Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17 & 18

Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17

The Halsey Street Festival, Part 3, Thursday, September 19, 2019,

On Halsey Street between Bleaker Street and New Street, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA

John Watts demonstrated pottery,

Ing’s Peace Project, Ing & Johns Artwork,

A lot of Merchants, Food, Music and Fashion Show

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

More people came to enjoy the activities that The Halsey Street Festival presented.  I brought my Peace Poster offering to the participants of the festival to express their thought on “What does Peace mean to You?” or to them.

I brought Kai’s books for the boy to look at in case he got tired of adult business.

I was very glad to see more people were willing to record their thoughts on Peace.

People were lined up to see john throwing a large pot.

I was glad to see the group of young women who are studying at NJIT (New Jersey Institute of Technology) where I graduated with a master’s degree in Polymer Chemistry in 1980.

This artwork is my – Finished “Peace” artwork 8

Shadow of Peace and  La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ Inc., Puerto Rican Festival in Newark on August 6, 2011, organized by Carlos Maldonado Pastrana, President of La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by  Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to Peace Comes to 5th Annual Arts Music Fair Elwood Park Page:

“Miss. Newark, New Jersey”, & Other people were watching John demonstrate pottery.

I brought Kai, our grandson’s desk chair, and an Alphabet spelling board to the boy and offered him some drink.  He seemed to enjoy playing with the Alphabet spelling board.

Please continue to view The Halsey Street Festival Part 4

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Thursday, February 16, 2020

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17

Ing & Johns Street Art & International Street Art Part 18

International Street Art Part 18

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year

Published on : January 2, 2020 Published by : laurent jacquet

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year P 3, 4 & 5

We’re at the beginning of 2020 and its time for the Streetart360 team to do a retrospective on the most beautiful urban art murals painted in 2019. We’ve selected 100 murals from around the world, some by renown artists and others by new talents. We based our selection on the number of likes and shares they have received on the StreetArt360 social network pages (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest) Please use the comment section to give us your feed back and remember to visit the artists social networks or websites. Thanks for sharing this Top 100. We wish you all the best for 2020.

41. Den Extralargos aka Eva Mena in Puerto Del Rosario, Canary Islands, Spain

Eva Mena links: Website | Instagram | Facebook  page

Den Extralargos aka Eva Mena in Puerto Del Rosario, Canary Islands, Spain

Eva Mena

42. Leticia Mandragora in Cochabamba, Bolivia

Leticia Mandragora links: Instagram | Facebook page

Leticia Mandragora in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Best urban art 2019

Leticia Mandragora

45. GÔMEZ in Naples, Italy

Gomez links: Instagram | Facebook page

GÔMEZ in Naples, Italy

GÔMEZ

46. Murales Lian in Leitza, Spain

Murales Lian links: Blog | Instagram | Facebook page

Murales Lian in Leitza, Spain

Murales Lian

47. Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

Ozmo links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

54. Ella & Pitr in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Ella et Pitr links: Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook page

urban artwork by Ella & Pitr in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Ella & Pitr

55. DEIH in Casablanca, Morocco

photo: M3ayzo.

Deih links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

DEIH in Casablanca, Morocco

DEIH

56. Iljin in Decazeville, France

photo: m.arya.lv.

Iljin links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

best urban artists 2019 Iljin in Decazeville, France

Iljin

59. Herakut and Nuno Viegas in Berlin, Germany

Links Herakut: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

street art masterpiece by Herakut and Nuno Viegas in Berlin, Germany

Herakut and Nuno Viegas

62. Jacoba Niepoort in Halifax, Canada

photo: Stoo Metz

Jacoba Niepoort links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Jacoba Niepoort

Jacoba Niepoort

63. Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

photo: Maria Shkineva

Bikismo links: Instagram | Facebook page

Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

67. Wasp Elder in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Wasp Elder links: Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook page

Wasp Elder in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Wasp Elder

69. Dourone in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Dourone links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Dourone in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Dourone

70. Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

photo: Michael Larsson

Carlos Callizo links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

71. Miramar Moh’d & Dalal Mitwally  in Amman, Jordan

Links  Miramar Moh’d:
Instagram | Facebook
Links dalal Mitwally:
Instagram | Facebook

Photo: Emad

urban art best of 2019

Miramar Moh’d & Dalal Mitwally

73. KAY2 in “Korean Demilitarized Zone”, South Korea

KAY2 links:  Website | Instagram | Facebook page

best street art in Korea

Kay2

74. Case Maclaim in Cancun, Mexico

Case Maclaim links: Instagram | Facebook  – Photo: Instagrafite

Case Maclaim in Cancun, Mexico

Case Maclaim

75. Dmitry Levochkin in Odintsovo, Russia

Dmitry Levochkin links:  Instagram | Facebook page

urban art mural by Dmitry Levochkin in Odintsovo, Russia

Dmitry Levochkin

77. Henri Lamy in Boulogne Billancourt, France

Henry Lamy links: Website | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page

Henri Lamy in Boulogne Billancourt, France

Henri Lamy

78. Cee Pil in Bexhill-on-Sea, UK

Cee Pil links: Instagram | Facebook

best of street art in England Cee Pil in Bexhill-on-Sea, UK

Cee Pil

79. Lula Goce in New Rochelle, New York, USA

Lula Goce links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Credits photo: just_a_spectator

Lula Goce in New Rochelle, New York, USA

Lula Goce

80. Piet Rodriguez  in Kramatorsk, Ukraine

Piet Rodriguez links: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook page

Photo: Artem Getman

Piet Rodriguez  in Kramatorsk, Ukraine

Piet Rodriguez

81. Inti  in Santiago, Chile

INTI links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Inti  in Santiago, Chile

Inti

82. Mabel Vicentef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Mabel Vicentef links: Website | Youtube | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

Mabel Vicentef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Mabel Vicentef

83. L7matrix in Sao Paulo, Brazil

L7M links: Website | Tumblr | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

L7matrix in Sao Paulo, Brazil

L7matrix

84. Evgeni Sosiura aka Mutus in Minsk, Belarus

Mutus links: Instagram | Facebook page

Evgeni Sosiura aka Mutus in Minsk, Belarus

Mutus

85. Daniel Eime in Nazaré, Portugal

Daniel Eime links: Website | Vimeo | Instagram | Facebook page

Photo: Nelson

Daniel Eime in Nazaré, Portugal

Daniel Eime

86. Case Maclaim in Tbilisi, Georgia

Case Maclaim links: Instagram | Facebook page

Case Maclaim in Tbilisi, Georgia

Case Maclaim

87. Telmo Miel in Ghent, Belgium

Telmo Miel links: Website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

Photo: M_FRENCHI

Telmo Miel in Ghent, Belgium

Telmo Miel

89. Swed Oner in Nouméa, New Caledonia, France

Guido Van Helten links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Guido Van Helten in Leiria, Portugal

Guido Van Helten

93. Paola Delfin in Tampere, Finland

Paola Delfin links: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

Paola Delfin in Tampere, Finland

Paola Delfin

94. Andres Cobre aka NDC media in Modesto, California, USA

photo: Ricardo Ontiveros

Andres Cobre Links: Instagram | Facebook page

Andres Cobre aka NDC media in Modesto, California, USA

Andres Cobre

95. Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

Pichi & Avo links: : Website | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook page

Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

97. Rogue One in Glasgow, UK

Rogue One links: Instagram | Facebook page

Rogue One in Glasgow, UK

Rogue One

98. Smates in Geel, Belgium

Smates links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

street art mural by Smates in Geel, Belgium

Smates

100. Manomatic in Patos, Albania

Manomatic links : WebsiteInstagram |  Facebook page

Festival Internaciona de Street Art Albania I.S.A.F.A. Mural Proyect by Urbanact.gr & VIZart

Manomatic mural artwork in albania

Manomatic

8th Annual Light Festival Illuminates Amsterdam with Glowing Sculptural Installations

December 10, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

“Butterfly Effect” by Masamichi Shimada. All photographs, unless noted, © Janus van den Eijnden

This year’s Amsterdam Light Festival, running November 28, 2019, to January 19, 2020, lights up the European city with illuminated art installations. The festival, now in its eighth year, attracts tourists and engages locals at a time when the city is cloaked in darkness for about sixteen hours each day. Visitors to the Light Festival use a phone app to guide themselves through Amsterdam’s city center, perusing twenty light works by artists from around the world. This year’s show theme was “DISRUPT!” and artists reflected the concept in pieces that ruminate on climate change, national history, technology, and more. See some of our favorites here, by Masamichi Shimada, UxU StudioSergey Kim and others. You can explore the full line-up and programming on the Amsterdam Light Festival website.

“Neighborhood” by Sergey Kim. Photograph courtesy of the artist

“Nacht Tekening” by Krijn de Koning 

“Atlantis” by Utskottet

“Surface Tension” by Tom Biddulph and Barbara Ryan

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 18

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Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15 & 16

Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15

The Halsey Street Festival, Part 2, Thursday, September 19, 2019,

On Halsey Street between Bleaker Street and New Street, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA

John Watts demonstrated pottery,

Ing’s Peace Project, Ing & Johns Artwork,

A lot of Merchants, Food, Music and Fashion Show

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

More people came to enjoy the activities that The Halsey Street Festival presented.  I brought my Peace Poster offering to the participants of the festival to express their thought on “What does Peace mean to You?” or to them.

Thanks to this person who was willingly to record her thoughts on Peace.

John started his performance with a pottery demonstration.

People love to take John’s pictures as he is making his magic pottery.

I love the way John produced his pottery or anybody who can have control and discipline enough to achieve making beautiful objects.  I love to work with clay making my sculptures where I do not have to follow the rule and be well disciplined.  One of these days I am going to ask Master John to teach me how to throw on the wheel and produce the controlled pottery.

More people were interested in recording their Peace comments on my Peace Poster.

People seemed to enjoy taking pictures and watching John demonstrate pottery.

It is so lovely to see a mother holding her child, who shows the happiness and comfort of being embraced by his mother with joy.

“Miss. Newark, New Jersey”, stopped her tour to write her comments about Peace.

Beautiful flowers and beautiful people made the atmosphere of the festival vibrant and Peaceful.  This is the kind of harmony we need when people get together to celebrate life.  (No Fighting, No Conflict and No More Wars)

Please continue to view The Halsey Street Festival Part 3

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Sunday, February 2, 2020

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15

Streetart360, TOP 100 Urban Art 2019, Toronto Light Festival,

Ing & John’s Street Art & International Street Art Part 16

International Street Art Part 16

Published on : January 2, 2020 Published by : laurent jacquet

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year P 1 & 2

We’re at the beginning of 2020 and its time for the Streetart360 team to do a retrospective on the most beautiful urban art murals painted in 2019. We’ve selected 100 murals from around the world, some by renown artists and others by new talents. We based our selection on the number of likes and shares they have received on the StreetArt360 social network pages (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest) Please use the comment section to give us your feed back and remember to visit the artists social networks or websites. Thanks for sharing this Top 100. We wish you all the best for 2020.

2. SimpleG in Athens, Greece

SimpleG links: Website | Behance | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page – Photo: John Spinoulas

best of Urban art

SimpleG

3. Nick Napoletano in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

photo: Dave Lee

Nick Napoletano links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Nick Napoletano urban artwork

Nick Napoletano

4. Owen Dippie in Los Angeles, CA, USA

photo: Impermanent Art.

Owen Dippie links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Owen Dippie in Los Angeles, CA, USA

Owen Dippie

7. Saype in Decazeville, France

Saype links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Saype in Decazeville, France

Saype

9. JEKS in Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

JEKS links: Instagram

best street art in USA - Nasa and street art

Jeks

10. Federico Zenobi aka Kor1 in Marotta, Italy

Kor1 links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Federico Zenobi aka Kor1 in Marotta, Italy

Federico Zenobi aka Kor1

14. Noe Two in Havana, Cuba

Noe Two links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Noe Two in Havana, Cuba

Noe Two

15. Sef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

photo: Agustin Silva.

Sef links: Instagram

Sef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Sef

19. El Mac in Los Angeles, CA, USA

El Mac links: Instagram | Facebook page

El Mac in Los Angeles, CA, USA

El Mac

26. Xi de Sign aka Die Dixons in Berlin, Germany

photo: Jörn Reiners.

Die Dixons links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Xi de Sign aka Die Dixons in Berlin, Germany

Die Dixons

28. Sonny Sundancer in Johannesburg, South Africa

Sonny Sundancer links: Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page

Sonny Sundancer in Johannesburg, South Africa

Sonny Sundancer

31. Fanakapan in Berlin, Germany

photo: Nika Kramer

Fanakapan links: Instagram | Facebook page

Fanakapan in Berlin, Germany

Fanakapan

40. Chisme in Benaguasil, Valencia

Asier: Instagram | Facebook page

MUS: Instagram | Facebook page

Chisme in Valencia

Chisme in Valencia

Local and International Artists Produce 21 Light Installations For the Inaugural Toronto Light Festival

February 10, 2017  Kate Sierzputowski

Images via Thane Lucas/Toronto Light Festival

Set within a district of Victorian industrial buildings, the Toronto Light Festival is a free 45-day festival occurring during this year’s winter months as a way to creatively draw the city’s inhabitants out of their homes. Featuring 21 diverse light installations built by local and international artists and thousands of glowing bulbs, the festival covers a total of 13 acres in the city’s Distillery District. Installations range from a series of lit figures appearing to jump from the roof of one of the historic buildings to two red, geometric cats prowling an included alleyway, with several multi-colored works in-between.

You can catch Toronto’s first ever light art festival until March 12, or follow the festival on Instagram to catch snapshots of the glowing installations.

 Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 16

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PBS News, TED Talks, Pocket Worthy, New Small Joys, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: November12-17, 2019, Why Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line to fight climate change, Blockbuster da Vinci exhibition showcases the master’s ‘endless curiosity’, and Why German divisions remain, 30 years after fall of the Berlin Wall

TED Talks: Paul A Kramer Our immigration conversation is broken here’ s how to have a better one?, Juan Enriquez A personal plea for humanity at the us Mexico border, Jon Lowenstein Family hope and resilience on the migrant trail, and Will Hurd A wall won’t solve America’s border problems

Pocket Worthy:  How Einstein Learned Physics

New Small JoysSand Sculptures

Ing’s Peace Project: Peace artwork 2 – The Peace and Art Parade and festival run by the Barat Foundation in Newark on 10.23.2011, organized by Chandri and Gary Barat.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 17, 2019

Nov 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 17, public hearings in the ongoing impeachment inquiry enter a second week, a long-awaited project in Italy that could help keep Venice afloat, and how Australia is trying to save the almost-extinct koalas. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 16, 2019

Nov 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 16, key takeaways from hearings in the impeachment inquiry. Also, a look at Kernza, a little-known grain with several environmental benefits. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 15, 2019

Nov 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a second day of public impeachment hearings, featuring former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. Plus: President Trump’s longtime associate Roger Stone is found guilty of witness tampering and lying to Congress, protests in Hong Kong enter a new phrase, analysis of the latest political news with Shields and Brooks and rebuilding Notre Dame Cathedral. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 14, 2019

Nov 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accuses President Trump of committing bribery with his handling of Ukraine policy. Plus: Controversial emails from presidential adviser Stephen Miller, an exclusive look behind Taliban lines, fighting superbugs, businesses try to retain older employees, a book on elitism, artist Delano Dunn and student letters to the late Gwen Ifill. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 13, 2019

Nov 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a historic day in Washington with the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, featuring witnesses William Taylor and George Kent. Plus: Reaction to the diplomats’ testimonies from House members as well as legal and foreign policy experts, and why Turkish President Erdogan was welcomed at the White House despite U.S.-Turkey tensions over Syria. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What Taylor and Kent said in public impeachment hearings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5BPx… Collins says ‘nothing new’ in 1st public impeachment hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqFks… Speier says Mulvaney, Bolton should testify on Ukraine saga https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Z5fG… Experts analyze testimonies of William Taylor, George Kent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFvj3… Despite Syria tensions, Trump offers Erdogan a warm welcome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXM9t… News Wrap: Israeli airstrikes kill dozens in Gaza https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSspQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 12, 2019

Nov 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Supreme Court hears arguments around President Trump’s move to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. Plus: Impeachment hearings go public, holding gun manufacturers liable for mass shootings, how we got to impeachment, life on Israel’s Lebanon and Gaza borders, and how media giants are competing for Americans’ streaming entertainment dollars. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Supreme Court considers whether DACA termination was legal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrSdO… News Wrap: Bolivia’s Morales goes into exile in Mexico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyNVV… Democratic and Republican messages as public hearings begin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDuWj… Could Remington lawsuit shape state consumer protections? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrBPT… The key events that led to the Trump impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6sXq… For Israelis along the border, violence is a constant threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1QNh… Why more media companies want in on ‘streaming revolution’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=217_t… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Why Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line to fight climate change

Nov 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Jane Fonda has been a household name for decades due to her prolific acting career, both on-screen and on stage. She has also drawn sustained attention for her enduring — and sometimes controversial — activism. Judy Woodruff sits down with Fonda to discuss her climate advocacy, what it’s like to spend the night in jail and how young activists like Greta Thuneberg are shaping a new movement. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Blockbuster da Vinci exhibition showcases the master’s ‘endless curiosity’

Nov 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The blockbuster exhibit of the year celebrates Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years after his death. People are flocking to the Louvre Museum in Paris to see the work of the master, who was born in Italy, died in France and personified the expression Renaissance man. Jeffrey Brown went to see firsthand why da Vinci’s art is drawing massive crowds. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Why German divisions remain, 30 years after fall of the Berlin Wall

Nov 8, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

It’s been 30 years since one of the 20th century’s biggest historic events: the fall of the Berlin Wall. Although the East German dictatorship subsequently collapsed, cultural and political divisions remain, more than a generation after reunification. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on the wall’s legacy, the polarizing issue of immigration and the lingering stain of anti-Semitism. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How did the US immigration debate get to be so divisive? In this informative talk, historian and writer Paul A. Kramer shows how an “insider vs. outsider” framing has come to dominate the way people in the US talk about immigration — and suggests a set of new questions that could reshape the conversation around whose life, rights and thriving matters.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Paul A. Kramer · Historian, writer

Paul A. Kramer’s work focuses on the changing relationships between the United States and the wider world.

More Resources

The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines

Paul A. Kramer

The University of North Carolina Press (2006)

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762,372 views

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Juan Enriquez · Author, academic, futurist

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and brain research will bring about in business, technology, politics and society.

More Resources

The Untied States of America: Polarization, Fracturing, and Our Future

Juan Enriquez

Crown (2005)

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

For the past 20 years, photographer and TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein has documented the migrant journey from Latin America to the United States, one of the largest transnational migrations in world history. Sharing photos from his decade-long project “Shadow Lives USA,” Lowenstein takes us into the inner worlds of the families escaping poverty and violence in Central America — and pieces together the complex reasons people leave their homes in search of a better life.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jon Lowenstein · Documentary photographer, filmmaker, visual artist

TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and visual artist whose work reveals what the powers that be are trying to hide.

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Shadow Lives

Jon Lowenstein

PREORDER NOW (2020)

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learn

Learn more about Jon Lowenstein’s work.

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Support Shadow Lives, a decade-long project documenting the experiences and lives of the millions of people along the migrant trail.

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TEDSummit 2019 | July 2019

“Building a 30-foot-high concrete structure from sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” says Congressman Will Hurd, a Republican from Texas whose district encompasses two times zones and shares an 820-mile border with Mexico. Speaking from Washington, DC in a video interview with former state attorney general Anne Milgram, Hurd discusses the US government’s border policy and its controversial detention and child separation practices — and lays out steps toward a better future at the border. (Recorded at the TED World Theater in New York on September 10, 2019)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Will Hurd · Politician

Congressman Will Hurd represents the 23rd District of Texas in the U.S. House of Representatives, serving constituents across 29 counties and two time zones from San Antonio to El Paso.

Anne Milgram · Criminal justice reformer

Anne Milgram is committed to using data and analytics to fight crime.

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-einstein-learned-physics?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy Stories to fuel your mind.

How Einstein Learned Physics

Einstein was a student long before he became a celebrity. There is a lot to glean from his education and unique approach to learning.

Scott Young

Wanting to understand how Einstein learned physics may, at first, seem as pointless as trying to fly by watching birds and flapping your arms really hard. How do you emulate someone who is synonymous with genius?

However, I think the investigation can still bear fruits, even if you or I might not have the intellectual gifts to revolutionize physics. Whatever Einstein did to learn, he clearly did something right, so there’s merit in trying to figure out what that was.

How Smart Was Einstein? (Did He Really Fail Elementary Mathematics?)

One of the most common stories about Einstein is that he failed grade school math. I think this is one of those ideas that sounds so good it has to get repeated, regardless of whether it is true or not.

Unfortunately, it’s not true. Einstein was a strong math student from a very young age. He himself admits:

“I never failed in mathematics. Before I was fifteen, I had mastered differential and integral calculus.”

While the story about Einstein being an early dullard is certainly false, it’s not the case that he was universally regarded as a genius, either.

Einstein’s grades (highest grade = 6).

In college, Einstein often struggled in math, getting 5s and 6s (out of a possible 6) in physics, but getting only 4s in most of his math courses (barely a passing grade). His mathematics professor, and future collaborator, Hermann Minkowski called him a “lazy dog” and physics professor, Jean Pernet, even flunked Einstein with a score of 1 in an experimental physics course.

At the end of college, Einstein had the dubious distinction of graduating as the second-to-worst student in the class.

The difficulty Einstein had was undoubtedly due in part to his non-conformist streak and rebellious attitude, which didn’t sit well in an academic environment. This would follow him in his future academic career, when he was struggling to find teaching jobs at universities, even after he had already done the work which would later win him the Nobel prize.

Einstein’s discoveries in physics were truly revolutionary, which certainly earns him the title of “genius” by any reasonable standard. However, the early picture of Einstein is more complicated than that. All of this indicates to me, at least, that it can often be very easy to judge the genius of someone after the fact, but perhaps harder to predict in advance.

How Did Einstein Learn Math and Physics?

Given Einstein’s enormous contributions to physics, I think it’s now worthwhile to ask how he learned it.

Throughout the biography, I took notes whenever his methods of learning and discovery were mentioned. Then, I tried to synthesize these observations into several methods or behaviors that appeared to have enabled both Einstein’s revolutionary discoveries and his deep understanding of the subject matter.

1. Learning comes from solving hard problems, not attending classes.

One thing that becomes apparent when looking at Einstein’s early schooling was both his distaste for rote memorization and attending classes. The physics professor that flunked him, did so, in no small part, because Einstein often skipped class. As he claims, “I played hooky a lot and studied the masters of theoretical physics with a holy zeal at home.”

Einstein as a boy.

This habit of skipping classes to focus on solving hard problems in his spare time was one cultivated by his uncle, Jakob Einstein, who first introduced him to algebra. By the time he was 12, Einstein already had a, “predilection for solving complicated problems in arithmetic,” and his parents bought him an advanced mathematical textbook he could study from during the summer.

Einstein learned physics, not by dutifully attending classes, but by obsessively playing with the ideas and equations on his own. Doing, not listening, was the starting point for how he learned physics.

2. You really know something when you can prove it yourself.

How do you know when you really understand something? Einstein’s method was to try prove the proposition himself! This began at an early age, when Uncle Jakob, challenged him to prove Pythagoras’s Theorem:

“After much effort, I succeeded in ‘proving’ this theorem on the basis of the similarity of triangles,” Einstein recalled.

Isaacson explains that Einstein, “tackled new theories by trying to prove them on his own.” This approach to learning physics, which came naturally to Einstein, was driven by a strong curiosity both to know how things actually work, and a belief that, “nature could be understood as a relatively simple mathematical structure.”

What’s important to note here is not only the method of proving propositions to learn physics, but also the drive to do so. It’s clear that Einstein’s curiosity wasn’t merely to perform adequately, but to develop a deep understanding and intuition about physical concepts.

3. Intuition matters more than equations.

Einstein was a better intuitive physicist than he was a mathematician. In fact, it was only when he struggled for years in developing general relativity, that he became more enamored with mathematical formalisms as a way of doing physics.

An early influence which encouraged this intuitive approach to physics was a series of science books by Aaron Bernstein. These books presented imaginative pictures to understand physical phenomenon, such as, “an imaginary trip through space,” to understand an electrical signal and even discussing the constancy of the speed of light, a matter which would later underpin Einstein’s discovery of special relativity.

Swiss education reformer Pestalozzi emphasized learning through images, not by rote.

Einstein’s later education in Aarau, Switzerland, was heavily influenced by the philosophy of Swiss educational reformer, Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi. Pestalozzi claimed, “Visual understanding is the essential and only true means of teaching how to judge things correctly,” adding, “the learning of numbers and language must definitely be subordinated.”

Were these early influences causal factors in Einstein’s later preferred style of visualization to solve physics problems, or were they merely a welcome encouragement for a mind that was already predisposed to reasoning in this way? It’s hard to tell. Whatever the case, I think it can be argued that developing intuitions of ideas, particularly visual intuitions, has an invaluable role in physics.

How does one develop those intuitions? Einstein’s own thoughts were that “intuition is nothing but the outcome of earlier intellectual experience.” Einstein’s hard work building understanding through proofs and solving problems undoubtedly supported his ability to visualize as much as it benefited from it.

4. Thinking requires a quiet space and deep focus.

Einstein was a master of deep work. He had an incredible ability to focus, his son reporting:

“Even the loudest baby-crying didn’t seem to disturb Father,” adding, “He could go on with his work completely impervious to noise.”

Although overlooked for academic positions, it was his intellectually unstimulating job at the Bern patent office, which gave him time and privacy to unravel the mysteries of relativity. Einstein remarks:

“I was able to do a full day’s work in only two or three hours. The remaining part of the day, I would work out my own ideas.”

Einstein in his home office.

The obsessive focus Einstein applied to solving problems as a young boy, eventually served him well in cracking general relativity, culminating in an “exhausting four-week frenzy.” This intensity sometimes impacted his health, with him developing stomach problems in his strain to unravel the difficult mathematics of tensor field equations.

Einstein’s ability to focus, combined with a reverence for solitude, allowed him to do some of his best work in physics. Even as he aged, he still spent many hours on his boat, idly pushing the rudder seemingly lost in thought, interrupted by bursts of scribbling equations in his notebook.

5. Understand ideas through thought experiments.

Einstein’s most famous method for learning and discovering physics has to be the thought experiment.

Books such as this were Einstein’s first introduction to the power of thought experiments.

One of his most famous was imagining riding on a beam of light. What would happen to the light beam as he rode alongside it at the same speed? Well, it would have to freeze. This, to Einstein, seemed impossible by his faith in Maxwell’s electromagnetic equations. But if the light doesn’t freeze, what must happen?

These thought experiments were built on his intuitive understanding of physics, which in turn was built on his experience with working through theories and problems. Their strength, however, was to draw attention to contradictions or confusions that may have been missed by a less intuitive physicist.

His ability to engage in thought experiments even served him when he ended up being wrong about the underlying physics. It was exactly this type of thought experiment that he suggested to refute the current understanding of quantum physics in what is now known as the ERP paper, which showed that quantum mechanics could create changes in a system instantaneously, violating the speed of light. In this case, however, Einstein’s intuition was wrong—quantum mechanical systems do behave in such bizarre ways—which is now known as quantum entanglement.

6. Overturn common sense … with more common sense.

Special and general relativity stand out as being some of the most mind-bending scientific discoveries of all time. With special relativity, Einstein discovered that there is no absolute time—that two people moving at different speeds can disagree about the passage of time—with neither being right or wrong. With general relativity, Einstein went further, showing that gravity bends space and time.

Einstein at age 42, the year he won the Nobel prize.

It would be reasonable to assume, therefore, that to overturn such commonsense principles would require some departure from common sense. However, Einstein’s genius was to reconcile two commonsense principles—relativity and the constancy of the speed of light—by discarding a third (the idea of absolute measurements of space and time).

Einstein’s talent, it would seem, lay in his ability to defend what he thought were the most reasonable ideas, even if that meant discarding ones which had a longer tradition of being thought to be correct.

This skill of overturning commonsense with other intuitions may have also eventually been behind his inability to accept quantum mechanics, a very successful theory of physics that he himself helped create. His intuitions about strict determinism, led him to champion an unsuccessful and quixotic quest to overturn the theory for much of his life.

This practice also suggests a method for learning the many, counter-intuitive principles of math and physics—start by building off of a different commonsense premise.

7. Insights come from friendly walks.

While solitude and focus were essential components of how Einstein learned and did physics, it was often conversations with other people that provided his breakthroughs.

Albert Einstein with Michele Besso.

The most famous example of this was a walk with longtime friend Michele Besso. During his struggles with special relativity, he walked with his friend trying to explain his theory. Frustrated, he declared that, “he was going to give up,” working on the theory. Suddenly, however, the correct insight came to him and the next day he told Besso that he had, “completely solved the problem.”

Discussing ideas aloud, sharing them with others, can often put together insights that were previously unconnected. Einstein made great use of this technique of discussing tricky problems with friends and colleagues, even if they were merely a sounding board rather than an active participant in the discussion.

8. Be rebellious.

Einstein was never much of a conformist. While his rebellious streak probably hurt his earlier academic career when he was struggling to find work in physics, it is also probably what enabled his greatest discoveries and accentuated his later celebrity.

This rebelliousness likely helped him in learning physics as he pushed against the traditions and orthodoxy he didn’t agree with. He hated the German educational system, finding in Isaacson’s words, “the style of teaching—rote drills, impatience with questioning—to be repugnant.” This rejection of the common educational method encouraged him to learn physics on his own through textbooks and practice.

Later, the same rebelliousness would be essential in revolutionizing physics. His research on the quantization of light, for instance, had been first discovered by Max Planck. However, unlike the older Planck, Einstein saw the quantization as being a physical reality—photons—rather than a mathematical contrivance. He was less attached to the predominant theory of the time that light was a wave in the ether.

Where many students would have been happy to conform to predominant educational and theoretical orthodoxies, Einstein wasn’t satisfied unless something made sense to him personally.

9. All knowledge starts with curiosity.

“Curiosity has its own reason for existing,” Einstein explains. “One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality.”

Einstein, curious until the end.

This curiosity is probably Einstein’s most defining quality, after his intelligence. His love of physics started as a boy when he was given a compass and fascinated by the idea that the needle moved because of an unseen force.

Curiosity was his motivation for learning physics. Einstein, who could be quite lazy and obstinate when a matter didn’t interest him, nonetheless had an intense passion for understanding the things, “the ordinary adult never bothers his head about.” Curiosity was also, in his own mind, the greatest reason for his accomplishments.

Einstein believed that, “love is a better teacher than a sense of duty.” Love of learning and knowledge is, perhaps, a more important skill to cultivate than discipline.

Learning as Einstein Did

Einstein’s approach towards learning cannot be entirely separated from who he was. Was his obsessive focus a result of his intelligence or his curiosity? Did his ability to easily visualize thought experiments come from encouragement in an unusual Swiss education system, extensive practice or natural ability? Was his revolution in physics a product of genius, rebelliousness, luck or maybe all three? I’m not sure there are clear answers to any of those questions.

What is clear, however, was Einstein’s reverence for nature and the humbled attitude to which he approached investigating it. As he wrote:

“A spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe—a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.”

And, so even if Einstein’s genius may lay outside the reach of most of us, his curiosity, humility and tenacity are still worth emulating.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-einstein-learned-physics?utm_source=pocket-newtab

40+ Amazing Sand Sculptures That Breathes Life Into Sand

If you’re at the beach and done with swimming what can you do? Most will build sand castles and sculptures, but some decide to go ahead and create art.

Sand art, or sand sculptures, in particular, have been quite popular and competitions and exhibitions are regularly held across the world. Of course, sand castles are the most known form of sand sculptures as kids just love building them.

It turns out to create more professional looking and detailed sand sculptures, just sand, and water will suffice – but it’s important that special sculpture sand is being used in order to maintain a stable structure.

Below is a list of 55 most amazing sand sculptures across the world that will probably give you a whole new perspective on using sand to build art.

1) Wonderland

With a beautiful sand castle like this, people would immediately want to jump in and accompany Alice on her journey to Wonderland.

Source: Octopodart

2) Rebel, rebel

Sometimes, statues are just a little bit too mainstream. Sand statues are just so much cooler! Someone made this amazing sculpture in David Bowie’s honor. The king of pop rock would definitely be proud.

Source: mcelliot_travel

3) Sand Dragon

Just look at the details of this wonderfully crafted dragon! Everything has been meticulously created, from his teeth up to his eyes and even the woman standing before the dragon’s very eyes. A true work of art.

Source: See The World With Green Eyes

4) Arabian Nights

This beautiful sculpture of Sheherazade was built in the Netherlands. The story of 1001 Nights or Arabian Nights has been told over many centuries, and this is an amazing representation of that story, created with sand.

Source: Svenpunt

5) Hey Mickey

Every year, the coastal city of Ostend in Belgium organizes a summer sand sculpture festival. One year, the main theme was Disney, so this welcoming Mickey Mouse was standing near the entry to say hello to all visitors!

Source: Happy_Love_Life_24

6) Welcoming hands

There is only one word to describe this sand sculpture: beautiful. The details are incredible, as you can see the ridges of the fingerprints, for example. And who wouldn’t want to welcome a cute baby like this with both hands?

Source: dehaenmichelle

7) Ready to ride

This picture was taken at an Oktoberfest event in Germany. Aside from drinking lots of beer during the festivities, you can apparently also spot great sand sculptures such as this one!

Source: Carl, Flickr

8) Sandglobes

These balls of sand are known as ‘sandglobes’, and putting them in formations such as these makes for a really appealing structure. This particular work of art was created by sand artist Naija Fatima.

Source: Sandglobes

9) For the GoT fans

If you’ve ever watched Game of Thrones, you’ll immediately recognize these two. The sand sculpture version of Daenerys Targaryen and her dragon looks amazing!

Source: Realalexander

10) Miniature city

Not every sand sculpture needs to be humongous and imposing, smaller pieces such as this one manage to capture the finesse of sand art perfectly too. This small and charming sand city in Australia looks like a real-life painting!

Source: georgie_girl_by_sandra

Ing’s Peace Project: Peace artwork 2   

The Peace and Art Parade and festival run by the Barat Foundation in Newark on 10.23.2011, organized by Chandri and Gary Barat.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

It took me a while to be able to complete this project.  I spent some time to compose this second finished artwork for the Peace Project.  The writings were the comments from the people on “What does Peace mean to you?” at the Washington Park and some of the people who participated in the Creation Nation Art and Peace Parade on Sunday, October 23, 2011, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Link to Peace Project and Creation Art Peace Parade Page:

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PBS News, BBC News, TED Talks, Unexplained Mysteries, My Modern Met, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: November 5-11, 2019

BBC News: Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager, and Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

TED Talks: Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck the price of a clean internet, Claire Wardle How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust, and Misha Glenny Hire the hackers,

Unexplained Mysteries: 5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

My Modern Met: Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

Ing’s Peace Project: Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland

PBS NewsHour full episode November 11, 2019

Nov 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, embattled Bolivian President Evo Morales resigns, leaving the country with a vacuum of power. Plus: Violence grips Hong Kong protests, an impeachment inquiry update, how Rudy Giuliani became involved with Ukraine, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, the Supreme Court takes up DACA “Dreamers,” rural arts in Minnesota and a Veterans Day commemoration. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 10, 2019

Nov 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 10, three officials will testify in public hearings this week as part of the impeachment inquiry, and humanitarian workers along the U.S.-Mexico border face prosecution under federal law for helping undocumented migrants. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 9, 2019

Nov 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 9, Republicans release their witness wishlist, why Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Graham Nash is performing his lesser-known tracks, and Marie Kondo’s tidying tricks for kids. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 8, 2019

Nov 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, House committees release transcripts from two more witnesses in the impeachment inquiry — and President Trump expresses anger toward the whistleblower. Plus: The 30th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s collapse, Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week’s political news, a brief but spectacular take on comedy and the year’s blockbuster Leonardo da Vinci exhibition. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How depositions link Mulvaney to Ukraine impeachment saga https://youtu.be/Km8TDlhoUGg News Wrap: Anonymous staffer’s book says Trump unfit to lead https://youtu.be/0qQHD_IvDEk 30 years after Berlin Wall, why German divisions remain https://youtu.be/zdif8sKubJM Shields and Brooks on impeachment hearings, state elections https://youtu.be/e664ih4ByQ8 Scott Aukerman on the origins of ‘Between Two Ferns’ https://youtu.be/UQQGS7TJCIg Louvre exhibition showcases da Vinci’s ‘endless curiosity’ https://youtu.be/eblCEzB0M0c Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 7, 2019

Nov 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

Thursday on the NewsHour, how far did President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, go to circumvent normal U.S. diplomatic channels with Ukraine? Plus: Saudi Arabia uses Twitter to target dissent, California fire fallout for utility PG&E, the latest on the health care marketplace, privacy issues around DNA testing, toxic pollution over India and Jane Fonda’s climate change crusade. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 6, 2019

Nov 6, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, election results from high-profile races in Kentucky, Mississippi and Virginia. Plus: The latest revelations from the impeachment inquiry, a conversation with Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the risks and benefits of genetic genealogy in solving crimes, the launch of NewsHour’s Broken Justice podcast and Ben Crump’s new book about the racist flaws of American criminal justice. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 5, 2019

Nov 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour   

Tuesday on the NewsHour, transcripts are released from the testimonies of two figures central to the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Analysis of and reaction to the newly released transcripts, U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate deal, criminal justice reform in Oklahoma, standardized tests in higher education admissions, rejecting white supremacy and a new film from actor and director Edward Norton. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager

By James Gallagher Health and science correspondent

Image copyright Ewan Fisher

A teenage boy nearly died after vaping caused a catastrophic reaction in his lungs, doctors in Nottingham say.

Ewan Fisher was connected to an artificial lung to keep him alive after his own lungs failed and he could not breathe.

Ewan told BBC News e-cigarettes had “basically ruined me” and urged other young people not to vape.

His doctors say vaping is “not safe”, although health bodies in the UK say it is 95% safer than tobacco.

Listen: Beyond Today – Can vaping kill you?

What happened?

Ewan started vaping in early 2017. He was 16 at the time and wanted to quit smoking to improve his boxing.

Despite being under age, he said, “it was easy” to buy either cigarettes or e-cigarettes.

In May that year, Ewan was finding it harder and harder to breathe.

His mother took Ewan to accident and emergency on the night before his GCSE exams, because he was coughing and choking in his sleep.

His lungs were failing and he very quickly ended up on life-support in intensive care in Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham.

“I thought I was going to die,” Ewan told BBC News.

Ewan was getting worse. Even ventilation could not get enough oxygen into his body and his life was in the balance.

Image copyright Ewan Fisher Image caption Ewan was attached to an ECMO machine to keep him alive

He was taken to Leicester and attached to an artificial lung or ECMO (extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) machine.

“This machine saved my life,” he said.

Large tubes took blood out of Ewan, removed the carbon dioxide, added oxygen and pumped the blood back into his body.

“He had very serious respiratory failure, he had to go to ECMO and that is a very big deal,” Dr Jayesh Bhatt, a consultant at Nottingham University Hospitals, told BBC News.

“He got as ill as anyone can get.”

The case – from May 2017 – has just come to light in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

How is Ewan now?

Ewan, who is 19 on Tuesday, had a long recovery. It was six months before he was properly up and, on his feet, again.

“I’m still not back to normal, I’d say 75-80%, it’s in the last six months that I’m feeling a bit stronger in myself,” he said.

“Vaping has basically ruined me, I try to tell everyone and they think I’m being stupid, I tell my mates and they don’t listen.

“They still do it, they all still vape, but they’ve seen what I’ve been through.

“Is it worth risking your life for smoking e-cigs?

“I don’t want you to end up like me and I don’t want you to be dead, I wouldn’t wish [that] on anyone.”

Ewan also fears being around other vapers – everywhere from the pub to High Street – could damage his lungs again.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxCERN, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speakers

Hans Block · Filmmaker, theater director, musician

Under the label Laokoon, Hans Block develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

Moritz Riesewieck · Author, scriptwriter, theater and film director

Under the label Laokoon, Moritz Riesewieck develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

More Resources

The Cleaners

Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck

Gebrueder Beetz Filmproduktion (2018)

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxCERN | November 2018

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

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Learn more skills to help you navigate the online world.

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TED2019 | April 2019

Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation — and learn we can start to make the internet less toxic.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Andrew Marantz · Writer

Andrew Marantz writes narrative journalism about politics, the internet and the way we understand our world.

More Resources

Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation

Andrew Marantz

Viking (2019)

Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Misha Glenny · Underworld investigator

Journalist Misha Glenny leaves no stone unturned (and no failed state unexamined) in his excavation of criminal globalization.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

May 30, 2019

Unexplained Mysteries

5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. We take a look at these 5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been at the center of a number of public discoveries. So today, here at unexplained mysteries, we will be highlighting the incredible breakthroughs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to help show the overwhelming support the agency has provided for the fields of science and technology. Thank you for watching! Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!

BBC News: “If I see someone with the same disability as I have, I encourage them to show the world what you can do.”

Manners from Zimbabwe makes artwork using thrown away cans.

bbc.in/36NEaqZ (via BBC News Africa

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-47975425/zimbabwean-manners-mukuwiri-recycles-rubbish-into-art?fbclid=IwAR3UQdowWVDz-5Lp6g_06dVFUJUpMb90OBjsIVAgTEVMFFfttoPPA2CeZgU

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri was struggling to earn a living until he started turning rubbish into art.

People with disabilities can often find it difficult to find work in the country, but his creations sell for up to $800 (£615) and Manners is hoping to turn his hobby into a full-time career.

Video journalists: Ashley Ogonda and Anthony Irungu.  22 Apr 2019

Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

By Jessica Stewart on October 23, 2019

Fluorescent turtle embryo. Teresa Zgoda & Teresa Kugler (Campbell Hall, New York, USA). First Place. Stereomicroscopy, Fluorescence. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

For forty-five years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the microscopic world and, in the process, allowed scientists and enthusiasts to show off the artistry of scientific imagery. Passionate micro-photographers from nearly 100 countries submitted over 2000 stunning pieces of microphotography to the competition. In the end, the expert judging panel narrowed the field to the top 20 images with a photo of a turtle embryo taking the top prize.

The colorful image, taken by microscopy technician Teresa Zgoda and recent university graduate Teresa Kugler, is the result of painstaking work done with precision and skill. Extensive image-stitching was necessary to create the final photograph, as the size and thickness of the turtle embryo meant that only a small portion of the turtle could be photographed at one time. By stacking and stitching together hundreds of photographs, the duo was able to create an image that is both scientifically and artistically satisfying.

“Microscopy lets us zoom in on the smallest organisms and building blocks that comprise our world–giving us a profound appreciation for the small things in life that far too often go unnoticed,” shared Kugler, “It allows me to do science with a purpose.”

The turtle wasn’t the only embryo in the winning selection. Reproduction was a topic for many photographers. An alligator and a California two-spot octopus embryo, as well as a pregnant planktonic crustacean and mosquito larva also joined the top twenty. Away from the animal kingdom, something as simple as a frozen drop of water was transformed into a mesmerizing, abstract photograph. At the same time, a close view of different flora helps us marvel at the beauty and precision of how nature develops.

Whether using focus stacking, image stacking, or confocal microscopy, the techniques employed help these scientists bring their vision to life. And as technology continues to grow and evolve, we can only expect even richer results. Take a look at the rest of the top 20 photos from the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition below and view more finalists via their online gallery.

For 45 years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the artistry of scientific imagery.

Alligator embryo developing nerves and skeleton. Daniel Smith Paredes & Dr. Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar (Yale University, Department of Geology and Geophysics, New Haven, Connecticut, USA). Third Place. Immunofluorescence. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Small white hair spider. Javier Rupérez (Almáchar, Málaga, Spain). Sixth Place. Reflected Light, Image Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Housefly compound eye pattern. Dr. Razvan Cornel Constantin (Bucharest, Romania). 16th Place. Focus Stacking, Reflected Light. 50x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Tulip bud cross section. Andrei Savitsky (Cherkassy, Ukraine). Ninth Place. Reflected Light. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Female Oxyopes dumonti (lynx) spider. Antoine Franck (CIRAD – Agricultural Research for Development, Saint Pierre, Réunion). 14th Place. Focus Stacking. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Male mosquito. Jan Rosenboom (Universität Rostock, Rostock, Mecklenburg Vorpommern, Germany). Fourth Place. Focus Stacking. 6.3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Octopus bimaculoides embryo. Martyna Lukoseviciute & Dr. Carrie Albertin (University of Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom). 19th Place. Confocal, Image Stitching. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Snowflake. Caleb Foster (Caleb Foster Photography, Jericho, Vermont, USA). Fifth Place. Transmitted Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Chinese red carnation stamen. Dr. Guillermo López López (Alicante, Spain). Seventh Place. Focus Stacking. 3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cuprite (mineral composed of copper oxide). Dr. Emilio Carabajal Márquez (Madrid, Spain). Focus Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Vitamin C. Karl Deckart (Eckental, Bavaria, Germany). 17th Place. Brightfield, Polarized Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification)

Depth-color coded projections of three stentors (single-cell freshwater protozoans). Dr. Igor Siwanowicz (Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, Virginia, USA). Second place. Confocal. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Frozen water droplet. Garzon Christian (Quintin, Cotes-d’Armor, France). Eighth Place. Incident Light. 8x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Pregnant Daphnia magna (small planktonic crustacean). Marek Mi? (Marek Mi? Photography, Suwalki, Podlaskie, Poland). 15th Place. Modified Darkfield, Polarized Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cristobalite crystal suspended in its quartz mineral host. E. Billie Hughes (Lotus Gemology, Bangkok, Thailand). 18th Place. Darkfield. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Mosquito larva. Anne Algar (Hounslow, Middlesex, United Kingdom). 12th Place. Darkfield, Polarizing Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

A pair of ovaries from an adult Drosophila female stained for F-actin (yellow) and nuclei (green); follicle cells are marked by GFP (magenta). Dr. Yujun Chen & Dr. Jocelyn McDonald (Kansas State University, Department of Biology, Manhattan, Kansas, USA). 11th Place. Confocal. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Blood vessels of a murine (mouse) heart following myocardial infarction (heart attack). Simon Merz, Lea Bornemann & Sebastian Korste (University Hospital Essen, Institute for Experimental Immunology & Imaging, Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany). 20th Place. Tissue Clearing, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy. 2x (Objective Lens Magnification).

BPAE cells in telophase stage of mitosis. Jason M. Kirk (Baylor College of Medicine, Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core, Houston, Texas, USA). 10th Place. Confocal with Enhanced Resolution. 63x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Nikon Small World: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Nikon Small World.

Finished “Peace” artwork 13

Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on during May and June 2014, organized by Joseph Giacalone Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Links to the finished Peace Project of the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland artwork page:

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PBS News, DW Documentary, NatureNorth, 4 Ever Green, Biju Varkey, TED Talks, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: September16-22, 2019

DW Documentary: Coca-Cola’s plastic secrets

NatureNorth: From Egg to Frog in 7 Weeks!

4 Ever Green: 10 Most Beautiful Butterflies on Planet Earth

 Biju Varkey: Butchart Gardens, Pocket Worthy: 22,000 Days Without Drinking Water and Physics Explains Why Time Passes Faster As You Age

TED Talks: Megan Phelps Roper I Grew up in the Westboro Baptist Church Here is Why I Left and Jonathan Haidt can a Divided America Heal

Thisiscolossal: An Incredible Aerial Tour of Earth’s Surface from the International Space Station and Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions

Ing’s Peace Project: Salon Creative Lounge Event, presented by the International Women Artist’ salon,154 Stanton Street at Suffolk, New York City, NY

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show September 22, 2019

•Streamed live 4 hours ago

PBS NewsHour   1.39M subscribers

On this edition for Sunday, September 22, President Trump hits the road as international issues take center stage, the General Motors strike enters its second week, and a look at what Peru is doing to reform a gold-mining industry that has decimated part of the Amazon rain forest. Megan Thompson anchors from New York.

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show September 21, 2019

Streamed live 4 hours ago

PBS NewsHour

1.38M subscribers

On this edition for Saturday, September 21, the U.S. says it will provide “defense support” to Saudi Arabia, young people take the lead on climate change at the Youth Climate Summit, and Peru’s government cracks down on gold mining in the Amazon. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 20, 2019

•Published on Sep 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, new details are being reported about a whistleblower complaint that might involve President Trump. Plus: Severe floods in southeastern Texas, the world’s largest climate change demonstrations, why Three Mile Island is closing, political analysis from Shields and Brooks and the movie premiere of the beloved “Downton Abbey.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 19, 2019

Published on Sep 19, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Rep. Adam Schiff weighs in on an “urgent” whistleblower complaint that’s causing a standoff between the White House and Congress. Plus: Fallout from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s blackface scandal, the Senate GOP’s gun policy ideas, rising costs of Guantanamo Bay, economic risks of a climate crisis, a Native voice in poetry and connecting through portraiture. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Iran threatens ‘all-out war’ if attacked by U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDXTf… Schiff says ‘we’re at risk’ over handling of whistleblower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJssW… For many Canadians, Trudeau blackface photos come as a shock https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NT4B… Public pressure on guns galvanizes Senate GOP, despite Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6s2A… Why cost of holding prisoners at Guantanamo Bay keeps rising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lDKI… Why extreme climate scenarios no longer seem so unlikely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu3Wo… Poet laureate Joy Harjo opens a Native ‘doorway of hope’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOArJ… Toyin Ojih Odutola on connecting through portraiture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N3XM…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 18, 2019

Published on Sep 18, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Fed cuts its benchmark interest rate for the second time in three months to keep the economy growing. Plus: Will attacks on Saudi oil sites prompt a U.S. military response, Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom on President Trump’s change to emissions rules, Maine lobsters suffer in warming waters, mining sand in Cambodia, teens on vaping dangers and a special retirement message. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Israel’s government in limbo after close election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1anGV… How U.S. economists have driven growth-oriented policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHaVb… What attacks on Saudi oil sites mean for the U.S. and Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DbIN… Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom on changes to auto emission rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Di5uj… How rising water temperatures could end Maine’s lobster boom https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iCrL… How sand mining is threatening Cambodia’s Mekong River https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tmyhe… How teens are reacting to news of vaping dangers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAFw9… A special retirement message for beloved teacher Mr. Moe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsIQA…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 17, 2019

•Published on Sep 17, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski testifies before the House Judiciary Committee — but doesn’t say much. Plus: What’s at stake in Israel’s second election of the year, Texas gun owners talk about universal background checks and red flag laws, how government detention can hurt children and remembering journalist and beloved NewsHour friend Cokie Roberts. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Taliban attacks kill at least 48 in Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOUR0… What Democrats and Republicans took from Lewandowski hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7E_4B… 2nd election, corruption charges place Netanyahu in jeopardy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG6FJ… How Texas gun owners feel about these reform ideas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-afcR… How detention centers deepen migrant children’s trauma https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ7vE… Linda Wertheimer and Nina Totenberg remember Cokie Roberts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF1Lb…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 16, 2019

Published on Sep 16, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, a strike by 50,000 General Motors workers at plants across the country puts the brakes on production. Plus: Airstrikes on two major Saudi oil fields increase U.S. tension with Iran, Israelis go to the polls for the second time in a year, Politics Monday, the first woman of color on network late-night TV and an artist’s brief but spectacular take on his unique visual medium. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Purdue Pharma files for bankruptcy protection https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgcPM… What’s at stake for GM and other automakers with UAW strike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XAvO… Will reaction to Saudi oil attacks ‘spiral out of control’? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vyAkd… How 2nd election could reshape Israel’s political landscape https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xde9D… Stu Rothenberg and Domenico Montanaro on gun policy in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJJ8g… How Lilly Singh is making late-night TV history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZuE0… Visual artist Angel Otero on discovering his creative voice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfP4c… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category    News & Politics

Coca-Cola’s plastic secrets | DW Documentary

Published on Sep 19, 2019

DW Documentary

By 2050, there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. Ten tons of plastic are produced every second. Sooner or later, a tenth of that will end up in the oceans. Coca-Cola says it wants to do something about it – but does it really? In January 2018, Coca-Cola made an ambitious announcement: The brand, which sells 120 billion plastic bottles every year, promised a “world without waste” by 2030. But filmmaker Sandrine Rigaud was skeptical about this ostensibly noble resolution. In Tanzania, for example, far from the company’s American headquarters, a different picture emerges. Here everyone waits for red-and-white buses and walks by red-and-white walls, and the children play with red-and-white equipment in the playgrounds. The Coca-Cola logo is ubiquitous. But what is even more worrying is that history is repeating itself here. As it did 50 years ago in the United States, Coca-Cola has been continuously replacing glass bottles with plastic ones since 2013. Coca-Cola Vice President Michael Goltzman tries to play down the problem, saying it’s not the plastic bottles themselves that are the problem, but the lack of suitable infrastructure in Tanzania. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

From Egg to Frog in 7 Weeks!

•Published on Apr 13, 2014

NatureNorth

The development of Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) eggs to froglets in 49 days, just 7 weeks!

Category   Education

10 Most Beautiful Butterflies on Planet Earth

•Published on Jul 15, 2019

4 Ever Green

These cute and colorful creatures known as Butterflies are heart of our beautiful nature and it is very important that we keep these beautiful insects highlighted. These wonderful creatures have hundreds of species and names but I have listed only 10 of the most beautiful ones that are appealing to me. You can comment which one you like the most and why. Subscribe To Our Channel : https://bit.ly/4EverGreen More Videos About Colorful Animals You Won’t Believe Actually Exist: Beautiful Insects: https://youtu.be/7HYj798vyM8 Beautiful Fishes: https://youtu.be/YXPQmr-S9Uk Beautiful Frogs: https://youtu.be/9k1hNqP4vmw Beautiful Snakes: https://youtu.be/mnuxdYwtxm0 Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/4EGYT Twitter: https://twitter.com/4EverGreens Google+:https://plus.google.com/+fourevergreen For more videos and articles visit our website: https://www.4evergreen.org/ For Any Copyright Concerns, Contact Us at our email address. We will act upon your query immediately.

Category   Pets & Animals

Butchart Gardens

Published on Oct 23, 2017

Biju Varkey

The Butchart Gardens is a group of floral display gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada, located near Victoria on Vancouver Island. The gardens receive close to a million visitors each year. Gears Used Zhiyun Crane v2 https://zhiyun.us/collections/all Sony PXWX70 4K https://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/micro-x… Nikon D800E Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8G ED www.onreviews.ca

Category   Travel & Events

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/22-000-days-without-drinking-water?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy:

·Stories to fuel your mind.

22,000 Days Without Drinking Water

Bolivia’s populist president has vowed to lift the fortunes of the rural poor. But high on the Andean plateau, one remote community still has no access to clean water—and one man has the awesome responsibility of ensuring his people are not parched.

Narratively | Michele Bertelli, Felix Lill, and Javier Sauras

Photos by Javier Sauras

It’s almost seven o’clock in the morning. The thermometer does not dare to peek above thirty degrees Fahrenheit but the sun bites every time it manages to find its way through the clouds of the high Andean plateau. Jacinto Sirpa, a peasant and member of the Aymara indigenous community, pulls down his camouflage hat over a woolen cap. Everything about him has the flavor of the Earth: chestnut coat, gray trousers, brown sneakers; a pair of beige gloves protects his copper hands while he ropes his old donkey, loaded with four large empty drums. Sirpa focuses his umber eyes, surrounded by wrinkles, on a distant barren slope and starts walking. He has to reach the slope, one hour walking from his home, to get some water. Just as he has done throughout his entire life. The same journey he has been repeating for sixty years now; 22,000 days without clean drinking water.

“I have never had drinking water,” says the farmer, shyly. “I have never drunk clean water.”

Jacinto Sirpa Condori is not one of a kind. Two million people don’t have drinking water piped into their houses in Bolivia and half of the population lacks basic sanitation. Sirpa lives in a rural community that is within the city of Viacha, two hours from La Paz, the capital. Despite living so close to the Presidential palace, Sirpa’s life is harsh. At 13,000 feet above sea level, even oxygen is a scarce resource.

***

The sun shines high in the sky, and Sirpa is back in his house of mud and straw. Using a colander, he filters the water he just brought from the pond and prepares coca tea. Sirpa knows better than anyone that the liquid he collects daily in the wetlands is not potable. His loneliness says so.

Jacinta Sirpa on his way to his only source of water – through a barren landscape, an hour away from home.

“These days my wife is sick, my children are sick; it seems that the land is also tired and no longer bears good fruits,” he says in a sad voice. Quiet, with simple and smooth movements, he pours the mate tea on the ground before taking a small mouthful. It is an offering to the Pachamama goddess so that she may look kindly upon him. “Hopefully, one day we will have water, and maybe we could irrigate and sow the fields. Do something.”

Sirpa believes in indigenous reciprocity towards Mother Earth, to whom he always gives something when there is something that he takes. However, these days he prefers to ask government institutions to address his problem of water scarcity rather than praying to the goddess. After leading the cattle to graze, the farmer uses one of the drums to wash himself. Then, he slithers into a red-and-black poncho, takes his ceremonial instruments and changes the camouflage hat out for a dark fedora. This year he has been appointed “Uma Mallku” of his community: overseer of the waters. In the Aymara society, Mallkus are rotating positions, their holder charged with ensuring the community has enough water. From a shack, he pulls out two large, rolled-up sheets, with documents and drawings, and gets back on track, crossing the infinite vastness of the “Altiplano.”

Sirpa speaking to the community. As the Uma Mallku, or Overseer of Water, he listens to the community’s concerns, writes down their suggestions and takes them to the local authority. Then, he will come back with answers from the officials.

“Governmental institutions don’t reach these places,” he says while strolling. In Central Coniri, the small rural community where he lives, they feel forgotten. Recently, several of the neighboring towns have inaugurated water wells and pipelines. According to a joint study carried out by UNICEF and the World Health Organization, twenty-four percent of the Bolivian population has gained access to improved water resources in the last fifteen years. Yet in rural areas, only fifty-seven percent of the population have pipelines installed and working in their plots. This ongoing shortage has drawn farmers towards the city like water emptying into a drain.

“Many have gone to the cities,” says Sirpa. “If there is no water, people cannot live.”

The Uma Mallku looks tired but he is relentless at heart. He will later gather his people to explain how the water works are progressing. Sirpa will listen to their concerns, write down their suggestions and take them to the local authority. Then, he will come back with the answers from officials. He is caught in a crossfire. His neighbors are angry because nobody is teaching them how to manage the water system that will soon be built. The city has promised him to send someone to give courses on technical issues, water pricing, sustainability and basic hygiene. Some of the elders will have to learn how to use a faucet and about the perks of washing their hands. Nothing has happened yet. In the belly of the “Altiplano,” time stands still.

As the Uma Mallku, Sirpa is entitled to wear a red and black poncho, ceremonial instruments, and a dark fedora. In the Aymara society, Mallkus are rotating positions that ensure the proper functioning of the community.

In 1990, less than half of the Bolivian population had water at home. Evo Morales, the current president of Bolivia, remembers well the days of thirst; he is, like Sirpa, a son of Aymara peasants and spent his early childhood in the high Andean plateau. He was born one kilometer away from a water well and his mother had to walk every day to bring water home. That may explain why one of his first acts after he came to power was the creation of a Ministry of Water. He also promoted a resolution at the UN, in 2010, that designated access to safe water and sanitation as an “essential to the full enjoyment of life and all human rights.”

GDP growth (6.8 percent in 2013), the Human Development Index, and the Gini Coefficient tell how Bolivia has progressed under Morales’ rule. However, in his eagerness to exert control, the president changed the head of the Ministry of Water—a precious political position—eight times in three terms. A minister with a technical background, José Antonio Zamora, stayed in office longer than anyone else (2012 – 2015). Although Bolivia has already reached the Millennium Development Goals, Zamora says that “much remains to be done,” especially in rural areas.

Since Evo Morales took office in 2005, water has been a main issue in Bolivia’s politics. Despite that, almost two million people still live without access to a reliable source of water. Here, Sirpa attends a meeting with leaders from other communities to speak about water scarcity.

“The president created the Agenda 2025, which sets specific targets for the elimination of extreme human poverty and coverage of basic services, including obviously water and sanitation,” Zamora explains. In 2025, Bolivia will turn 200 as an independent country and, to commemorate the Bicentennial, Morales’ government created a comprehensive development program. However, some of its points clash directly with Bolivia’s economic model, which is based in the exploitation of its natural resources.

Sirpa, the quiet Andean peasant, admires “el Evo,” as he calls him, but his life has not improved substantially in the nine years Morales has been leading the country. Two of the neighboring towns, Achica Arriba and Achica Baja, recently built new drinking water distribution systems with money given by NGOs and international development agencies. Now people from Central Coniri look at their nearby countrymen with envy. That’s why Sirpa keeps on walking through the wasteland, carrying blueprints and documents. He has to control, along with the members of his community, the advances on the well they are digging.

***

Jacinto Sirpa Condori sits on the ground, surrounded by his neighbors in the shade of a huge blue drill. Women lay down and open their multicolored blankets to prepare the feast. People from Central Coniri have gathered for an “apthapi,” an Aymara tradition of meeting and sharing. Everybody has brought a little something: there are boiled and freeze-dried potatoes, beans, yucca, fried fish, cheese, chili peppers and llama meat.

In the shadow of a drill, people from Central Coniri gather for an “apthapi,” an Aymara tradition of meeting and sharing. Everybody has brought something to share; beans, yucca, fried fish and even llama meat.

On the horizon glows the snow of the glaciers, topping 20,000 feet-high peaks. Sirpa pays attention to the people around him and patiently meets their demands. “We are drilling down to one hundred feet and there is water,” he announces, smiling. “There is water!”

Michele, Felix and Javier worked on “Bolivia’s Everyday Water War,” an interactive documentary that follows the struggle in the Andean country to improve water access and sanitation. Bolivia’s Everyday Water War is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation through the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Program, a media-funding project operated by the European Journalism Center). https://www.facebook.com/bewwdoc; Twitter @beww_en.

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Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain

People are losing the brain benefits of writing by hand as the practice becomes less common

Markham Heid  Sep 12 · 4 min read

Illustration: Kieran Blakey

Not so long ago, putting pen to paper was a fundamental feature of daily life. Journaling and diary-keeping were commonplace, and people exchanged handwritten letters with friends, loved ones, and business associates.

While longhand communication is more time-consuming and onerous, there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings. Since the 1980s, studies have found that “the writing cure,” which normally involves writing about one’s feelings every day for 15 to 30 minutes, can lead to measurable physical and mental health benefits. These benefits include everything from lower stress and fewer depression symptoms to improved immune function. And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.

A commonly cited 1999 study in the Journal of Traumatic Stress found that writing about a stressful life experience by hand, as opposed to typing about it, led to higher levels of self-disclosure and translated to greater therapeutic benefits. It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today, many of whom grew up with computers and are more accustomed to expressing themselves via typed text. But experts who study handwriting say there’s reason to believe something is lost when people abandon the pen for the keyboard.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings.

“When we write a letter of the alphabet, we form it component stroke by component stroke, and that process of production involves pathways in the brain that go near or through parts that manage emotion,” says Virginia Berninger, a professor emerita of education at the University of Washington. Hitting a fully formed letter on a keyboard is a very different sort of task — one that doesn’t involve these same brain pathways. “It’s possible that there’s not the same connection to the emotional part of the brain” when people type, as opposed to writing in longhand, Berninger says.

Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information. A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology found that brain regions associated with learning are more active when people completed a task by hand, as opposed to on a keyboard. The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not. And other researchers have argued that writing by hand promotes learning and cognitive development in ways keyboard writing can’t match.

The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contexts. A 2014 study in the journal Psychological Science found that students who took notes in longhand tested higher on measures of learning and comprehension than students who took notes on laptops.

“The primary advantage of longhand notes was that it slowed people down,” says Daniel Oppenheimer, co-author of the study and a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. While the students who typed could take down what they heard word for word, “people who took longhand notes could not write fast enough to take verbatim notes — instead they were forced to rephrase the content in their own words,” Oppenheimer says. “To do that, people had to think deeply about the material and actually understand the arguments. This helped them learn the material better.”

Slowing down and writing by hand may come with other advantages. Oppenheimer says that because typing is fast, it tends to cause people to employ a less diverse group of words. Writing longhand allows people more time to come up with the most appropriate word, which may facilitate better self-expression. He says there’s also speculation that longhand note-taking can help people in certain situations form closer connections. One example: “A doctor who takes notes on a patient’s symptoms by longhand may build more rapport with patients than doctors who are typing into a computer,” he says. Also, a lot Berninger’s NIH-funded work found that learning to write first in print and then in cursive helps young people develop critical reading and thinking skills.

Finally, there’s a mountain of research that suggests online forms of communication are more toxic than offline dialogue. Most of the researchers who study online communication speculate that a lack of face-to-face interaction and a sense of invisibility are to blame for the nasty and brutish quality of many online interactions. But the impersonal nature of keyboard-generated text may also, in some small way, be contributing to the observed toxicity. When a person writes by hand, they have to invest more time and energy than they would with a keyboard. And handwriting, unlike typed text, is unique to each individual. This is why people usually value a handwritten note more highly than an email or text, Berninger says. If words weren’t quite so easy to produce, it’s possible that people would treat them — and maybe each other — with a little more care.

Elemental  Your life, sourced by science. A new Medium publication about health and wellness.

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https://elemental.medium.com/bring-back-handwriting-its-good-for-your-brain-fe22fe6c81d2

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/physics-explains-why-time-passes-faster-as-you-age?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy

·Physics Explains Why Time Passes Faster As You Age

Mind time cannot be measured on a watch.

Quartz | Ephrat Livni

Photo by Sergei Karpukhin.

Mind time and clock time are two totally different things. They flow at varying rates.

The chronological passage of the hours, days, and years on clocks and calendars is a steady, measurable phenomenon. Yet our perception of time shifts constantly, depending on the activities we’re engaged in, our age, and even how much rest we get. An upcoming paper in the journal European Review by Duke University mechanical engineering professor Adrian Bejan, explains the physics behind changing senses of time and reveals why the years seem to fly by the older we get.  (The paper, sent to Quartz by its author, has been peer-reviewed, edited, and has been approved for publication but a date has not yet been set.)

Bejan is obsessed with flow and, basically, believes physics principles can explain everything. He has written extensively about how the principles of flow in physics dictate and explain the movement of abstract concepts, like economics. Last year, he won the Franklin Institute’s Benjamin Franklin Medal for “his pioneering interdisciplinary contributions…and for constructal theory, which predicts natural design and its evolution in engineering, scientific, and social systems.”

In his latest paper, he examines the mechanics of the human mind and how these relate to our understanding of time, providing a physical explanation for our changing mental perception as we age.

The Mind’s Eye

According to Bejan—who reviewed previous studies in a range of fields on time, vision, cognition, and mental processing to reach his conclusion—time as we experience it represents perceived changes in mental stimuli. It’s related to what we see. As physical mental-image processing time and the rapidity of images we take in changes, so does our perception of time. And in some sense, each of us has our own “mind time” unrelated to the passing of hours, days, and years on clocks and calendars, which is affected by the amount of rest we get and other factors. Bejan is the first person to look at time’s passage through this particular lens, he tells Quartz, but his conclusions rest on findings by other scientists who have studied physical and mental process related to the passage of time.

These changes in stimuli give us a sense of time’s passage. He writes:

The present is different from the past because the mental viewing has changed, not because somebody’s clock rings. The “clock time” that unites all the live flow systems, animate and inanimate, is measurable. The day-night period lasts 24 hours on all watches, wall clocks and bell towers. Yet, physical time is not mind time. The time that you perceive is not the same as the time perceived by another.

Time is happening in the mind’s eye. It is related to the number of mental images the brain encounters and organizes and the state of our brains as we age. When we get older, the rate at which changes in mental images are perceived decreases because of several transforming physical features, including vision, brain complexity, and later in life, degradation of the pathways that transmit information. And this shift in image processing leads to the sense of time speeding up.

Clock time and mind time over a lifetime. From Adrian Bejan.

This effect is related to saccadic eye movement. Saccades are unconscious, jerk-like eye movements that occur a few times a second. In between saccades, your eyes fixate and the brain processes the visual information it has received. All of this happens unconsciously, without any effort on your part. In human infants, those fixation periods are shorter than in adults.

There’s an inversely proportional relationship between stimuli processing and the sense of time speeding by, Bejan says. So, when you are young and experiencing lots of new stimuli—everything is new—time actually seems to be passing more slowly. As you get older, the production of mental images slows, giving the sense that time passes more rapidly.

Fatigue also influences saccades, creating overlaps and pauses in these eye movements that lead to crossed signals. The tired brain can’t transfer the information effectively when it’s simultaneously trying to see and make sense of the visual information. It’s designed to do these things separately.

This is what leads to athletes’ poor performance when exhausted. Their processing powers get muddled and their sense of timing is off. They can’t see or respond rapidly to new situations.

Another factor in time’s perceived passage is how the brain develops. As the brain and body grow more complex and there are more neural connections, the pathways that information travels are increasingly complicated. They branch like a tree and this change in processing influences our experience of time, according to Bejan.

The brain’s complexity changes our sense of time. From Adrian Bejan.

Finally, brain degradation as we age influences perception. Studies of saccadic eye movements in elderly people show longer latency periods, for example. The time in which the brain processes the visual information gets longer, which makes it more difficult for the elderly to solve complex problems. They “see” more slowly but feel time passing faster, Bejan argues.

A Lifetime to Measure By

Bejan became interested in this topic more than a half century ago. As a young athlete on a prestigious Romanian basketball team, he noticed that time slowed down when he was rested and that this enabled him to perform better. Not only that, he could predict team performance in a game based on the time of day it was scheduled. He tells Quartz:

Early games, at 11 a.m., were poor, a killer; afternoon and evening games were much better. At 11 AM we were sleepwalking, never mind what each of us did during the night. It became so clear to me that I knew at the start of the season, when the schedule was announced, which games will be bad. Games away, after long trips and bad sleep were poor, home games were better, for the same reason. In addition, I had a great coach who preached constantly that the first duty of the player is to sleep regularly and well, and to live clean.

Now he’s experienced how “mind time” changes over the much longer span of his whole life. “During the past 20 years I noticed how my time is slipping away, faster and faster, and how I am complaining that I have less and less time,” he says. It’s a sentiment he hears echoed by many around him.

Still, he notes, we’re not entirely prisoners of time. The clocks will continue to tick strictly, days will go by on the calendar, and the years will seem to fly by ever faster. By following his basketball coach’s advice—sleeping well and living clean—Bejan says we can alter our perceptions. This, in some sense, slows down mind time.

This article was originally published on January 8, 2019, by Quartz, and is republished here with permission.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/physics-explains-why-time-passes-faster-as-you-age?utm_source=pocket-newtab

What’s it like to grow up within a group of people who exult in demonizing … everyone else? Megan Phelps-Roper shares details of life inside America’s most controversial church and describes how conversations on Twitter were key to her decision to leave it. In this extraordinary talk, she shares her personal experience of extreme polarization, along with some sharp ways we can learn to successfully engage across ideological lines.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Megan Phelps-Roper · Writer, activist

A former member of Westboro Baptist Church, Megan Phelps-Roper is now a writer and educator on topics related to extremism, bullying and empathy in dialogue.

Take Action

participate

Be deliberate about cultivating empathy for “enemies.” Before getting into a conversation full of intense disagreement, you can lay the groundwork for success by making deliberate efforts to understand the perspective of groups with ideas you oppose. Whether Republicans or Democrats, city-dwellers or rural farmers, consider the groups you tend to write off. Who are they? Given their experiences, can you understand why they hold the positions they do? What ideas do you share? When you’re intentional about searching for understanding and common ground, you’ll be better at engaging people with opposing ideas on the merits — instead of the mental caricatures humans often form of one another.

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Practice engaging when the stakes are low. Remember that the strategies mentioned in this talk aren’t natural; they’re skills we have to learn and develop in ourselves. Disagreements are common, but the more intense the disagreement, the harder it is to remain calm enough to engage effectively. To practice, be on the lookout for low-stakes disagreements that appear in your life. Answering an angry tweet from a stranger requires less time and emotional energy than staying cool in a long conversation with a close friend about a divisive subject. Reaching out when the stakes are low strengthens our ability to engage when stress levels and potential costs are higher.

How can the US recover after the negative, partisan presidential election of 2016? Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt studies the morals that form the basis of our political choices. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, he describes the patterns of thinking and historical causes that have led to such sharp divisions in America — and provides a vision for how the country might move forward.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Jonathan Haidt · Social psychologist

Jonathan Haidt studies how — and why — we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

More Resources

Further reading

To improve democracies

CivilPolitics.org educates groups and individuals who are trying to bridge moral divisions by connecting them with scientific research into the political domain.

More at civilpolitics.org ?

Further reading

To improve universities

HeterodoxAcademy.org is politically diverse group of social scientists, natural scientists, humanists, and other scholars who share a concern about a growing problem: the loss or lack of “viewpoint diversity.”

More at heterodoxacademy.org ?

Further reading

To improve business ethics

EthicalSystems.org makes the world’s best research available and accessible, for free, to anyone interested in improving the ethical culture and behavior of an organization.

More at ethicalsystems.org ?

An Incredible Aerial Tour of Earth’s Surface from the International Space Station

January 9, 2019   Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based photographer and videographer Bruce W. Berry Jr. brings together images from the International Space Station (ISS) in his new time-lapse video, The World Below. Berry used public content from NASA to form the meditative short film that reads like a supersized version of today’s popular drone landscape videos. The World Below offers a glimpse at the vast scale of our planet, with portions of the ISS in-frame to provide additional perspective. The film compares richly textured, abstracted topography with dense networks of bright lights to showcase the powerful impact of humans on the planet.

All video and time-lapse sequences were taken by astronauts onboard the ISS. Berry then edited, color graded, denoised, and stabilized the footage to create the seamless quality of the final film. If you’re interested to learn the specifics of the clips’ locations, the filmmaker lists them out to the best of his knowledge in the video notes.

Berry created a similar video in 2013, but decided to create the newer version due to the wealth of content that has become available since his original take. The ISS makes 14.54 orbits around the Earth every day, providing ample opportunity for new views. You can see more of Berry’s photography portfolio on his website, and watch more videos on his Vimeo channel. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Swan Lake” (2014), all images © Natalie Lennard

Photographer Natalie Lennard, who works as Miss Aniela, creates lavish scenes centered around elegantly dressed models. While each image might seem, at first glance, like a straightforward luxury fashion shoot, further inspection reveals surreal details. A canary yellow tulle gown morphs into birds, and ocean water splashes out of a painting frame.

Miss Aniela’s fantastical scenes are created using a combination of on-site shoots with practical effects, along with extensive post-production and even bespoke C.G.I. (as for the 20,000 fish forming the dress worn by a deep sea diver model in “She Shoal”). The photographer explains that all images are shot on location with the model posed and lit in-frame. “Sometimes I do not know whether the image will be largely ‘raw’ and not require overt surrealism added,” Aniela shares, “until I go through the process to feel what is right for each piece.”

The U.K.-based artist has been working as a fine art photographer for 13 years, getting her start with self-portraits as a university student. In some works, she incorporates direct references to paintings from the art historical canon. Aniela has been working in her current style since 2011, and shares with Colossal that she has noticed a rising interest in her work from art collectors, as the lines between fine art and fashion are increasingly blurred.

You can explore more of Miss Aniela’s immersive worlds on Instagram, and go behind the scenes of production in her explanatory blog posts. Fine art prints are available via Saatchi Art.

“What He Bequeathed” (2016)

“She Shoal” (2019)

“Poster & Plumage” (2016)

“Enter the Golden Dragon” (2018)

“Thawed Fortress” (2015)

“Gilt” (2016)

“Scarlet Song” (2013)

“Away with the Canaries” (2013)

“Pokerface” (2015)

Ing’s Peace Project

Finished “Peace” artwork 3  

Salon Creative Lounge Event, presented by the International Women Artist’ salon,154 Stanton Street at Suffolk, New York City, NY, on March 31, 2012, organized by Heidi Russell.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by      Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 

Link to Peace Project Comes to Salon Creative Lounge NYC Page:

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PBS News, Al Jazeera English, USA TODAY, ABC News Australia, CNN. BBC Click, BBC The Travel Show, My Thought Spot, Webneel, Be AMAZE, MacManLtd, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Garden, Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: August 16-20, 2019, Al Jazeera English Live, USA TODAY: Pumped Dry: The Global Crisis of Vanishing Groundwater, ABC News (Australia) Live, CNN: How Trump’s trade wars hurt US farmers, BBC Click: How online abuse after Facebook scandal affected my life – Carole Cadwalladr, and Shutting Down The Web, BBC The Travel Show: Thailand Canals (Week 15), My Thought Spot (Tood William): Inspiration from Ray Dalio, webneel.com: Rajasthani Paintings-India, BE AMAZED: Incredible Vegetables You’ve Never Heard Of, MacManLtd: Crash Course on Our Solar System & Beyond, The Secrets of Nature: Puszta – Land of Salt and Sand, Thisiscolossal: Look Inside the World’s Most Beautiful Libraries in a New 560-Page Photo Book by Massimo Listri, Ing’s Garden: Black Swallowtail Butterfly, Ing’s Peace Project

PBS NewsHour full episode – August 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Aug 20, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the leaders of America’s largest corporations endorse a more socially minded vision for business — but can they practice what they preach? Also: The Trump administration dismisses fears of a potential recession, life on the ground in Gaza, tricks of the trade from the CIA’s former master of disguise, and hip-hop artist Common discusses his new book. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live show August 19, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Streamed live 3 hours ago

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show August 18, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Streamed live 7 hours ago

On this edition for Sunday, August 18, more than a million protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong and the 1619 Project by The New York Times Magazine reframes American history through the lens of slavery. Also, musician Ben Folds shares the stories behind his songs. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 17, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 17, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, August 17, pro-government and pro-democracy demonstrators face off in Hong Kong, and a retired police officer is coaching some of the growing number of seniors who use medical marijuana in Arizona. Also, Syrian residents who built a library amid the rubble of war, and what may come of peace talks between the U.S. and Taliban. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

PBS NewsHour full episode August 16, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 16, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, India’s crackdown in Kashmir leaves millions confined to their homes. Plus: Allegations of abuse among migrant children in government-funded foster care, an existential conflict about land use in the western U.S., previewing 2020 Senate races, political analysis from Michael Gerson and Karen Tumulty, a brief but spectacular take on imagination in art and Woodstock at 50. Editor’s note: In reporting the news of Peter Fonda’s death, his father, Henry Fonda, was misidentified as Harry. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Hong Kong braces for weekend of demonstrations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UBN8… How people of Kashmir are reacting to India’s crackdown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sa44n… What oversight do foster homes for migrant children have? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuY7g… Balancing leisure and livelihood on Colorado public lands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjpBq… Here are the Senate seats that will be critical in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBspA… Michael Gerson and Karen Tumulty on 2020 Senate races https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6DQz… Painter Walton Ford on portraying ‘the imagined animal’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umHD-… What Woodstock meant for America’s culture of rebellion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfXAY… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

Al Jazeera English   Started streaming on Jun 1, 2019

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: https://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category   News & Politics

Pumped Dry: The Global Crisis of Vanishing Groundwater | USA TODAY

USA TODAY   Published on Aug 14, 2018

In places around the world, supplies of groundwater are rapidly vanishing. As aquifers decline and wells begin to go dry, people are being forced to confront a growing crisis. Much of the planet relies on groundwater. And in places around the world – from the United States to Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America – so much water is pumped from the ground that aquifers are being rapidly depleted and wells are going dry. Groundwater is disappearing beneath cornfields in Kansas, rice paddies in India, asparagus farms in Peru and orange groves in Morocco. As these critical water reserves are pumped beyond their limits, the threats are mounting for people who depend on aquifers to supply agriculture, sustain economies and provide drinking water. In some areas, fields have already turned to dust and farmers are struggling. Climate change is projected to increase the stresses on water supplies, and heated disputes are erupting in places where those with deep wells can keep pumping and leave others with dry wells. Even as satellite measurements have revealed the problem’s severity on a global scale, many regions have failed to adequately address the problem. Aquifers largely remain unmanaged and unregulated, and water that seeped underground over tens of thousands of years is being gradually used up. In this documentary, USA TODAY and The Desert Sun investigate the consequences of this emerging crisis in several of the world’s hotspots of groundwater depletion. These are stories about people on four continents confronting questions of how to safeguard their aquifers for the future – and in some cases, how to cope as the water runs out. **************** Humankind: Amazing moments that give us hope ? https://bit.ly/2MrPxvd Humankind: Stories worth sharing ? https://bit.ly/2FWYXNP Animalkind: Cute, cuddly & curious animals ? https://bit.ly/2GdNf2j Just the FAQs: When news breaks, we break it down for you ? https://bit.ly/2Dw3Wnh The Wall: An in-depth examination of Donald Trump’s border wall ? https://bit.ly/2sksl8F

Category   News & Politics

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwxtkBcayK8

Watch ABC News live

ABC News (Australia)  Started streaming on Jul 6, 2019

This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: https://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category   News & Politics

How Trump’s trade wars hurt US farmers

CNN   Published on Oct 23, 2018

As a result of President Donald Trump’s trade wars with China and other countries, US farmers are seeing a surplus of perishable goods stuck in limbo and increased prices for equipment. In good years, cargo trains moving west along the flat, sweeping grasslands of North Dakota’s plains are a sign of money rolling in. Today, as tariffs from America’s largest foreign soybean market — China — threaten to upend the industry, many trains sit idle. “There are no shuttle trains leaving. There is no nothing,” said Joe Ericson, the 38-year-old president of the North Dakota Soybean Growers Association. “They can’t get rid of the beans.” In conversations with more than 50 farmers, producers and agriculture experts in five states representing each of the five food groups, one trend was clear: The once-deep ties to President Donald Trump have frayed over the past year. But they remain intact for a small majority of farmers CNN spoke with ahead of the critical 2018 midterm elections. Democrats, who see an opening with Trump’s trade war, will likely struggle to make inroads with these voters. The President gives all of them plenty to complain about. They grumble about his tweeting — that’s not their style — and what his trade war has done to their bottom lines. But if the President’s re-election were held tomorrow, most of them would back him. They trust Trump, and many believe Democrats don’t understand or largely ignore their way of life. Still, Trump’s deep support in rural America, which helped propel him to the White House in 2016, is being tested. The wheat farmers, soybean growers and pork producers confront a growing trade war that is forcing them to re-evaluate their ties to the President’s Republican Party and openly question whether his mantra to “Make America Great Again” came at the expense of voters like them. Read more on CNN.com: https://cnn.it/2CxBkty Animations By Melody Shih Produced and edited By: Mkenna Ewen Nick Scott Jeff Simon #trump #tradewar #CNN #News 

Category   News & Politics

How online abuse after Facebook scandal affected my life – Carole Cadwalladr – BBC Click

BBC Click  Published on Aug 9, 2019 

Carole Cadwalladr is the journalist who brought the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica story to the mainstream. Despite suffering online abuse as a result, she continues to campaign to get Facebook to reveal more details about how users’ data was used during the EU Referendum. Here she talks to Spencer Kelly about what it’s like to be trolled online, and also how Facebook would change if she was put in charge. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

Shutting Down The Web – BBC Click

BBC Click  Published on Aug 15, 2019

We travel to Kashmir to find out how communications there have been shutdown. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

BBC The Travel Show – Thailand Canals (Week 15)

BBC Travel Show

Published on Sep 24, 2018

Category Travel & Events

Inspiration from Ray Dalio

Imagine that in order to have a great life you have to cross a dangerous jungle. You can stay safe where you are and have an ordinary life, or you can risk crossing the jungle to have a terrific life. How would you approach that choice? Take a moment to think about it because it is the sort of choice that, in one form or another, we all have to make.

~ Ray Dalio

(Artwork by: Mike Worrall)

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.my-thought-spot.com/2018/04/inspiration-from-ray-dalio.html

Rajasthani Paintings

Indian woman with peacock – Rajasthani paintings

Rajasthani painting modern artwork village by poojaartnframe

Rajasthani painting modern artwork woman by poojaartnframe

Rajasthani paintings: Radhe Krishna paintings are quite prominent in Rajasthani paintings. Rajasthani paintings started around 16th – 19th century in western India. Ever wondered how the Rajput kings and queens looked like and what cutlery they used during their elaborate dining? Rajasthan paintings are also known as rajput paintings and they are quite famous for the miniature paintings. The bani-thani paintings/ ragini made of plywood and vegetable colour is quite popular worldwide. The Bhani-thani paintings are created with attractive emboss work at the border using fabric pearl colors & water proof solution of Papier Mache for the antique look. Rajasthani paintings tell us a lot of tales from the epics ” The Ramayana” and “Mahabharata”. Stories of love and affection of Radhe Krishna are shown in a number of paintings. You can also see a simple life of the rajasthanis portrayed in these beautiful traditional Rajasthani paintings. In this post we have included 50 Beautiful and Traditional Rajasthani paintings.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://webneel.com/rajasthani-paintings

Incredible Vegetables You’ve Never Heard Of

BE AMAZED   Published on Aug 13, 2019

There are some incredible vegetables in the world. Lets look at some incredible vegetables you’ve probably never heard of. Subscribe for more! ? https://goo.gl/pgcoq1 ? Stay updated ? https://goo.gl/JyGcTt https://goo.gl/5c8dzr ? For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: hello@beamazed.com Legal Stuff. Unless otherwise created by BeAmazed, licenses have been obtained for images/footage in the video from the following sources: https://pastebin.com/ZgusXNcR

Category   Education

Crash Course on Our Solar System & Beyond

MacManLtd   Published on Jul 5, 2011

[To My Subscribers, Don’t worry I wont stop making TechNews related videos] Want to know why we don’t have to worry about our sun burning out? It’s because long before that happens the sun will expand so enormously that the earth will be cooked to a cinder! And again, don’t fret, that wont happen for another 4-5 Billion years. Take a tour through the solar system, learn about the event horizon of black holes and find out when our galaxy began.

Category   Science & Technology

Puszta – Land of Salt and Sand – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Jan 26, 2015

Less than an hour’s drive south of Hungary’s capital Budapest, Central Europe’s last and only wandering sand dunes surprise the traveller. These dunes are some 600 feet high and in continuous motion, shaping a landscape one would only expect in Africa. Spring storms whip up giant clouds of fine sand that darken the sun and loom over the low Kecskemet plain.

Category   Travel & Events

Thisiscolossal: Look Inside the World’s Most Beautiful Libraries in a New 560-Page Photo Book by Massimo Listri

August 16, 2018  Laura Staugaitis

Real Gabinete Português de Leitura, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All photographs © Massimo Listri / TASCHEN

Italian photographer Massimo Listri has spent decades traversing the globe to document the spectacular architecture, sculptural elements, and furnishings of historic libraries. His new book, The World’s Most Beautiful Libraries, includes views inside such rarefied locations as the Palafoxiana Library in Pueblo, Mexico and the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, France. Listri also includes descriptions and histories of each library. The 560-page tome is published by TASCHEN and available on Amazon and the TASCHEN website.

Klosterbibliothek Metten, Metten, Germany

Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris, France

Biblioteca do Convento de Mafra, Mafra, Portugal

Stiftsbibliothek Admont, Admont, Austria

Biblioteca Joanina, Coimbria, Portugal

Stiftsbibliothek Sankt Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland

Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Rome, Italy

Strahovská Knihovna, Prague, Czech Republic

Ing’s Garden:  Black Swallowtail Butterfly

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Monday, August 19, 2019

Kai, our grandson, and his mother, came to visit us on Monday, August 19, 2019 during the afternoon. Kai went to the backyard garden; he saw a Black Swallowtail Butterfly.  He called me and his mother to see the butterfly.  This black swallowtail Butterfly was quite big and stayed about twenty minutes.  But the butterfly was so active moving around the garden and jumping to different butterfly bush flowers.  It went from one to the other so often that it made it difficult to capture the photographs.

In December 2014, I incorporated black swallowtail Butterfly photographs that I took during summer 2014 into my peace project.  The finished artwork for the Essex County 4-H Scholarship Awards is shown below.   

Finished artwork of the Peace comments from Essex County 4-H Scholarship Awards’ attendants on “What does Peace mean to you?” organized by Marissa Blodnik and Greg Walker on Saturday, November 15th, 2014 at Paul Robson Center, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, August 20, 2019

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LGBTQ Youths Comment on Ing’s Peace Project

LGBTQ Youths Comment on Ing’s Peace Project

LGBTQ Youths Comment on Ing’s Peace Project & the Photographs at Military Park on Friday, June 28, 2019

I took my grandson to ride his bicycle in the park on Friday, June 28, 2019, I saw two models, photographers and others.  They were taking pictures for the LGBTQ events by Wisetastie Productions. Gmail: wisetastie@gmail.com

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

This occasion makes me think of my Peace Project with LGBTQ youths at Hetrick-Martin Institute which shows as the following:

  Finished “Peace” artwork 10

Shadow of Peace and LGBTQ youths from Hetrick-Martin Institute in Newark, NJ, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” during fall and winter 2012, organized by Gabriela C. Celeiro, bilingual counselor.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to LGBTQ Youth at Hetrick-Martin Institute

LGBTQ Youth At Hetrick-Martin Institute

Ing’s Peace project and LGBTQ Youth

At Hetrick-Martin Institute, Newark, NJ

Comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”

And artworks, during fall and winter 2012

Organized by Gabriela C. Celeiro, Bilingual Counselor

I love flowers, they are beautiful.  I wait for the weather to change till spring then I can go to my backyard garden.  I cultivate my garden seeing the plants rising and growing each day.  Then the magic will come when the flowers show up to greet me.  I can spend hours in my little garden.  To keep the beauty of these flowers in winter when I long to see them I take a lot of pictures.  Thanks to the evolution of digital cameras I can take the photographs and print to give to friends or make a slide show or movie.

 When I sat wanting to compose the finished artwork from the LGBTQ youth comments poster I thought of something beautiful.  I want this group of youths to feel beautiful just like my beautiful flowers.  When we feel beautiful then we feel good.  As long as we feel happy we can do a lot of things no matter what some people say.

Below are the sections of my finished artwork that show the written comments from the LGBTQ youth on “What does Peace mean to you?” on my Peace Project Poster that accompanies beautiful flower images that I took from our backyard garden. 

You Are Beautiful

Life is precious

Life is short 

Enjoy as much as you can

Try to be independent 

But ask when you need help

Help yourself as much as you can 

And help the others as much as you can

That is life 

As long as you try your best

Then you will be worthwhile 

Be kind and be happy

Because you are beautiful 

We are all beautiful

And we are all equal

Lead your life in a harmonious and peaceful way

Because you are beautiful to me

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, March 28, 2013, 10:25 pm

Appreciate simple things around you

Minimize luxury life styles

 Be more concerned with conservation

  Be generous and kind

 Remove ill thought

  Broaden your knowledge

 Learn and do your best

  Understand things beyond yourself

If you are still dissatisfied

 Then sleep and after your rest

 Try again the next day

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, February 9, 2013, 4:38 pm

Equality for All

There will be no Peace

Without equality

If the scale of justice

Is unbalanced

There are always reasons for oppressors

To put others down

At one time women could not own property

And could not vote

And slaves of all races could be sold like cattle

And others historically were also treated wickedly

Humanity has evolved

Using our brains and our knowledge

To progress and change

Change we must!

Equality is balance

Human Rights is for all

And equality is for all 

This will bring peace to the world

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, March 29, 2013, 12:03 am

I am glad to know Gabby.  I appreciate her help bringing my Peace Project to the LGBTQ youth.  I even more appreciate her enthusiastic helping to educate the youth.  It requires a special kind of person to undertake the work that she does. 

Ing’s Peace Project & LGBTQ Youth

Link to YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Seqjsap7LQc&feature=youtu.be

(7:42 minutes)  

Hi Gabby,  

Thanks for the attachments.  I do love your composition about the LGBTQ youth.  Your writing helps the readers to understand the lives of this group of youths and how they can get themselves into bad situations and become homeless.  My love and my heart go out to these youths.  The help that you and your organization offer to these youngsters is to be complimented and should be recognized as a good example for others to follow.  

I am glad that you have the finished peace project artwork framed and exhibited.  

Please let me know if you would like to work on my peace project with the new classes and the new group of youngsters again.  

I hope you enjoy your summer.  Please stop by when you are near our shop.  

All the best,  

Ing  

PS. I hope you do not mind; I posted your responses to my email on my website. 

7.4.2013  

The Hetrick-Martin Institute believes all young people, regardless of sexual orientation or identity, deserve a safe and supportive environment in which to achieve their full potential. Hetrick-Martin creates this environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth between the ages of 12 and 24 and their families.

Through a comprehensive package of direct services and referrals, Hetrick-Martin seeks to foster healthy youth development. Hetrick-Martin’s staff promotes excellence in the delivery of youth services and uses its expertise to create innovative programs that other organizations may use as models.

HMI:Newarkis based on the services for LGBTQ youth operated for over 30 years by the Hetrick-Martin Institute inNew York City. Offering counseling and crisis management, health and wellness programming, academic enrichment, job readiness and arts and cultural programming, HMI has implemented its first out-of-state direct service program.

Provides after-school services to LGBTQ youth in the City of Newark

•Mental Health & Supportive Services: support groups for youth-related issues including relationships and “coming out.”

•Health & Wellness: health education groups and referrals for HIV testing, provided by community partners.

•Arts & Culture Programs: service learning programs with a focus on leadership and team building.

Provides a safe and supportive environment for Newark’s LGBTQ youth to reach their full potential

•By collaborating with family and other support systems, we work to engage youth in their own growth and development and get them involved as responsible citizens of their community.

•Available to young people and their families.

•Open weekdays 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm, year round.

•Open to youth between the ages of 12 to 21.

 HMI: Newark (A Demographic Snapshot)

•Multi-ethnic: 42% African Americans, 27% Latin , 4%  Caucasian, 4% West Indian, & 22% Other.

•Serve youth fromNewark, the greaterEssexCounty, and beyond.

•Educational status comprising youth from Junior High: 9%, High School: 82%, College: 7%, & Out of School: 2%.

•53% high school graduates with  47% youth attending college next year.

 HMI: Newark

Located in the Rutgers T.E.E.M. Gateway/YES Center

200 Washington Street

Newark, NJ 07101

 For more information, please contact Juan Williams, LMSW, Site Supervisor, HMI: Newark at jwilliams@hmi.org or 347-501-2930.

Our Programs & Services

After School Programs

Year-round, in a safe, supportive environment, the Hetrick-Martin Institute’s After-School Services Department provides its youth members (whether they are enrolled in school or not) a wide range of group activities designed to develop social and interpersonal skills and build confidence. Last year our After-School Department reached more than 2,000 LGBTQ youth and their families.

Arts and Culture programs foster self-expression through dance, film, photography, painting, theater, and more.

Health and Wellness programs range from hands-on instruction in how to cook healthy meals to learning more about STDs, fighting stress, and preventing HIV.

Academic Enrichment programs help our LGBTQ youth prep for college, do computer training, get help with homework, or join a book club (among countless activities).

Job Readiness and Career Exploration programs assist in building job skills, writing résumés, and landing internships.

Supportive Services

From the first moment a young person enters HMI, one of our team of professional Supportive Services counselors is there to:

  • Assess the safety of each youth.
  • Offer assistance in getting a meal at Café HMI, getting clothing from our pantry, and finding housing.
  • Provide counseling sessions based on individual needs. Individual, group, and family counseling are available.
  • Make referrals to LGBTQ-sensitive agencies.
  • Provide an opportunity for youth to develop and strengthen the skills necessary to move toward self-sufficiency, self-acceptance, and personal success.
  • Be a part of their care and their family.

Internships

HMI Youth Members can take their involvement to the next level through our paid-internship and experiential programs. Learn More

HMI can not accept electronic information from users under the age of 13. For more information please read our privacy policy.


Advocacy and Capacity Building

Advocacy: Educating Decision Makers on Issues Affecting LGBTQ Youth; Providing a voice for those who often go unheard. 
HMI Staff works to provide information and best practices to address the needs of the often disconnected population working with policy makers, government institutions and the community-at-large, advocating on the behalf of LGBTQ youth and those that support them.

Capacity Building: Training and Resources
With over 3 decades of experience, HMI takes its best practices in LGBTQ youth service delivery on the road!  We offer workshops, trainings and seminars in how to serve this unique population.  Our trained staff will work with you and your organization or community to provide a custom-designed training that meets your specific needs.  Workshop topics include, “Building Inclusive Communities,” “Understanding Human Sexuality and Gender Identity,” “Working with LGBTQ Adolescents,” and much more.

PBS NewsHour full episode July 4, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 4, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, the United States celebrates its birthday with pomp and presidential campaigning. Plus: Analysis of President Trump’s unprecedented July 4th military display, why national economic data can mask underlying problems, a book about why there’s so much hatred in contemporary politics and how to get past it and an update on President Trump’s speech at the National Mall. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump faces criticism for July 4th military display https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amZLn… News Wrap: Magnitude 6.4 earthquake shakes Southern Calif. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLWQM… Why Trump’s 4th of July event is complicated for military https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXNAl… As the U.S. economy rises, so does inequality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQzdQ… A book on why we hate our political enemies–and how to stop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO0ge… Trump praises military in history-oriented July 4th speech https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X31_m… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

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Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales –Part 7

Photograph and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You”Poem translated into Welsh By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017

Sent: 09 October 2017 19:38
From: Lewis, Hywel                                                      Subject: poem

Pan fyddwch chi’n mwynhau diferion glaw,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan fyddwch chi’n clywed adar yn canu,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan welwch chi bysgod’n nofio mewn dwr glân,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan fyddwch chi’n clywed plant yn chwerthin,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
A phan fyddwch chi’n hwmian wrth gerdded yn y goedwig

Ddaw heddwch i chi,,
A phan fyddwch chi’n eistedd yn dawel yn gwylio’r haul yn codi a’i osod
Gwrando ar y tonnau’n canu,
Yna ddaw heddwch i chi,
Gadewch i heddwch ddod atoch mewn gwahanol ffyrdd
Gadewch i heddwch fod gyda ni holl.

 Ing’s comments:
I was very lucky when I went to Swansea, Wales in October 2017. A friend came to visit us with her three daughters and her sister with one daughter. They made us very happy from their visit and all of them read my “Peace Comes to You” poem aloud for me to record their voices. They also wrote their peace comments from my Peace Project “What does Peace mean to you?” on my large Peace Poster. The girls enjoyed drawing artwork and writing their expressions on Peace. I was doubly lucky to have Mr. Hywel Lewis, who works at the Swansea Library, being kind enough to translate my poem “Peace Comes To You” into Welsh. Mr. Lewis also read my poem both in Welsh and in English for me to record. John went to Swansea many times to visit his sister but was unable to find anyone to translate my Peace Poem. John is Welsh, I thought that it is important for me to have a Welsh translation for my Peace Poem. I already have my Peace Poem translated into 28 languages and the Welsh translation added to this number made the total 29. I was so lucky, happy and grateful to receive this help, that I felt much better even though I had bad cold for the entire time of my trip to the UK.
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Wednesday, December 27, 2017

 

 Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Welsh translated into Welsh By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017

 Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg, pronounced Welsh pronunciation: [k?m?rai?, ? ??m?rai?] ( listen)) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages. It is spoken natively in Wales, by few in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).[10] Historically, it has also been known in English as “Cambrian”,[11] “Cambric”[12] and “Cymric”.[13]
The United Kingdom Census 2011 recorded that 19% of people aged three and over who live in Wales can speak Welsh, a decrease from the 20.8% recorded in 2001. An overall increase in the size of the Welsh population, most of whom are not Welsh speakers, appears to correspond with a fall in the number of Welsh speakers in Wales – from 582,000 in 2001 to 562,000 in 2011. This figure is still a greater number, however, than the 508,000 (18.7%) of people who said that they could speak Welsh in 1991. According to the Welsh Language Use Survey 2013–15, 24% of people aged three and over living in Wales were able to speak Welsh, demonstrating a possible increase in the prevalence of the Welsh language.[14]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Welsh translated into Welsh by Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Welsh orthography: Welsh is written in a Latin alphabet traditionally consisting of 28 letters, of which eight are digraphs treated as single letters for collation:
a, b, c, ch, d, dd, e, f, ff, g, ng, h, i, l, ll, m, n, o, p, ph, r, rh, s, t, th, u, w, y
In contrast to English practice, “w” and “y” are considered vowel letters in Welsh along with “a”, “e”, “i”, “o” and “u”.
The letter “j” is used in many everyday words borrowed from English, like jam, jôc “joke” and garej “garage”. The letters “k”, “q”, “v”, “x”, and “z” are used in some technical terms, like kilogram, volt and zero, but in all cases can be, and often are, replaced by Welsh letters: cilogram, folt and sero.[75] The letter “k” was in common use until the sixteenth century, but was dropped at the time of the publication of the New Testament in Welsh, as William Salesbury explained: “C for K, because the printers have not so many as the Welsh requireth”. This change was not popular at the time.[76]
The most common diacritic is the circumflex, which disambiguates long vowels, most often in the case of homographs, where the vowel is short in one word and long in the other: e.g. man “place” vs mân “fine”, “small”.
Morphology
Main articles: Colloquial Welsh morphology and Literary Welsh morphology
Welsh morphology has much in common with that of the other modern Insular Celtic languages, such as the use of initial consonant mutations and of so-called “conjugated prepositions” (prepositions that fuse with the personal pronouns that are their object). Welsh nouns belong to one of two grammatical genders, masculine and feminine, but they are not inflected for case. Welsh has a variety of different endings and other methods to indicate the plural, and two endings to indicate the singular of some nouns. In spoken Welsh, verbal features are indicated primarily by the use of auxiliary verbs rather than by the inflection of the main verb. In literary Welsh, on the other hand, inflection of the main verb is usual.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in Welsh translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017,  Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Welsh numerals
The traditional counting system used in the Welsh language is vigesimal, i.e. it is based on twenties, as in standard French numbers 70 (soixante-dix, literally “sixty-ten”) to 99 (quatre-vingt-dix-neuf, literally “four score nineteen”). Welsh numbers from 11 to 14 are “x on ten” (e.g. un ar ddeg: 11), 16 to 19 are “x on fifteen” (e.g. un ar bymtheg: 16), though 18 is deunaw, “two nines”; numbers from 21 to 39 are “1–19 on twenty”, 40 is deugain “two twenties”, 60 is trigain “three twenties”, etc. This form continues to be used, especially by older people, and it is obligatory in certain circumstances (such as telling the time, and in ordinal numbers).[77]
There is also a decimal counting system, which has become relatively widely used, though less so in giving the time, ages, and dates (it features no ordinal numbers). This system is in especially common use in schools due to its simplicity, and in Patagonian Welsh. Whereas 39 in the vigesimal system is pedwar ar bymtheg ar hugain (“four on fifteen on twenty”) or even deugain namyn un (“two score minus one”), in the decimal system it is tri deg naw (“three tens nine”).
Although there is only one word for “one” (un), it triggers the soft mutation (treiglad meddal) of feminine nouns, where possible, other than those beginning with “ll” or “rh”. There are separate masculine and feminine forms of the numbers “two” (dau and dwy), “three” (tri and tair) and “four” (pedwar and pedair), which must agree with the grammatical gender of the objects being counted. The objects being counted appear in the singular, not plural form.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

Adelaide Dupont’s comments:
#welsh is a very #peaceful #language.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: +Adelaide Dupont Thank you for your comment
Have A Wonderful New Year

Adelaide Dupont: +Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts I appreciate your #newyear #wishes!

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and “The Flag of Wales”

“The Flag of Wales (Y Ddraig Goch) incorporates the red dragon, a popular symbol of Wales and the Welsh people, along with the Tudor colours of green and white. It was used by Henry VII at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, after which it was carried in state to St. Paul’s Cathedral. The red dragon was then included in the Tudor royal arms to signify their Welsh descent. It was officially recognised as the Welsh national flag in 1959. Since the British Union Flag does not have any Welsh representation, the Flag of Wales has become very popular.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_people

 

 Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

Welsh syntax
The canonical word order in Welsh is verb–subject–object.
Colloquial Welsh inclines very strongly towards the use of auxiliaries with its verbs, as in English. The present tense is constructed with bod (“to be”) as an auxiliary verb, with the main verb appearing as a verbnoun (used in a way loosely equivalent to an infinitive) after the particle yn:
Mae Siân yn mynd i Lanelli
Siân is going to Llanelli.
There, mae is a third-person singular present indicative form of bod, and mynd is the verbnoun meaning “to go”. The imperfect is constructed in a similar manner, as are the periphrastic forms of the future and conditional tenses.
In the preterite, future and conditional mood tenses, there are inflected forms of all verbs, which are used in the written language. However, speech now more commonly uses the verbnoun together with an inflected form of gwneud (“do”), so “I went” can be Mi es i or Mi wnes i fynd (“I did go”). Mi is an example of a preverbal particle; such particles are common in Welsh.
Welsh lacks separate pronouns for constructing subordinate clauses; instead, special verb forms or relative pronouns that appear identical to some preverbal particles are used.
Possessives as direct objects of verbnouns
The Welsh for “I like Rhodri” is Dw i’n hoffi Rhodri (word for word, “am I [the] liking [of] Rhodri”), with Rhodri in a possessive relationship with hoffi. With personal pronouns, the possessive form of the personal pronoun is used, as in “I like him”: Dw i’n ei hoffi, literally, “am I his liking” – “I like you” is Dw i’n dy hoffi (“am I your liking”).
Pronoun doubling
In colloquial Welsh, possessive pronouns, whether they are used to mean “my”, “your”, etc. or to indicate the direct object of a verbnoun, are commonly reinforced by the use of the corresponding personal pronoun after the noun or verbnoun: ei d? e “his house” (literally “his house of him”), Dw i’n dy hoffi di “I like you” (“I am [engaged in the action of] your liking of you”), etc. It should be noted that the “reinforcement” (or, simply, “redoubling”) adds no emphasis in the colloquial register. While the possessive pronoun alone may be used, especially in more formal registers, as shown above, it is considered incorrect to use only the personal pronoun. Such usage is nevertheless sometimes heard in very colloquial speech, mainly among young speakers: Ble ‘dyn ni’n mynd? T? ti neu d? fi? (“Where are we going? Your house or my house?”).
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and Swansea Bay at the back of Swansea Library, Swansea, Wales, UK
Photograph and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is a bay on the southern coast of Wales. The River Neath, River Tawe, River Afan, River Kenfig and Clyne River flow into the bay. Swansea Bay and the upper reaches of the Bristol Channel experience a large tidal range. The shipping ports in Swansea Bay are Swansea Docks, Port Talbot Docks and Briton Ferry wharfs.
Each stretch of beach within the bay has its own individual name:
·Aberavon Beach
·Baglan Bay
·Jersey Marine Beach
·Swansea Beach
·Mumbles Beach
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

 

 “The 1588 Welsh Bible: The Bible translations into Welsh helped maintain the use of Welsh in daily life. The New Testament was translated by William Salesbury in 1567 followed by the complete Bible by William Morgan in 1588.

The Welsh language arguably originated from the Britons at the end of the 6th century. Prior to this, three distinct languages were spoken by the Britons during the 5th and 6th centuries: Latin, Irish, and British. According to T. M. Charles-Edwards, the emergence of Welsh as a distinct language occurred towards the end of this period.[17] The emergence of Welsh was not instantaneous and clearly identifiable. Instead, the shift occurred over a long period of time, with some historians claiming that it happened as late as the 9th century. Kenneth H. Jackson proposed a more general time period for the emergence, specifically after the Battle of Dyrham, a military battle between the West Saxons and the Britons in 577 AD.[18]
Four periods are identified in the history of Welsh, with rather indistinct boundaries: Primitve Welsh, Old Welsh, Middle Welsh, and Modern Welsh. The period immediately following the language’s emergence is sometimes referred to as Primitive Welsh,[19] followed by the Old Welsh period – which is generally considered to stretch from the beginning of the 9th century to sometime during the 12th century.[19] The Middle Welsh period is considered to have lasted from then until the 14th century, when the Modern Welsh period began, which in turn is divided into Early and Late Modern Welsh.
The name Welsh originated as an exonym given to its speakers by the Anglo-Saxons, meaning “foreign speech” (see Walha)[citation needed], and the native term for the language is Cymraeg, meaning “British”.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Swansea Bay (1840)
Bartlett, William Henry, 1809-1854, artist. Armytage, James Charles, d. 1897, engraver. – This image is available from the National Library of Wales You can view this image in its original context on the NLW Catalogue
Abstract: A view of showing Swansea bay and a town. Ships are sailing in the sea and a lighthouse can be seen in the background.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

 

Bilingual road markings near Cardiff Airport. In Welsh-speaking areas, the Welsh signage appears first. Photograph by Adrian Pingstone
The Welsh Language (Wales) Measure 2011 gave the Welsh language official status in Wales,[15] making it the only language that is de jure official in any part of the United Kingdom, with English being de facto official. Thus, official documents and procedures require Welsh and English to be given equality in the conduct of the proceedings of the National Assembly for Wales.[16]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Trilingual (Spanish, Welsh and English) sign in Argentina

Gastón Cuello – Own work

Sign at former Gaiman Station of the Central Chubut Railway

Sign promoting the learning of Welsh: Alan Fryer

Defnyddiwch eich Cymraeg – Use your Welsh. Detail of 488575

Origins

See also: Celtic languages § Classification

Welsh evolved from Common Brittonic, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Celtic Britons. Classified as Insular Celtic, the British language probably arrived in Britain during the Bronze Age or Iron Age and was probably spoken throughout the island south of the Firth of Forth.[20] During the Early Middle Ages the British language began to fragment due to increased dialect differentiation, thus evolving into Welsh and the other Brittonic languages. It is not clear when Welsh became distinct.[18][21][22]

Kenneth H. Jackson suggested that the evolution in syllabic structure and sound pattern was complete by around 550, and labelled the period between then and about 800 “Primitive Welsh”.[18] This Primitive Welsh may have been spoken in both Wales and the Hen Ogledd (“Old North”) – the Brittonic-speaking areas of what is now northern England and southern Scotland – and therefore may have been the ancestor of Cumbric as well as Welsh. Jackson, however, believed that the two varieties were already distinct by that time.[18] The earliest Welsh poetry – that attributed to the Cynfeirdd or “Early Poets” – is generally considered to date to the Primitive Welsh period. However, much of this poetry was supposedly composed in the Hen Ogledd, raising further questions about the dating of the material and language in which it was originally composed.[18] This discretion stems from the fact that Cumbric was widely believed to have been the language used in Hen Ogledd. An 8th century inscription in Tywyn shows the language already dropping inflections in the declension of nouns.[23]

Janet Davies proposed that the origins of Welsh language were much less definite; in The Welsh Language: A History, she proposes that Welsh may have been around even earlier than 600 AD. This is evidenced by the dropping of final syllables from Brittonic: *bardos “poet” became bardd, and *abona “river” became afon.[21] Though both Davies and Jackson cite minor changes in syllable structure and sounds as evidence for the creation of Old Welsh, Davies suggests it may be more appropriate to refer to this derivative language as Lingua Brittanica rather than characterizing it as a new language altogether.

Sculpture of Owain Glynd?r, the last native Welsh person to hold the title Prince of Wales

Primitive Welsh

The argued dates for the period of “Primitive Welsh” are widely debated, with some historians’ suggestions differing by hundreds of years.

Old Welsh

The next main period is Old Welsh (Hen Gymraeg, 9th to 11th centuries); poetry from both Wales and Scotland has been preserved in this form of the language. As Germanic and Gaelic colonisation of Britain proceeded, the Brittonic speakers in Wales were split off from those in northern England, speaking Cumbric, and those in the southwest, speaking what would become Cornish, and so the languages diverged. Both the works of Aneirin (Canu Aneirin, c. 600) and the Book of Taliesin (Canu Taliesin) were during this era.

Middle Welsh

Middle Welsh (Cymraeg Canol) is the label attached to the Welsh of the 12th to 14th centuries, of which much more remains than for any earlier period. This is the language of nearly all surviving early manuscripts of the Mabinogion, although the tales themselves are certainly much older. It is also the language of the existing Welsh law manuscripts. Middle Welsh is reasonably intelligible to a modern-day Welsh speaker.

The famous cleric Gerald of Wales tells, in his Descriptio Cambriae, a story of King Henry II of England. During one of the King’s many raids in the 12th century, Henry asked an old man of Pencader, Carmarthenshire whether the Welsh people could resist his army. The old man replied:

It can never be destroyed through the wrath of man, unless the wrath of God shall concur. Nor do I think that any other nation than this of Wales, nor any other language, whatever may hereafter come to pass, shall in the day of reckoning before the Supreme Judge, answer for this corner of the Earth.[24]

Modern Welsh

Modern Welsh is subdivided within itself into Early Modern and Late Modern Welsh.Early Modern Welsh ran from the 15th century through to the end of the 16th century, and the Late Modern Welsh period roughly dates from the 16th century onwards. Contemporary Welsh still differs greatly from the Welsh of the 16th Century, but they are similar enough that a fluent Welsh speaker should have little trouble understanding it. The Modern Welsh period is where one can see a decline in the popularity of the Welsh language, as the number of people who spoke Welsh declined to the point at which there was concern that the language would become extinct entirely. Welsh government processes and legislation have worked to increase the proliferation of the Welsh language throughout school projects and the like.

Welsh as a first language is largely concentrated in the north and west of Wales, principally Gwynedd, Conwy, Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych), Anglesey (Ynys Môn), Carmarthenshire (Sir Gâr), north Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro), Ceredigion, parts of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), and north-west and extreme south-west Powys, although first-language and other fluent speakers can be found throughout Wales.

Outside Wales

Welsh-speaking communities persisted well on into the modern period across the border with England. Archenfield was still Welsh enough in the time of Elizabeth I for the Bishop of Hereford to be made responsible, together with the four Welsh bishops, for the translation of the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer into Welsh. Welsh was still commonly spoken here in the first half of the 19th century, and churchwardens’ notices were put up in both Welsh and English until about 1860.[31]

The number of Welsh-speaking people in the rest of Britain has not yet been counted for statistical purposes. In 1993, the Welsh-language television channel S4C published the results of a survey into the numbers of people who spoke or understood Welsh, which estimated that there were around 133,000 Welsh-speaking people living in England, about 50,000 of them in the Greater London area.[32] The Welsh Language Board, on the basis of an analysis of the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Longitudinal Study, estimated there were 110,000 Welsh-speaking people in England, and another thousand in Scotland and Northern Ireland.[33] In the 2011 Census, 8,248 people in England gave Welsh in answer to the question “What is your main language?”[34] The ONS subsequently published a census glossary of terms to support the release of results from the census, including their definition of “main language” as referring to “first or preferred language” (though that wording was not in the census questionnaire itself).[35][36] The wards in England with the most people giving Welsh as their main language were the Liverpool wards: Central and Greenbank, and Oswestry South.[34] In terms of the regions of England, North West England (1,945), London (1,310) and the West Midlands (1,265) had the highest number of people noting Welsh as their main language.[37]

In the later 19th century, virtually all teaching in the schools of Wales was in English, even in areas where the pupils barely understood English. Some schools used the Welsh Not, a piece of wood, often bearing the letters “WN”, which was hung around the neck of any pupil caught speaking Welsh. The pupil could pass it on to any schoolmate heard speaking Welsh, with the pupil wearing it at the end of the day being given a beating. One of the most famous Welsh-born pioneers of higher education in Wales was Sir Hugh Owen. He made great progress in the cause of education, and more especially the University College of Wales at Aberystwyth, of which he was chief founder. He has been credited[by whom?] with the Welsh Intermediate Education Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict c 40), following which several new Welsh schools were built. The first was completed in 1894 and named Ysgol Syr Hugh Owen.

Towards the beginning of the 20th century this policy slowly began to change, partly owing to the efforts of Owen Morgan Edwards when he became chief inspector of schools for Wales in 1907.

The Aberystwyth Welsh School (Ysgol Gymraeg Aberystwyth) was founded in 1939 by Sir Ifan ap Owen Edwards, the son of O.M. Edwards, as the first Welsh Primary School.[52] The headteacher was Norah Isaac. Ysgol Gymraeg is still a very successful school, and now there are Welsh language primary schools all over the country. Ysgol Glan Clwyd was established in Rhyl in 1955 as the first Welsh language school to teach at the secondary level.[53]

Examples of sentences in literary and colloquial Welsh

English

Literary Welsh

Colloquial Welsh

I get up early every day. Codaf yn gynnar bob dydd. Dw i’n codi’n gynnar bob dydd. (North)
Rwy’n codi’n gynnar bob dydd. (South)
I’ll get up early tomorrow. Codaf yn gynnar yfory. Mi goda i’n gynnar fory
Wna i godi’n gynnar fory
He had not stood there long. Ni safasai yno yn hir.[82] Doedd o ddim wedi sefyll yno’n hir. (North)
(D)ôdd e ddim wedi sefyll yna’n hir. (South)
They’ll sleep only when there’s a need. Ni chysgant ond pan fo angen. Fyddan nhw’n cysgu ddim ond pan fydd angen.

In fact, the differences between dialects of modern spoken Welsh pale into insignificance compared to the difference between some forms of the spoken language and the most formal constructions of the literary language. The latter is considerably more conservative and is the language used in Welsh translations of the Bible, amongst other things (although the 2004 Beibl Cymraeg Newydd – New Welsh Bible – is significantly less formal than the traditional 1588 Bible). Gareth King, author of a popular Welsh grammar, observes that “The difference between these two is much greater than between the virtually identical colloquial and literary forms of English”.[83] A grammar of Literary Welsh can be found in A Grammar of Welsh (1980) by Stephen J. Williams[84] or more completely in Gramadeg y Gymraeg (1996) by Peter Wynn Thomas.[85] (No comprehensive grammar of formal literary Welsh exists in English.) An English-language guide to colloquial Welsh forms and register and dialect differences is “Dweud Eich Dweud” (2001, 2013) by Ceri Jones.[86]

Welsh emigration

Flag of the city of Puerto Madryn, Argentina, inspired by the Flag of Wales, owing to the Welsh immigration

There has been migration from Wales to the rest of Britain throughout its history. During the Industrial Revolution thousands of Welsh people migrated, for example, to Liverpool and Ashton-in-Makerfield.[72][73] As a result, some people from England, Scotland and Ireland have Welsh surnames.[74][75][76][77]

John Adams, the second President of the United States (1797–1801), whose paternal great-grandfather David Adams was born and bred at “Fferm Penybanc”, Llanboidy, Carmarthenshire, Wales[78] and who emigrated from Wales in 1675.

Other Welsh settlers moved to other parts of Europe, concentrated in certain areas. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a small wave of contract miners from Wales arrived in Northern France; the centres of Welsh-French population are in coal mining towns of the French department of Pas-de-Calais.[citation needed] Welsh settlers from Wales (and later Patagonian Welsh) arrived in Newfoundland in the early 1900s, and founded towns Labrador‘s coast region.[citation needed] In 1852 Thomas Benbow Phillips of Tregaron established a settlement of about 100 Welsh people in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil.

Internationally Welsh people have emigrated, in relatively small numbers (in proportion to population, Irish emigration to the USA may have been 26 times greater than Welsh emigration),[79] to many countries, including the USA (in particular, Pennsylvania), Canada and Y Wladfa in Patagonia, Argentina.[80][81][82] Jackson County, Ohio was sometimes referred to as “Little Wales”, and the Welsh language was commonly heard or spoken among locals by the mid 20th century.[citation needed] Malad City in Idaho, which began as a Welsh Mormon settlement, lays claim to a greater proportion of inhabitants of Welsh descent than anywhere outside Wales itself.[83] Malad’s local High School is known as the “Malad Dragons”, and flies the Welsh Flag as its school colours.[84] Welsh people have also settled in New Zealand and Australia.[79][85]

Around 1.75 million Americans report themselves to have Welsh ancestry, as did 458,705 Canadians in Canada’s 2011 census.[5][7] This compares with 2.9 million people living in Wales (as of the 2001 census).[86]

There is no known evidence which would objectively support the legend that the Mandan, a Native American tribe of the central United States, are Welsh emigrants who reached North America under Prince Madog in 1170.[87]

The Ukrainian city of Donetsk was founded in 1869 by a Welsh businessman, John Hughes (an engineer from Merthyr Tydfil) who constructed a steel plant and several coal mines in the region; the town was thus named Yuzovka (??????) in recognition of his role in its founding (“Yuz” being a Russian or Ukrainian approximation of Hughes).[88]

Former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard was born in Barry, Wales. After she suffered from bronchopneumonia as a child, her parents were advised that it would aid her recovery to live in a warmer climate. This led the family to migrate to Australia in 1966, settling in Adelaide.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

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Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales – Part 6

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 Ings Peace Project Organized by Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children

Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children, Lacey, Madison, Hallie, and Cleo were reciting Ing’s Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”, Swansea, Wales

“Peace Comes To You”
When you enjoy rain drops
Peace comes to you
When you hear birds sing
Peace comes to you
When you see fish swim in clean water
Peace comes to you
When you hear children laugh
Peace comes to you
And when you hum while walking in the wood
Peace comes to you
And when you sit quietly watching the sun rise and set
Listening to the waves sing
Then Peace comes to you
Let Peace come to you in different ways
Let Peace be with us all

“Peace” poem by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, written on September 24, 2010

Hi Kelly & Stephanie,
I was very glad to see both of you and the girls. The girls are so lovely and very good kids. I love their drawings and comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” I really enjoyed that day, it made me forget about my sickness. John enjoyed cooked Pizza and prepared for everything. I was too weak to help him. He said he loved to do it for the kids. Thank you for everything. We appreciate all your help and your parents also.
Thanks again, please give my love to everyone.
All the best,
Ing
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John and I had bad colds all three weeks in Swansea, Wales. At the end of our trip, two days before we left Swansea, two of our former neighbors who become our good friends, came to visit us with their children, four girls. We were so glad to see them. The children sang Welsh songs for our grandson, Kai for me to record on my camcorder. All of them recited my Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”. They also joined in to write their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”. 

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

 

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Their comments are as the following:

Peace means Love all around the world
Peace means care and kindness
Peace means happiness, relaxation and peace starts with Love
Peace is Life
Peace means getting down on a special chair, quietly watching over your garden
Peace means silence and kindness
Peace is joy, Sweetness and Love
Love. Love. Love. Love.
Peace means caring and kind
Peace starts with kind heart and Love!
Peace is Hope
Peace is us
Peace means Family
Be in Peace not in pieces
Peace begins with a smile
“Aren’t we all Humans then why can we all live in PEACE!!”
Peace is our gift to others
Peace is Beacks!
Peace means caring and Kind
Peace means Love
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”
Peace means that all is clam and Its also means to me is friendship and Loyalty.
Peace begins with a smile.
Peace is family
Peace means that everything is calm and relaxing

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

 

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Their comments are as the following:
Peace means caring and kind
Peace starts with kind heart and Love!
Peace is Hope
Peace is us
Peace means Family
Be in Peace not in pieces
Peace begins with a smile
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”

 Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children, Lacey, Madison, Hallie, and Cleo were reciting Ing’s Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”, Swansea, Wales
“Peace Comes To You”
When you enjoy rain drops
Peace comes to you
When you hear birds sing
Peace comes to you
When you see fish swim in clean water
Peace comes to you
When you hear children laugh
Peace comes to you
And when you hum while walking in the wood
Peace comes to you
And when you sit quietly watching the sun rise and set
Listening to the waves sing
Then Peace comes to you
Let Peace come to you in different ways
Let Peace be with us all
“Peace” poem by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, written on September 24, 2010
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Their comments are as the following:

Peace means Love all around the world
Peace means care and kindness
Peace means happiness, relaxation and peace starts with Love
Peace is Life
Peace means getting down on a special chair, quietly watching over your garden
Peace means silence and kindness
Peace is joy, Sweetness and Love
Love. Love. Love. Love.

 Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11, commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Some of their comments are as the following:

“Aren’t we all Humans then why can we all live in PEACE!!”
Peace is our gift to others
Peace is Beacks!
Peace means caring and Kind
Peace means Love
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”
Peace means that all is clam and Its also means to me is friendship and Loyalty.
Peace begins with a smile.
Peace is life

Before Kelly, Stephanie and four of their children came to our gathering John was very busy preparing pizza for everyone, especially for the children.  Because he knows that they love pizza.

 

John is a good cook and he presents his food nicely just like they are his artwork.

 

I love pepperoni and mushroom.  He used a mixture of cheeses for his home made pizza.

I was sick with a bad cold and could not help him.  But I thought John was enjoying making the food for the children and good friends.

 

Now Everybody was arriving and John’s hot pizza just came out of the oven ready to eat.

 

We all enjoyed John’s pizza.  The children said they loved it.

 

 

Ending with a slice of cake.  Our fully bellies said thanks to John for a wonderful meal.

I showed everyone the photos of Kai, our two years old grandson, and his parents, Mali and Jim.

 

I showed my Peace Poem and Peace Project from my website.

 

Lacey and Cleo were reading my Peace Poem.

 

Hallie was reading my Peace Poem.

 

Madison turned to read the Peace poem.

 

Madison was helping Cleo to recite my peace poem.

 

Kelly was generous enough to recite my Peace Poem.

Lacey and Cleo enjoyed singing Welsh songs for Kai to listen and watch from my camcorder.

Cleo and her mother, Stephanie, recite my Peace Poem.

 

Hallie was enjoying acting and reciting the poem.

 

Now everyone joined in reading my Peace Poem all together.

 

Time to relax, the children enjoyed acting out for the camera.

They love the little gifts from us, hand made bronze chokers from Thailand.

 

 

Time to say good bye!!!!!  We will meet again soon 🙂 🙂 🙂

 Thank you very much!!  We had a good time and will forever remember our time together.

 John Watts and Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Sunday, October 15, 2017

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Ing’s Peace Project and Open Doors, Newark International Art exhibition

 Ing’s Peace Project and Open Doors Art exhibition

At Newark International, Newark, New Jersey

Organized by Charley Cano

On October 19th – 30th

In participation of the OPEN DOORS CITYWIDE ARTS FESTIVAL
A glimpse of Newark’s rich ethnic and cultural diversity of artists, past and present.
Art by Esmeralda Vazquez, Grigory Gurevich, Ibou Ndoye, Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Joanne Leone, John Watts, Luisa F. Pinzon-Romero and Petra Lea
Wednesday & Thursday, 10/19&20, 6-9pm – General Viewing
Friday, 10/21, 5-11pm – Artists’ Reception [Refreshments Served]
Saturday, 10/22, 1-4pm – Poetry/Spoken Word Open Mic
4-8pm – Musical Performances
7-9pm – Dr. Law, Linda Everswick, Okestura
9-12am – Dance Party
Sunday, 10/23, 1-3pm – Informal Artist Talk
3-6pm – Closing Cocktails

Newark International

August Agency <art-n-action@hotmail.com>

August 1, 2016

Hi, Ing!

I’ve been invited to participate in this year’s Newark Open Doors (officially) and will be putting on a group show entitled ‘Newark International’. I was hoping you might be interested in participating with 1-4 pieces. Let me know!

All the best,

Charley

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 

<ingpeaceproject@gmail.com>

August 3, 2016

Hi Charley,

It was nice to hear from you.  Thanks for your earlier response on “Honor Killing”

I will be glad to participate in your group show entitled ‘Newark International’.  If you do not mind I would like to have my finished peace project artwork exhibit.  I posted most of them on my Home page website if you would like to view them. 

John says thanks for your acknowledgement on his sister passing.  Please let me know how your preparation for the exhibition is progressing.  Where will the exhibition be held?

Look forward to hearing from you.

Best,

Ing

Newark International

August Agency <art-n-action@hotmail.com>

August 5, 2016

Hi, Ing!

Thank you so much, Ing! It means a lot to me for you to participate in the exhibit. Yes, absolutely please bring the peace project. The exhibit will be in a commercial storefront on Broad Street, most likely one I’m assigned by Newark Arts Council (probably 744 Broad) or one I have in reserve at 889 Broad (diagonally across the street from City Hall). I will keep everyone updated on all developments.

One quick question: Can you please send me a picture of the Gandhi piece(s)? I need it for the Newark Arts Council’s promotional materials for the festival. Thanks! – Charley

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 

<ingpeaceproject@gmail.com>

August 5, 2016

Hi Charley,

I am glad to be part of your exhibition, thanks for including John and I.

The following are the things that I would like you to consider which is related to the exhibition:

1.       My Gandhi’s artwork: I have different versions; please visit the following link to view some of them: https://ingpeaceproject.com/2016/01/13/gandhi-peace-and-nonviolence-for-the-world/

2.       For the artwork that I would like to display at your exhibition; please visit the following link to view some of them: https://ingpeaceproject.com/

3.      If it is possible I would like to have a table or easel for my Peace Poster for people to write their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on the reception day. 

Please let me know of your decisions.

Thanks,

Ing

Newark International

August Agency <art-n-action@hotmail.com>

August 5, 2016

Hi, Ing,

Thanks very much for the link; it was the Gandhi #4 I was looking for. I’m already familiar with the project and you know I love your art work. Also, it won’t be a problem at all for the table and easels on the reception day. Feel free to contact me at any time with any other questions or concerns.

– Charley

Gandhi: Man of Peace and His Words – Artist Ing-on Vibulbhan-Watts

Paint Me As Part Of The Universe After I Die, Said Iris – Artist Joanne Leone

Drawing by Ibou Ndoye, ink on heavy craft paper

Sculpture – Artist John Watts

Stone Clouds – Artist John Watts

Impossible Dreamer – Artist John Watts

Made In America del Sur – Artist/Photographer Luisa F. Pinzon-Luisa F. Pinzon Romero

Drawing by Ibou Ndoye, ink on heavy craft paper

Bella – Artist Grigory Gurevich

Artist – Joanne Leone

Finished “Peace” artwork 13

Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on during May and June 2014, organized by Joseph Giacalone Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Links to the finished Peace Project of the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland artwork page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2014/07/10/ings-peace-project-international-craniosacral-therapy-conference-2014-iceland/

Finished “Peace” artwork 12

Shadow of Peace and CLOUD CYPH Event 2014 in Newark, NJ, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on Friday, May 16th, 2014, organized by Them Cloud Kids.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Links to Finished Peace Project CLOUD CYPH Event – Them Cloud Kids 2014 pages:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2014/05/21/ings-peace-project-at-cloud-cyph-event/

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2014/05/25/ings-peace-project-clat-oud-cyph-event-part-2/

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2014/06/03/ings-peace-project-at-cloud-cyph-event-part-3/

Finished “Peace”artwork 2   

The Peace and Art Parade and festival run by the Barat Foundation in Newark on 10.23.2011, organized by Chandri and Gary Barat.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

It took me a while to be able to complete this project.  I spent some time to compose this second finished artwork for the Peace Project.  The writings were the comments from the people on “What does Peace mean to you?” at the Washington Park and some of the people who participated in the Creation Nation Art and Peace Parade on Sunday, October 23, 2011, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Link to Peace Project and Creation Art Peace Parade Page:

 https://ingpeaceproject.com/peace-project-participations/peace-project-participations-peace-project-and-creation-nation-art-peace-parade/                         

Print:  Shadow of Peace   “What does Peace mean to you?”          Sizes 24 inches x 40 inches

Participation art, for any viewers to write their comments with their names and dates

Link to Ing’s Peace Project Page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/ing-peace-project/

Peace Poem, English and Thai by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to Ing’s Peace Project Page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/ing-peace-project/

Drawing by Ibou Ndoye, ink on heavy craft paper

Night Birth – Artist John Watts

 

My Little Red Shoes – Artist Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Newark, NJ

 

Gandhi: Man of Peace #2 – Artist Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Newark, NJ

In The Wake of False Gods Artist Esmeralda Vazquez

Artist Petra Lea

 Fragility – new work by Petra Lea

Dauntless – Artist Petra Lea

Twiggy – Artist Petra Lea

Artist – Joanne Leone

Artist – Joanne Leone

Group Pictures from Newark International Art Exhibition on Friday, October 21, 2016

Ing with our best friend Patricia Meidel, our best friend and artist Joanne Leone and Artist/Photographer Luisa F. Pinzon

Artist/Photographer Luisa F. Pinzon and Artist Ibou Ndoye

At Friday’s opening (10.21.2016) for Newark International with 5 of 8 exhibiting artists (Ing’s not on FB, Grigory had just left, John and Petra were in England), plus the food artist, family and friends old and new. Thanks, Malcolm M. King, for the shot!

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