda Are indoor vertical farms the future of agriculture?, Mohammad Modarres Why you should shop at your local farmers market, Wevita Davison how urban agriculture is transforming Detroit

BBC Click: The Self-Driving Car Revolution & More

Pocket: Invasion of the ‘Frankenbees’: The Danger of Building a Better Bee

New York Times: Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

Thisiscolossal: A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf and A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle Urban Species: Kinetic Lifeforms Created by U-Ram Choe and Slowly Rising: A Mesmerizing New Music Video by Hideki Inaba

Derek Hugger: Carapace – an organic motion sculpture

Frist Art Museum: URAM Choe – New Urban Species Exhibition

Creators: Kinetic Sculptor Puts Cyber Dreams In Motion

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 30, 2020

Jan 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, senators continue asking questions in President Trump’s impeachment trial as a pivotal vote on witnesses looms. Plus: Legal experts analyze the latest impeachment trial developments, a preview of the Iowa caucus, novel coronavirus is now a global health emergency, the economic power of peer pressure, Malcolm Gladwell on meeting strangers and Gwen Ifill forever remembered. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 29, 2020

•Jan 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, carefully scripted legal arguments give way to senator questions in President Trump’s impeachment trial. Plus: Legal experts analyze the latest from the impeachment trial, how China and the global health community are responding to the outbreak of novel coronavirus, understanding traumatic brain injury, saving Australian wildlife after bushfires and Now Read This. Editor’s Note: The first segment of tonight’s show incorrectly identified the location of the bakery sending cakes to lawmakers in the Senate. The cakes did not come from a bakery in Washington, D.C., but rather from one in New York. The segment’s transcript has been corrected. NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Senators begin question period in Trump impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrVi0… 2 legal experts on the latest from Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BVXe… News Wrap: Trump touts USMCA trade deal at signing ceremony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IUnH… How China is responding to rapid spread of novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIROm… The challenge traumatic brain injury poses for U.S. troops https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VAa8c… Australians rush to rescue wildlife imperiled by bushfires https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDKyy… ‘Heart Berries’ author Terese Mailhot on reader questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y73WI… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode Jan 28, 2020

Jan 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team concludes its defense, arguing that Trump’s impeachment was motivated by political differences and that conviction would set a dangerous precedent. Plus: Sen. Elizabeth Warren on the Senate impeachment trial, reaction to Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan, the battle over Huawei and 5G technology and a conversation with Robert DeNiro. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Witness question remains unsettled in Trump’s Senate trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCX8x… Sen. Warren on Trump’s trial and why ‘women win’ elections  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6nhN… News Wrap: U.S. steps up screenings for novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCF2I… 2 reactions to Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-9TV… Why the U.S. doesn’t want Huawei building 5G networks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNUWU… Robert De Niro on ‘The Irishman’ and his prolific career https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4g6X_… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 27, 2020

Jan 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team presents its defense in his Senate impeachment trial. Plus: China’s coronavirus is still spreading as the city of Wuhan remains closed, previewing Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan, remembering the horror of Auschwitz-Birkenau, 2020 Democrats in Iowa, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith and the world grieves Kobe Bryant. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 26, 2020

Jan 26, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, January 26, President Trump’s impeachment trial enters a second week, retired NBA superstar Kobe Bryant dies in a helicopter crash, new limits in China amid a widening coronavirus outbreak, Philadelphia’s famed Sigma Sound Studios lives, and award-winning vocalist Shemekia Copeland brings the blues into the 21st century. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 25, President Trump’s legal team lays out their defense in the Senate impeachment trial, the wind energy industry faces the loss of decades-old tax incentives, the coronavirus continues to spread internationally, and one young lion dancer is impacting the Chinese Lunar New Year. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 24, 2020

Jan 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, House impeachment managers complete their third and final day of arguments in President Trump’s Senate trial. Plus: China’s new coronavirus outbreak continues to spread as new U.S. cases are confirmed, a drug company CEO is sentenced to prison for his role in prescribing deadly opioid drugs and the NewsHour family remembers co-founder, anchor, mentor and friend Jim Lehrer. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The extraordinary legacy and unique voice of Jim Lehrer

Jan 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

It is impossible to quantify Jim Lehrer’s influence on this news program, American journalism, presidential debates or the lives of so many of us. He was an extraordinary journalist, writer, collaborator and friend. Robert MacNeil, Lehrer’s NewsHour co-founder, longtime Lehrer friend Justice Stephen Breyer and Sharon Percy Rockefeller, president and CEO of WETA, join Judy Woodruff to remember him. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Idlib is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing Assad — and it is barely livable

Jan 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The war in Syria has waged for almost nine years and claimed millions of lives. Northwest Idlib province is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing attacks by President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. But the crowded, muddy refugee camps there offer little shelter or support, and to the north, Turkey’s border is closed to those seeking better conditions. Nick Schifrin reports on Idlib’s “fragile stability.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

By 2050, the global population is projected to reach 9.8 billion. How are we going to feed everyone? Investment-banker-turned-farmer Stuart Oda points to indoor vertical farming: growing food on tiered racks in a controlled, climate-proof environment. In a forward-looking talk, he explains how this method can maintain better safety standards, save money, use less water and help us provide for future generations.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Stuart Oda · Entrepreneur, urban farmer

Stuart Oda is an indoor urban farmer with a passion for innovation and sustainability. His goal: democratize access to fresh and nutritious food by democratizing the means and knowledge of production.

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Learn more about indoor vertical farming by joining a community engagement event in your area.  Learn more ?

About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

608,448 views

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | June 2019

https://www.ted.com/talks/mohammad_modarres_why_you_should_shop_at_your_local_farmers_market#t-3081

he average farmer in America makes less than 15 cents of every dollar on a product that you purchase at a store. They feed our communities, but farmers often cannot afford the very foods they grow. In this actionable talk, social entrepreneur Mohammad Modarres shows how to put your purchasing power into action to save local agriculture from collapse and transform the food industry from the bottom up.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Mohammad Modarres · Social entrepreneur

Mohammad Modarres developed the first-ever Zabihah Halal and Glatt Kosher “Interfaith Meat” to make faith-based foods more accessible.

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How to build a more inclusive dinner tableIn his first TED Talk, Mohammad Modarres discusses why he produced the Shabbat Salaam interfaith dinner series, where he premiered Interfaith Meat to help Muslim and Jewish communities eat from the same plate.

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participate

Support Abe’s Eats in their mission to make high-quality, inclusive foods accessible to all.

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learn

Learn more about the Farmers Market Coalition, dedicated to strengthening farmers markets across the US.

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1,209,420 views

TED Residency | May 2019

There’s something amazing growing in the city of Detroit: healthy, accessible, delicious, fresh food. In a spirited talk, fearless farmer Devita Davison explains how features of Detroit’s decay actually make it an ideal spot for urban agriculture. Join Davison for a walk through neighborhoods in transformation as she shares stories of opportunity and hope. “These aren’t plots of land where we’re just growing tomatoes and carrots,” Davison says. “We’re building social cohesion as well as providing healthy, fresh food.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Devita Davison · Food activist

At FoodLab Detroit, Devita Davison supports local entrepreneurs and imagines a new future for food justice.

Take Action  learn  Learn more about how FoodLab Detroit is using food as a catalyst for community change.  Learn more ?

participate

Donate to FoodLab Detroit and help strengthen our ability to support, improve and grow resources for our network of good food entrepreneurs.

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TED2017 | April 2017

The Self-Driving Car Revolution – BBC Click

Jan 23, 2020  BBC Click

Click looks at the battle for self-driving car supremacy between the USA and China. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category    Science & Technology

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/invasion-of-the-frankenbees-the-danger-of-building-a-better-bee?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy  Stories to fuel your mind.

Invasion of the ‘Frankenbees’: The Danger of Building a Better Bee

Beekeepers are sounding the alarm about the latest developments in genetically modified pollinators. 

The Guardian |  Bernhard Warner

GettyImages-167524958.jpg
BLANKENFELDE, GERMANY – APRIL 25: Worker bees surround a queen, who is marked with a yellow spot on her back, in the colony of beekeper Reiner Gabriel in the garden of his home near Berlin on April 25, 2013 in Blankenfelde, Germany. Local beekeepers claim their yearly loss rates within their bee populations has gone from an average of 10% per year to 30% per year over the last 10 years, though they are unsure whether the cause lies with a mite and a virus it might be spreading or with the increased use of certain pesticides by local farmers. According to a recent report prepared by Greenpeace seven pesticides currently in use in Europe present a real danger to bees. Bees are essential in nature in pollinating a wide variety of plants and trees. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The spring of 2008 was brutal for Europe’s honeybees. In late April and early May, during the corn-planting season, dismayed beekeepers in Germany’s upper Rhine valley looked on as whole colonies perished. Millions of bees died. France, the Netherlands and Italy reported big losses, but in Germany the incident took on the urgency of a national crisis. “It was a disaster,” recalled Walter Haefeker, German president of the European Professional Beekeepers Association. “The government had to set up containers along the autobahn where beekeepers could dump their hives.”

An investigation in July of that year concluded that the bees in Germany died of mass poisoning by the pesticide clothianidin, which can be 10,000 times more potent than DDT. In the months leading up to the bee crisis, clothianidin, developed by Bayer Crop Science from a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, had been used up and down the Rhine following an outbreak of corn rootworm. The pesticide is designed to attack the nervous system of crop-munching pests, but studies have shown it can be harmful to insects such as the European honeybee. It muddles the bees’ super-acute sense of direction and upsets their feeding habits, while it can also alter the queen’s reproductive anatomy and sterilise males. As contaminated beehives piled up, Bayer paid €2m (£1.76m) into a compensation fund for beekeepers in the affected area, but offered no admission of guilt.

The die-off forced a reckoning among European farmers. Hundreds of studies examined the safety of neonicotinoids, known as neonics, and their links to colony collapse disorder (CCD), in which worker bees abandon the hive, leaving the queen and her recent offspring unprotected, to starve. In 2013, the evidence led to a landmark European commission ruling, imposing a moratorium on clothianidin and two other major neonics – the world’s most popular pesticides. In April 2018, Europe went a step further. The commission extended the ban on the trio of neonics to virtually everywhere outside greenhouses, citing evidence that by harming pollinating insects, neonics interfere with the pollination of crops to the value of €15bn a year. Environmentalists cheered the victory. Regulators beyond Europe plan to follow.

For Haefeker at the beekeepers association, who had spent years campaigning against the use of neonics, victory was sweet, but short-lived: faced with multiple threats from modern farming methods, beekeepers know the insecticide ban alone is not enough to save the honeybee.

Honeybees originated in Eurasia roughly 35m years ago, and as long as they have had steady access to flowering plants, they have thrived. But in the modern world, bees face all kinds of dangers. Colony collapse is not a single malady, but rather an amalgamation of different challenges. Alongside the dangers of pesticides, diseases such as Israeli acute paralysis virus, gut parasites and invasive parasites such as the varroa mite can overwhelm the bees’ immune systems. Industrial agriculture imposes its own threats: a mania for monocultures has led to shrinking foraging habitats, while, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency, bees employed in commercial pollination, in which hives are stacked high on trucks and driven around the country to pollinate almond trees and other crops, get highly stressed, which damages their resilience and eating habits.

Since the EU began phasing out neonics, in 2014, the honeybees’ recovery has not been as dramatic as hoped. Neonics are probably not the biggest factor in the demise of bees, but they are the easiest to outlaw. To farmers, this seems outrageously unfair. Citing an industry-funded study, they say the ban will cost the EU agriculture sector €880bn annually in diminished crop yields.

Another, more controversial, response to the slump in bee populations is in the works. This is the plan to create a more resilient strain of honeybee – a genetically modified superbee. The technology for creating GM honeybees is in its infancy, and still confined to the laboratory. But, if successful, it could lead to a hardier species, one that is resistant to natural and manmade hazards: viruses, varroa mites, pesticides and so on. If we can’t change modern farming practices, the thinking goes, maybe we should change the bees.

The prospect horrifies many bee people – from commercial beekeepers such as Haefeker to passionate amateurs – who see a lab-made superbee as a direct threat to the smaller, struggling bee species. Traditional beekeepers have a name for them that expresses their fear and suspicion: Frankenbees.

Like many beekeepers, Haefeker is an activist and conservationist. A kind of bearded Lorax, Dr Seuss’s valiant spokesman for threatened trees, Haefeker speaks for the bees. For much of the past two decades, he has sounded the alarm on declining bee health, bringing his message to lawmakers in Brussels, Berlin and Munich, before judges at the European court of justice in Luxembourg, to investor roundtables in London, to beekeeper conferences in Istanbul, Austria and Rome, and to corporate gatherings of the agrichemical industry around Europe.

When we met in Bavaria a week after the EU extended its neonics ban, I expected Haefeker to be in celebratory mood. But over lunch at a favourite roadway tavern an hour outside Munich, he explained that he considers the development of GM bees – however long it takes to get them in production – an even greater threat to the humble honeybee. “I don’t expect it to be commercialised next week, but then I don’t want to leave anything up to chance,” Haefeker said. “The public has been pretty late on a whole bunch of bad ideas. We don’t want to be late on this one.”

Some beekeepers worry that, if the agriculture industry succeeds in building and patenting a blockbuster, mite-free, pesticide-proof superbee, it would dominate and destroy the vibrant local market in conventional bee strains. There are health fears, too: the sting of GM bees may introduce new allergy risks. And beekeepers are afraid they would not be able to protect the gene pool of traditional strains such as the beloved Apis mellifera, the scientific name for the European honeybee, against a dominant, pesticide resistant, lab-designed version.

Jay Evans heads the bee research lab at the US Department of Agriculture, where they are looking at various threats to bee health. Designing a truly pesticide-resistant honeybee, a “bulletproof bee”, as Evans calls them, would “throw a lot of nature under the bus”.

It is always hive-like – 30C and humid – in the narrow, windowless laboratory where genetically engineered honeybees are created on the campus of Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. One June day, three students in T-shirts were on the morning shift. Two of them silently inspected plastic honeycomb discs. Each disc contained 140 tiny plug holes, in each of which a single honeybee embryo was growing. These discs were then passed to a third student at a separate workstation, where, with remarkable dexterity, she injected each egg with an sgRNA gene-manipulation solution, a main ingredient in a revolutionary new gene-editing technique called Crispr-Cas9.

Crispr technology has transformed microbiology in recent years by allowing scientists to copy a desirable part of the DNA strand and insert it directly into the chromosome of the target specimen. Now, with great precision, scientists can remove harmful mutations or unwanted traits, or insert a desired trait. In the US, you can buy a Crispr apple that doesn’t brown. Medical researchers, meanwhile, see Crispr as a promising route to making mosquitos resistant to the malaria parasite.

The director of the Düsseldorf lab is Martin Beye, a giant in the field of evolutionary genetics. In 2003, Beye and his colleagues were the first to pinpoint the gene variants, or alleles, that determine the sex of honeybees. Three years later (coincidentally, just as scientists determined the likely causes of colony collapse disorder), Beye and an international team of biologists decoded the Apis mellifera honeybee genome, a breakthrough that transformed the field of bee biology. Scientists now have an understanding of bee health down to the chromosomal level, enabling them, for example, to analyse precisely how pathogens and parasites affect their bee hosts. Genomics can take much of the guesswork out of breeding, too, revealing the precise gene markers that make stocks more resilient to stressors and disease. Once the genome was cracked, it was only a matter of time before the scientific community would build a designer bee. In 2014, Beye’s lab claimed that crown.

The gene-injection method Beye’s team pioneered, and laid out in their 2014 research paper, is painstaking and fraught with risk. To demonstrate, a student motioned for me to peer into her microscope. The faint outline of a tiny needle and its intended target, the egg, came into focus. Magnified, the egg looked like a smooth grey balloon, the kind performers at children’s parties tie into poodles and giraffes. Poke the egg at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure, or with an imprecise dosage, and it will pop. And the injection has to be stealthy enough to leave no marks. If the worker bees, the hive’s fastidious caretakers, sense in any way the pupae are not perfect, they cast them from the nest, leaving them for dead. Only the pristine survive.

To increase the odds of success, Beye’s team keep their injected embryos away from the workers at first, incubating in an artificial hive. Only after 72 hours do they slip the fittest of their modified larvae specimens into a queen-rearing colony. What happens next is similar to the conventional queen-breeding method. The researchers graft the larvae into cell cups lined with royal jelly, the nutrient rich compound that young larvae gorge on to become queens. Even so, the workers, on average, rejected three out of four mutant larvae. But the survival rate was enough to guarantee the birth, in 2014, of the world’s first genetically modified honeybee queens.

I was also shown the transgenic queens. Up close, they looked vigorous, but unremarkable. The researchers affixed a magenta-coloured ID tag to the queen’s back, between the base of her wings. She mingled with ordinary worker bees in a small wooden nucleus hive. The sides were made of a hard plastic for viewing. Beye’s research team told me their transgenic bees behave no differently than any other Apis mellifera honeybees. The queen and the workers covered every inch of their cramped confines, popping in and out of a small well containing water. After a week or so, the queen would be moved outside to a flight cage.

Beye’s researchers believe manipulating the genome of the European honeybee will lead to new insights into what makes this species unique – which genes make them such meticulous groomers, or which genes programme the worker bees’ super-assiduous attention to looking after their young. They want to know why bees are so good to each other. Is this instinct to work tirelessly for the good of the hive something learned, or genetic?

Beekeepers, dismayed at the prospect of GM bees becoming a reality, made a huge fuss about Beye’s work. Many suspected his lab was bankrolled by the agriculture industry, or “Big Ag”.

“The beekeeper associations … ” Beye said, shaking his head in lingering disbelief. In person, he is affable and professorial. “They thought we were working with Bayer. I mean, they’re very close by: Bayer’s headquarters is maybe 20km from here.” He insisted inferences of a Bayer connection were totally false.

Beye and Marianne Otte, his research partner, explained that the purpose of their work was to understand the genetic basis for bee behaviour and health. It was never to build a pesticide-resistant bee. Building a GM bee, Beye said, is “a stupid idea”. The world doesn’t need chemical-resistant bees, he says. It needs farming practices that don’t harm bees. “They should be working on that. Not on manipulating the bee.”

But the truth is that Beye’s highly detailed paper serves as a kind of blueprint for how to build a bee. Thanks to research like his, and the emergence of tools such as Crispr, it has never been cheaper or so straightforward for a chemical company to pursue a superbee resistant to, say, the chemicals it makes. Takeo Kubo, a professor of molecular biology at the University of Tokyo, was the second scientist in the world to make a genetically modified bee in his lab. He told me that he, too, is focused on basic research, and has no ties to the agriculture industry. But, unlike Beye, he welcomes the prospect of GM bee swarms buzzing around the countryside. Lab-made, pesticide-resistant bees could be a real saviour for beekeepers and farmers, he says. And, he adds, the science is no more than three years away. “I’m now 57 years old,” he told me via email, “and completely optimistic to see such transgenic bees in the marketplace in my lifetime!”

It is not yet legal to release genetically engineered bees into the wild, but the private sector is already watching closely. One US startup contacted Beye’s lab offering to help commercialise their breakthrough research. Beye said no.

Beekeepers tend to see the world through the eyes of their bees. After a few hours in their presence, you too begin to re-evaluate your surroundings. The monochrome sameness of our farmlands – that vast, neat checkerboard of green and brown that feeds us mammals so well – can be a desert for foraging pollinators. The shocking yellow brilliance of rapeseed in blossom each spring can be a reservoir of pesticides. Beekeepers have learned to mitigate the risks and adapt, mainly by moving their hives around an ever-dwindling patch of safe zones. But the genetically modified bee, which can breed with other species and looks just like bees hand-raised from carefully chosen strains, is an altogether more dangerous challenge.

Jay Evans at the US agriculture department, an entomologist and beekeeper, admires Beye’s work, but thinks his breakthrough GM bee should remain confined to the lab. “The road to making a superbee looks really long to me, and probably not necessary,” he said. “I don’t see the justification.”

Haefeker, a former tech entrepreneur, came to beekeeping late in life, around his 40th birthday. After spending two decades in Silicon Valley, he, his wife and two sons returned home to Germany in 2001, settling in a picturesque village on Lake Starnberg, halfway between Munich and the Bavarian Alps. What started as a backyard hobby quickly became an obsession, then a growing business. Haefeker studied everything about beekeeping, from hive maintenance to nutrition. Later, he developed an iPhone app for breeders called iQueen and started a podcast called Bienenpolitik, or Beekeeping and Politics. One of the few tech-savvy beekeepers in bucolic Upper Bavaria, in 2003 Haefeker was recruited to join the local professional beekeepers association where second- and third-generation beekeepers routinely grumbled about modern farming practices gobbling up open space. His first assignment was to investigate an issue that nobody at the organisation knew much about: GM crops. “I had no opinion of GMOs (genetically modified organisms),” he recalls. “But as the new kid on the block it was my job to figure out: is this going to have an impact on us?”.

Haefeker’s investigations into GMOs turned into a decade-long crusade. What began as a local case involving a Bavarian beekeeper with GMO-contaminated honey grew into an epic battle, pitting Europe’s beekeepers against two giants: Monsanto, the biotech giant that markets MON810, the pest-resistant genetically modified maize, and the World Trade Organization, which, at the time, was pressuring the EU to give GM crops a chance. The beekeepers eventually won a huge victory in 2011 in the European court of justice, keeping European honey, for now, virtually GMO-free. The fight continues, but the beekeepers’ message was clear: don’t underestimate us.

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A beekeeper in California with his hives. Photograph: Brett Murphy © Guardian / eyevine Contact eyevine for more information about using this image: T: +44 (0) 20 8709 8709 E: info@eyevine.com http://www.eyevine.com

A beekeeper in California with his hives. Photograph: Brett Murphy

The agrichemical companies’ business model is to dominate both ends of the market. They sell the farmer the chemical that kills the pests, and then they sell them their patented seeds, genetically engineered to withstand those very chemicals. (Monsanto’s top-selling line of Roundup Ready herbicide-resistant seeds are marketed as the best defence against Roundup, Monsanto’s top-selling herbicide.) The multinationals have locked farmers into contracts that prevent them from manipulating the seeds to develop their own cross-breed.

Beekeepers fear genetic engineering of honeybees will introduce patents and privatisation to one of the last bastions of agriculture that is collectively managed and owned by no one. “Think about it,” Haefeker told me, “the one area Big Ag doesn’t yet control is pollination.” And pollination is huge. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that pollinators help farmers grow crops worth up to $577bn (£437bn) annually.

Damage to the bee population, by harming a vital pollinator, is already threatening crops worldwide. Outside FAO’s headquarters in Rome, a neon billboard flashes in English, Italian and Arabic a series of urgent save-the-planet messages. Save the bees tops the list. If bees disappear, food crops and animal feeds, not to mention the raw materials for biofuels (from canola and palm oil), textiles (cotton) and medicines, will simply vanish from much of the planet. It has got so bad in some parts of China that humans already pollinate some crops by hand. In what feels like a riff on a Black Mirror episode, Harvard researchers are working on the RoboBee, a flying robotic pollinator that is half the size of a paperclip and weighs less than one-tenth of a gram. In March 2018, Walmart filed a series of patents for its own tiny robotic pollinators.

Beekeepers and conservationists believe bees should be left to evolve on their own, helped only by protection of open spaces and best-practice natural breeding methods. Conventional bee breeding has embraced technology in recent years via the introduction of apps, tracking software and temperature-controlled “finishing” incubators. But the method is otherwise little changed from ancient times. During the year, beekeepers will perform what they call “splitting the hive”, or separating a portion of the colony, frame by frame, and putting the frames in new hives with new inhabitants. This can invigorate the gene pool by introducing hardy newcomers.

“Before the introduction of neonicotinoids,” Haefeker said, “about 15 years ago, you’d open up the hive and it was bursting with healthy bees. That level of reproductive energy is really crucial.”

During 2008, Germany’s infamous season of heavy colony losses, the dead piled up on the ground under Haefeker’s hives and along the hive’s inner floor. “It’s got better in recent years, since the bans went into place. But we’re not yet back to where we were in the days before neonics,” he said. “That will take years.” He tests the spring pollen for traces of neonics and other chemicals. The level of contamination is much improved, he says. On his property in Bavaria, he offered me a pinch of raw pollen. The sharp, sweet taste lingered on my tongue. I peered down to get a good look at the workers entering one of the hives. They streamed in one by one, their thighs weighed down with yellow balls of dandelion pollen. “It’s good, isn’t it?” Haefeker chuckled proudly.

By late July, cracks had appeared in the new neonics law. More than a dozen EU member states sought loopholes to stay the ban, and Bayer pledged to appeal against its legal basis, warning that the ban would limit our ability to grow the quantities of “safe, affordable” food we need.

Despite the setback, Haefeker remains defiant. “Their business model is obsolete,” he told me on the phone in July 2018. The “big six” companies of Big Ag are in the process of merging into three, forming Bayer-Monsanto, Dow-DuPont and Syngenta-ChemChina. This historic, quarter-of-a-trillion-dollar spending spree is a sign of market uncertainty, Haefeker asserts, not strength. The future, he says, is big data. Sensor- and computer-assisted crop care – digital crop protection, as it is known, in which tiny robots and drones will tend to rows and rows of crops round the clock, picking off pests and releasing super-precise flows of irrigation – will feed the planet’s billions, not chemicals. “I’ve been telling them this for years.”

However ground down by Haefeker’s tireless advocacy for bees they may be, Bayer officials told me they largely concur with his view that the industry is beginning to grow less reliant on chemicals, and investing more in big data and tiny robots. They even let Haefeker in the building from time to time to discuss that digital future.

Humans have been consuming honey since our hunter-gatherer days. Not long after we began farming, we started keeping bees (sugar came several millennia later). About 10,000 years ago artists depicted apiculture on the walls of Spanish caves, and, centuries after that, demand for bees wax and honey drove commerce across the empires of ancient Greece and Rome. In the 20th century, apiology, the study of bees, took off. In the 1920s, Austrian zoologist Karl von Frisch was the first to explain the meaning of the honeybees’ waggle dance, which communicates to other bees the direction and distance of a food source; a half-century later he won the Nobel Prize. Honeybees are eusocial creatures, making them one of the most studied insects on the planet. Researchers study the species to understand how the human brain works and to improve the design of supercomputers. Bees, it turns out, can even do abstract maths.There are 22 million beekeepers across 146 countries, estimates Apimondia, a 123-year-old organisation that protects and promotes the livelihood of beekeepers, and lately they have been seeing a dramatic rise in membership. “During a downturn in the economy of a country, the number of new members increases,” Philip McCabe, an Irish beekeeper and president of Apimondia, told me. The media attention around colony collapse and bee health continues to bring in new members as well.

In October 2017, Haefeker delivered a presentation at Apimondia’s International Apicultural Congress in Istanbul, unveiling Apimondia’s answer to Frankenbees. Like Haefeker himself, the fix he proposes is geeky and left-leaning: an open-source license for honeybees. A software engineer, he takes inspiration from the free software movement of the 1980s and 90s, which gave birth to the “open source” concept. Now, he sees such a licence promoting open collaboration as the perfect model to protect the beekeepers from a nightmare scenario – powerful corporations building a genetically engineered bee that they then commercialise and lock down with patents and trademarks.

In his opening remarks, Haefeker launched into what he called “the big question”. “Did anybody ask our permission before they took our bees, the bees we have been working on, selecting and breeding within Apimondia, before the scientists decided to take these bees and modify them?” The answer was, of course, no. Until that moment, nobody, not even beekeepers, claimed an ownership stake on the bees’ genetic code. Anyone can start a hive, which might explain why you can find beekeepers tending to hives in Yemeni war zones, on the roof of Paris’ Bastille opera house and in Tanzanian refugee camps. The free exchange of breeding materials – from the queens and her eggs to the drones’ sperm – has long been encouraged to keep colonies genetically diverse. Through this free exchange, we preserve a common resource, benefitting everyone and everything. The beekeepers get healthier colonies out of the arrangement. We get flowers, food and honey.

To get around any attempt by the agriculture industry to distribute and license superbees, Apimondia is seeking to enshrine this freedom as a right in the form of an open-source contract, establishing bee breeding as a public good that nobody can own outright.

“This is the most efficient way to legally protect our bees from patenting and privatisation by commercial interests,” Haefeker insists. Later, he told me, “we don’t want to get screwed, the way farmers did by corporations and their GM patented seeds.”

Apimondia has minuscule lobbying resources, but it has lined up powerful allies, including the FAO, environmental NGOs and scientific advisers. Together, they press for international treaties to protect vital pollinators. Now Apimondia, too, is sounding the alarm on GM honeybees. Radical bee-breeding experiments don’t always end well, McCabe reminded me. Beekeepers won’t soon forget the story of the Africanised bee, a cross-breed between the African bee and European strains introduced in South America in the 1950s. It escaped quarantine, mated with indigenous species and then multiplied and multiplied, venturing thousands of miles north into the US, breeding with local species and quickly coming to dominate their gene pool. It landed the unfortunate, even nativist, nickname “African killer bee” for the aggressive manner in which it defends its nest. “That’s what we’re concerned with,” McCabe says, “any inter-breeding that messes with the genetics of indigenous bee populations.”

Jay Evans keeps bees on the grounds of his job at the USDA, at the government research facility in Maryland, 30 minutes north of Washington DC. I contacted him by phone and asked how things were going.

“Terribly,” he said with a wry laugh. “The losses have doubled in the last 10 years.” He blames a host of factors, with disease and parasites such as the varroa mite chief among them. Beekeepers, he added, are closely watching what happens next in Europe. “I go to beekeepers’ meetings all the time. They’re suffering. They’re trying to keep their operations afloat. They’re desperate for a new solution, or technology, or regulation. Anything,” he says. But there’s consensus on what they don’t want. “When I talk to a group, I talk a lot about genetics. And occasionally they’ll say: ‘Are you making a transgenic bee, one of those Frankenbees?’”

Haefeker and his business partner, Arno Bruder, run their beekeeping enterprise on a field bordering two organic farms in Upper Bavaria. Their colonies have recovered somewhat since the neonics ban went into effect, he said, but they take steps to protect their hives. A lot of beekeepers pack their hives on to trailers and position them near nature reserves or in fields like the one in which we stood. “Over time you learn where you have the worst exposure to whatever it is that harms the bees,” Haefeker said.

He pulled out a frame to reveal a queen. Like an awkward commuter on the tube, she brushed up against every inhabitant near her as she made her way from one end of the frame to the other. The jostling has a purpose; it reassures the cavorting masses. “It’s the queen’s pheromones,” he explained. It makes them relaxed and productive. “The pheromones affect us beekeepers, too.” He says he plans to harness this anti-stress essence and build a kind of a bee-powered wellness centre on the two-hectare property. I pictured Munich’s pampered classes soaking up queen-bee pheromones in a lodge in the hills around Lake Starnberg. A moment later, Haefeker put the frame back, closed the lid, and surveyed his hives with satisfaction. He and Bruder then discussed what’s next.

Keeping bees safe from pesticides is labour-intensive and requires specialist local knowledge. Bruder agreed to wake before dawn the following morning and pack up some of the hives, load them on to a trailer and drive the bees to higher ground. They had decided on a region in the foothills of the Alps, about an hour away, near the Wieskirche, an 18th-century church on the Unesco world heritage list. There would be fresh dandelion flowers up there. The bees would be further away from intensive agriculture, said Haefeker. “We’ve scouted out the locations.”

Meanwhile, it is possible that humankind has even more extreme designs on bees. In October 2018, Haefeker sent me a message pointing to something called Insect Allies, a $45m research project sponsored by Darpa, the US Department of Defense’s military research department. It proposes using insects to carry immune-boosting mutations designed to protect crops from drought, flooding, pathogens and bioweapons. In essence, the visiting insects would modify the plant’s genetic makeup. A group of academics from universities in Germany and France declared the programme’s existence alarming, saying it turns the insects themselves into bioweapons.

Darpa does not say what kind of insects it plans to use, but Haefeker did not like the sound of it. “We need to keep an eye on this craziness,” his text read, “in case they want to use bees to transport their genetically modified viruses into crops.”

This article was originally published on October 16, 2018, by The Guardian, and is republished here with permission.

Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

“A Frankenstein material” is teeming with — and ultimately made by — photosynthetic microbes. And it can reproduce.

Wil Srubar, left, a structural engineer at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and materials science and engineering PhD student, Sarah Williams, holding bricks of building matter made from cyanobacteria and other materials.Credit…CU Boulder College of Engineering & Applied Science

By Amos Zeeberg  Jan. 15, 2020

 For centuries, builders have been making concrete roughly the same way: by mixing hard materials like sand with various binders, and hoping it stays fixed and rigid for a long time to come.

Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has created a rather different kind of concrete — one that is alive and can even reproduce.

Minerals in the new material are deposited not by chemistry but by cyanobacteria, a common class of microbes that capture energy through photosynthesis. The photosynthetic process absorbs carbon dioxide, in stark contrast to the production of regular concrete, which spews huge amounts of that greenhouse gas.

Photosynthetic bacteria also give the concrete another unusual feature: a green color. “It really does look like a Frankenstein material,” said Wil Srubar, a structural engineer and the head of the research project. (The green color fades as the material dries.)

Other researchers have worked on incorporating biology into concrete, especially concrete that can heal its own cracks. A major advantage of the new material, its creators say, is that instead of adding bacteria to regular concrete — an inhospitable environment — their process is oriented around bacteria: enlisting them to build the concrete, and keeping them alive so they make more later on.

The new concrete, described Wednesday in the journal Matter, “represents a new and exciting class of low-carbon, designer construction materials,” said Andrea Hamilton, a concrete expert at the University of Strathclyde, in Scotland.

To build the living concrete, the researchers first tried putting cyanobacteria in a mixture of warm water, sand and nutrients. The microbes eagerly absorbed light and began producing calcium carbonate, gradually cementing the sand particles together. But the process was slow — and Darpa, the Department of Defense’s speculative research arm and the project’s funder, wanted the construction to go very quickly. Necessity, happily, birthed invention.

An arch made from living building materials in Dr. Srubar’s lab.

An arch made from living building materials in Dr. Srubar’s lab.Credit…CU Boulder College of Engineering & Applied Science

Dr. Srubar had previously worked with gelatin, a food ingredient that, when dissolved in water and cooled, forms special bonds between its molecules. Importantly, it can be used at moderate temperatures that are gentle on bacteria. He suggested adding gelatin to strengthen the matrix being built by the cyanobacteria, and the team was intrigued.

The researchers bought Knox brand gelatin at a local supermarket and dissolved it in the solution with the bacteria. When they poured the mixture into molds and cooled it in a refrigerator, the gelatin formed its bonds — “just like when you make Jell-O,” Dr. Srubar said. The gelatin provided more structure, and worked with the bacteria to help the living concrete grow stronger and faster.

After about a day, the mixture formed concrete blocks in the shape of whatever molds the group used, including two-inch cubes, shoe box-size blocks and truss pieces with struts and cutouts. Individual two-inch cubes were strong enough for a person to stand on, although the material is weak compared to most conventional concretes. Blocks about the size of a shoe box showed potential for doing real construction.

“The first time we made a big structure using this system, we didn’t know if it was going to work, scaling up from this little-bitty thing to this big brick,” said Chelsea Heveran, a former postdoc with the group — now an engineer at Montana State University — and the lead author of the study. “We took it out of the mold and held it — it was a beautiful, bright green and said ‘Darpa’ on the side.” (The mold featured the name of the project’s funder.) “It was the first time we had the scale we were envisioning, and that was really exciting.”

When the group brought small samples to a regular review meeting with officials from Darpa, they were impressed, Dr. Srubar said: “Everyone wanted one on their desk.”

Stored in relatively dry air at room temperature, the blocks reach their maximum strength over the course of days, and the bacteria gradually begin to die out. But even after a few weeks, the blocks are still alive; when again exposed to high temperature and humidity, many of the bacterial cells perk back up.

The group can take one block, cut it with a diamond-tipped saw, place half back in a warm beaker with more raw materials, pour it in a mold, and begin concrete formation anew. Each block could thus spawn three new generations, yielding eight descendant blocks.

The Department of Defense is interested in using the reproductive ability of these “L.B.M.s” — living building materials — to aid construction in remote or austere environments. “Out in the desert, you don’t want to have to truck in lots of materials,” Dr. Srubar said.

The blocks also have the advantage of being made from a variety of common materials. Most concrete requires virgin sand that comes from rivers, lakes and oceans, which is running short worldwide, largely because of the enormous demand for concrete. The new living material is not so picky. “We’re not pigeonholed into using some particular kind of sand,” Dr. Srubar said. “We could use waste materials like ground glass or recycled concrete.”

The research team is working to make the material more practical by making the concrete stronger; increasing the bacteria’s resistance to dehydration; reconfiguring the materials so they can be flat-packed and easily assembled, like slabs of drywall; and finding a different kind of cyanobacteria that doesn’t require the addition of a gel.

Eventually, Dr. Srubar said, the tools of synthetic biology could dramatically expand the realm of possibilities: for instance, building materials that can detect and respond to toxic chemicals, or that light up to reveal structural damage. Living concrete might help in environments harsher than even the driest deserts: other planets, like Mars.

“There’s no way we’re going to carry building materials to space,” Dr. Srubar said. “We’ll bring biology with us.”

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf

July 31, 2014  Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures. His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors. You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle

November 2, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Carapace is a kinetic sculpture designed by Derek Hugger (previously) that mimics the motion of a sea

turtle gliding through the ocean. The wooden work is composed of over six hundred parts which allow the creature to elegantly tilt its fins, move its body up and down, and even crane its head as if rising above the water for air. A single crank controls the complex structure of gears and mechanisms which were designed to flow as organically as possible.

“A non-trivial amount of time was spent watching and studying videos of turtles swimming,” explains Hugger. “Getting the motions of Carapace to closely resemble the motions of real turtles was a true challenge. Countless hours were spent refining the sculpture’s motion to be as lifelike as possible, even before any mechanisms were developed to drive those motions.”

Hugger has also developed a hummingbird in addition to several abstract wood sculptures. You can see these works in action on his website and Youtube.

Carapace: an organic motion sculpture

Oct 27, 2018  Derek Hugger

Make your own! Woodworking plans are available at http://www.derekhugger.com/carapace.html Carapace is a wooden kinetic sculpture that simulates the motion of a sea turtle swimming. A complex series of mechanisms allows Carapace to swim up and down, tilt forward or back, and even lift its head up for a breath of air. As each mechanism is carefully linked to the next, each of Carapace’s flowing motions are driven by turning a single crank. For more videos and photos of Carapace, check out: https://www.facebook.com/derekhuggerk… The music is “Morning Mist” by Marika Takeuchi.

Category   Science & Technology

Urban Species: Kinetic Lifeforms Created by U-Ram Choe

July 15, 2013  Christopher Jobson

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URAM Choe: New Urban Species Exhibition

Mar 29, 2010  Frist Art Museum

U-Ram Choe: New Urban Species is on view at the Frist Center through May 16, 2010. Korean artist U-Ram Choes kinetic sculptures are made of delicately curved sections of wrought metal, joined together in movable parts that are driven by motors to expand, contract, or otherwise suggest the autonomic motions of such primitive life forms as plants and single-celled aquatic creatures. The intricate workmanship and graceful movements of these mechanical sculptures offer viewers an unparalleled visual delight.

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Kinetic Sculptor Puts Cyber Dreams In Motion

Nov 19, 2012  Creators

Through his prodigious understanding of robotics, U-ram Choe sees motion as a necessity in his work, creating moving, futuristic sculptures. For more information: http://thecreatorsproject.com/creator… The Creators Project is a partnership between Intel and VICE: http://thecreatorsproject.com/ ** Subscribe to The Creators Project: http://bit.ly/Subscribe_to_TheCreator… Check out our full video catalog: http://youtube.com/user/TheCreatorsPr… Facebook: http://fb.com/thecreatorsproject Twitter: http://twitter.com/creatorsproject Tumblr: http://thecreatorsproject.tumblr.com/

Category   Science & Technology

Korean artist U-Ram Choe lives and works in Seoul where he creates highly ornate kinetic that mimic forms and motions found in nature. Choe uses various metals, motors, gears, and custom CPU boards to control the precise motions of each sculpture that are at times perfectly synchronized and other times completely random. With names like “Unicus – cavum ad initium” and “Arbor Deus Pennatus” it’s clear the artist treats each new work like a brand new species.

The artworks are so complex each “organism” is shipped with a manual to show collectors and galleries how to maintain and fix various components. Choe tells the Creator’s Project in one of the videos above how some of the works in his studio live a complete lifecycle where they are at first born and put on display, but after time begin to degrade as certain parts stop working. Eventually he raids old artworks for parts and uses them to build new ones.

Watch the videos above to see a good sampling of his work both old and new, and he has a huge archive of videos for nearly 50 artworks over on Vimeo.

Animation Music   #music video #psychedelic

Slowly Rising: A Mesmerizing New Music Video by Hideki Inaba

November 3, 2015  Christopher Jobson

Directed and animated by Hideki Inaba, this dense and intensely beautiful music video was created for the track Slowly Rising, off the album Full Circle by BEATSOFREEN. The 3-minute animation features an unceasing barrage of seemingly infinite creatures, hybrids of flora and fauna, that swarm and multiply in space like schools of fish or flowers in a field. (via prosthetic knowledge)

Official music video for BEATSOFREEN ­” Slowly Rising”

directed by Hideki Inaba ?? ??
instagram.com/kanahebi1783/
twitter.com/kanahebi_1783
facebook.com/inabahideki1783
hide.tokyo

“Slowly Rising” suggested to me the image of the sun.

A seed was born beneath the sun, the source of all existence.
The seed absorbed the light. It created more seeds like itself, gradually increasing in number.

Time passed, but still their numbers slowly continued to rise,
and before long they were quietly swallowed up by their own shadows.

After everything that had lived had perished, nothing but an empty world remained.
There, once again, an environment where the next living things could grow silently began to spread.

Animation

Music Videos

Music

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PBS News, TED Talks, Scientific American, BBC Click, Thisiscolossal Great Big Story and Inspiration Grid

PBS News: Jan 12 – 8, 2020, What’s in the $1.4 trillion federal spending bill, This Paris program helps refugees tell their stories through art

TED Talks: Colette Pichon Battle climate change will displace millions here’s how we prepare? And Kelsey Leonard Why lakes and rivers should have the same rights as humans

Scientific American: To Stop Wildlife Crime, Conservationists Ask Why People Poach

BBC Click: Best Of 2019, Tim Peake Talks Life In Space

Thisiscolossal: A 17-Story Dragon Climbs Thailand’s Pink 80-Meter Buddhist Temple, Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac

Great Big Story: Ascend Thailand’s Temple of the Rising Dragon and Protecting Pangolins from Poachers in South Africa

Inspiration Grid: Surreal Digital Paintings by Cyril Rolando

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 12, 2020

Jan 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, January 12, the Trump administration defends a U.S. drone strike against Iran, House Democrats prepare to deliver impeachment articles this week, and the Latin Grammy-winning singer Concha Buika continues to defy genres with an eclectic mix of musical styles and languages. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 11, 2020

Jan 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 11, Iran says the downing of a Ukrainian passenger plane last week was “human error,” an influx of migrants attempting to head to the U.S. are stuck in limbo in Mexico amid shifting immigration policies, and neuroscientist Daniel Levitin explores how to age successfully. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Jan 10, 2020

Streamed live on Jan 10, 2020 

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 9, 2020

Jan 9, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the U.S. says it is likely that Iran shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane that crashed near Tehran early Wednesday. Plus: How Congress is attempting to limit President Trump’s power to respond to Iran with military action, high stakes in Taiwan’s upcoming election, Trump’s rollback of seminal environmental regulations, a successful Las Vegas labor union and Ronan Farrow. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS U.S., other governments say Iran likely downed civilian jet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqUGu… Can Congress effectively limit Trump’s war powers on Iran? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66eGV… News Wrap: UK’s House of Commons approves Jan. 31 for Brexit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WQSK… Taiwanese election resurfaces long-simmering China tensions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptq0i… Trump may roll back infrastructure environmental review law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DX0Mw… Are Nevada’s hospitality workers the future of labor unions? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bR-Je… Ronan Farrow’s Brief But Spectacular take on pursuing truth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PG_YZ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 8, 2020

Jan 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, after Iran strikes Iraqi air bases housing U.S. troops without incurring casualties, President Trump says the Islamic Republic is “standing down.” Plus: Reaction to the Iranian conflict from two members of Congress, Iran’s deadly plane crash, immense bushfire devastation in Australia and how the country’s government is responding and the promise of personalized medicine. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Both U.S. and Iran appear to want to de-escalate conflict https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JP_w… Gallagher: Iran will again use proxies for ‘dirty work’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ_2w… Crow: Trump hasn’t answered questions about Soleimani threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5u7Y… News Wrap: Puerto Rico reels from strong earthquake https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tY4u… Ukrainian plane crashes near Tehran, killing all 176 aboard https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIXgK… Australia’s catastrophic and relentless battle with bushfire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_StlM… How Australia is fighting fires while also mounting recovery  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OneHo… How trove of genetic data can yield individualized medicine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1BB2… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What’s in the $1.4 trillion federal spending bill

Jan 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Before leaving town for the holidays, lawmakers came together to pass a huge federal spending bill that illuminates the government’s policy priorities for 2020. The deal allocates a total of $1.4 trillion to the military, education, a barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border and much more. Lisa Desjardins joins Nick Schifrin to discuss where American tax dollars will be going this year. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Paris program helps refugees tell their stories through art

Jan 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

For years, refugees from the Middle East and Africa have sought shelter in Europe, igniting debates there about immigration, asylum and changing culture. But one Paris program has been using the lens of art to help some of these refugees find community in France — and to try to change the conversation around their plight. Jeffrey Brown reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 — a crisis of “climate migration” the world isn’t ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration — and caused it in the first place — and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Colette Pichon Battle · Climate justice and human rights lawyer

A Louisiana native with a deep connection to things that burrow in the mud, Colette Pichon Battle fights to advance human rights for communities on the frontline of the struggle against climate change.

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Join the Gulf Coast Center for Law and Policy mailing list.

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Learn more about the Gulf South for a Green New Deal policy platform.

Water is essential to life. Yet in the eyes of the law, it remains largely unprotected — leaving many communities without access to safe drinking water, says legal scholar Kelsey Leonard. In this powerful talk, she shows why granting lakes and rivers legal “personhood” — giving them the same legal rights as humans — is the first step to protecting our bodies of water and fundamentally transforming how we value this vital resource.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kelsey Leonard · Water protector

As a water scholar and protector, Kelsey Leonard seeks to establish Indigenous traditions of water conservation as the foundation for international water policy-making.

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Learn more about the Navajo Water Project and how you can support the work of Dig Deep to bring water and sanitation access to families across the Navajo Nation.

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Learn more about the efforts of Indigenous youth to promote Indigenous water governance by bringing together diverse Indigenous water initiatives, increasing access to knowledge, connections, information and approaches.

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Donate to Mother Earth Water Walkers and help foster healing for the water.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/to-stop-wildlife-crime-conservationists-ask-why-people-poach/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-01-10_top-stories&spMailingID=62528901&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1801330883&spReportId=MTgwMTMzMDg4MwS2

Scientific American: To Stop Wildlife Crime, Conservationists Ask Why People Poach

A novel study in Nepal shines light on why people commit wildlife crime and how others might be dissuaded from doing so in the future

By Rachel Nuwer on January 10, 2020

To Stop Wildlife Crime, Conservationists Ask Why People Poach

An Indian one-horned rhinoceroswalking in Chitwan National Park. Credit: Frank Bienewald Getty Images

Most people imprisoned in Nepal for wildlife crime share two things in common: they did not understand the seriousness of their offense, and they had little conception of how profoundly it would impact not only their lives but also the lives of their families. In interviews with more than 100 people convicted of illegally killing or trapping wildlife, researchers found some lost their businesses and land following their imprisonment. A dozen men’s wives left them. Many respondents’ children had to drop out of school, and family members of some took jobs in other countries to survive. One man’s daughter found herself unable to marry because of the stigma of his crime, and another said his mother committed suicide out of shame.

“People really underestimate the risk of getting arrested and all of the social harm that comes from that punishment,” says Kumar Paudel, who led the research and is co-founder and director of Greenhood Nepal, a science-driven nonprofit organization that focuses on the human dimensions of conservation. He is also a graduate student in conservation leadership at the University of Cambridge.

Paudel and his colleagues uncovered these gaps in awareness of the punishments for poaching as part of an effort to better understand the motivations of, and impacts on, the people who are arrested and prosecuted for wildlife crime. Such information is critical for designing effective deterrent strategies yet is often lacking, despite the hundreds of millions of dollars governments and nonprofits have poured into combatting the illegal wildlife trade worldwide.

The researchers also took their findings, published Friday in Conservation Science and Practice, a step further: they teamed up with a well-known local musician to create awareness-raising songs that share key messages from their study. They hope this effort will ultimately benefit both people and wildlife. “I don’t think scientists should wait for decision makers to come and read their paper,” Paudel says. “They should find ways to inform policy and undertake conservation interventions on the ground.”

Prakash Gandharva performing “Ban Ko Katha” at Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. Credit: Kumar Paudel

“Full Force” Crime Fighting

Nepal takes its antipoaching efforts very seriously, particularly for charismatic megafauna such as tigers and rhinoceroses, which receive the majority of global conservation funding and attention. Nearly 7,000 military personnel patrol the country’s protected areas, and wildlife-crime-related arrests increased more than eightfold between 2009 and 2014. Official data now report around 2,000 such arrests annually, and these efforts do seem to be helping. Nepal celebrated zero rhino poaching for the first time in 2011 and has repeated that achievement several times since. Yet the possible social harms of the nation’s militarized conservation approach have gone unexplored. “This is a country that’s going full force, but we don’t know who they’re going full force against,” says Jacob Phelps, an environmental social scientist at Lancaster University in England and senior author of the new study.

Paudel, who has worked in conservation in his native Nepal since 2010, wanted to tackle this question to help develop targeted, fairer ways to combat poaching. Starting in 2016, after securing special permission from the government, he visited seven prisons across the country. He persuaded 116 people who had poached primarily rhinos but also tigers, red pandas and other species to speak with him. Paudel says it helped that he came from a similar rural background as most of the interviewees, 99 percent of whom were men.

Their answers offer nuance to experts’ understanding of the problem. Most respondents were from poor backgrounds, but surprisingly, nearly 90 percent of them said they resorted to breaking the law to make some extra money—not to meet basic economic and nutritional needs. “A really popular narrative in conservation is that poor people poach, but this overlooks other motivations by just blaming poverty,” Paudel says. A lack of awareness also factored in the decision to do so, he found. More than 90 percent of the interviewees said they knew wildlife poaching and trade were illegal, but just 30 percent understood the steep penalties involved, such as the possibility of a five- to 15-year prison sentence. Nearly half of the respondents said their imprisonment had negatively impacted their families’ livelihood, their children’s education or both.

Communities near protected areas have been particularly affected. For example, more than 20 percent of inmates in one prison near Chitwan National Park were jailed for wildlife crime, compared with about 3 percent of Nepal’s total prison population. “That’s mind-boggling, especially if you consider that many people are from the same communities that were originally expropriated” from their land to make way for the park, Phelps says. “We’re hitting them twice. That’s a huge social cost.”

Basudev Dhungana, who lives near Chitwan and is former chair of the Mrigakunja Bufferzone User Committee (which works with communities to use park revenue for local development), says he has seen firsthand the impacts described in the study. He knows several people who have been arrested for poaching, most of them heads of families. “Their arrest affects the livelihood of the family and education of their children,” he says. “Further, it affects the family’s prestige and dignity in society, because they are seen as a family of poachers.”

According to Annette Hübschle, a criminologist at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, who was not involved in the Nepal research but has interviewed rhino poachers in South Africa and Mozambique, the study provides “important, novel perspectives” on the motivations, drivers and impacts of people who engage in wildlife crime in Nepal. Yet she would have liked to see a deeper analysis on whether historical injustices, land evictions and political marginalization motivated people to retaliate or seek to reclaim land perceived as unfairly taken from them. Hübschle also wonders whether offenders agree or disagree with antipoaching rules. In southern Africa, for example, some communities contest the illegality of poaching, pointing out that hunting was their right prior to colonization. In Nepal, she says, “future research might want to explore this in more detail.”

Maheshwar Dhakal, joint secretary of Nepal’s Ministry of Forests and Environment, also believes the findings are important for shining a light on the reasons why individuals in the nation poach. While enforcement is necessary to curtail “greedy people who would like to be rich overnight,” he says, education would go a long way toward stopping others who are simply unaware of the seriousness of wildlife crime.

Singing to Stop Poaching

Paudel and Phelps agree that education could make a crucial difference on the ground, and they both say they felt a responsibility to act on their findings. They launched a fellowship program between Greenhood Nepal and Lancaster University to provide more opportunities to young Nepalese conservationists. Paudel also initiated a collaboration with a musician from the Gandharva ethnic group, whose traveling troubadours are famous in Nepal for their sorrowful ballads, played on a stringed instrument called a sarangi. Paudel wrote five songs based on his interviews. In “Shameful Name,” for example, a farmer in prison for poaching recounts how greed led to the loss of his freedom and his family’s dignity and implores the listener not to make the same mistake.

The songs are now available online as music videos and are being played on the radio and performed live in communities across Nepal. Paudel says more than 1,000 people have already seen the performances, and some were moved to tears. “Music is one of the simplest ways to communicate,” he says. “Even illiterate people can understand our songs.”

Dhungana attended a performance and agrees people responded well to it. “We all love the sarangi music,” he says. “This is a simple and an innovative approach to make communities aware of wildlife conservation.” He wonders, though, whether his neighbors will actually retain the songs’ messages over the long term. What’s really needed, he says, is for the government to invest not only in conservation enforcement but also in education and employment opportunities for communities near national parks. “Local people should be empowered to take advantage of the potential for conservation tourism and nature-based enterprises,” Dhungana says. “I think people will poach less if they get significant benefits from conservation.”

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Rachel Nuwer

Rachel Nuwer is a freelance journalist and author of Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking (Da Capo Press, 2018). She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Credit: Nick Higgins

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The Samphran district of Thailand holds one of the most unique Buddhist temples found in the country.  The bright pink temple, called Wat Samphran, stands 17-stories high and is wrapped in a scaly green dragon. The design of the structure came to the founder of the temple during a 7-day fasting meditation, and is built 80 meters tall to honor the number of years that Buddha lived.

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In the Samphran district of Thailand sits one of the country’s most spectacular Buddhist temples. Wat Samphran is a towering pink masterpiece scaling in at 80 meters high — an homage to the number of years Buddha lived. Known for the hollow dragon’s head that encircles the temple, visitors are welcome to ascend the 17-story superstructure to touch the dragon’s beard, or climb inside the belly of the beast. SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/vR6Acb This story is a part of our Planet Earth series. From mammals to insects and birds to reptiles, we share this great big world with all manner of creatures, large and small. Come with us to faraway places as we explore our great big planet and meet some of its wildest inhabitants. Got a story idea for us? Shoot us an email at hey [at] GreatBigStory [dot] com Follow us behind the scenes on Instagram: https://goo.gl/2KABeX Make our acquaintance on Facebook: https://goo.gl/Vn0XIZ Give us a shout on Twitter: https://goo.gl/sY1GLY Come hang with us on Vimeo: https://goo.gl/T0OzjV Visit our world directly: https://www.greatbigstory.com

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Art director Jonathan Bréchignac of Paris-based design studio Joe & Nathan has been working on a series of drawn carpets using ballpoint Bic pens. The first four drawings were completed last year and were made to approximate the size of Muslim prayer carpets. Bréchignac says the various designs and patterns found in each piece were inspired by an amalgam of artistic forms and influences:

Painstakingly detailed, it explores different ways and patterns to create a unique whole with only a simple tool: the “Less is more” precept. The inspiration comes from different types of art (French roman, traditional Japanese, native American and Mexican) and also military camouflage and animal patterns. Together they create a mix of civilizations and religions bringing forth a new meaning to them.

A newer carpet, aptly titled Ultraviolet, was recently completed and will be on view at the Boghossian Foundation in Brussels through 2014. (via Juxtapoz, Yatzer)

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Stronger Than Steel, Able to Stop a Speeding Bullet—It’s Super Wood!

Simple processes can make wood tough, impact-resistant—or even transparent.

Scientific American | Sid Perkins

Abstract background like slice of wood timber natural. Tree ring.

New techniques for “densifying” wood can turn the ubiquitous substance into a super-material suitable for constructing buildings and body armor. Photo by mack2happy / Getty Images

Some varieties of wood, such as oak and maple, are renowned for their strength. But scientists say a simple and inexpensive new process can transform any type of wood into a material stronger than steel, and even some high-tech titanium alloys. Besides taking a star turn in buildings and vehicles, the substance could even be used to make bullet-resistant armor plates.

Wood is abundant and relatively low-cost—it literally grows on trees. And although it has been used for millennia to build everything from furniture to homes and larger structures, untreated wood is rarely as strong as metals used in construction. Researchers have long tried to enhance its strength, especially by compressing and “densifying” it, says Liangbing Hu, a materials scientist at the University of Maryland, College Park. But densified wood tends to weaken and spring back toward its original size and shape, especially in humid conditions.

Now, Hu and his colleagues say they have come up with a better way to densify wood, which they report in Nature. Their simple, two-step process starts with boiling wood in a solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium sulfite (Na2SO3), a chemical treatment similar to the first step in creating the wood pulp used to make paper. This partially removes lignin and hemicellulose (natural polymers that help stiffen a plant’s cell walls)—but it largely leaves the wood’s cellulose (another natural polymer) intact, Hu says.

The second step is almost as simple as the first: Compressing the treated wood until its cell walls collapse, then maintaining that compression as it is gently heated. The pressure and heat encourage the formation of chemical bonds between large numbers of hydrogen atoms and neighboring atoms in adjacent nanofibers of cellulose, greatly strengthening the material.

The results are impressive. The team’s compressed wood is three times as dense as the untreated substance, Hu says, adding that its resistance to being ripped apart is increased more than 10-fold. It also can become about 50 times more resistant to compression and almost 20 times as stiff. The densified wood is also substantially harder, more scratch-resistant and more impact-resistant. It can be molded into almost any shape. Perhaps most importantly, the densified wood is also moisture-resistant: In lab tests, compressed samples exposed to extreme humidity for more than five days swelled less than 10 percent—and in subsequent tests, Hu says, a simple coat of paint eliminated that swelling entirely.

A five-layer, plywoodlike sandwich of densified wood stopped simulated bullets fired into the material—a result Hu and his colleagues suggest could lead to low-cost armor. The material does not protect quite as well as a Kevlar sheet of the same thickness—but it only costs about 5 percent as much, he notes.

The team’s results “appear to open the door to a new class of lightweight materials,” says Ping Liu, a materials chemist at the University of California, San Diego, unaffiliated with the Nature study. Vehicle manufacturers have often tried to save weight by switching from regular steel to high-strength steel, aluminum alloys or carbon-fiber composites—but those materials are costly, and consumers “rarely make that money back in fuel savings,” Liu says. And densified wood has another leg up on carbon-fiber composites: It does not require expensive adhesives that also can make components difficult, if not impossible, to recycle.

Densified wood provides new design possibilities and uses for which natural wood is too weak, says Peter Fratzl, a materials scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Germany who did not take part in the study. “Instead of creating a design for the material at hand, researchers can create a material to suit the design they want,” he says, alluding to a familiar process among aerospace engineers who have a long history of developing ever-stronger alloys to meet their needs.

One possible obstacle to the widespread use of densified wood will be engineers’ ability to scale up and accelerate the process, Liu notes. Hu and his team spent several hours making each coffee-table book–size slab of densified wood used for testing. But there are no practical reasons the process could not be sped up or used to make larger components, Hu contends.

Although Hu and his team have sought to enhance wood’s strength, other researchers have pursued more unusual goals—such as making it transparent. One team, led by materials scientist Lars Berglund at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, has come up with a way to make windowpanes of wood. The first step in that process (as in Hu’s) is to remove lignin, a substance that not only stiffens wood but also creates its brownish color. The researchers infuse the lignin-free wood with a polymer called methyl methacrylate (MMA), a material better known by trade names such as Plexiglas and Lucite.

Because MMA’s index of refraction (a measure of how much it bends light) matches that of the lignin-free wood, rays of light pass right through the MMA-infused composite instead of getting bounced around inside empty cells. This renders the material remarkably clear. Berglund and his team described their feat two years ago in Biomacromolecules. Coincidentally, at the same time Hu and his colleagues were also developing a method for rendering wood transparent.

Research like Hu’s and Berglund’s can only add to the wild prospects for the future of materials science. Someday soon it might be possible to live in a home made almost completely from one of Earth’s most abundant and versatile building materials—from floors to rafters, walls to windows. In the garage there may be a car whose chassis and bumpers could be composed of densified wood rather than steel and plastic—knock on wood.

Sid Perkins, who writes most often about Earth and planetary sciences, materials science and paleontology, is based in Crossville, Tenn.

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This article was originally published on February 7, 2018, by Scientific American, and is republished here with permission

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E-cigarettes and vapes have exploded in popularity in the last decade, especially among youth and young adults — from 2011 to 2015, e-cigarette use among high school students in the US increased by 900 percent. Biobehavioral scientist Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin explains what you’re actually inhaling when you vape (hint: it’s definitely not water vapor) and explores the disturbing marketing tactics being used to target kids. “Our health, the health of our children and our future generations is far too valuable to let it go up in smoke — or even in aerosol,” she says.

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Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin · Biobehavioral scientist

Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin is focused on developing a bio-behavioral understanding of substance use behaviors in adult and adolescent substance users.

TEDMED 2018 | November 2018

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When you eat something loaded with sugar, your taste buds, your gut and your brain all take notice. This activation of your reward system is not unlike how bodies process addictive substances such as alcohol or nicotine — an overload of sugar spikes dopamine levels and leaves you craving more. Nicole Avena explains why sweets and treats should be enjoyed in moderation. [Directed by STK Films, narrated by Michelle Snow, music by Michael Dow].

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Nobel Peace laureate Jody Williams brings tough love to the dream of world peace, with her razor-sharp take on what “peace” really means, and a set of profound stories that zero in on the creative struggle — and sacrifice — of those who work for it.

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Jody Williams · Nobel peace laureate

Jody Williams won a Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts to eradicate landmines. Now she’s teaming up with five other female peace laureates to empower women to fight violence, injustice and inequality.

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Time to break the silence: Nobel Laureates to Aung San Suu Kyi

September 11, 2017

© 2016 Reuters- Taken from The Independent

OPEN LETTER TO AUNG SAN SUU KYI: STOP THE PERSECUTION OF ROHINGYAS

Dear State Counsellor and sister Laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,

In the years leading to your final release in 2010, your struggle for democracy was ours. Your defiant activism and unimaginable sacrifices profoundly inspired us, and like the rest of the world, we held you as a beacon of hope for Burma and for our human family. Along with other fellow laureates, we worked tirelessly and diligently for your personal freedom.

It is thus with deep shock, sadness and alarm that we witness your indifference to the cruelty inflicted upon the Rohingya minority today. Nearly 270,000 people have sought refuge into neighbouring Bangladesh these past two weeks, and a recent UN report has highlighted an all too familiar story: extrajudicial executions; enforced disappearance and arbitrary detention; rape, including gang rape, and other forms of sexual violence. Arson attacks are being launched on civilians and entire villages burnt, leading to what the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights calls “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing”. This is an assault on our humanity as a whole.

As Nobel Laureates working under the banner of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, we have supported the groundbreaking work and courage of women activists inside and along the borders of Burma for a decade. Their tireless activism consistently highlights abuses committed by the Burmese military. Just last November the Women’s League of Burma denounced the ferocious militarism that plagues Burma: “[…] we are gravely concerned for the security of women in conflict areas. It is urgently needed for the government to end impunity for state-sponsored sexual violence, and bring the military under civilian control”.

As a fellow Nobel Laureate, a worldwide icon for the universal freedom and human rights, and now State Counsellor and de-facto Prime Minister of Burma, you have a personal and moral responsibility to uphold and defend the rights of your citizens.

How many Rohingya have to die; how many Rohingya women will be raped; how many communities will be razed before you raise your voice in defense of those who have no voice?  Your silence is not in line with the vision of “democracy” for your country that you outlined to us, and for which we all supported you over the years.

As women committed to peace, as your sisters and fellow Laureates, we urge you to take a firm stand on this unfolding crisis: recognize Rohingyas as citizens with full rights and take all expedited measures possible to end the persecution of innocent civilians by the Myanmar authorities.

In the words of fellow Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu: “If the political price of your ascension to the highest office in Myanmar is your silence, the price is surely too steep.” The time is now for you to stand for the rights of Rohingya people, with the same vigour and conviction so many around the world stood for yours.

Sincerely,

Mairead Maguire, Nobel Peace Laureate, (1976) – Northern Ireland

Jody Williams, Nobel Peace Laureate (1997) – United States

Shirin Ebadi, Nobel Peace Laureate (2003) – Iran

Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace Laureate (2011) – Liberia

Tawakkol Karman, Nobel Peace Laureate (2011) – Yemen

Nobel Women’s Initiative Statement on the persecution of Rohingya women

March 21, 2019

Photo by Fabeha Monir.

International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
March 21, 2019 – Parliament Hill, Ottawa

In March 2018, Nobel Women’s Initiative conducted a fact-finding delegation in partnership with Bangladeshi organizations, and met with over 100 Rohingya women in two refugee camps, in Kutapalong and Thyankhali. Sexual violence is one of the largest atrocities committed in Myanmar, and we were able to witness, firsthand, how women are systematically targeted by the Myanmar military.

The vast majority of women who testified to the delegation were rape survivors. They provided first-hand accounts of the high-levels of violence they endured. An alarming majority of these women identified their perpetrators as members of the Myanmar Army. They were raped openly, in broad daylight by men in military apparel, often in public or just outside their home.

One of our partners Razia Sultana, a lawyer and researcher with the Kaladan Press —a Rohingya press network— has documented over 300 cases of women and girls raped in August 2017 alone. This only represents a fraction of the total number raped at this time.

Women have been detained, tortured, mutilated and killed in military camps, with the clear authorization of camp commanders. Rape, as we know, is a common tool for genocide, and in Myanmar the mutilation of women’s bodies, breasts and genitals was deliberately aimed to destroy the very means of reproduction of the Rohingya.

In 2018, the UN Fact-Finding mission on Myanmar, interviewed over 800 rape survivors and concluded there was a ‘very clear chain of command’ within the Myanmar Army. It called for the country’s military leaders to be investigated and prosecuted for ‘genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.’

The Myanmar Army’s latest atrocities against the Rohingya are not new, and must not be seen in isolation. Nobel Women’s Initiative has worked with multiple ethnic women’s groups in Burma over the past ten years who have been documenting these patterns for decades.

These latest atrocities are a continuation of a decades-long policy to divide-and-rule, occupy and control the ethnic territories, and seize their rich natural resources and land. In fact, Myanmar has recently passed amendments to the VFV law, making it easier for villagers’ lands to be confiscated.

To this date, the Myanmar Army continues to harass and torture Rohingya villagers inside Rakhine State, and continues to launch attacks and commit war crimes– including sexual violence, in Northern and Eastern Myanmar, with impunity.

As the only country to have formally recognized the Rohingya genocide, Canada is in a unique position to lead the international community towards justice and meaningful support for Rohingya women.

We call on the Canadian Government to:

  1. Increase humanitarian assistance to women refugee survivors in Bangladesh through local women’s organizations who have been responding to their needs, and are best equipped to continue doing so;
  1. Stop ‘business as usual’ with Myanmar. Canada should suspend all investments and direct aid, and redirect support to local civil society and women’s groups who are the real agents of change;
  1. Use all avenues available under international law to bring both individual perpetrators of the Rohingya genocide, and the State of Myanmar, to justice.

Why is a Nobel-winning human rights activist defending Myanmar on Rohingya atrocities?

Dec 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

In 2017, the Myanmar military unleashed a reign of terror on Rohingya Muslims. According to the U.N., soldiers tortured, raped and killed civilians, driving hundreds of thousands to flee to neighboring Bangladesh. Now the International Court of Justice is trying Myanmar for genocide — as a human rights advocate defends its actions. Nick Schifrin talks to John Dale of George Mason University. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

https://nobelwomensinitiative.org/laureate/

Meet The Laureates

Mairead Maguire

Northern Ireland, 1976

After three of her sister’s children were killed during the violence between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland, Mairead Maguire organized massive demonstrations and other action calling for a nonviolent end to the conflict. Along with Betty Williams, she is the co-founder of Peace People, and together the two women won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1976. She has spent her life since then to bearing witness to oppression and standing in solidarity with people living in conflict, including most in Syria.

Together, they co-founded the Peace People, a movement committed to building a just and peaceful society in Northern Ireland. They organized each week, for six months, peace rallies throughout Ireland and the UK. These were attended by many thousands of people – mostly women, and during this time there was a 70% decrease in the rate of violence. Mairead currently serves as Honorary President.

Since receiving the award, Mairead has dedicated her life to promoting peace, both in Northern Ireland and around the world. Working with community groups throughout Northern Ireland, political and church leaders, she has sought to promote dialogue, nonviolence and equality between deeply divided communities.

A graduate from Irish School of Ecumenics, Maguire works with inter-church and interfaith organizations and is a councilor with the International Peace Council. She is a Patron of the Methodist Theological College, and Northern Ireland Council for Integrated Education. She is also the author of  The Vision of Peace: Faith and Hope in Northern Ireland.

“If we want to reap the harvest of peace and justice in the future, we will have to sow the seeds of nonviolence, here and now, in the present.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Rigoberta Menchú Tum

Guatemala, 1992

Rigoberta Menchú Tum is a Mayan k’iche’ activist born in 1959 in Chimel, a small Mayan community in the highlands of Guatemala. As a young girl, Rigoberta traveled alongside her father, Vincente Menchú, from community to community teaching rural campesinos their rights and encouraging them to organize.

In 1960, ethnic and socioeconomic tensions engrained since colonization spurred a brutal civil war against the Mayan people. The military dictatorship, under the leadership of Efraín Ríos Montt, and rich landowners initiated the bloodshed. By the time a peace agreement was signed in 1996, 450 Mayan villages were destroyed, over 200,000 Guatemalans murdered and 1 million were displaced.

Rigoberta and her family mobilized Guatemalans during the war to denounce government-led mass atrocities. Their activism came at a great cost. At a peaceful protest held at the Spanish Embassy in Guatemala City in 1980, Rigoberta’s father and thirty-seven other campesino activists were murdered in a fire. Not long after, the Guatemalan army tortured and murdered Rigoberta’s brother and mother. At age 21, Rigoberta fled into exile.

Rigoberta spoke publicly about the plight of the Mayan people in Guatemala while in exile. In 1983 she published I, Rigoberta Menchú and catapulted the civil war into global headlines. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1992 in recognition of her work for social justice and ethno-cultural reconciliation based on respect for the rights of indigenous peoples. After receiving the prize Rigoberta returned to Guatemala and established the Rigoberta Menchú Tum Foundation (FRMT) to support Mayan communities and survivors of the genocide as they seek justice. Rigoberta and the Foundation have been key in advocating for justice in several high profile cases in Guatemala, including the trial against former dictator Efrain Ríos Montt in May 2013, the Spanish Embassy massacre in January 2015, and the case of 14 survivors of sexual violence in Sepur Zarco in February 2016.

Rigoberta ran for President of Guatemala in 2007 and 2011 under the banner of WINAQ, the first indigenous-led political party founded by herself. In 2013 the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM) appointed her as a Special Investigator within its Multicultural Nation Program. She continues to seek justice for all Mayan people impacted by the genocide.

“Only together can we move forward, so that there is light and hope for all women on the planet.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Jody Williams

USA, 1997

Jody Williams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for her work to ban landmines through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which shared the Peace Prize with her that year. At that time, she became the 10th woman – and third American woman – in its almost 100-year history to receive the Prize.  Since her protests of the Vietnam War, she has been a life-long advocate of freedom, self-determination and human and civil rights.

Like others who have seen the ravages of war, she is an outspoken peace activist who struggles to reclaim the real meaning of peace – a concept which goes far beyond the absence of armed conflict and is defined by human security, not national security. Williams believes that working for peace is not for the faint of heart.  It requires dogged persistence and a commitment to sustainable peace, built on environmental justice and meeting the basic needs of the majority of people on our planet.

Since January of 2006, Jody Williams has worked toward those ends through the Nobel Women’s Initiative, which she chairs.  Along with sister Nobel Laureate Dr. Shirin Ebadi of Iran, she took the lead in establishing the Nobel Women’s Initiative.  They were joined at that time by sister Nobel Laureates Wangari Maathai (Kenya), Rigoberta Menchú Tum (Guatemala) and Betty Williams and Mairead Maguire (Northern Ireland). The Initiative uses the prestige of the Nobel Peace Prize and the influence and access of the women Nobel Laureates themselves to support and amplify the efforts of women around the world working for sustainable peace with justice and equality.

Since 1998, Williams has also served as a Campaign Ambassador for the International Campaign to Ban Landmines.  Beginning in early 1992 with two non-governmental organizations and a staff of one – Jody Williams, she oversaw the Campaign’s growth to over 1,300 organizations in 95 countries working to eliminate antipersonnel landmines. In an unprecedented cooperative effort with governments, UN bodies and the International Committee of the Red Cross, she served as a chief strategist and spokesperson for the ICBL as it dramatically achieved its goal of an international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines during a diplomatic conference held in Oslo in September 1997.

Williams continues to be recognized for her contributions to human rights and global security. She is the recipient of fifteen honorary degrees, among other recognitions. In 2004, Williams was named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most powerful women in the world in the publication of its first such annual list.

She holds the Sam and Cele Keeper Endowed Professorship in Peace and Social Justice at the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston where she has been teaching since 2003.  In academic year 2012-2013, she became the inaugural Jane Addams Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Social Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Her memoir on life as a grassroots activist, My Name is Jody Williams:  A Vermont Girl’s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize was released by the University of California Press in early 2013.

“We must teach ourselves to believe that peace is not a ‘utopian vision’, but a responsibility that must be worked for each and every day.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Shirin Ebadi

Iran, 2003

7

Shirin Ebadi, J.D., was awarded the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts to promote human rights, in particular, the rights of women, children, and political prisoners in Iran. She is the first Muslim woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, and only the fifth Muslim to receive a Nobel Prize in any field.

Dr. Ebadi was one of the first female judges in Iran. She served as president of the city court of Tehran from 1975 to 1979 and was the first Iranian woman to achieve Chief Justice status. She, along with other women judges, was dismissed from that position after the Islamic Revolution in February 1979. She was made a clerk in the court she had once presided over, until she petitioned for early retirement. After obtaining her lawyer’s license in 1992, Dr. Ebadi set up private practice. As a lawyer, Dr. Ebadi has taken on many controversial cases defending political dissidents and as a result has been arrested numerous times.

In addition to being an internationally-recognized advocate of human rights, she has also established many non-governmental organizations in Iran, including the Million Signatures Campaign, a campaign demanding an end to legal discrimination against women in Iranian law. Dr. Ebadi is also a university professor and often students from outside Iran take part in her human rights training courses. She has published over 70 articles and 13 books dedicated to various aspects of human rights, some of which have been published by UNICEF.  In 2004, she was named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 100 most powerful women in the world.

In January 2006, along with sister Laureate Jody Williams, Dr. Ebadi took the lead in establishing the Nobel Women’s Initiative.

“Human rights is a universal standard. It is a component of every religion and every civilization.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Leymah Gbowee

Liberia, 2011

Leymah Gbowee received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 for her work in leading a women’s peace movement that brought an end to the Second Liberian Civil War in 2003. Gbowee shared the prize with fellow Liberian Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Yemen-native Tawakkol Karman. Gbowee and Sirleaf became the second and third African women to win the prize, preceded by the late Wangari Maathai of Kenya.

Leymah is the founder and president of Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa based in Liberia. Her foundation provides educational and leadership opportunities to girls, women and youth in West Africa.

Leymah was born in central Liberia in 1972. She was living with her parents and sisters in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia, when the First Liberian Civil War erupted. She recalls clearly the day the first Liberian civil war came to her doorstep. “All of a sudden one July morning I wake up at 17, going to the university to fulfill my dream of becoming a medical doctor, and fighting erupted.”

Witnessing the effects of war on Liberians, she decided to train as a trauma counsellor to treat former child soldiers.

A second civil war broke out in 1999 and brought systematic rape and brutality to an already war-weary Liberia. Responding to the conflict, Leymah mobilized an interreligious coalition of Christian and Muslim women and organized the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace movement.  Through Leymah’s leadership, thousands of women staged pray-ins and nonviolent protests demanding reconciliation and the resuscitation of high-level peace talks. The pressure pushed President Charles Taylor into exile, and smoothed the path for the election of Africa’s first female head of state, fellow 2011 Nobel Laureate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. Documenting these efforts in the Tribeca Film Festival 2008 Best Documentary winner Pray the Devil Back to Hell, Leymah demonstrated the power of social cohesion and relationship-building in the face of political unrest and social turmoil.

In 2007, Leymah earned a Master’s degree in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University in the United States. Meanwhile, she continued to build women’s agency in fighting for sustainable peace.  She is a founding member and former coordinator for Women in Peacebuilding/West African Network for Peacebuilding (WIPNET/WANEP). She also co-founded the Women Peace and Security Network Africa (WIPSEN-Africa) to promote cross-national peace-building efforts and transform women’s participation as victims in the crucible of war to mobilized armies for peace.

Ever-focused on sustaining peace, Leymah continued working on behalf of grassroots efforts in her leadership positions. She served as a member of both the African Feminist Forum and the African Women’s Leadership Network on Sexual and Reproductive Rights, and as a commissioner-designate for the Liberia Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  Through these positions, Leymah addressed the particular vulnerability of women and children in war-torn societies.

In her current position as President of Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa, Leymah pushes for greater inclusion of women as leaders and agents of change in Africa.

Since winning the Nobel Peace Prize, Leymah travels internationally to speak about the pernicious and devastating effects of war and gender-based violence. She has been featured on a number of international television programmes including CNN, BBC and France24, and speaks internationally advocating for women’s high level inclusion in conflict-resolution. She has received several honorary degrees from universities, and is a Global Ambassador for Oxfam.

She serves on the Board of Directors of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, Gbowee Peace Foundation and the PeaceJam Foundation, and she is a member of the African Women Leaders Network for Reproductive Health and Family Planning. She has received honorary degrees from Rhodes University in South Africa, the University of Alberta in Canada, Polytechnic University in Mozambique, and University of Dundee in Scotland. After receiving the Barnard College Medal of Distinction in 2013, she was named a Distinguished Fellow in Social Justice. Leymah is the proud mother of six children.

When asked how she first found the courage to become a peace activist, Leymah explained: “When you’ve lived true fear for so long, you have nothing to be afraid of. I tell people I was 17 when the war started in Liberia. I was 31 when we started protesting.  I have taken enough dosage of fear that I have gotten immune to fear.”

“It is time to stand up, sisters, and do some of the most unthinkable things. We have the power to turn our upsidedown world right.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Tawakkol Karman

Yemen, 2011

Tawakkol Karman was known as “The Mother of the Revolution” and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 in recognition of her work in nonviolent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peacebuilding work in Yemen. Upon being awarded the prize, Tawakkol became the first Yemeni, the first Arab woman, and the second Muslim woman to win a Nobel Peace Prize, as well as the youngest Nobel Peace Laureate at the time, at the age of 32.

Karman is a mother of three as well as a human rights activist, journalist, and politician.

Tawakkol was born in 1979 in Taiz, Yemen’s third largest city. She studied an undergraduate degree in Commerce from the University of Science and Technology in Sana’a before completing a graduate degree in Political Science from the University of Sana’a.

Growing up in a politically tumultuous country, Tawakkol witnessed the unification of North and South Yemen in 1990, followed by a civil war between the two factions in 1994 in which the North triumphed over the South. The civil war led to dissidence in the South as the repressive Northern government assumed control over the country.

A journalist by profession and human rights activist by nature, Tawakkol responded to the political instability and human rights abuses in Yemen by mobilizing others and reporting on injustices. In 2005, she founded the organization Women Journalists Without Chains, (WJWC) which advocates for rights and freedoms and provides media skills to journalists. In addition, the organization produces regular reports on human rights abuses in Yemen, documenting more than 50 cases of attacks and unfair sentences against newspapers and writers to date.

In 2007, Tawakkol began organizing weekly protests in Yemen’s capitol, Sana’a, targeting systemic government repression and calling for inquiries into corruption and other forms of social and legal injustice. Tawakkol’s weekly protests continued until 2011, when she redirected protesters to support the Arab Spring. Tawakkol even brought Yemen’s revolution to New York speaking directly with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon and organizing rallies at the UN headquarters.

Bold and outspoken, Tawakkol has been imprisoned on a number of occasions for her pro-democracy, pro-human rights protests. Amongst Yemen’s opposition movement, she is known as “mother of the revolution” and “the iron woman.”

Since receiving the award, Tawakkol has continued to support female journalists and rally Yemenis against government corruption and injustice. Fiercely committed to change, Tawakkol spends the majority of her time in a tent in Change Square, where she continues her peaceful protests for justice and freedom.

“You have to be strong; you have to trust yourself that you can build a new country. You have to know that you have the ability to achieve your dream.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Wangari Maathai

Founding Member – Kenya, 2004

Dr. Wangari Muta Maathai was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 for her actions to promote sustainable development, democracy and peace and was the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.  She passed away in September of 2011.

The first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree, Professor Maathai was an active member of the National Council of Women of Kenya from 1976 to 1987 and served as its chairman from 1981 to 1987. In 1976 she introduced the idea of community-based tree planting. She continued to develop this idea into a broad-based grassroots organization whose main focus is poverty reduction and environmental conservation through tree planting. The organization eventually became known as the Green Belt Movement (GBM), and to-date has assisted women in planting more than 40 million trees on community lands including farms, schools and church compounds.

In December 2002, Professor Maathai was elected to Kenya’s parliament with an overwhelming 98 percent of the vote. Until 2007, she represented the Tetu constituency, Nyeri district in central Kenya (her home region). From 2003 to 2007 Professor Maathai served as Assistant Minister for Environment and Natural Resourcesin Kenya’s ninth parliament.In September 1998, Professor Maathai launched and become co-chair of the Jubilee 2000 Africa Campaign, which advocates for canceling the debts of poor African countries. Her campaign against land grabbing (illegal appropriation of public lands by developers) and the rapacious re-allocation of forest land received much attention in Kenya and the region.

In June of 2008 the Congo Basin Forest Fund was launched. The fund protects the forests of the Congo Basin by supporting projects that make the forest worth more as a living resource, than it would be cut down.  Professor Maathai acted as co-chair and goodwill ambassador for the initiative.

Professor Maathai addressed the United Nations on several occasions and spoke on behalf of women at special sessions of the General Assembly for the five-year review of the 1992 Earth Summit. In March 2005, she was elected as the first president of the African Union’s Economic, Social and Cultural Council.

She authored four books; an autobiography, Unbowed, and an explanation of her organizational method, The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the Approach and the ExperienceThe Challenge for Africa and Replenishing the Earth were both released in 2010.

“It’s the little things citizens do. That’s what will make the difference. My little thing is planting trees.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Betty Williams

Founding Member – Ireland, 1976

“The Nobel Peace Prize is not awarded for what one has done, but hopefully what one will do.” These are the words of Betty Williams, who in 1976 along with Mairead Maguire, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work to end the sectarian violence in her native Northern Ireland.

Williams was one of the six founding members of the Nobel Women’s Initiative in 2006. She currently heads the World Centers of Compassion for Children International, which was founded in 1997 in honour of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The organization is headquartered in the Republic of Ireland, and is building the first City of Compassion for children in the Basilicata Region of southern Italy. Williams left the Nobel Women’s Initiative in 2011 in order to devote more time to her work there.

“Compassion is more important than intellect in calling forth the love that the work of peace needs, and intuition can often be a far more powerful searchlight than cold reason.”

For more information please visit the following link:

For more information please visit the following link:

https://nobelwomensinitiative.org/laureate/

TOPSHOT – EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content / A wounded Syrian girl awaits rescue from under the rubble next to the body of her sister (hands seen-R) who did not survive regime bombardment in Khan Sheikhun in the southern countryside of the rebel-held Idlib province, on February 26, 2019. – Regime bombardment near Khan Sheikhun, in Idlib province, killed two civilians on Tuesday, raising the civilian death toll to 42 since February 9, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. (Photo by Anas AL-DYAB / AFP) (Photo by ANAS AL-DYAB/AFP via Getty Images)

A wounded Syrian girl awaits rescue from under the rubble next to the body of her sister (hands visible at right), who did not survive a regime bombardment in Khan Sheikhun in the southern countryside of the rebel-held Idlib province, on February 26, 2019. Five months after this photo, the Syrian photographer who took it, Anas Al-Dyab, was killed in an air strike in Khan Sheikhun. Al-Dyab was also a member of the “White Helmets,” a group of volunteers carrying out search-and-rescue efforts in Syria.

Anas Al-Dyab / AFP / Getty

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2019/12/top-25-news-photos-2019/602848/

GoldenSwallowtailButterfly (8:15 minutes)

Aug 24, 2013  naahblubiv (Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts)

To All Syrians from the Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Beautiful Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Summersaults in the sky

Drinking sweet nectar

For the beautiful wings to fly

The golden wings span out

Showing the black accented lines

A highlight for your beautiful wings

Two perfect tails you have

But a broken wing

Knowing how far you came from

Do you pass by Syria lately?

No! No one cultivates the gardens

They are busy fighting with each other

No trees, no plants

No flowers giving me the nectar to drink

They are running away

From their homes and their land

One million children are refugees now

What are you doing Syrian people?

Everybody stops fighting

Please come!

Plant your trees for butterflies and bees

Show your children how nice butterflies can be

They help to fertilize your plants

Producing fruits for your children to enjoy

Syrian people you have a long culture

Your arts and your country are beautiful

Do not ruin your ancestors’ good reputation

Preserve your culture for your children to grow

Show your children your fruitful gardens

And the beautiful Golden Butterfly will visit you

The butterfly says,

You will see no tears

No fear on your children faces

But the sound of your children’s laughter

The joy of seeing my beautiful wings

Everybody stops using weapons

Please come!

To enjoy your tasty food

Your dance, your music, your arts

And your ancient civilization

We want to visit you

Show us how civilized Syrian Society can be

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, August 23, 2013, 9:45 pm

The Golden Swallowtail Butterfly was captured by me on Saturday, August 17, 2013 at our backyard garden in downtown Newark, New Jersey. I would like to dedicate this video to all the children in Syria.

Please visit

 for more pictures and information

Category Education

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PBS News, BBC Click, TED Talks, Elian Silverman and Scientific American

PBS News: November 22-25,2019, How these 2 economists are using randomized trials to solve global poverty, Is the distinction between migrant and refugee meaningful?, and Winslow Homer’s long love affair with the sea,

BBC Click: What’s The Impact Of 5G?

TED Talks: Daniel Bogre Udell How to save a language from extinction?, Jimmy Nelson Gorgeous portraits of the world’s vanishing people,

Elian Silverman: Photo gallery: Stunning images of indigenous peoples in their traditional splendor

Scientific American: Can Scientists Predict Fire Tornadoes?  

PBS NewsHour full episode November 25, 2019

Nov 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Hong Kong voters deliver a stunning rebuke to Beijing in the first election since protests began months ago. Plus: President Trump clashes with military leadership over a Navy SEAL, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, Italy’s falling birthrate drives rising anxiety, David Rubeinstein on America’s story and art brings joy to people with Alzheimer’s disease. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Judge rules McGahn must testify to Congress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlKk5… How will Beijing respond to Hong Kong election results? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7r0BC… The fallout from Trump’s intervention in Navy SEAL case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uiZb… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on impeachment polls, Bloomberg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igLPJ… In Italy, rising anxiety over falling birth rates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYYzT… David Rubenstein on what history can teach our politicians https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VNhf… How art can help people with Alzheimer’s enjoy the moment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zW-3j… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 24, 2019

Nov 24, 2019 BS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 24, the latest on the impeachment inquiry, Michael Bloomberg officially enters the 2020 presidential race, a look a racial bias in algorithms used by hospitals, and reenacting the largest slave rebellion in U.S. history more than two centuries later. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 23, 2019

Nov 23, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 23, a look ahead at the next steps in the impeachment inquiry, Minneapolis eliminates single-family zoning as it searches for a solution to its housing crisis, and the Navy secretary downplays reports he may resign. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 22, 2019

Nov 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the week’s impeachment hearings are over, but analysis of their impact continues. Plus: The significance of Hong Kong’s upcoming election, countering the dangers of vaping through public policy, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks, a Brief But Spectacular take on women in comedy and a preview of a movie about beloved children’s entertainer Mister Rogers. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ says political bias didn’t alter Russia probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFr1P… What happens next in the impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQPFZ… Will Trump take action on medical crisis of youth vaping? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sz4Uw… Shields and Brooks on impeachment hearing revelations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkE0F… Amid protests, Hong Kong’s interest in local elections soars https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5Btj… A Brief But Spectacular take on women in late-night comedy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJrfd… Honoring Mister Rogers with a film starring Tom Hanks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNz-t… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How these 2 economists are using randomized trials to solve global poverty

Nov 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

More than 700 million people across the globe live on extremely low wages. This year, a trio of economists won the Nobel Prize for their work on addressing global poverty, using randomized control trials to test and improve social policy. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to two of those winners, husband-and-wife duo Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, about their work. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Is the distinction between migrant and refugee meaningful?

Nov 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Under President Trump, American immigration policy has been in the spotlight. While Trump may talk the most about stopping illegal entry into the U.S., he is also taking action to reduce the volume of legal migrants the country accepts as refugees. But what makes one immigrant a refugee and another simply a migrant? Writer Dina Nayeri offers her humble opinion questioning that distinction. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Winslow Homer’s long love affair with the sea

Nov 18, 2019   PBS NewsHour

Renowned 19th century American artist Winslow Homer began his journey in marine painting with a trip to Europe, following his well-known work documenting the frontlines of the Civil War as an illustrator. But it was back in the U.S., and specifically on the shores of Gloucester, Massachusetts, where Homer became “enchanted” with land, sea and sky. Jared Bowen of PBS station WGBH in Boston reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What’s The Impact Of 5G? – BBC Click

•Nov 15, 2019  BBC Click

Click investigates whether 5G networks could damage our health as some fear, and whether 5G might take our weather forecasting ability back to the 1980s? Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

As many as 3,000 languages could disappear within the next 80 years, all but silencing entire cultures. In this quick talk, language activist Daniel Bögre Udell shows how people around the world are finding new ways to revive ancestral languages and rebuild their traditions — and encourages us all to investigate the tongues of our ancestors. “Reclaiming your language and embracing your culture is a powerful way to be yourself,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Daniel Bögre Udell · Language activist

Daniel Bögre Udell is the cofounder and director of Wikitongues, working with a global network of grassroots linguists to build a seed bank of every language in the world.

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147,311 views

TED Residency | May 2019

When Jimmy Nelson traveled to Siberia to photograph the Chukchi people, elders told him: “You cannot photograph us. You have to wait, you have to wait until you get to know us, you have to wait until you understand us.” In this gorgeously photo-filled talk, join Nelson’s quest to understand — the world, other people, himself — by making astonishing portraits of the world’s vanishing tribes and cultures.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jimmy Nelson · Last tribes photographer

Jimmy Nelson’s photographs of vanishing tribes illuminate the indigenous cultures of our shared world.

More Resources  book

Before They Pass Away

Jimmy Nelson

teNeues (2013)

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Support the effort to protect the homes of indigenous people who live in the rainforest.

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TEDGlobal 2014 | October 2014

https://www.ted.com/speakers/jimmy_nelson

Jimmy Nelson’s photographs of vanishing tribes illuminate the indigenous cultures of our shared world.

Why you should listen

In his quest to photograph endangered cultures, Jimmy Nelson has endured Kalishnikov-toting Banna tribesmen, subzero reindeer attacks, and thousands of miles of hard travel. With a blend of humility and humor, Nelson won the trust of each of his subjects, using an antique plate camera to create stunning portraits of 35 indigenous tribes.

The result is Before They Pass Away, a photo treasury that Nelson hopes will not only help preserve the lifestyles of people the world over, but also perhaps inspire readers in the developed world to ponder their own connections with their ancestral environments.

What others say

“There is a pure beauty in their goals and family ties, their belief in gods and nature, and their will to do the right thing in order to be taken care of when their time comes. Whether in Papua New Guinea or in Kazakhstan, in Ethiopia or in Siberia, tribes are the last resorts of natural authenticity.” — beforethey.com

Jimmy Nelson’s TED talk

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Arts + Design

Photo gallery: Stunning images of indigenous peoples in their traditional splendor

December 7, 2018

Jimmy Nelson has gone all over the earth to photograph native peoples at their proudest moments and to show you their soul.

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Live from TEDGlobal

Through the looking glass: A recap of session 8 of TEDGlobal 2014

October 9, 2014

In this session, “Lenses,” speakers look through cameras and new lenses — at subjects from the very, very big to the very, very small to the very, very far away. Wendy Freedman talks about a remote location in the Andes, far from the lights of civilization, where the stars can be seen clearly with the naked eye. In that location, […]

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Live from TEDGlobal

Lenses: A sneak peek of session 8 at TEDGlobal 2014

October 9, 2014

Lenses allow us to look at far away worlds and to examine our own more closely. In this session hidden social and scientific fabrics will be amplified by several orders of magnitude, bringing us a richer and more vibrant experience than the naked eye can see on its own. The speakers who’ll appear in this […]

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Photo gallery: Stunning images of indigenous peoples in their traditional splendor

Dec 7, 2018 / Elian Silverman

Jimmy Nelson has gone all over the earth to photograph native peoples at their proudest moments and to show you their soul.

“This is us at our best” — that’s the caption that could hover over these images from Dutch photographer Jimmy Nelson (TED talk: Gorgeous portraits of the world’s vanishing people), who works to put the world’s peoples and their rich traditions front and center in his pictures.

“I don’t think there’s anyone else in the world who looks like us or does things the way we do,” says Mucathalepa Tchombo, a 32-year-old Muchimba woman from southwestern Africa, and one of the subjects of Nelson’s work. “I’m very proud of my culture, but the world is changing fast, and we’re part of that too.”

Nelson is keenly aware that customs can vanish in a flash. To document them before they do, he spends months immersing himself in remote communities, connecting with people and really learning about their lives. Later, he returns to share the finished pictures with them. “In some cases, I’m not the first person to have photographed them,” he says. “But, in most cases, I’m the first to return and show them the imagery.”

While Nelson’s images are undeniably beautiful, some critics have accused him of perpetuating stereotypes and “othering” his subjects. But he disagrees. “I think a lot of judgement is based on fear,” he says. “And that’s the antithesis of my project — it’s about trying to break down those barriers and bring the people closer to you.”

Nelson’s new book, Jimmy Nelson: Homage to Humanity, is his latest attempt to showcase the pride, strength and resilience of the people he has come to know; all shown, as he puts it, “standing at their most proud.” The book’s smartphone app lets viewers access 360-degree images and videos, letting readers feel as if they are witnessing these rituals firsthand. “The idea is that the whole world can get access to what’s going on behind the pictures, see who these people really are, and dispel myths about them,” he says. “I want to show you the soul of these people.”

The Huli people, Papua New Guinea

The Huli are believed to have laid down roots in Papua New Guinea as far back as 45,000 years ago. The people shown are from the town of Tari, and many still live according to the traditional ways. “The Huli men are famous for their unique custom of creating and wearing impressive wigs decorated with feathers. They also wear bright facial paint in red, yellow and white — colors originally chosen to strike fear into their enemy in times of conflict,” says Nelson. “Nowadays, they usually wear them to sing and dance.”

The so-called Wigmen make their wigs out of their own hair — yes, that’s right — and weave them with feathers from the island’s 700 bird species. Each feather carries its own symbolic meaning (such as strength and courage). The Huli who participated in Nelson’s photographs did so in the hopes that their portraits will inspire their youth to follow in their elders’ footsteps. But they also want their images to reach people outside their community.

“The forest in which we live is essential to us. It provides for all our needs, it is sacred, and I would do anything in my power to protect it,” writes Mundiya Kepanga, a 53-year-old Huli Wigman, in the foreword to Homage to Humanity. “I hope that by helping people to better understand my culture, they will also respect our environment.”

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The Dolgan people, Siberia

The nomadic Dolgans roam one of the coldest regions on earth, the tundra of the northern Anabar Republic of Yakutia in Siberia. On a particularly brutal day, the temperature may drop to -76 degrees Fahrenheit. “Dolgan means ‘people who live close to water’ — or, in this case, ice. They live on icy white plains that stretch out as far as the eye can see,” says Nelson.

The herders move every few days to find enough lichen for their reindeer to eat. For maximum efficiency, the Dolgan put everything they need to carry with them — including their homes, which are called balok — on skis. They travel with more than 1,500 animals, including packs of herding dogs and herds of reindeer.

“We Dolgan have been the envy of many people. During perestroika in the 1990s, the reindeer herders were the only ones who were well-fed because the tundra always keeps providing,” says Roman Dimitruvik Tupirin, a 44-year-old Dolgan who was interviewed by Nelson and his team. “Now we’re fearful of losing our connection to nature because people are coming here to hunt for diamonds and oil.”

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The Ngalop people, Bhutan

Buddhism is the most widely practiced religion in Bhutan — an estimated two-thirds to three-quarters of the population are adherents — so the Ngalop people hold a special place in their country. “Ngalop means ‘the first risen,’ and they are known as the people who brought Tibetan Buddhism to Bhutan when they migrated there in the ninth century,” says Nelson. The Ngalop live mainly in the northwest region of the country.

Shown are a group of Ngalop masked dancers. Symbolizing different deities, demons and animals, the masks are used when the Ngalop act out spiritual stories from their collective past. In this photo, they’re dressed for the annual Tshechu festival. “Religious gatherings such as the Tschechu festival are an important way to promote and share cultural heritage between the people from remote villages,” Nelson says. The temple complex seen on the left-hand side of the image is Paro Takstang or “The Tiger’s Nest.” Located more than 10,000 feet above sea level, it is is one of the most sacred sites in Bhutan.

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The Marquesan people, the Marquesas Islands, Polynesia

When Captain Cook and his crew arrived at the Marquesas Islands — a volcanic chain in the southern Pacific — in the late 1700s, they were struck by the appearance of the inhabitants. A crew member said they were “the most beautiful … people I ever beheld.” Unfortunately, Cook and co. (and subsequent European settlers) ended up bringing disease and conflict to the people they so admired. In a matter of years, the Marquesan population shrunk from 80,000 to 2,000 — today, the population of the 15 islands totals just over 9,000 people.

“The native inhabitants are known in the local language as Enanaa, meaning ‘people,’” says Nelson. “Traditionally, Marquesans wore clothing made of leaves and grasses that were decorated with animal teeth and beads. Today, their skirts are more likely to be made of cloth.”

Historically, Enanaa had no written alphabet, so tattoos are an important part of their identities. Shapes and symbols enable people to communicate their status and their genealogy. After a child is born, parents start saving money — by raising pigs and growing crops — to pay for their child’s tattoos in adulthood. Getting inked isn’t just a young person’s game; it’s a lifelong pursuit. Subsequent tattoos are earned as people accrue wealth and achieve higher status in their community. Today, even though many Marquesans speak and write French, tattoos are still an important part of their culture.


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The Q’ero people, Peru

The Inca empire is believed to be the largest pre-European civilization in the Americas, numbering some 10 million. The Q’ero, shown here, are thought to be direct descendants of the Inca, and their 2,000 members live in and around the community of Qochamoqo, located in eastern Peru and perched over 14,000 feet above sea level in the Andes Mountains.

Considered part of the Quechua population group — with whom they share a language — “the Q’ero are one of the most isolated Andean communities, moving with the seasons to live and work at various altitudes, growing potatoes, corn and bamboo,” says Nelson. “They are known for their weaving techniques, with which they make the colorful unkuña carrying cloths.” The cloth is made from a blend of alpaca, sheep and llama wool, and the fabrics’ designs communicate their people’s history and mythology.

Some of the Q’ero’s other traditions aren’t as visible. “We still believe there should always be equal exchange, a sacred reciprocity we call ayni: I do something for you today; you do something for me tomorrow,” says Fredy Flores Machacca, 30, the youngest-ever president of the Q’ero nation, to Nelson. Added Machacca, “We Q’eros live close to nature and we sleep close to the earth. I want to protect it like it protects us. That is ayni.”

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The Muchimba people, Angola/Namibia

In recent times, the Kaokoveld Plateau in southern Africa has become known for rare minerals such as shattuckite and dioptase. Yet the culture of its native inhabitants — which includes the semi-nomadic Muchimba people — is similarly rich. They spend much of their time along the Cunene River, which is an important resource for them and their herds of cattle and goats, and live in dome-shaped houses made from sticks, clay, straw and cow dung.

Since water is so scarce, the Muchimba reserve it for livestock. To keep clean, says Nelson, “the women cover their skin and hair in a mixture of butterfat and ochre pigment known as otjize, which also protects them from the sun.” Additional bonus: Otjize acts as a moisturizer and insect repellant, too. Only the women wear it — not the men — and they use it in their hair as well. “We rub the wet [ochre] paste into our hair to make long braids. A few times a year, we wash it all out and redo it,” Mucathalepa Tchombo, a Muchimba woman, tells Nelson. “If there’s a special occasion coming up, we put on more ochre. It’s a kind of makeup.



The Kazakh people, Mongolia

Dalaikhan Boskay, the man shown here, is an eagle hunter and one of the Kazakhs, the largest ethnic minority group in Mongolia. The term doesn’t mean that he hunts down eagles; rather, he hunts red foxes, rabbits and wolves withthe assistance of these powerful birds of prey. His thick coat and hat are made from animal hides, fur and felt; whenever a Kazakh hunts and kills an animal, they are careful to use every piece of it — for utility and as a sign of respect to the creature.

The Kazakhs, who live in northwestern Mongolia, rely primarily on golden eagles. And while this kind of falconry was once the domain of men, the thousands-year-old tradition is open to change — women, girls and boys are now taking it up. People start training their eagles as fledglings, so human and bird develop an intense bond. “Hunters usually keep their eagles for around 10 years, which is about a third of their lifespan. We can feel when it’s time to give them back to the wild,” Boskay tells Nelson. “We only use female eagles, and it’s important to release them so they can have offspring and keep the natural balance.”


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The Miao people, China

The mountainous province of Guizhou in southwest China is home to more than 50 minority groups. However, few of them still follow traditional customs, but among those who do are the Miao people (sometimes called the Hmong or Guizhou people). But the 7 million-strong Miao are not all the same — they’re split among distinct groups.

Shown is an 11-year-old girl, who is one of the Longhorn Miao. “They’re named for their impressive headpieces, which were originally made from the hair of their ancestors in order to keep them close,” says Nelson. “Nowadays most headpieces are made of wool. Their shape is derived from the oxen and water buffalo that play such an important part in their agricultural life.” To form that distinctive shape, wool is wrapped around a horn-shaped wooden comb. The headpieces are worn by the Miao during their spiritual rituals. Most Miao people are animists and believe that rocks, trees, rivers and human creations all possess their own spirits.

Watch Jimmy Nelson’s TED talk here:

About the author

Elian Silverman is a writer based in New York City who covers science and technology.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-scientists-predict-fire-tornadoes/

Can Scientists Predict Fire Tornadoes?  

Inside the effort to understand wildfire season’s scariest phenomena

December 1, 2019

AUTHOR   Jason M. Forthofer

Jason M. Forthofer is a firefighter and mechanical engineer at the U.S. Forest Service’s Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana. His research involves field, laboratory and computational studies of heat transfer and fluid flow related to wildland fires. Credit: Nick Higgins

In Brief

  • Fire tornadoes, vortices of fire with tornadolike wind speeds, are exceedingly rare but deadly. The Carr Fire tornado near Redding, Calif., killed up to four people.
  • Apart from fire itself, generation of a fire tornado requires a source of rotation in the atmosphere. The fire can concentrate this vorticity into a spinning tube of air and stand it up.
  • Scientists understand the physics of fire tornadoes rather well, but they cannot yet predict when and where one might appear.

As the plane began its descent into Medford, we dropped into the blanket of smoke that covered southwestern Oregon and northern California. It was late July 2018, and several major fires were burning in the region. I was en route to join a Cal Fire (California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection) team investigating a fatal incident that had taken place two days earlier. What the group leader told me over the phone had sent chills up my spine: “A firefighter has been killed in a fire tornado. His vehicle was thrown hundreds of feet across the ground.”

I, perhaps more than anyone, had known that this might happen someday. Ten years earlier I had gotten my first look at the aftermath of a fire tornado. The object, almost 1,000 feet in diameter, had moved out of the Indians Fire in California and overrun a group of firefighters. So strong was the wind that trying to get to safety felt like running through chest-deep water, one of the survivors told me. Fortunately, the men were standing on a paved two-lane highway, which probably saved their lives: had they been even 10 feet away and among the trees and grass, they would have died. When I reached the site, massive oak branches lay all around, and the ground had been scoured of pebbles.

The scene left me impressed and worried. A fire tornado could evidently harm firefighters taking refuge in areas usually thought to be safe. It had been a close call. Many of us had seen fire whirls, dust-devil-sized rotating columns of fire, and did not regard them as particularly dangerous. In contrast, fire tornadoes—which combine the destructive power of fire with that of winds as ferocious as in an actual tornado—were so rare as to be almost mythical. Even I, a firefighter since 1996 and a fire-behavior researcher for eight years, had heard of only one, from a story a veteran firefighter told me.

On returning to my home base at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana, I conducted a literature survey. It turned up reports, most rather sketchy, of several fire tornadoes that had occurred around the world in the near and distant past. So scant was the information on the subject that scientists did not even agree on what qualified as a fire tornado. Massive forest fires can generate so-called pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) clouds at high altitudes. These are ice-capped thunderclouds that condense from the moisture released above a fire—from the vegetation it consumed, from the water vapor in the atmosphere and as a by-product of combustion itself. A few researchers held that only those fire vortices that connect to overhead pyroCb clouds are true fire tornadoes. By that definition, only one had ever been documented, in a 2003 firestorm near Canberra, Australia. It had left a damage path almost 15 miles long.

That framework seemed far too restrictive to be of much use to firefighters, however. Using the working definition of a fire tornado as a fire whirl with tornadolike wind speeds, my colleague Bret Butler and I had gathered up whatever documentation we could find and consolidated it into firefighter-training manuals and classes. But now I found myself driving south toward the Carr Fire just outside Redding, Calif., to investigate the death of a firefighter in a fire tornado—a tragedy I had long sought to avert.

The Carr Fire Tornado

The site looked like a war zone. Neither the famous tornado researcher Josh Wurman, whom I had recruited for the investigation, nor I had ever seen anything like this. Entire blocks of homes had been leveled, with only the foundations remaining. Roofing and other debris littered the area, and vehicles had been rolled multiple times over the ground. Trees were uprooted or broken off, and flying particles of sand and rock had stripped them of their bark. Three power-line towers built of metal lattice, each roughly 100 feet tall, had been blown down, with one of them having been lifted off its base and carried 1,000 feet through the air. A 40-foot shipping container had been torn apart, and a steel pipe was wrapped around downed power poles.

We estimated that the winds could have reached 165 miles per hour, a speed that occurs in class 3 tornadoes on the Enhanced Fujita scale. (This scale rates tornadoes on a scale ranging from 0 to 5, with 5 indicating the fastest and most destructive winds.) In California, only two regular tornadoes of this strength had ever been recorded. Peak temperatures of the burning gases inside the fire tornado may have reached almost 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit. The object was more than 1,000 feet wide at its base and, according to radar imagery, three miles high. It lasted for at least 40 minutes, during which time it moved slowly across the ground, leaving a path of destruction nearly a mile long.

Burning boards arranged in a rough triangle allow air to swirl into the central area, where another fire gathers the rotation into a vortex. Forest or urban fires of certain shapes can similarly generate fire tornadoes. Credit: Spencer Lowell

Our team interviewed witnesses and collected video evidence in the hope of learning from the event. The fire tornado occurred on the evening of July 26, 2018, in the course of a forest fire covering thousands of acres northwest of Redding. So extensive and intense was the fire that it generated pyroCb clouds at altitudes higher than three miles. Suddenly, at around 5:30 P.M., the flames raced eastward, killing firefighting bulldozer operator Don Smith, as well as a civilian in his home. As the wildfire neared the outskirts of Redding, it spawned a number of fire whirls and threw embers more than a mile ahead of the fire and across the Sacramento River. These started several “spot,” or small, isolated fires near two subdivisions at the end of a dead-end road. An extremely chaotic scene unfolded as firefighters tried to evacuate homeowners and save houses even as their escape route was being cut off. People were literally running for their lives.

Redding firefighter Jeremy Stoke headed to the scene to help. Just as he was arriving, at about 7:30 P.M., the fire tornado formed over the road, trapping residents and firefighters at the subdivisions. It apparently caught Stoke on the road. He transmitted a mayday call on his radio before powerful winds rolled his truck multiple times; it eventually came to rest against a tree hundreds of feet away. Stoke was found hours later, dead from traumatic injuries.

Two Cal Fire vehicles being driven down the road had most of their windows blown out and were battered by flying debris. Strangely, one of the trucks was damaged mostly on the driver’s side and the other on the passenger side—even though they were only 150 feet apart and facing the same direction—indicating the rotating motion of the air. The occupants huddled on the floorboards to save themselves from projectiles. Three nearby bulldozers also had their windows blown out, with one operator getting glass in his eye and another receiving serious burns to his hands. A retired police officer who was driving out realized his truck bed was on fire and pulled over; he survived but sustained burns to his airways. Most tragically, on the outer edge of the revolving inferno two children and their great-grandmother perished inside their burned home.

In the Laboratory

What can we learn from an event like this? Can we predict when and where a fire tornado will occur so that we can evacuate residents and firefighters? What causes fire tornadoes? A first step toward answering these questions is to look back in history. In 1871 a town in Wisconsin was devastated by what was probably a fire tornado, judging by the massive amount of debris—which included a house—thrown around. In 1964 the Polo Fire in California spawned one that injured four people and destroyed two homes, a barn, three cars and an avocado orchard. One of the most horrific occurred during the World War II incendiary bombing of Hamburg, Germany: the resulting firestorm generated a fire tornado that, according to geographer Charles Ebert, was up to two miles wide and three miles tall. More than 40,000 civilians died in the conflagration.

Credit: Bryan Christie Design

This is what a lethal fire tornado looks like

Nov 21, 2019  Scientific American

Fire tornadoes are terrifying forces of nature. They’re rare, but as wildfires become bigger and more frequent, they may grow more common. Thankfully, scientists are getting closer to predicting when and where these lethal vortices will appear. Read the full story this hellish phenomenon: https://bit.ly/2O4xJIK

Category  Science & Technology

In 1923 a major earthquake sparked an urban fire in Tokyo. As it spread from building to building, residents evacuated to an open area between the structures. A large fire tornado formed over this area, killing an estimated 38,000 people in 15 minutes. For more than half a century the accepted explanation for this terrible event was that a regular tornado happened to form at the exact same time and location as the fire. But in the 1980s and 1990s engineers S. Soma and K. Saito of the University of Kentucky used historical records to construct a small-scale model of the actual fire, painstakingly reproducing its geometry and ambient winds. Their laboratory fire generated a vortex—proving that the original one was not a coincidence but was caused by the fire itself.

This research built on pioneering lab work conducted two decades earlier, when George Byram and Robert Martin of the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station created small fire whirls at their facility in Macon, Ga. Their apparatus consisted of a small circular pool of burning alcohol surrounded by cylindrical walls with vertical slits, which forced drafts into the fire to enter in a rotating motion. Significantly, the resulting fire whirl caused the fuel to burn—and its energy to be released—up to three times faster than in a nonrotating fire. The rotating wind appears to have increased the rate of burning by pushing the flames down toward the surface of the alcohol, heating it up. Subsequent research has found the energy-release rate to be enhanced by up to seven times in such fires.

Something similar occurs in wildfire whirls and fire tornadoes. A heated piece of wood generates hundreds of different flammable gases, the further combustion of which yields flames. The strong horizontal, rotating winds in the fire tornado can force the flames down into the vegetation, causing it to burn more fiercely.

In 1967 Howard Emmons and Shuh-Jing Ying of Harvard University surrounded a stationary lab fire with a cylindrical wire screen that could be spun at various speeds, imparting rotation to the air flowing into the flames. The researchers measured the wind velocity and temperature distribution of the fire whirl thus generated, getting a glimpse into its inner workings. They found that, apart from fire itself, the formation of such a vortex requires a source of rotation and a mechanism to intensify it.

A fire tornado has essentially the same hydrodynamics. Significant vorticity often exists in the atmosphere—generated by wind curling around mountains or dragging along the ground or by variations in density and pressure. The fire itself carries out two other crucial functions: it concentrates the rotation and stands it up, so that a tight tube of air ends up spinning around a vertical axis.

First the hot air rising above the fire pulls in replacement air at the base, thereby gathering rotating air from the surroundings. Some of the vorticity might originally be around a horizontal axis, but once air is sucked up into the fire plume, its hot, buoyant upward stream causes the axis to tilt to a vertical orientation. Second, although the upwardly moving air starts out slow when it is near the ground, it heats up as the gases in it burn. The air pressure all around the vortex forces the hot, light air within the core upward. The accelerating air in the fire plume stretches the fire whirl or fire tornado vertically along its axis, reducing its diameter, much as pulling apart a clump of dough causes a long, thin neck to form. The reduced diameter drives the air to turn faster to conserve its angular momentum—the same effect seen when a spinning ice skater draws in his or her arms.

It appears that when a fire whirl or fire tornado moves over a burning area, it stretches to a considerable height and spins tight and fast, but when it moves over an already burned area, it spreads out and slows down into a diffuse cylinder of smoke. Sometimes the rotating object is so wide and slow that firefighters fail to perceive it. The direction of motion of the vortex across the ground depends on ambient winds and details of terrain in ways that we have yet to understand.

Emmons and Ying also found that fire vortices are remarkably efficient at conserving their rotational energy, which makes them (unfortunately) rather long-lived. The Indians Fire tornado, for example, lasted for about an hour. As the fire tornado spins up, two opposing forces in the radial direction strengthen: centrifugal force pulling a parcel of rotating air outward and, in opposition, low pressure in the core pulling it inward. The resulting balance limits the movement of air in the radial direction and therefore the loss of energy from the vortex. In contrast, nonrotating fires exchange roughly 10 times more energy with the surrounding atmosphere. This mechanism also makes fire whirls thinner and taller than nonrotating fires because with practically no air being drawn in, except at the base, less oxygen is available for combustion. Thus, some of the fuel gases must travel high up the core before they encounter sufficient oxygen to burn.

Just as dangerous, the towering column of hot, low-density gases induces very low pressure at the base of the whirl. Drag near the ground slows the rotation, reducing the centrifugal force pushing the air outward. Because the inward force generated by pressure remains the same, however, the wind near the ground streams into the fire tornado. It ends up acting like a giant vacuum cleaner, sucking air and, often, burning debris into the base, forcing it vertically up the core at extreme velocities and spitting it out from high up—unpredictably generating spot fires.

In the Field

Despite all this knowledge about the physics of fire tornadoes, we still cannot predict where and when one will occur. One thing is clear, however: given how rare fire tornadoes are even though a large, intensely burning fire always has the capacity to concentrate rotation, the essential factor for their appearance seems to be the presence of a strong source of rotation.

Corona fire in Yorba Linda, Calif., in November 2008 generated a flaming vortex—possibly a fire tornado—that threatened homes. Credit: David McNew Getty Images

We know from case studies, for example, that one of the likeliest locations for fire tornadoes to form is on the lee side of a mountain. Wind blowing around the mountain causes swirling motions on the downwind side, like water moving around a large rock in a river. A fire burning there can gather and stretch this rotation into a fire tornado. But matters are in fact more complicated: Fiery vortices can also show up on flat ground and in calm wind conditions. For example, a large fire whirl in Kansas was likely generated by a cold front that collided with warm ambient air as it passed over a fire in a field. And a 2007 study by Rui Zhou and Zi-Niu Wu of Tsinghua University in Beijing showed that multiple fires burning in certain specific configurations—which can happen when a fire throws embers ahead of itself, starting new fires—may even generate their own rotation by inducing jets of air to flow along the ground between them.

So where did the rotation that caused the deadly Carr Fire tornado come from? Given the several fire whirls that preceded the fire tornado, an abnormally high amount of rotation obviously existed in the area. On a hunch, I asked Natalie Wagenbrenner, a colleague at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory, to run some specialized computer simulations of the weather that day. Her studies showed that cool, dense air from the Pacific Ocean was being pushed eastward and over the top of a mountain range west of Redding. This cool air was much heavier than the hot air in the Sacramento Valley: the Redding airport reported a peak temperature that day of 113 degrees F, a record. So gravity caused the air to accelerate as it moved down the slopes toward the valley, much like water flowing downhill. Oddly, these strong surface winds stopped abruptly—right where the fire tornado formed.

What happened to the wind? Finally, I realized that a hydraulic jump was occurring—the atmospheric equivalent of what happens to water when it flows down the spillway below a dam. When the fast-moving water hits the low-speed pool below, the surface of the water jumps upward, forming a breaking wave that stays in place and marks the boundary between the two flows. This region contains intense swirling motions. In much the same way, the cold, dense air speeding down the mountainside hit the slow-moving pool of air in the Sacramento Valley, most likely generating the powerful rotation that formed the Carr Fire tornado [see graphic above]. N. P. Lareau of the University of Nevada and his colleagues speculated in a 2018 paper that the pyroCb clouds overhead, which reached altitudes of up to seven miles even as the fire tornado formed, helped to stretch the vortex to a great height, thereby thinning it and spinning it up even more.

If wildfires continue to become more extensive, we may encounter such lethal objects more frequently. The silver lining is that lessons learned from studying them carefully might help prevent future tragedies. I am hopeful that further research into fire tornadoes, combined with advances in weather prediction and computing power, will, in the near future, give us the ability to issue fire tornado warnings—possibly saving lives.

Fire whirl is formed by rotating air drafting into a pan of burning alcohol at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana. Credit: Spencer Lowell

This article was originally published with the title “Fire Tornadoes” in Scientific American 321, 6, 60-67 (December 2019)

doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1219-60  View This Issue

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PBS news, The UN Web TV Channel, Al Jazeera Live, BBC Click, TED Talks, TED-ED, Thisiscolossal, Adam Grochowalski, Free High-Quality Documentaries, Real Wild, Ing’s Artwork

PBS News: September 1-7, 2019 and Is France’s groundbreaking food-waste law working?

 United Nation: The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming

Al Jazeera English Live

BBC Click: E-Scooters, Debit Cards and Dementia

TED TAlKS: Kishore Mahbubani how the west can adapt to a rising asia?, and Hyeonseo Lee, my escape from North Korea

TED-ED: How do vitamins work? – Ginnie Trinh Nguyen

Thisiscolossal: Preview Artworks Available at Mother & Child Vol. II Fundraiser to Aid Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border, and Chart-Like Composite Photographs by Dan Marker-Moore Show the Progression of the 2019 Solar Eclipse   

Adam Grochowalski: Actias dubernardi

Free High-Quality Documentaries: The Pan-American Highway – From Peru to Tierra del Fuego

Real Wild: Valley of The Golden Baboons [Monkey Documentary]

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ artworks posted on Pinterest

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 7, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Sep 7, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, September 7, Hurricane Dorian leaves devastation and destruction in the Bahamas, the Carolina coast assesses damage as thousands remain without power, and Rwanda is seen as a model of success after the 1994 genocide, but at what cost? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 6, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 6, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian comes ashore in North Carolina as relief efforts in the Bahamas grapple with immense devastation. Plus: The health implications of detention and family separation for migrant children, warnings about the dangers of vaping, political analysis from Shields and Brooks and the Kennedy Center expands both its physical campus and its community approach. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 5, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 5, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian continues a path of destruction along the Carolina coast as relief efforts mobilize for the devastated islands of the Bahamas. Plus: Which DOD projects are losing money to fund border wall construction, Amazon species threatened by deforestation, mixing Mexican art and politics, migrating to save one’s family and a brief but spectacular take on tradition. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: After Dorian, what’s next for relief efforts in the Bahamas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqS80… How South Carolina’s coast is coping with Hurricane Dorian https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCJUU… What the U.S. East Coast can expect from Hurricane Dorian https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj0Tt… News Wrap: Taliban cause more deadly violence in Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyYl8… Trump’s ‘unprecedented’ use of DOD money for border wall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xcxz… In Brazil, deforestation threatens Amazon species’ survival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZ6pz… How Mexico’s Joaquin Segura translates politics into art https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zBXk… What this Filipino family proves about poverty and migration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeGcR… How gay male dancers are preserving a Cambodian tradition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aB2Jz…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 4, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 4, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the southeastern U.S. watches as a weakened but still potent Hurricane Dorian skirts the coast. Plus: Hurricane relief efforts in the Bahamas, confusion around the UK’s path to Brexit, Hong Kong drops its controversial extradition bill, Brazil’s Amazon burns, what Middle America voters are saying about politics and remembering the victims of the Odessa mass shooting.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 3, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 3, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian leaves unprecedented destruction in the Bahamas after lingering for days. Plus: How the southeastern U.S. is preparing for Hurricane Dorian, a conversation with acting DHS Sec. Kevin McAleenan, stemming Central American migration to the U.S., intensifying violence in Afghanistan, Texas copes with a mass shooting and the work of designer Alexander Girard. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 2, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 2, 2019

Monday on the NewsHour, the southeastern U.S. prepares for a possible hit from Hurricane Dorian. Plus: Hurricane Dorian slams the Bahamas, where rescuers have been unable to get to many of the stranded, a conversation with former Defense Sec. James Mattis, another mass shooting in Texas, Brexit drama in the UK, 2020 Democrats talk gun laws and Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Hurricane Dorian slams Bahamas; Florida awaits storm’s path https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXn6R… Scope of Hurricane Dorian’s damage in the Bahamas unknown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCdb8… News Wrap: At least 4 dead, 29 missing in Calif. boat fire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxslH… Amid peace talks, Taliban claims deadly explosion in Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmEF3… Why Mattis left Trump administration–but won’t criticize it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0-3X… Texas’ 2nd mass shooting in a month leaves state reeling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcZHG… In Britain, Boris Johnson’s Brexit ‘hardball’ sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwMXk… 2020 Democrats add gun safety to Labor Day campaign agenda https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suV0x… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on 2020 labor vote, gun policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuZlJ…

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 1, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 1, 2019

On this edition for Sunday, September 1, Odessa, Texas, remains as an active crime scene, Hurricane Dorian intensifies and draws closer to the southeast coast, and Columbine cop advises on how to respond to mass shootings. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Is France’s groundbreaking food-waste law working?

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 31, 2019

A third of the world’s food goes to waste, but France is attempting to do something about it. Since 2016, large grocery stores in the country have been banned from throwing away unsold food that could be given away. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Christopher Livesay reports from Paris as part of our “Future of Food” series, which is supported in partnership with the Pulitzer Center. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

https://webtv.un.org/live/

24 Hour Live and pre-recorded Programming

6 Sep 2019 –  The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming of United Nations meetings and events as well as with pre-recorded video features and documentaries on various global issues.

Al Jazeera English | Live

Al Jazeera English  Started streaming on Jun 1, 2019

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: https://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category   News & Politics

E-Scooters, Debit Cards And Dementia BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on Aug 23, 2019

Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

As Asian economies and governments continue to gain power, the West needs to find ways to adapt to the new global order, says author and diplomat Kishore Mahbubani. In an insightful look at international politics, Mahbubani shares a three-part strategy that Western governments can use to recover power and improve relations with the rest of the world.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kishore Mahbubani · Author, diplomat, academic

Through his books, diplomatic work and research, Kishore Mahbubani reenvisions global power dynamics through the lens of rising Asian economies.

More Resources

Has the West Lost It?: A Provocation

Kishore Mahbubani

Penguin UK (2019)

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Take Action learn

Learn more about the end of Western domination of world history, and how we can open our minds to non-Western perspectives.

Learn more ?

TED2019 | April 2019

As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was “the best on the planet.” It wasn’t until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope — and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Hyeonseo Lee · Activist

As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thoght her country was the “best on the planet.” It wasn’t until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 17-years-old to begin a life in hiding as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope — and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.

More Resources

since the talk

Since the Talk: How Hyeonseo Lee found the man who saved her family

In 2013, Lee finally got the chance to say thank you to the stranger who helped her mother and brother flee North Korea. Read more.

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bbc radio4

The business of saving lives

In a half-hour podcast from BBC Radio 4, get an inside look at the world of controversial South Korean brokers who help smuggle defectors out of North Korea.

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b012r7jv  Escape from North Korea  Crossing Continents

Lucy Williamson reports from Seoul on the dangerous trade of the people brokers, smuggling the desperate out of North Korea to the safety of the South.

https://www.ted.com/talks/yeonmi_park_how_i_escaped_north_korea_and_found_freedom?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=button__2019-08-30

“North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yeonmi Park · Human rights activist

North Korean defector Yeonmi Park is becoming a leading voice of oppressed people around the world.

More Resources

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom

Yeonmi Park and Maryanne Vollers

Penguin Books (2016)

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Take Action

participate

Support Flash Drives For Freedom, a campaign to help bring outside information into North Korea.

How do vitamins work? – Ginnie Trinh Nguyen

TED-Ed   Published on Oct 6, 2014

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-s-the-… Vitamins are the building blocks that keep our bodies running; they help build muscle and bone, capture energy, heal wounds and more. But if our body doesn’t create vitamins, how do they get into our system? Ginnie Trinh Nguyen describes what vitamins are, how they get into our bodies — and why they are so crucial. Lesson by Ginnie Trinh Nguyen, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

Category   Education

Fundraiser To Aid Families Separated At The US Mexico Border

Preview Artworks Available at Mother & Child Vol. II Fundraiser to Aid Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border

July 8, 2019  Colossal

Valerie Lueth

It’s been a year since the trauma of separated families at the U.S.-Mexico border shocked people around the world. Tragically, this humanitarian crisis continues, as documented by journalists and photographers, as well the detained children themselves. Please join us in New York City on July 15, 2019 from 6-9pm for Mother & Child Vol. II, a fundraising gallery show. Colossal is partnering with Sugarlift and a slate of talented and generous artists from around the globe to support three vetted non-profits: Kids in Need of Defense, The Young Center, and The Florence Project provide direct aid and legal support to affected families.

Original artworks, prints, and photographs have been donated by over fifty artists including Valerie Lueth, Luján Pérez, Pat Perry, Maude White, Elicia Edijanto, Lauren Matsumoto, Michael Meadors and more. If you can’t make it to Manhattan, artworks are also available for purchase in the Mother & Child web shop, starting on July 15. RSVP for free here so we can send you a quick one-time reminder: bitly.com/motherandchild2019.

Luján Pérez

Jess X. Snow

Faith XLVII

Maude White

Sonni

Elicia Edijanto

Lauren Matsumoto

Pepe Salgado

Actias dubernardi

Adam Grochowalski   Published on Nov 28, 2016

Actias dubernardi, Chinese Luna Moth. The film shows details of the full development of this moth. I strongly recommend watching the movie on a TV screen 4K. Thank you, Adam Der Film zeigt Einzelheiten der vollständigen Entwicklung dieser Motte. Ich empfehle den Film auf einem 4K TV-Bildschirm beobachten. Danke, Adam

Category   Pets & Animals

The Pan-American Highway – From Peru to Tierra del Fuego

Free High-Quality Documentaries

Published on Jul 10, 2018

It measures roughly 35,000 kilometres. From Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. It runs across two continents and through more than a dozen countries; sometimes, as a gravel track, but also as an eight-lane motorway. It meanders through vast landscapes, as well as the confines of major cities. For many, it is the absolutely perfect route: The Pan-American Highway. It leads through forests and deserts, through jungles and across high mountain passes. To the right and left of the Pan-Americana, drug wars and civil wars are contended, Hollywood films produced and computer programmes developed. And just a few thousand kilometres further south, Red Indians still hunt with bows and arrows. For the very first time, a Norddeutscher Rundfunk TV-team travelled the entire route – in search of history and stories.

Category   Travel & Events

Valley of The Golden Baboons [Monkey Documentary] | Real Wild

Real Wild  Published on Dec 2, 2017

Marvel at this epic story, seen through the eyes of the king of the resident golden baboons in the Luangwa Valley, one of the last true wildernesses in Africa. It appears to be an idyllic setting, but below this tranquil scene, is a concentration of animal drama found nowhere else in Africa. Click here for more documentaries: https://bit.ly/2gSPaf6 For exclusive clips, follow us Facebook: facebook.com/wildthingschannel Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com Content licensed by Sky Vision

Category   Pets & Animals

Chart-Like Composite Photographs by Dan Marker-Moore Show the Progression of the 2019 Solar Eclipse

August 12, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Los Angeles-based photographer Dan Marker-Moore (previously) flew south to document the solar eclipse that occurred in Chile on July 2, 2019. While many professional photographers also documented the event, most images capture the singular moment in one image. Marker-Moore decided to break out the progression in orderly chart-like designs. He shares with Colossal that he experimented with over one hundred different format variants before deciding on the final five. Each image contains between 26 and 425 photos of the sun. Read more about Marker-Moore’s trip and the equipment he used here, and find prints of his eclipse series in his online store. The photographer also shares new work on Instagram.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ artworks posted on Pinterest

On Friday, September 6, 2019 I jointed Pinterest and posted three of my artworks which are shown above.

I created “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996.

“I Have A Dream.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and, Vincent van Gogh and His Letters to his brother, I produced both artworks in 2010. 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, September 7, 2019

For more information please visit the following link:

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PBS, ABC, Al Jazeera, & D W News, NASA, TED Talks, BBC Click, Crash Course, Colossal, Ing’s Garden & More

PBS News: 8.5-10.2019, ABC News live (Australia), Al Jazeera English | Live, DW News Livestream,  NASA: Hubble Catches 2 Galaxies at Play, Hubble Snaps a Galactic Potpourri of Particles, Hubble Peers at Galactic Cherry Blossoms, Growing VEGGIEs in Space, BBC Click: What Is The Food You’ll Eat In The Future?, TED Talks: Victor Vescovo a groundbreaking expedition to the bottom of all five oceans?, Crash Course: Endocrine System, Part 1 – Glands & Hormones, EBS English: Bolivia, Part 1.Uyuni, Walking on a Sea of Salt, Pete Kanaris GreenDreamsFL:  Check Out This 15-Acre Organic Tropical Fruit Operation!, Trees for Life: Restoring the ancient Caledonian Forest Alan Watson Featherstone TEDxFindhorn, Colossal: Neighboring Communities Playfully Connect Atop Neon Pink Teetertotters Slotted Through the U.S.-Mexico Border Wall, Infinite Forms Unfurl in New Rotating Sculptures by John Edmark, Pinterest: heartbeat-of-leafy-limbs-IMAO KEINEN Sparrow and Peonies [circa 1930], redlipstickresurrected, Utagawa Yoshifuji (1828 – 1887), “Cat” by Hasegawa Sadanobu III (1881-1963), Monarch Butterfly & Flowers in our garden By Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 10, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 10, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, August 10, the latest on the death of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein. Also, LGBTQ asylum seekers are often lost in the immigration debate, and a look at whether employers in Mississippi’s ICE raids will be prosecuted. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour full episode August 9, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Published on Aug 9, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump names retired Adm. Joseph Maguire as acting director of national intelligence. Plus: The enduring emotional toll of Michael Brown’s death on Ferguson, 2020 Democrats attend the Iowa State Fair, the latest politics with David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart, reviving Polish Jewish music and a remembrance of the 31 people killed in last weekend’s mass shootings.

PBS NewsHour live show August 8, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Streamed live 2 hours ago

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode August 7, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 7, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump travels to the bereaved cities of El Paso and Dayton — but his arrival is not without controversy. Plus: Puerto Rico’s political upheaval continues, reactions from El Paso and Dayton to Trump’s visit, an interview with 2020 Democrat Tom Steyer, Grand Cayman’s health care tourism, director Ron Howard and a vigil for victims of the El Paso mass shooting.

PBS NewsHour full show August 6, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 6, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the emotional and political fallout continue from massacres in El Paso and Dayton. Plus: How the city of El Paso and lawmakers on Capitol Hill are responding to the shootings, whether mental illness is a risk factor for violent acts like mass shootings, unrest in Hong Kong, gun legislation, an interview with 2020 Democrat Gov. Steve Bullock and remembering Toni Morrison. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode August 5, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Aug 5, 2019

Monday on the NewsHour, grief and frustration grip the nation after two mass shootings leave dozens of people dead. Plus: Reports from the shooting scenes in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, analysis of how to prevent future mass shootings, reaction to the tragedies from 2020 Democratic presidential contenders Rep. Tim Ryan and Bill de Blasio, and Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwxtkBcayK8

Watch ABC News live

ABC News (Australia)   Started streaming on Jul 6, 2019

This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: https://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category   News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

Al Jazeera English   Started streaming on Jun 1, 2019

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: https://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category   News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

DW News   Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples.

Category   News & Politics

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2019/hubble-catches-2-galaxies-at-play

Aug. 9, 2019

Hubble Catches 2 Galaxies at Play

The pair of strange, luminescent creatures at play in this image are actually galaxies — realms of millions upon millions of stars. This galactic duo is known as UGC 2369. The galaxies are interacting, meaning that their mutual gravitational attraction is pulling them closer and closer together and distorting their shapes in the process. A tenuous bridge of gas, dust, and stars can be seen connecting the two galaxies,, during which they pulled material out into space across the diminishing divide between them.  Interaction with others is a common event in the history of most galaxies. For larger galaxies like the Milky Way, the majority of these interactions involve significantly smaller so-called dwarf galaxies. But every few aeons, a more momentous event can occur. For our home galaxy, the next big event will take place in about four billion years, when it will collide with its bigger neighbour, the Andromeda Galaxy. Over time, the two galaxies will likely merge into one — already nicknamed Milkomeda.

The pair of strange, luminescent creatures at play in this image are actually galaxies — realms of millions upon millions of stars.

This galactic duo is known as UGC 2369. The galaxies are interacting, meaning that their mutual gravitational attraction is pulling them closer and closer together and distorting their shapes in the process. A tenuous bridge of gas, dust and stars can be seen connecting the two galaxies, created when they pulled material out into space across the diminishing divide between them. 

Interaction with others is a common event in the history of most galaxies. For larger galaxies like the Milky Way, the majority of these interactions involve significantly smaller so-called dwarf galaxies. But every few billion years, a more momentous event can occur. For our home galaxy, the next big event will take place in about four billion years, when it will collide with its bigger neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy. Over time, the two galaxies will likely merge into one — already nicknamed Milkomeda.

Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Evans

Last Updated: Aug. 9, 2019

Editor: Rob Garner

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2019/hubble-snaps-a-galactic-potpourri-of-particles

July 26, 2019

Hubble Snaps a Galactic Potpourri of Particles

Every now and then, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope glimpses a common object — say, a spiral galaxy — in an interesting or unusual way. A sharply angled perspective, such as the one shown in this Picture of the Week, can make it seem as if we, the viewers, are craning our necks to see over a barrier into the galaxy’s bright centre.  In the case of NGC 3169, this barrier is the thick dust embedded within the galaxy’s spiral arms. Cosmic dust comprises a potpourri of particles, including water ice, hydrocarbons, silicates, and other solid material. It has many origins and sources, from the leftovers of star and planet formation to molecules modified over millions of years by interactions with starlight.  NGC 3169 is located about 70 million light-years away in the constellation of Sextans (The Sextant). It is part of the Leo I Group of galaxies, which, like the Local Group that houses our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is part of a larger galactic congregation known as the Virgo Supercluster. 

Every now and then, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope glimpses a common object — say, a spiral galaxy — in an interesting or unusual way. A sharply angled perspective, such as the one shown in this Hubble image, can make it seem as if we, the viewers, are craning our necks to see over a barrier into the galaxy’s bright center.

In the case of NGC 3169, this barrier is the thick dust embedded within the galaxy’s spiral arms. Cosmic dust comprises a potpourri of particles, including water ice, hydrocarbons, silicates and other solid material. It has many origins and sources, from the leftovers of star and planet formation to molecules modified over millions of years by interactions with starlight.

NGC 3169 is located about 70 million light-years away in the constellation of Sextans (the Sextant). It is part of the Leo I Group of galaxies, which, like the Local Group that houses our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is part of a larger galactic congregation known as the Virgo Supercluster.

Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho 

Last Updated: July 26, 2019

Editor: Rob Garner

Tags:  Galaxies, Goddard Space Flight Center, Hubble Space Telescope, Image of the Day, Universe

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2019/hubble-peers-at-galactic-cherry-blossoms

July 12, 2019

Hubble Peers at Galactic Cherry Blossoms

The galaxy NGC 1156 resembles a delicate cherry blossom tree flowering in springtime in this Hubble Picture of the Week. The many bright “blooms” within the galaxy are in fact stellar nurseries — regions where new stars are springing to life. Energetic light emitted by newborn stars in these regions streams outwards and encounters nearby pockets of hydrogen gas, causing it to glow with a characteristic pink hue. NGC 1156 is located in the constellation of Aries (The Ram). It is classified as a dwarf irregular galaxy, meaning that it lacks a clear spiral or rounded shape, as other galaxies have, and is on the smaller side, albeit with a relatively large central region that is more densely packed with stars.  Some pockets of gas within NGC 1156 rotate in the opposite direction to the rest of the galaxy, suggesting that there has been a close encounter with another galaxy in NGC 1156’s past. The gravity of this other galaxy — and the turbulent chaos of such an interaction — could have scrambled the likely more orderly rotation of material within NGC 1156, producing the odd behaviour we see today.

The galaxy NGC 1156 resembles a delicate cherry blossom tree flowering in springtime in this Hubble image. The many bright “blooms” within the galaxy are in fact stellar nurseries — regions where new stars are springing to life. Energetic light emitted by newborn stars in these regions streams outwards and encounters nearby pockets of hydrogen gas, causing the gas to glow with a characteristic pink hue.

NGC 1156 is located in the constellation of Aries (the Ram). It is classified as a dwarf irregular galaxy, meaning that it lacks a clear spiral or rounded shape, as other galaxies have, and is on the smaller side, albeit with a relatively large central region that is more densely packed with stars. 

Some pockets of gas within NGC 1156 rotate in the opposite direction to the rest of the galaxy, suggesting that there has been a close encounter with another galaxy in NGC 1156’s past. The gravity of this other galaxy — and the turbulent chaos of such an interaction — could have scrambled the likely more orderly rotation of material within NGC 1156, producing the odd behavior we see today.

Text credit: ESA (European Space Agency)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, R. Jansen

Last Updated: July 12, 2019

Editor: Rob Garner

Tags:  Galaxies, Goddard Space Flight Center, Hubble Space Telescope, Image of the Day, Universe

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/growing-veggies-in-space

July 10, 2019

Growing VEGGIEs in Space

Leafy greens are growing in space! The Columbus laboratory module’s VEGGIE botany research facility is the home to the International Space Station‘s gardening activities. The VEG-04 botany study is exploring the viability of growing fresh food in space to support astronauts on long-term missions. The salad-type plants are harvested after 28 days of growth, with some samples stowed for analysis and the rest taste-tested by the crew aboard the station.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: July 10, 2019

Editor: Yvette Smith

Tags:  Humans in Space, Image of the Day, International Space Station (ISS)

What Is The Food You’ll Eat In The Future? – BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on Aug 5, 2019

Click checks out the tech producing food with less environmental impact, 5G helping salmon farms in the Orkney Islands, and a taste of new lab grown foods. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

Victor Vescovo is leading the first-ever manned expedition to the deepest point of each of the world’s five oceans. In conversation with TED science curator David Biello, Vescovo discusses the technology that’s powering the explorations — a titanium submersible designed to withstand extraordinary conditions — and shows footage of a never-before-seen creature taken during his journey to the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Victor Vescovo · Undersea explorer, investor

In 2019, Victor Vescovo could become the first person to have climbed to the highest point of all the world’s continents as well as descended to the deepest reaches of all its oceans, including the Challenger Deep.

David Biello · Science curator, author

David Biello is TED’s science curator and the author of “The Unnatural World: The Race to Remake Civilization in Earth’s Newest Age.”

Endocrine System, Part 1 – Glands & Hormones: Crash Course A&P #23

CrashCourse   Published on Jun 22, 2015

Hank begins teaching you about your endocrine system by explaining how it uses glands to produce hormones. These hormones are either amino-acid based and water soluble, or steroidal and lipid-soluble, and may target many types of cells or just turn on specific ones. He will also touch on hormone cascades, and how the HPA axis effects your stress response. Table of Contents Endocrine System 2:32 Glands Produce Hormones 2:58 Amino Acid Based and Water Soluble 4:18 Steroidal and Lipid Soluble 4:44 Hormone Cascades 6:15 HPA Axis Effects Your Stress Response 6:30 *** Crash Course Psychology Poster: https://www.dftba.com/crashcourse

Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Rachel FROM: Alex I Love You! — TO: Crash Course FROM: James Earle I loved Subbable. I’ll see you on Patreon. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Megan McChristy, Matthew Feickert, Tara D. Kane, Gage Ledbetter, Benjamin Perea, Chad Walter, Janel Christensen, Alura Embrey, Ken Johnson, Harland Wirth — Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC… Twitter – https://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr – https://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: https://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: https://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

48 videos   Anatomy & Physiology  Learning playlist

Bolivia, Part 1.Uyuni, Walking on a Sea of Salt / ??? ?? ??????

EBS ENGLISH   Published on May 1, 2016

Bolivia, the Heart of South America Part 1.Uyuni, Walking on a Sea of Salt ??? ?? ??????(Themes Around the World) ?For more videos visit us at https://www.ebse.co.kr/ebs/flz.AlcCour… – ??????? ??? ??? ????? ??? ????? ??? ?? ???? ???. – ??? ?? ??????? ???? ??? ?? ?? ??? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??? ???. ?Subscribe to the EBS Language Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_c… ?For more information visit us at https://www.ebse.co.kr/ebs/index.laf https://www.ebs.co.kr/ ?Check out what we’re up to elsewhere: https://plus.google.com/+ebslanguage

Check Out This 15-Acre Organic Tropical Fruit Operation!

Pete Kanaris GreenDreamsFL   Published on Jul 14, 2018

LNB Groves Boasts Nearly 40 Years of Growing a Wide Range Tropical Fruits in Homestead, FL – Jackfruit, Mamey Sapote, Mangos, Carambola, Dragonfruit, Jaboticaba, Passionfruit, plus other power-packed tropical crops, such as turmeric & sorrel (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Take a tour with Levi Ellenby, as he shares the methods, the challenges & the beloved tropical crops that LNB is known for. This our 3rd annual fruit hunting trip to Homestead, Florida – the southernmost continental destination in the U.S. & you can probably guess why we keep coming back. We are obsessed with tropical fruit & are so happy to be able to bring you along for the 2nd year in a row. We will have even more content coming up from this latest trip, so be sure that you are subscribed & signed up for our notifications (click the bell icon next to the subscribe button). To Learn More About LNB Groves: https://www.lnbgrovestand.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lnbgroves/ Want to support GreenDreams for FREE?!!! https://amzn.to/2uAXvKV Simple, Fast, FREE Shipping with Amazon Prime https://amzn.to/2uFsAf8 Camera Gear: Sony a6500 body – https://amzn.to/2HbFvdb Sigma 16mm Lens – https://amzn.to/2J5jF0L Zhiyun Crane Plus Gimbal – https://amzn.to/2Jct96G DJI Mavic Pro Drone – https://amzn.to/2kI3W9j Camera/Gear Backpack – https://amzn.to/2J7w2ti ^^Those are affiliate links^^ If you plan on purchasing anyways, we’d be so happy if you choose to use our links. It helps support our channel & mission.^^ ______________________________________________________________ To learn more about us, as well as our products & services: https://www.greendreamsFL.com Follow us on Social media https://www.facebook.com/greendreamsf… https://www.instagram.com/GreenDreamsFL ______________________________________________________________ Have we made a difference for you? We would much appreciate your contribution to keep improving upon the quality, content & consistency of this channel. Support Us @ https://www.patreon.com/greendreamsFL If you would like to support us by shopping for some amazing tools with your Amazon Prime membership, we get a small commission on all your full checkout cart when you order our suggestions below. If you don’t have Amazon Prime yet, we have a referral link you can use that rewards us when you sign up. Simple, Fast, FREE Shipping with Amazon Prime https://amzn.to/2uFsAf8 Our Favorite Shovel For Planting Trees: Bully Tools 92702 12-Gauge Weighted Caprock/Pony Shovel with Fiberglass Long Handle – https://amzn.to/2UNaaW0 Our Favorite Hand Pruner For Your Garden or Grove: Felco F-2 Classic Manual Hand Pruner – https://amzn.to/2WhJXPH Camera Gear: Sony a6500 body – https://amzn.to/2HbFvdb Sigma 16mm Lens – https://amzn.to/2J5jF0L Zhiyun Crane Plus Gimbal – https://amzn.to/2Jct96G DJI Mavic Pro Drone – https://amzn.to/2kI3W9j Camera/Gear Backpack – https://amzn.to/2J7w2ti ^^These are affiliate links^^ If you plan on purchasing anyways , we’d be so happy if you choose to use our links. It helps support our channel & mission.^^ Want to send us something? P.O. BOX #1159 LAND O LAKES FL 34639-9998

Category   Education

Restoring the ancient Caledonian Forest Alan Watson Featherstone TEDxFindhorn

Trees for Life   Published on Aug 9, 2016

Nearly 30 years ago, Trees for Life Founder, Alan Watson-Featherstone stood in the Universal Hall and in front of 300 people made a life-long commitment to restore the ancient Caledonian Forest. He started with no resources, no knowledge, no access to land, no funds, but his passion and inspiration have carried him forward and now Trees for Life not only helps nature to restore the Scottish Highlands – it also helps people reconnect with their spirit, with hope and with the land. Alan’s talk also includes a wide range of his photography illustrating both the damage to the land and the difference our work makes. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Neighboring Communities Playfully Connect Atop Neon Pink Teetertotters Slotted Through the U.S.-Mexico Border Wall

July 30, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello have long worked in activating structures in projects that blur the line between art and architecture. The Oakland-based duo, who self-describe as pursuing “applied architectural research”, also have a longstanding interest in the United States-Mexico border wall. In 2009 Rael wrote Borderwall as Architecture, which features a conceptual drawing of a teetertotter. The concept relocates the classic playground equipment to the border wall as its fulcrum. Ten years later, this cover art came to life in the neighboring communities of Sunland Park, New Mexico and Colonia Anapra, Mexico.

Constructed by Taller Herrería in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, neon pink teetertotters slot through the wall’s narrow gaps, allowing citizens on both sides to playfully engage with their cross-border counterparts. The fundamental design of the teetertotter, while delightful and chuckle-inducing, also functions by each user literally feeling the weight of humanity of the person on the other side. In an Instagram post announcing the project Rael shared, “children and adults were connected in meaningful ways on both sides with the recognition that the actions that take place on one side have a direct consequence on the other side.”

Rael and San Fratello worked in collaboration with Omar Rios to execute “Teetertotter Walls.” Rael is a Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley and San Fratello is an Assistant Professor at San José State University. Dive into an archive of nearly twenty years of the duo’s socially engaged work on their website, and follow along with their latest projects on Instagram.

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IMAO KEINEN Sparrow and Peonies [circa 1930]

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Utagawa Yoshifuji aka ?? ?? (Japanese, 1828-1887, b. Japan) – Newly Published Applications for Cats, ca. 1868–1912 Woodblocks, Color Woodblock Print; 22 ½ x 16 inches. Courtesy of Hiraki Ukiyo-e Foundation

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Infinite Forms Unfurl in New Rotating Sculptures by John Edmark

August 6, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

We continue to be transfixed by John Edmark’s (previously) infinite 3-D printed designs. The self-described artist, designer, and inventor uses visual tricks to create cascading effects on rotating textured white sculptural surfaces. His most recent video, “Blooms Assortment”, features a noodle-like form, shifting cubes, and a hollow gridded shape that resembles a geyser or mushroom cloud. Edmark has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in computer science and has lectured at Stanford’s design program for over fifteen years.  See more of Edmark’s creations on Vimeo and if you’d like to call one of his pieces your own, visit his online store.

A Monarch Butterfly and Large Pink Flowers in our garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

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PBS News, BBC Click, DW Documentaries, TED Talks, Metabolism & Nutrition, Colossal, Black Swallowtail Butterfly & Ing’s Garden

PBS News: July 23-27, 2019, BBC Click: NASA Meets Big Brother and The Moon Landing 50 Years On, DW Documentary: The New Silk Road, Part 1 & 2: From China to Pakistan and From Kyrgyzstan to Duisburg, Todd William: Why Keep Spending Money on Space Exploration?, TED Talks: where did the moon come from a new theory and how playing instrument benefits your brain, Metabolism & Nutrition, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #36, Colossal: Two Collaborative Murals by Pat Perry and Local Schoolchildren Connect Communities in Iraq and Maine, Black Swallowtail Butterfly and Ing’s Garden: Captured by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at the Backyard Garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey

July 27, 2019 – PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 27, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, July 27, a faceoff over the use of facial recognition technology in Great Britain, and how biometric data is being weaponized by protesters and police in Hong Kong. Also, an attempt to change the one-note narrative about Congo, and an exhibit in New York City celebrates street art. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

As bee populations decline, can technology help fill the gap?

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 25, 2019

Humans rely heavily on pollinator bees to sustain food production globally. But for decades, the insects’ population has declined, in part because of pesticide use. If the die-off continues, it will have huge economic and public health consequences for people. William Brangham reports on groups that are working on innovative ways to save the world’s jeopardized bee population — or supplement it.

How violinist Gaelynn Lea is redefining who can be a musician

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 26, 2019

Gaelynn Lea is transforming our cultural understanding of who can be a musician. A congenital disability called osteogenesis imperfecta caused her bones to break more than 40 times while she was in the womb. But the violinist is known for her haunting original songs, innovative interpretations of traditional folk music and growing role as an advocate for disability rights. Jeffrey Brown reports.

PBS NewsHour full episode July 26, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 26, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, election security is again in the forefront after Robert Mueller and a Senate intelligence report warn of the continued threat of Russian interference. Plus: Turmoil continues over national immigration policy, Poland’s democracy at risk, the 2020 campaign trail grows more contentious, analysis of political news with Mark Shields and David Brooks and a violin virtuoso. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Economic growth slows in 2nd quarter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o33_A… House Democrats launch official impeachment investigation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIexl… How dated voting equipment exposes elections to interference https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2FZS… Immigration battles roil in Congress, courts and communities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_Svi… Why Poland’s conservative government is causing the EU alarm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OeNY… How 2020 Democrats are going after each other’s records https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siSZK… Shields and Brooks on Mueller’s testimony, election security https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmtjO… How violinist Gaelynn Lea redefines who can be a musician https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5qQU…

PBS NewsHour full episode July 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 25, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, Puerto Rico’s Gov. Ricardo Rossello finally announces his upcoming resignation after more than a week of protests. Plus: Democratic and Republican reaction to Robert Mueller’s congressional testimony, the Justice Department says it will resume enforcement of the death penalty, bees in danger, Rotterdam’s architecture and a brief but spectacular take on life on Earth. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Trump slams court that blocked new asylum rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAqbk… Rossello resignation puts Puerto Rico at ‘critical juncture’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4IL0… The 3 key points Rep. Jeffries took from Mueller’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JM5Di… How Rep. Collins interpreted what Mueller told Congress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHDik… Federal executions to resume, despite falling public support https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ap7d… As bees continue to die, can technology help fill the gap? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky6AL… How Rotterdam fosters a spirit of architectural exploration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmUNt… What inspired this biologist to study Earth’s creatures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DI5WS…

PBS NewsHour full episode July 24, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 24, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, former special counsel Robert Mueller testifies before two House committees about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible obstruction by President Trump in the investigation that ensued. Plus: Legal experts and congressional representatives from both parties analyze the Mueller hearings and the latest on the political chaos in Puerto Rico. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Partisan divide fuels Mueller hearings on a historic day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9L_f… What Trump and lawmakers are saying about Mueller testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehcU8… 2 former DOJ officials on takeaways from Mueller’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lgy69… ‘Not many surprises’ in Mueller hearings, says Rep. Johnson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeLMN… What worries Rep. Demings about Trump’s responses to Mueller https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2uEC… Will Mueller’s testimony change anything for Trump? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrTBg… Amid political chaos, Puerto Rico is in an ‘anxious place’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At81-… News Wrap: DOJ won’t charge Barr or Ross over census https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKq7H…

PBS NewsHour full episode July 23, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 23, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Congress and the White House reach a two-year budget deal that should avoid a government shutdown but increases debt. Plus: Boris Johnson will become the next British prime minister, questions for Robert Mueller, a former ally of Nicolas Maduro in the U.S., how changing food stamp eligibility will affect working families and a mobile classroom that brings school to kids. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Police and protesters clash in Puerto Rico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSB1u… Is budget deal is a short-term fix for a long-term problem? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYTPM… For Boris Johnson, securing Brexit will be a difficult task https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BoXM… How lawmakers and Trump are preparing for Mueller testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEDKS… Maduro’s former intelligence chief on crisis in Venezuela https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5qNw… Why Trump’s food stamp change will hurt working families https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpwPN… How a mobile classroom is expanding early education access https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6lKT…

How a classroom on wheels is expanding access to early education

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 23, 2019

Although preschool can provide children with a vital foundation for success later in life, only 43 percent of four-year-olds nationwide have access to public preschool. The rate varies widely, with no options available in some rural and low-income areas, sometimes called “childcare deserts.” But a community outside Denver has found an innovative way to bring education to kids. Amna Nawaz reports.

Why Trump’s new limit on food stamp eligibility will affect working families most

PBS NewsHour   Published on Jul 23, 2019

More than 40 states currently allow people who receive welfare benefits to become eligible automatically for food stamps, or SNAP. But the Trump administration has announced new rules to restrict that automatic eligibility, meaning 3 million may stop receiving food stamps. William Brangham talks to the Urban Institute’s Elaine Waxman about why the move could hurt the people SNAP aims to help. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NASA Meets Big Brother – BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on Jul 22, 2019

We get rare access to a lesser-known division of Nasa, where astronauts are locked in a spacecraft for 45 days and scientists study the effect of isolation. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

The Moon Landing: 50 Years On – BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on Jul 15, 2019

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, Click lifts off with technology which takes us back to the moon as well as a little closer to earth. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

The New Silk Road, Part 1: From China to Pakistan | DW Documentary

DW Documentary   Published on Jul 20, 2019

The New Silk Road is a mammoth project intended to connect China with the West. It’s a gigantic infrastructure project that Beijing says will benefit everyone. But this two-part documentary shows China’s predominant self-interest and geopolitical ambitions. The old Silk Road is a legend, whereas the New Silk Road is a real megaproject. China wants to reconnect the world though a network of roads, railways, ports and airports between Asia and Europe. A team of reporters travels by sea and land along the New Silk Road and shows how China, with the largest investment program in history, is expanding its influence worldwide. Their journey begins in Shenzhen on the Pearl River Delta. This is where China’s legendary rise to an economic superpower began 40 years ago. The private market economy experiment unleashed forces that allowed Shenzhen to grow into a mega-metropolis. The team takes a container ship towards Southeast Asia. Its first stop is the port city of Sihanoukville in Cambodia. A joke is making the rounds there these days: you can now travel to China without a passport and without leaving your own country. Sihanoukville is now almost part of China itself! The Chinese have financed practically everything built here in the recent past: the extension of the port, new roads, bridges and factories. Many Cambodians are unhappy and feel like losers in the boom. Rising prices and rents are making the poor even poorer. But for land and house owners, on the other hand, it’s a bonanza. In Myanmar, resistance is already growing. Locals in Kachin have successfully blocked a new dam project, asking how the Chinese could produce energy for their own country whilst leaving the locals themselves without electricity? The Myanmar government pulled the emergency brake and the huge Chinese dam project did not get beyond the first concrete piers in the river. The Karakorum Highway from Kashgar in China across the Roof of the World to Islamabad in Pakistan is one of the most difficult and dangerous roads in this breathtaking mountain world. Once the road is finished, it often disintegrates again, and rock falls and landslides block the highway as if the Karakorum Mountains are trying to deny China strategic access to the Arabian Sea. The first part of the report ends in Islamabad. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

The New Silk Road, part 2: From Kyrgyzstan to Duisburg | DW Documentary

DW Documentary   Published on Jul 20, 2019

The New Silk Road is a mammoth project meant to connect China with the West. It’s a gigantic infrastructure project that Beijing says will benefit all. But this two-part documentary shows another side: of China’s self-interest and geopolitical ambitions. China’s path to global power leads through the legendary trade road. Our authors travel west on two separate paths: One team follows the sea route, along which China is expanding its support bases, while the other follows the ancient Silk Road through Central Asia. Their journey takes them through stunning landscapes and to magical places with ancient caravanserais, where the lore of the old Silk Road lives on. At the same time, they observe China’s overwhelming new influence in immense construction sites and shipping hubs. People everywhere are hoping the new trade will bring them and their children work and prosperity, just as the old Silk Road did hundreds of years ago. But others fear that a future dominated by China will bring them no good at all. “Clean water, the mountains and nature are much more important than the money they give us,” the filmmakers learn in Kyrgyzstan. Chinese investment has not only bestowed the country with better roads, power lines and railway lines, but also with environmental pollution, corruption and crippling debt. Oman is another stop on the line, where Beijing has taken over large parts of a new Special Economic Zone in the desert city of Duqm. You can still see traditional Arab dhows in the old harbor at Sur, but they no longer have a place in today’s international trade. Instead, the horizon is dotted with huge container ships, many of them flying the Chinese flag. Meanwhile, the French port city of Marseille is aiming to become the New Silk Road’s European bridgehead. A small container village in the hills above the city is the first step. Cheap textiles from the Far East are delivered here to the “Marseille International Fashion Center”. MIF 68 for short – 68 is considered a lucky number in China – is geared towards distributing China’s products throughout Europe. The two-part documentary shows the breathtaking dimensions of this gigantic project – one where, it would seem, no stone will be left unturned. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

Todd William: Why Keep Spending Money on Space Exploration?

With so many problems here on earth requiring our attention, how is it possible to justify spending money to explore space? One of the best answers I’ve heard to this was found in a letter written over 40 years ago.

This question was posed to Dr. Ernst Stublinger, the associate director of Science at NASA in the early 1970s. It was asked by a Nun, who felt strongly that the money would better be spent helping starving children.

As part of Stublinger’s reply, he told the following story about a Count from the 1500s:

The Count

About 400 years ago, there lived a count in a small town in Germany. He was one of the benign counts, and he gave a large part of his income to the poor in his town. This was much appreciated, because poverty was abundant during medieval times, and there were epidemics of the plague which ravaged the country frequently.

One day, the count met a strange man. He had a workbench and little laboratory in his house, and he labored hard during the daytime so that he could afford a few hours every evening to work in his laboratory. He ground small lenses from pieces of glass; he mounted the lenses in tubes, and he used these gadgets to look at very small objects.

The count was particularly fascinated by the tiny creatures that could be observed with the strong magnification, and which he had never seen before. He invited the man to move with his laboratory to the castle, to become a member of the count’s household, and to devote henceforth all his time to the development and perfection of his optical gadgets as a special employee of the count.

The townspeople, however, became angry when they realized that the count was wasting his money, as they thought, on a stunt without purpose. “We are suffering from this plague,” they said, “while he is paying that man for a useless hobby!” But the count remained firm. “I give you as much as I can afford,” he said, “but I will also support this man and his work, because I know that someday something will come out of it!”

Indeed, something very good came out of this work, and also out of similar work done by others at other places: the microscope. It is well known that the microscope has contributed more than any other invention to the progress of medicine, and that the elimination of the plague and many other contagious diseases from most parts of the world is largely a result of studies which the microscope made possible.

The count, by retaining some of his spending money for research and discovery, contributed far more to the relief of human suffering than he could have contributed by giving all he could possibly spare to his plague-ridden community.

Full letter found here:
https://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/08/why-explore-space.html

With this in mind, how can anyone argue with spending money on space exploration given that less than 1% of the US Budget goes to NASA?

For more information please visit the following link: https://www.my-thought-spot.com/2019/03/the-proper-way-to-justify-spending.html

The Earth and Moon are like identical twins, made up of the exact same materials — which is really strange, since no other celestial bodies we know of share this kind of chemical relationship. What’s responsible for this special connection? Looking for an answer, planetary scientist and MacArthur “Genius” Sarah T. Stewart discovered a new kind of astronomical object — a synestia — and a new way to solve the mystery of the Moon’s origin.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with U.S. Air Force. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Sarah T. Stewart · Planetary scientist

Sarah T. Stewart specializes in the study of collisions in the solar system.

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What’s going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians’ brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout. [Directed by Sharon Colman Graham, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Peter Gosling].

Meet the educator

Anita Collins · Educator, researcher, writer

Dr. Anita Collins is an educator, researcher and writer in the field of brain development and music learning.

Metabolism & Nutrition, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #36

CrashCourse   Published on Sep 28, 2015

Metabolism is a complex process that has a lot more going on than personal trainers and commercials might have you believe. Today we are exploring some of its key parts, including vital nutrients — such as water, vitamins, minerals, carbs, fats, and proteins — as well as how anabolic reactions build structures and require energy, while catabolic reactions tear things apart and release energy. Anatomy of Hank Poster: https://store.dftba.com/products/crash… — Table of Contents Water, Vitamins, Minerals, Carbs, Fats and Proteins 3:47 Anabolic Reactions Build Structures and Require Energy 2:59 Catabolic Reactions Tear Things Apart and Release Energy 3:17 Metabolism 2:30 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh — Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC… Twitter – https://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr – https://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: https://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: https://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids

Two Collaborative Murals by Pat Perry and Local Schoolchildren Connect Communities in Iraq and Maine

July 26, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Detroit-based artist Pat Perry (previously) travels widely to create drawings, paintings, and murals inspired by the diverse cultures and landscapes of different parts of the world, often with an eye toward forgotten or marginalized people and places. Partnering with aptART and the Good Works Foundation, Perry’s most recent project took him to Maine and Iraq, where he collaboratively designed and painted a pair of murals with local schoolchildren. The two fifth grade classes, located over 5,600 miles apart in Biddeford and Slemani, got to know each other by exchanging videos and artwork. They then assisted Perry with painting their own messages on the new murals.

The resulting project, OPENING LINES, depicts a child in each mural holding a red telephone. Because their backs are turned, the viewer can imagine whether each subject is speaking or listening. Surrounding each figure are doodles and messages written in both English and Arabic by Perry’s young collaborators. Samantha Robison of aptART tells Colossal, “With cultural overlap across the globe unavoidable, the peril of stereotype can be lessened by individual, personal acquaintances across borders; a literal face rather than an idea of one. The most integral part of equality is providing platforms for people to speak, to create, to be listened to.”

The video below offers a glimpse behind the scenes of OPENING LINES. You can follow along with aptART’s youth programming on Instagram and explore more of Perry’s wide-ranging humanist work (including limited edition prints) on his website and Instagram.

Opening Lines Pat Perry   Published on Jul 17, 2019

Corresponding murals painted with groups of kids in Slemani, Iraq and Biddeford, Maine. An aptArts project in conjunction with One Blue Sky/Good Works Foundation. video: Emad Rashidi www.emadrashidi.com/ artwork: Pat Perry www.patperry.com/ www.aptart.org

Category  People & Blogs

Black Swallowtail Butterfly and Ing’s Garden

Captured by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Wednesday, July 24, 2019

At the Backyard Garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey

I usually see Yellow Swallowtail butterflies every year and hardly see any of Black Swallowtail butterflies, but this year I saw this Black Swallowtail butterfly before I saw the Yellow Swallowtail butterfly.  I was lucky to capture the butterfly on my camcorder for only three minutes.  Yellow Swallowtail butterflies usually stay to drink the nectar from the Butterfly bush flowers for about thirty minutes or more.  

I enjoy all kinds of flowers but every year I wait for these large pink flowers.  The flower diameter is about ten inches.  The flower will last only one day.  If the weather is very hot then by the afternoon the flower will wither away.  This year we were very lucky to see a lot of flowers blossom.

These white little daisies have a nice character of their own compared to the other larger flowers in the garden.  They standout strongly and have a nice contrast to the green leaves around them.

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