PBS News, Roylab Stats, Al Jazeera, DW News, FRANCE 24 English, TED Talks, Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, WEHImovies, and The New York Times

PBS News: March 30 – 31, 2020

Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Al Jazeera English – Live

DW News Livestream – Latest news and breaking stories

FRANCE 24 English: LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

TED Talks: Seth Berkley HIV and flu the vaccine strategy

Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell: The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

WEHImovies: DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

The New York Times: Coronavirus Map – Tracking the Global Outbreak Updated April 1, 020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 31, 2020

Mar 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the death toll from novel coronavirus in the U.S. has now exceeded that in China. Plus: Food banks struggle to feed the newly unemployed, teachers and students adapt to distance learning, unlocking the science of the virus, President Trump relaxes fuel efficiency standards, an update from the White House, how the military is handling the outbreak and Now Read This. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The U.S. novel coronavirus death toll now tops China’s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9effA… News Wrap: Dow Jones concludes worst quarter since 1987 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqbW… How food bank are trying to cope with a surge in demand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul96q… How learning changes when school happens at home and online https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9Thm… What scientists know about COVID-19 — and what they don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RO37V… Trump hastens deregulation with fuel efficiency rollback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPe7Y… Trump tells Americans to brace themselves for more pain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGFaK… U.S. Navy says it won’t evacuate ship with infected sailors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy2ta… ‘Inheritance’ author Dani Shapiro answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImIHT… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 30, 2020

Mar 30, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, COVID-19 continues to burn through the U.S. population, with New York as the most severe national hot spot. Plus: Why U.S. coronavirus testing is still problematic, Illinois’ surging number of cases, a Greek refugee camp poised for disaster, U.S. delivery workers fear for their health, President Trump’s update, Politics Monday and one family’s story of coping with pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lock populations down as COVID-19 cases climb https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-Ki3… How ‘constrained’ virus testing has crippled U.S. response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPmWa… ‘Everyone is afraid’ as Illinois virus cases spike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8azIz… At Greek refugee camp, few defenses against COVID-19 threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TQsl… News Wrap: Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozC06… As more people order delivery, workers fear virus exposure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmWrt… How the president’s coronavirus approach has changed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh5rT… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Trump and COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XTsI… The particular pain of losing a loved one during quarantine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6xKV… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

Novel coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases, recovered cases(COVID-19). I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the coronavirus spreading. For anyone that wants to know the numbers and progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. At first, I tried to show only official data from governments without any manipulation. But many people wanted to apply an up-to-date format of data to stream. I added a procedure to manually manipulate data with my computer. After seeing the inflicted countries numbers had sharply increased, I realized that I could no longer keep up with new information from 100 countries. So I made another procedure which enables moderators the ability to manipulate the numbers on screen remotely. Not only the moderators who willingly accepted the hard work, but also everyone that gave us reliable information were able to add streaming data. The role of this streaming is to show basic information to undertand situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites. References: 1. WORLDOMETER: https://www.worldometers.info/coronav… 2. BNO News: https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02… 3. JHU CSEE: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/ap… 4. 1point3acres (for USA/CAN):https://coronavirus.1point3acres.com/en 5. RiskLayer (DEU): http://www.risklayer-explorer.com/eve… 6. MorgenPost (DEU): https://interaktiv.morgenpost.de/coro… 7. DXY (CHN): https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneum… 8. J.A.G Japan (JPN): https://jagjapan.maps.arcgis.com/apps… 9. VG (NOR): https://www.vg.no/spesial/2020/corona… 10. Wiki – Brazil page (BRA): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_co… I majored in life science and joined bioinformatics laboratory for master degree. At that time I used python. Since I decided to change my career as dentist, I have been stopped programming for 15 years. Now, I start to learn more about python with googling. Because my job doesn’t allow mistakes, I won’t try something new works. Still I am wondering how can i start this live streaming. Sometimes python program doesn’t work as i intended. If I can devote all my free time to this live stream, I would give more accurate and faster information. But please understand that I can’t manipulate data all day. While I am working and sleeping, data gathering is done automatically. I live in South Korea. At the beginning of streaming, the number of confirmed cases were not so high in South Korea. After sudden appearing local transmission that can’t be trackable, the number has been dramatically increased. Please be warned that COVID-19 is highly contagious disease. Although the stream started off crude and basic, many people have supported me in improving and maintaining this. It is because of your support that I am encouraged to keep streaming. I especially appreciate all moderators for willingly accepting the role. They have given their precious time to making this live stream better – Max Mustermann, Stephanie Hughes, Random, Entrenched Trader, Droid Knight, Craft Fan, Fries, jlpowell73, The NCV, Josh Leathers,The Eldritch God, srpk khin, Hitz1001, Red Chiref, GildArt by Gilda, emmamec, lambi, AmberLeanne, DukeHeart, Green Rock Films, Charlie and amithist57. I hope this live stream can be a useful source of information for you. Please keep track of the numbers that impact you and let them inform the decisions you make when you have to make them. Please take care. Keeping good immunity is very important!!! Please sleep, eat and rest fully for resilience. Keep those affected by this unfortunate outbreak in your thoughts. Data1 – screen numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Data2 – Daily numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Eyes_of_Glory/ Heaven_and_Hell / Heaven_and_Hell_Part_2 / Hero_Down/ Into_the_Sky / Lonely_Troutman / Lonely_Troutman_II / Parzival / Mountain/The_Heartache Hero Down: http://incompetech.com/ from www.bensound.com from www.epidemicsound.com

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020   Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019   DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

FRANCE 24 English – LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

Started streaming on Jan 24, 2020  FRANCE 24 English

Watch FRANCE 24 live in English on YouTube for free Subscribe to France 24 now https://f24.my/YouTubeEN Watch France 24 live news: all the latest news live broadcasted from Paris, France. Le DIRECT France 24 en français : https://f24.my/YTliveFR France 24 EN VIVO en Español: https://f24.my/YTliveES ????? 24 ???? ??????? https://f24.my/YTliveAR Like us on Facebook: https://f24.my/FBen Follow us on Twitter: https://f24.my/TWen Watch our stories on Instagram: https://f24.my/IGen FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 https://www.france24.com/en/

Category  News & Politics

Seth Berkley explains how smart advances in vaccine design, production and distribution are bringing us closer than ever to eliminating a host of global threats — from AIDS to malaria to flu pandemics.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

TED2010 | February 2010

The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

Mar 19, 2020  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell

Get Merch designed with ? from https://kgs.link/shop Join the Patreon Bird Army ? https://kgs.link/patreon ?? More infos and links are just a click away ?? A huge thanks to the experts who helped us on short notice with the video. Especially “Our World in Data”, the online publication for research and data on the world’s largest problems – and how to make progress solving them. Check out their site. It also includes a constantly updated page on the Corona Pandemic. In December 2019 the Chinese authorities notified the world that a virus was spreading through their communities. In the following months it spread to other countries, with cases doubling within days. This virus is the “Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2”, that causes the disease called COVID19, and that everyone simply calls Coronavirus. What actually happens when it infects a human and what should we all do? Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources… OUR CHANNELS ?????????????????????????? German Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeDE by FUNK Spanish Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeES by WIX HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US?

DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

Jul 16, 2018  WEHImovies

Edit of wehi.tv’s DNA animations. Created for V&A exhibition “The Future Starts Here” 2018 No narration, Yes sound and text.

Category  Science & Technology

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_NN_p_20200331&instance_id=17204&nl=morning-briefing&regi_id=105496626&section=topNews&segment_id=23382&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Global Outbreak

By The New York Times Updated April 1, 2020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

World, U.S., Europe, Asia, Tips

The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 873,200 people, according to official counts. As of Wednesday morning, at least 41,624 people have died, and the virus has been detected in at least 171 countries, as these maps show.

Where cases are rising fastest

Avg. number of new cases each day (for the last 7 days)

Sources: Local governments; The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; World Health Organization.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

CASESDEATHSNEW CASES
United States188,0493,909Jan. 22 Mar. 31
Italy105,79212,428
Spain94,4178,189
Mainland China83,2233,312
Germany61,913583
France52,1283,523
Iran44,6052,898
Denmark28,76090
U.K.25,1501,789
Switzerland16,176373
Turkey13,531214
Belgium12,775705
Netherlands12,5951,039
Austria10,180128
South Korea9,887165
Canada8,53696
Portugal7,443160
Brazil5,812202
Israel5,35820
Australia4,70720
Norway4,64139
Sweden4,435180
Czech Republic3,30831
Ireland3,23571
Japan2,87464
Malaysia2,76643
Chile2,73812
Russia2,33717
Poland2,31133
Ecuador2,30279
Romania2,24582
Luxembourg2,17823
Philippines2,08488
Pakistan1,93826
Thailand1,65110
Saudi Arabia1,56310
Indonesia1,528136
Finland1,41817
India1,39735
South Africa1,3535
Greece1,31449
Mexico1,21529
Panama1,18130
Iceland1,1352
Dominican Rep.1,10951
Peru1,06530
Argentina1,05427
Singapore9263
Colombia90616
Serbia90016
Croatia8676
Slovenia80215
Qatar7812
Estonia7454
Algeria71644
Hong Kong7144
Egypt71046
New Zealand7081
Iraq69450
U.A.E.6646
Ukraine64517
Morocco61736
Bahrain5674
Lithuania5378
Armenia5323
Hungary49216
Lebanon47012
Bosnia and Herzegovina42013
Bulgaria3998
Latvia3980
Tunisia39410
Andorra37612
Slovakia3630
Moldova3534
Kazakhstan3482
Costa Rica3472
Uruguay3381
North Macedonia3299
Taiwan3225
Azerbaijan2985
Kuwait2890
Jordan2745
Cyprus2628
Burkina Faso26114
Albania24315
San Marino23626
Vietnam2120
Cameroon1936
Oman1921
Cuba1866
Ivory Coast1791
Senegal1750
Afghanistan1744
Honduras17210
Uzbekistan1722
Faroe Islands1690
Malta1690
Ghana1615
Belarus1521
Sri Lanka1432
Mauritius1435
Channel Islands1413
Nigeria1352
Venezuela1353
Brunei1291
West Bank & Gaza1191
Bolivia1157
Kosovo1121
Georgia1100
Cambodia1090
Montenegro1092
Kyrgyzstan1070
Congo988
Trinidad and Tobago874
Rwanda750
Gibraltar690
Liechtenstein680
Paraguay653
Isle of Man600
Kenya591
Madagascar570
Aruba550
Monaco521
Bangladesh515
Uganda440
Guatemala381
Jamaica382
Zambia360
Barbados340
Niger343
Togo341
Bermuda320
El Salvador321
Djibouti300
Mali282
Ethiopia260
Guinea220
Republic of the Congo190
Tanzania191
Maldives180
Gabon161
Bahamas150
Eritrea150
Equatorial Guinea150
Haiti150
Myanmar151
Cayman Islands141
Saint Lucia130
Dominica120
Guyana122
Mongolia120
Namibia110
Curaçao111
Greenland100
Libya100
Macau100
Seychelles100
Suriname100
Syria102
Benin90
Grenada90
Laos90
Eswatini90
Guinea-Bissau80
Saint Kitts and Nevis80
Mozambique80
Zimbabwe81
Antigua and Barbuda70
Angola72
Sudan72
Chad70
Cape Verde61
Mauritania61
Vatican City60
Sint Maarten60
Fiji50
Montserrat50
Nicaragua51
Nepal50
Somalia50
Turks and Caicos Islands50
Bhutan40
Botswana41
Gambia41
Belize30
Central African Republic30
Liberia30
British Virgin Islands30
Anguilla20
Burundi20
Papua New Guinea10
Sierra Leone10
Timor-Leste10
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines10 
 
 

Notes: New cases are represented as seven-day averages. Japan’s count includes 696 cases and seven deaths from a cruise ship that docked in Yokohama. The data excludes cases on the Zandaam cruise ship, which has not yet docked. France and the U.S. figures include overseas territories.

While the outbreak is a serious public health concern, most people who contract the coronavirus do not become seriously ill, and only a small percentage require intensive care. Older people and those with existing health conditions, like heart or lung disease, are at higher risk.

Follow the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

United States

The number of known coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow quickly. As of Wednesday morning, at least 188,049 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times database, and at least 3,909 patients with the virus have died.

Reported cases

Ala.900+

Alaska100+

Ariz.1,200+

Ark.500+

Calif.8,500+

Colo.2,900+

Conn.3,100+

Del.300+

D.C.400+

Fla.6,700+

Ga.4,100+

Hawaii200+

Idaho500+

Ill.5,900+

Ind.2,100+

Iowa400+

Kan.400+

Ky.500+

La.5,200+

Maine300+

Md.1,600+

Mass.6,600+

Mich.7,600+

Minn.600+

Miss.900+

Mo.1,300+

Mont.100+

Neb.100+

Nev.1,100+

N.H.300+

N.J.18,600+

N.M.300+

N.Y.75,800+

N.C.1,500+

N.D.100+

Ohio2,100+

Okla.500+

Ore.600+

Pa.4,900+

R.I.400+

S.C.1,000+

S.D.100+

Tenn.2,000+

Texas3,500+

Utah800+

Vt.200+

Va.1,200+

Wash.5,200+

W.Va.100+

Wis.1,300+

Wyo.100+

Note: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by county. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive, which may differ from where they contracted the illness. Some people who traveled overseas were taken for treatment in California, Nebraska and Texas. Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories are not shown. Sources: State and local health agencies, hospitals, C.D.C.

See our page of maps, charts and tables tracking every coronavirus case in the U.S.

The New York Times is engaged in a comprehensive effort to track details about every confirmed case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. Many people are infected despite having no known connection to previous cases, which suggests local, person-to-person spread of the virus.

Europe

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to surge across Europe, there are now more total confirmed cases outside of China than inside China, the country where the virus first spread.

Total confirmed coronavirus cases

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; Local governments.

Many of the cases across Europe have been traced back to Italy, which has one of the world’s largest outbreaks. At least 105,792 people have tested positive as of Wednesday morning.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

ITALY105,700+

SPAIN94,400+

GERMANY61,900+

FRANCE52,100+

U.K.25,100+

NORWAY4,600+

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; local governments.

Asia

The outbreak is believed to have begun in a seafood and poultry market in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in central China. The virus seems to spread very easily, especially in confined spaces, making containment efforts difficult. It is difficult to know how many people who contract the virus die, but some early estimates put the fatality rate at roughly 1 percent.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

SOUTH KOREA9,800+

JAPAN2,800+

MALAYSIA2,700+

PHILIPPINES2,000+

THAILAND1,600+

INDIA1,300+

MEXICO1,200+

ICELAND1,100+

SINGAPORE900+

NEW ZEALAND700+

TAIWAN300+

VIETNAM200+

NIGERIA100+

500+

67,800+

CHINA

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; local governments.

The precise dimensions of the outbreak are hard to know. Not all infected people have received a diagnosis, and some countries, like Singapore, have more proactive testing and containment efforts than others do.

Tips

Experts’ understanding of how the virus spreads is still limited, but there are four factors that likely play a role: how close you get; how long you are near the person; whether that person projects viral droplets on you; and how much you touch your face.

If your community is affected, you can help reduce your risk and do your part to protect others by following some basic steps:

Wash your hands! Scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, and then dry them with a clean towel or let them air dry.

Keep distance from sick people. Try to stay six feet away from anybody showing flu- or cold-like symptoms, and don’t go to work if you’re sick.

Prepare your family, and communicate your plan about evacuations, resources and supplies. Experts suggest stocking at least a 30-day supply of any needed prescriptions. Consider doing the same for food staples, laundry detergent and diapers, if you have small children.

Here’s a complete guide on how you can prepare for the coronavirus outbreak.

Note: Data are based on reports at the time of publication. At times, officials revise reports or offer incomplete information.

By Jin WuAllison McCannKeith CollinsKaren YourishSarah AlmukhtarRich HarrisJon HuangK.K. Rebecca LaiDerek WatkinsAnjali SinghviJugal K. Patel and Scott Reinhard.  ·   Mitch SmithAmy Harmon and Mike Baker contributed reporting.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_NN_p_20200331&instance_id=17204&nl=morning-briefing&regi_id=105496626&section=topNews&segment_id=23382&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

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PBS News, TED Talks, New York Time Morning Briefing, and South China Morning Post SCMP

PBS News: March 25, 2020

TED Talks:  Bill Gates How we must respond to the Covid – 19 pandemic

The News York Times: Morning Briefing – Wednesday, March 25, 2020

South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia – Coronavirus: Tokyo’s cherry blossoms bring thousands to parks but experts worry the worst isn’t over yet for Japan                                                                    

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 25, 2020

Mar 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, much of the U.S. is under orders to stay home, as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases climbs past 60,000. Plus: What’s in Congress’ historic economic relief bill, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Louisiana Gov. Bel Edwards on what states need from President Trump, conditions in New York emergency rooms, COVID-19 in Russia, Trump’s news briefing and Songs of Comfort. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Congress pushes ahead on aid deal as U.S. virus cases rise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6AP4… Pelosi says relief bill will ‘put money in people’s pockets’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Uw4P… Louisiana governor: We need help sourcing more ventilators https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Fxjc… ‘Everything is transformed’ as COVID-19 grips NY hospitals https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFU-k… As Russia closes borders, how widespread is COVID-19 there? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32LO7… News Wrap: Pompeo warns Afghan leaders to end political feud https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ES0lP… Trump urges Congress to pass pandemic economic aid package https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7iPz… Yo-Yo Ma’s musical effort to share #SongsofComfort amid coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFGKQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates offers insights into the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing why testing and self-isolation are essential, which medical advancements show promise and what it will take for the world to endure this crisis. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Bill Gates · Philanthropist

A passionate techie and a shrewd businessman, Bill Gates changed the world while leading Microsoft to dizzying success. Now he’s doing it again with his own style of philanthropy and passion for innovation.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Whitney Pennington Rodgers · TED Current Affairs Curator

Whitney Pennington Rodgers is an award-winning journalist and media professional.

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=wm&ogbl#inbox/FMfcgxwHMZHmBwDCWfKNDVXsWHNXklrW

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 | View in browser Good morning.   We’re covering a stimulus deal between the Senate and the Trump administration and the growing toll of the coronavirus in New York. We also look at the newest additions to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry (when the news includes Mister Rogers, it’s not all bad).

 By Chris Stanford

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, center, said President Trump was “very pleased with this legislation.”  Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times $2 trillion for a nation under siege   The Senate and the Trump administration agreed early this morning on a roughly $2 trillion measure that would send direct payments and jobless benefits to individuals, as well as money to states and businesses hit by the coronavirus pandemic. The legislation, which was still being finalized, is expected to be enacted within days. It’s the largest fiscal stimulus package in modern U.S. history.   Here are the latest updates and maps of the outbreak. We’ve also compiled a daily tracker that shows the virus’s trajectories by country and state. In other developments:   ? President Trump said on Tuesday that he wanted to reopen the U.S. for business by Easter, on April 12, saying he believed that a crippled economy and forced social isolation would do more harm than the spread of the virus. Public health experts said that lifting the restrictions now in place would result in unnecessary deaths. ? Here’s how some economists assess the trade-off between economic well-being and health. Our Opinion section also compiled a range of perspectives.   ? Global markets rose today on the news from Washington, after a major rally on Wall Street. Here’s the latest. ? The Chinese province of Hubei, where the pandemic began, lifted travel restrictions on most of its 60 million residents today, ending a nearly two-month lockdown.   ? India’s 1.3 billion people must stay in their homes for three weeks starting today. Prime Minister Narendra Modi acknowledged that the lockdown would create “a very difficult time for poor people,” in a country where hundreds of millions are destitute. ? For Olympic athletes, the decision to postpone the Summer Games in Tokyo until 2021 comes as both a blessing and a curse.   ? Yellowstone, Grand Teton and the Great Smoky Mountains national parks were closed, after concerns about crowding. ? Hundreds of e-commerce sites are popping up to sell products that they claim help fight the coronavirus, and many are being shut down for making exaggerated claims or selling phantom goods.   “The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the president’s response to the pandemic. The Times is providing free access to much of our coronavirus coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter — like all of our newsletters — is free. Please consider supporting our journalism with a subscription.

Times Square on Tuesday. The coronavirus infection rate was up to 10 times greater in the New York area than in other parts of the country, officials said.  Bryan Derballa for The New York Times   New York is a ‘high-risk area’ Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday advised people who have passed through or left the city recently to place themselves in a 14-day quarantine. About 60 percent of the country’s new confirmed cases of the coronavirus were in the New York City metropolitan area, officials said.   Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has emerged as the Democratic Party’s most prominent voice during the crisis, offered a grim forecast for the outbreak in the city and criticized the federal government for its slow response in sending crucial equipment. “You want a pat on the back for sending 400 ventilators?” he said. “What are we going to do with 400 ventilators when we need 30,000 ventilators? You’re missing the magnitude of the problem.”   Related: The city’s public transportation network is cutting service at least 25 percent, after subway ridership on Tuesday fell 87 percent — by nearly 4.8 million riders — compared with the same day last year.

Photo illustration by Delcan & Co. ‘What I learned when my husband got sick’   “It has been 12 days since T woke up in the middle of the night on March 12 with chills.” In a first-person essay, an editor for The Times, Jessica Lustig, describes life with her family since her husband was diagnosed with Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.   She writes: “It’s as if we are in a time warp, in which we have accelerated at 1½ time speed, while everyone around us remains in the present — already the past to us — and they, blissfully, unconsciously, go about their ordinary lives, experiencing the growing news, the more urgent advisories and directives, as a vast communal experience, sharing posts and memes about cabin fever, about home-schooling, about social distancing, about how hard it all is, while we’re living in our makeshift sick ward, living in what will soon be the present for more and more of them.” If you have 20 minutes, this is worth it

Drawn to Chernobyl Mark Neville for The New York Times   Driven by his own curiosity, a writer for The Times Magazine traveled to the area around the former nuclear plant, the site of arguably the worst ecological catastrophe in history. “I was on a kind of perverse pilgrimage,” he writes. “I wanted to see what the end of the world looked like.” Above, two tourists at an abandoned amusement park in Pripyat, a city built for Chernobyl workers.   Here’s what else is happening Draft could include women: Under a new recommendation to Congress, all Americans ages 18 to 25 — not just young men as currently required — would have to register with the government in case of a military draft.

Meridith Kohut for The New York Times Snapshot: Above, a boarding school for girls in need in Maracaibo, Venezuela. As the country’s economic crisis deepens, mothers and fathers are going abroad in search of work, leaving hundreds of thousands of children in the hands of relatives, friends and, sometimes, one another.   In memoriam: Terrence McNally, a four-time Tony Award-winning playwright, dramatized and domesticated gay life in a Broadway career that spanned five decades. He died on Tuesday at 81, from complications of the coronavirus. A playlist for history: The theme song for “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” and the Village People’s “Y.M.C.A.” are among 25 recordings that have been added to the national registry at the Library of Congress.   What we’re reading: This article about a socially distanced wedding from The Cut. It’s “a charming story of making do,” says Steven Erlanger, our chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe, “when you just have to get that wedding done for the insurance.” Now, a break from the news

Melissa Clark Cook: This “highly adaptable” vegetarian skillet chili from Melissa Clark is part of her series on cooking with pantry staples.   Watch: Netflix’s feel-good documentary “Crip Camp” recalls a Catskills summer camp that fostered American disability rights activism. We made it a Critic’s Pick. Listen: Patrick Stewart reads Shakespeare on Twitter, Ballet Hispánico is on Instagram, and art museums are expanding their digital offerings. If you’re stuck at home and hankering for the fine arts, there’s plenty online.   Smarter Living: Catastrophizing — imagining the worst-case scenario and planning for it — can be damaging. So take a breath, stick to the facts and follow these other suggestions for staying sane. And now for the Back Story on …   A lost sense of smell There is growing evidence that anosmia — loss of the sense of smell — may be a coronavirus symptom. Medical experts said that people who lose their ability to smell or taste should isolate themselves for at least a week, even if they are otherwise asymptomatic.   Sarah Maslin Nir, a Times reporter who covered a suburban outbreak, lost her sense of smell last week and later tested positive for the virus. She spoke to our colleague Jonathan Wolfe about her experience for our Coronavirus Briefing. When did you notice that you couldn’t smell?   I had a socially distant lunch with a friend on Perry Street, at opposite ends of a stoop, and she passed me some Clorox wipes. And I thought, Unscented Clorox wipes? That’s weird. But then I looked at them, and they said “lemon scent.”

Blossom season in North Macedonia. The loss of smell has been associated with the coronavirus.  Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters   What did you do next? I quickly made my exit, because I remembered reading an article about two Chinese health care workers and one sentence stuck out to me — that one of the women lost her sense of taste and smell. I went home, got my godmother on FaceTime, opened my spice cupboard and tried sniffing all of the spices. I sliced fresh ginger and practically put it up my nose and couldn’t smell it.   Is anosmia your only symptom? I don’t have a cough or a fever, but I’m exhausted. And because I can’t smell, food is bland. Eggplant Parmesan tastes like a hot wet book.   Has your sense of smell returned? Since I can’t smell, I don’t really have an appetite, but I’m still trying to eat nutritiously. After several days, my sense of smell briefly came back: I was making myself what I would normally make, a kale salad, and surprisingly, it did not taste like serrated paper. But shortly after that it went away again.   How would you describe anosmia to others? It’s deeply unsettling. It’s a constant reminder that something is deeply wrong with your body. You can perk up and have a good moment or two, but then you eat your Cheerios and your heart misses a beat.   A correction: Tuesday’s briefing cited an article that misstated the regulatory status of the drug thalidomide. It was approved in the 1990s for leprosy and, later, cancer treatment; it is not the case that it was never approved in the U.S.   That’s it for this briefing. See you next time. — Chris   Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.   P.S.
• We’re listening to “The Daily.” Today’s episode is about President Trump’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.
• Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Capital of Vietnam (five letters).

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South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia –

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/health-environment/article/3076854/coronavirus-tokyos-cherry-blossoms-bring-thousands

Coronavirus: Tokyo’s cherry blossoms bring thousands to parks but experts worry the worst isn’t over yet for Japan

  • Japanese people bow instead of shaking hands and avoid direct contact with each other, so many believe they are relatively safe from Covid-19
  • But health experts say Japan faces a serious risk and people are not taking the threat seriously enough

Julian Ryall   Published: 9:09am, 25 Mar, 2020

Thousands of people ventured out to see the cherry blossoms over the weekend, but Tokyo’s governor has warned that a lockdown could be declared if people do not heed calls for social distancing. Photo: EPA-EFE

Japanese

 law student Mayako Shibata is making plans to see the cherry blossoms this weekend, despite increasingly strident warnings from health authorities to stay at home.

The 23-year-old said she was washing her hands often as she does during “regular flu season” and was not concerned about getting the 

coronavirus

 given that she has no underlying conditions.

The one concession that Shibata is making to the 

Covid-19

 disease that has so far infected well over 380,000 people globally and caused more than 16,000 deaths, is to try to steer clear of elderly people.

“I’m trying to stay away from them when I see them on the train because I know that I could be infected but that it would be far more serious for them,” she said.

Thousands of people visit Ueno Park in Tokyo to see the cherry blossoms. Photo: Reuters

Her sense of security is partly because of her location – the capital Tokyo has 14 million residents and has reported only 138 cases so far, less than 12 per cent of the national total. Japan has had 1,141 infections and 45 deaths out of its population of 127 million people, and close to 900 patients have already been discharged from hospital. This figure excludes the Diamond Princess cruise ship that docked in Yokohama last month, where one in five people on board became infected.

In comparison, 334 infections have been reported in the 

South Korean

 capital of Seoul, which has 10 million residents, while 

Singapore

, a city state with 5.6 million people, has more than 500 infections. 

Hong Kong

, with over 7 million residents, has recorded more than 350 cases.

“If I was in 

Spain

 or 

Italy

, where the outbreaks have been much worse and where the medical infrastructure is not as developed as here, then I think I would be more careful,” Shibata said.

In Italy, an estimated 0.1 per cent of the population of 60.5 million – or about 60,000 people – have been infected, with 5,476 deaths, while in Spain, about 0.06 per cent of the 46.66 million population – or 28,572 people – have been infected, with 1,720 people dying.

While many Asian nations are concerned about new cases being imported from overseas, Japan’s borders remain open to some foreign travellers, though Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi on Tuesday said arrivals from 18 European countries and Iran would be turned away, in an expansion of existing restrictions. Japan had already closed its doors to some regions in Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Iran, in addition to the whole of Iceland and San Marino as well as parts of 

China

 and South Korea.

According to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, 12 people have been found to have the virus after arriving at airports and were subsequently quarantined.

Abe agrees to Tokyo 2020 postponement after call with Olympics chief

25 Mar 2020

Experts say Japan’s comparatively low rate of infection may be due to low testing rates – the country carried out 18,322 tests before March 22, compared to almost 348,000 tests for South Korea’s 51 million population.

But Makoto Watanabe, an associate professor of communications at Hokkaido Bunkyo University, said ordinary Japanese people’s belief that they are relatively safe could also be attributed to social and cultural traditions.

People in Japan bow instead of shaking hands, hugging or kissing cheeks, he pointed out, while Japanese wash their hands frequently, shower or bathe daily and typically try to keep a distance between each other.

“It has always been like that in Japan, it’s part of our culture and I believe that perhaps people here act more out of respect for the broader community in which they live and work than elsewhere,” he said.

Thousands of Tokyo residents thronged parks over the past weekend to enjoy the early blooming of the cherry blossoms, while the K-1 kick-boxing organisation held matches before 6,500 fans at the Saitama Super Arena. Many people pack trains to get to work and are still dining out, with most shops and bars operating as usual.

On Monday, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike sought to dispel some of this complacency by warning that if more people fail to heed calls for “social distancing” she will have no option but to declare a lockdown in the city.

Japan’s cherry blossoms have come early but no one’s around to see them

16 Mar 2020

Koike said the next three weeks are “critical” for whether the city will experience an explosive rise in infections. Part of the problem is that the greater Tokyo region encompasses six other surrounding prefectures and is home to more than 38.1 million people, many of whom travel into the city on a daily basis.

“Depending on developments, it is possible that we may need to take strong measures, such as a so-called lockdown of the city,” Koike said. “We must do our best to avoid that, so I want to ask all of the people of Tokyo for their further cooperation.”

I think citizens are not facing this epidemic with a sense of crisis and the impact of their actions on one another Professor Hiroshi Nishiura

Hitoshi Oshitani, a professor of virology at Tohoku University, said the riskiest environments are those that are enclosed, have low ventilation and draw large crowds, such as the K-1 kick-boxing, while cherry blossom viewing is less risky.

Hiroshi Nishiura, a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at Hokkaido University, warned that large-scale events risk a resurgence of the virus. “If behaviour returns to normal, there could be an explosion of cases like what’s happened in the United States and Europe,” Nishiura wrote in a commentary published on Yahoo Japan. “In particular, once major events have resumed in an endemic area, the outbreak can grow out of control.”

Japanese citizens “are not facing this epidemic with a sense of crisis and the impact of their actions on one another”, Nishiura said.

Coronavirus: Hokkaido ends state of emergency; Japan schools to reopen

20 Mar 2020

While the first wave of infections originating from China was relatively small, Japan faces a more serious threat from explosive outbreaks in Europe and the United States. “We’re expecting that the second wave is much bigger,” Oshitani said.

At the current rate of transmission, experts predict there will be 530 cases in Tokyo by April 8 – although city officials appear to be less optimistic that numbers can be kept that low and have increased the number of hospital beds solely for coronavirus cases to 4,000.

World Bank data shows Japan has about 13 hospital beds per 1,000 people, the highest among the G7 nations and more than triple the rate for Italy and Britain.

Visitors wearing face masks walk under cherry blossoms at Ueno Park in Tokyo. Photo: AP

Watanabe said he was not surprised that people were out enjoying the cherry blossoms as the government had only recommended they stay indoors.

“The recommendations so far are more of a soft ‘code of conduct’ rather than the strict and specific orders that are coming out in Europe,” he said.

“Japanese people are generally obedient and if it had been an official order then they would not have been out, but I also believe that anyone who does go out in these circumstances accepts the responsibility for their actions. They were aware of the risks and would blame no one for their actions.”

Coronavirus: how Japan’s response echoes 1918 Spanish flu guidelines

24 Mar 2020

Kazuhiro Tateda, president of the Japan Association of Infectious Diseases and a member of the panel advising the government on the crisis, agreed that many of the everyday habits of Japanese people may be giving the population a degree of added protection, but he admitted to having some serious concerns.

“We feel at the moment that we are doing quite well with the infection numbers, although we still do not know much about what is going on under the surface,” he said.

“We do not know if supercarriers with no symptoms are walking around, visiting clubs and bars and pubs and spreading it. I worry that it is going to be the younger generation who are going to pass this virus on. For me, that is a very big concern.”

Additional reporting by Park Chan-kyong, Bloomberg, Kyodo and Reuters

Julian Ryall

Julian Ryall never expected to still be in Japan 24 years after he first arrived, but he quickly realised its advantages over his native London. He lives in Yokohama with his wife and children and writes for publications around the world.

Coronavirus outbreak

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Japan

Japan warns against cherry blossom watching parties to contain coronavirus spread

Mar 12, 2020  South China Morning Post

Subscribe to our YouTube channel for free here: https://sc.mp/subscribe-youtube The Japanese government urges people to refrain from ‘hanami’, or traditional cherry blossom watching parties, to contain the spread of coronavirus. Follow us on: Website: https://scmp.com Facebook: https://facebook.com/scmp Twitter: https://twitter.com/scmpnews Instagram: https://instagram.com/scmpnews Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sout…

Category   News & Politics



South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia


Confirmed Covid – 19 cases

Based on the WHO’s Covid -19 situation reports

Sources: WHO and health authorities

Cases: 443,554

Deaths: 20,463

Recovered: 105,668

Cases                     Deaths

 Mainland China                              81,285                      3,287

Italy                                                     74,386                     7,503

United States**                                54,381                       734

Spain                                                   47,610                    3,434

Germany                                            31,554                       149

Iran                                                      27,017                    2,077

France                                                 25,233                    1,331

Switzerland                                         9,765                        103

United Kingdom                                9,529                         422

South Korea                                       9,137                        126

Netherlands                                       6,412                        356

Austria                                                5,560                           31

Belgium                                              4,269                         122

Canada                                               3,409                           35

Portugal                                             2,995                           43

Norway                                              2,830                           12

Sweden                                              2,510                           42

Turkey                                                2,433                           59

Australia                                            2,423                             8

Brazil                                                  2,201                           46

Israel                                                 1,930                              3

Malaysia                                           1,796                           20

Denmark                                         1,724                           34

Czech Republic                              1,654                            6

Ireland                                             1,564                            9

Luxembourg                                    1,333                           8

Japan                                               1,271                          45

Ecuador                                            1,211                         29

Chile                                                 1,142                           3

Pakistan                                            1,022                          8

Thailand                                               934                          4

Poland                                                  927                        12

Finland                                                  792                           1

Indonesia                                             790                         58

Greece                                                  743                          20

Diamond Princess*                             712                         10

South Africa                                         709                            0

Russia                                                    658                            1

Iceland                                                  648                             1

Philippines                                           636                           38

Singapore                                             631                             2

Romania                                               576                            13

India                                                      562                            10

Saudi Arabia                                        562                              0

Qatar                                                    526                               0

Colombia                                             470                               4

Panama                                                443                              6

Croatia                                                  442                             1

Slovenia                                               442                              1

Bahrain                                                419                              4

Peru                                                      416                              5

Hong Kong                                          410                              4

Estonia                                                404                              1

Egypt                                                   402                            20

Argentina                                           387                               6

Mexico                                               367                              4

Dominican Republic                        312                              6

Lebanon                                            304                               4

Serbia                                                 303                               2

Iraq                                                     266                              23

Armenia                                             265                                0

Algeria                                                264                              17

New Zealand                                      262                               0

Lithuania                                             255                               2

United Arab Emirates                       248                               2

Bulgaria                                              242                                3

Taiwan                                                235                               2

Hungary                                              226                              10

Slovakia                                              204                                0

Latvia                                                  197                                0

Kuwait                                                191                                0

Uruguay                                             189                                0

Andorra                                              188                                1

Costa Rica                                          177                                2

Tunisia                                                173                                3

Morocco                                            170                                 5

Bosnia and Herzegovina                 164                                 2

San Marino                                        162                               21

Jordan                                                 153                                0

North Macedonia                             148                                2

Albania                                               146                                 5

Vietnam                                              134                                 0

Faroe Islands*                                    132                                 0

Moldova                                              125                                 1

Cyprus                                                  124                                 1

Burkina Faso                                        114                                4

Ukraine                                                 113                                4

Malta                                                     110                                0

Brunei                                                    109                                0

Sri Lanka                                                102                                0

Cambodia                                                96                                0

Azerbaijan                                              87                                 1

Oman                                                       84                                 0

Venezuela                                               84                                 0

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/health-environment/article/3076854/coronavirus-tokyos-cherry-blossoms-bring-thousands

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PBS News: March 15 & 16, 2020, and Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

 Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

CNN: Fareed Zakaria – Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

DW News: Coronavirus update – Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders

ABC News: Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency – Four Corners – ABC News In-depth

TED Talks: Adam Kucharski How can we control the coronavirus pandemic?

The New York Times: We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L. By Chris Stanford

Scientific American: Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there By Jane Qiu, and WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 16, 2020

Mar 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the novel coronavirus pandemic dominates the U.S., as numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb and cities essentially shut down. Plus: The economic fallout from the outbreak, what epidemiologists mean by “flattening the curve,” the Biden-Sanders debate, Politics Monday, coronavirus threatens Lebanon with another crisis, coping through art and song and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 15, 2020

Mar 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 15, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, what you need to know about “social distancing,” how the coronavirus scare is shaping the political playing field, and what’s being done to stop Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

Mar 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the unique magnitude of the novel coronavirus pandemic, how President Trump is handling the crisis, what the government should do to reassure fearful Americans, and how the outbreak might affect the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race.

Category  News & Politics

Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

Mar 15, 2020  Global News

Canadian travellers are scrambling to return home amid the COVID-19 outbreak as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says nothing is ‘off the table” in combating the pandemic in Canada. Abigail Bimman reports on whether those plans could also involve border closures, and Jennifer Johnson reports on how U.S. health authorities are raising the possibility of more country-wide crackdowns. Heather Yourex-West reports on how many Canadian provinces are beginning to enforce tough measures by closing public spaces and schools. Robin Gill reports on a disastrous pipeline explosion in Nigeria and why the COVID-19 pandemic is halting Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial. Plus, Mike Le Couteur looks at why hundreds of millions of dollars allocated to support Canadian veterans has not been spent. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #Coronavirus #COVID19

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Fareed Zakaria: Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

Mar 15, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria discusses how President Trump is handling coronavirus and America’s well-being in comparison to other countries’ response to the global pandemic. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus update: Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders | DW News

Mar 15, 2020  DW News

Germany joins a growing list of EU countries to at least partially shut out its neighbors. Authorities here have decided to close borders with Switzerland and Austria. That’s according to German media reports. Added restrictions are also being imposed on the French-German boundary. Spain is in lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus Covid-19. Unprecedented lockdowns and border closures are coming into effect in many European countries, and the streets are empty throughout Europe, with Spain and France among the worst hit by the virus’ spread behind Italy. England is planning self-isolation measures for all people over 70, for up to four months. Austria’s Chancellor Sebstian Kurz says his government is banning gatherings of more than five people. Iran’s coronavirus death toll has leapt by 113 in one day to reach 724. And the Vatican says all Easter services will take place without worshipers in attendance. Pope Francis will hold Sunday blessings via TV and the internet. Meanwhile, the United States has tightened its ban on visitors from Europe. President Donald Trump says it will now include travelers from Britain and Ireland. In countries that are far away from coronavirus hotspots, like Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia, the response from authorities has ranged from tough to nonexistent.Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #dwNews

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Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency | Four Corners

Feb 24, 2020  ABC News In-depth

It’s likened to a scene from an apocalypse. Wuhan — a city more populous than London or New York — placed in ‘lockdown’ following the outbreak of the new and deadly coronavirus. In China, more than two thousand people have died, with tens of thousands more infected, and authorities are resorting to extreme measures to try to halt the contagion. In interviews filmed on smartphones, Chinese activists and Australians trapped in the lockdown explain what they are going through. Four Corners charts how the outbreak occurred and investigates whether a cover-up by Chinese authorities allowed the virus to spread. _________ Watch more Four Corners investigations here: https://bit.ly/2JbpMkf You can also like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abc4corners/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/4corners And sign up to our newsletter: https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/newsl… _____________

Category  News & Politics

As the threat of COVID-19 continues, infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski answers five key questions about the novel coronavirus, providing necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what might need to change about our social behavior to end the pandemic. (This video is excerpted from a 70-minute interview between Kucharski and head of TED Chris Anderson. Listen to the full interview at go.ted.com/adamkucharski.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Adam Kucharski · Infectious disease scientist

Adam Kucharski is working to understand how epidemics spread — and how they can be controlled.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread — and Why They Stop Hardcover

Adam Kucharski

Basic Books (2020)

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Monday, March 16, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L.
 

By Chris Stanford

Chelsea Market in Manhattan on Sunday. Restaurants and bars were ordered closed in several parts of the U.S.  Jose A. Alvarado Jr. for The New York Times
Americans are urged to ‘hunker down’
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that no gatherings of 50 people or more be held in the U.S. for the next two months, one of the federal government’s most sweeping efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
“For a while, life is not going to be the way it used to be in the United States,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Sunday. “We have to just accept that if we want to do what’s best for the American public.”
Here are the latest updates on the outbreak and maps of where the virus has spread.
In other developments:
? New York City’s public school system, the largest in the country, will be closed starting today. The city has also ordered a shutdown of tens of thousands of bars and restaurants, except for delivery and pickup services.
To ease a bottleneck in coronavirus testing, federal officials are setting up more drive-through centers and increasing commercial laboratories’ ability to process multiple samples at once.
? The Trump administration tried to persuade a German company that is developing a possible vaccine to move its work to the U.S., German officials said, raising fears in Berlin that any inoculation would be available first — and perhaps exclusively — in the U.S.
? Italy, the hardest-hit country outside China, reported a death toll of 1,809, a 25 percent increase over the day before. In a communal effort to lift the mood, Italians stuck in their homes have been breaking out in song. “It’s not like we’re maestros,” a woman in Rome said, but “it’s a moment of joy in this moment of anxiety.”
? As part of restrictions across Europe, Germany will close its borders with several neighbors.
? A Tennessee man who became a subject of national scorn after stockpiling more than 17,000 bottles of hand sanitizer donated the supplies. The state has begun a price-gouging investigation.
? Movie theaters had their worst weekend in two decades. Domestic ticket sales totaled $55.3 million, a 44 percent drop from the previous weekend.
What to know: Here’s how to practice social distancing and clean your phone. The Times is providing free access to much of our coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, like all of our newsletters, is free.
Another angle: On a special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. The story is a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” Listen here.
Fed cuts rates to near zero
The Federal Reserve on Sunday cut its benchmark interest rate by a full percentage point and said it would inject hundreds of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy, making an aggressive effort to address the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.
If the measures remind you of the 2008 global financial crisis, you’re not alone, our senior economics correspondent writes.
Global markets fell today. Here’s the latest.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the financial system’s response to the pandemic.
Related: Retailers, dairy farmers and meat producers say the U.S. food supply chain remains intact and has been ramping up to meet pandemic stockpiling.
Another angle: As the outbreak forces the cancellation of trips, nights out and large gatherings, economic damage is mounting. “Last week, I would have told you nothing had changed,” a California real estate agent said. “This week, it has all gone to hell.”  
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders bumped elbows rather than shaking hands before Sunday’s debate.  Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Democrats debate pandemic, and each other
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders called on Sunday for far more aggressive government action against the coronavirus and its economic effects, during their first one-on-one debate of the Democratic primary race.
The shadow of the pandemic loomed over the event, which was held without a live audience and with a six-foot distance between the candidates, following guidelines for social distancing.
Mr. Biden committed for the first time to selecting a female running mate, and Mr. Sanders said that “in all likelihood” he would do so as well. Here are six takeaways from the debate. We also fact-checked some of the candidates’ remarks.
Perspective: Writers from our Opinion section ranked the performances.
What’s next: Polls suggest that Mr. Biden is likely to win the four states with primaries on Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio. Georgia, which had been scheduled to vote March 24, postponed its primary for two months because of the coronavirus.
Go deeper: The Times Magazine looks at Mr. Sanders’s campaign. “Even as the two-man race has taken a more pugilistic turn while the economy reels and a pandemic sweeps the globe, Sanders has remained steadfast in his willingness to let the Democratic voters judge him by his democratic-socialist vision of what America should be. And so, it would seem, they have.”
Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. Shira Ovide wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

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How China’s “Bat Woman” Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

     By Jane Qiu on March 11, 2020 

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Shi Zhengli, known as China’s “bat woman” for her virus-hunting expeditions in bat caves, releases a fruit bat after taking blood and swab samples from it. Credit: Wuhan Institute of Virology

BEIJING—The mysterious patient samples arrived at Wuhan Institute of Virology at 7 P.M. on December 30, 2019. Moments later, Shi Zhengli’s cell phone rang. It was her boss, the institute’s director. The Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention had detected a novel coronavirus in two hospital patients with atypical pneumonia, and it wanted Shi’s renowned laboratory to investigate. If the finding was confirmed, the new pathogen could pose a serious public health threat—because it belonged to the same family of bat-borne viruses as the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that plagued 8,100 people and killed nearly 800 of them between 2002 and 2003. “Drop whatever you are doing and deal with it now,” she recalls the director saying.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-chinas-bat-woman-hunted-down-viruses-from-sars-to-the-new-coronavirus1/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=health&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-03-16_featured-this-week&spMailingID=64310566&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1841993808&spReportId=MTg0MTk5MzgwOAS2

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

     By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT on March 11, 2020

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

Coronavirus illustration. Credit: Dowell Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, acknowledging what has seemed clear for some time—the virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe.

Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the situation will worsen.

“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” said Tedros, as the director general is known.

As of Wednesday, 114 countries have reported that 118,000 have contracted Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, known as SARS-CoV2. In the United States, where for weeks state and local laboratories could not test for the virus, just over 1,000 cases have been diagnosed and 29 people have died. But authorities here warn continuing limits on testing mean the full scale of spread in this country is not yet known.

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Read more from this special report:

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

The virus causes mild respiratory infections in about 80% of those infected, though about half will have pneumonia. Another 15% develop severe illness and 5% need critical care.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/who-declares-the-coronavirus-outbreak-a-pandemic/

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PBS News, The New York Times, DW Documentary, BBC Click, TED Talks, Bored Panda, and My Modern Met

PBS News: March 6 – 9. 2020, How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’, What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case, and How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

DW Documentary: Better brain health

BBC Click: Foldable Phones and Medical Tech

TED Talks: The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings – Renzo Piano, and Jill Seubert How a miniaturized atomic clock could revolutionize space exploration

Bored Panda:  NASA’s Curiosity Has Been on Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

My Modern Met: These Exotic Trees Transform into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

PBS NewsHour live episode, Mar 9, 2020

•Streamed live 83 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 8, 2020

Mar 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday March 8, the coronavirus outbreak spreads and Italy imposes strict travel restrictions, and after years of planning the 2020 census makes its debut this week. Also, a new approach in Louisiana for prison reform focuses on rehabilitation. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 7, 2020

Mar 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 7, concerns over coronavirus continue as the number of cases rise, the presidential democratic candidates rally ahead of the upcoming primaries, tensions escalate amid migrant push on Greece-Turkey border, and can women landowners in Iowa help conservation efforts? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 6, 2020

Mar 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump signs a bipartisan emergency spending deal to fund the government’s novel coronavirus response, as the global number of cases approaches 100,000. Plus: Questions about how to handle sick leave and medical bills amid the novel coronavirus outbreak, a conversation about women in politics, political analysis with Shields and Brooks and a music documentary. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Spread of novel coronavirus yields new global reality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEB94… News Wrap: February saw strongest U.S. hiring since 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIfKt… How lack of paid sick leave complicates U.S. virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JrYP… Are female presidential candidates held to higher standard? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNLVk… Shields and Brooks on Warren’s farewell, Biden’s surge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcP7u… Robbie Robertson on building The Band https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxRL7… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Amid the McCarthy hearings and the launch of the civil rights movement in the 1950s, painter Jacob Lawrence sought to frame early American history the way he saw it. His ensuing work, the sprawling series “Struggle,” has been reassembled and is now on a national tour, with its first stop at the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of WGBH visits the exhibit. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case about access to abortion doctors in Louisiana. The law in question is similar to a Texas one struck down by the Court in 2016 — but decided by a different group of justices. Lisa Desjardins talks to the National Law Journal’s Marcia Coyle and Mary Ziegler, professor and author of “Abortion and the Law in America: Roe v. Wade to the Present.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On Wednesday, California officials confirmed the state’s first death from novel coronavirus, as the number of infections nationwide continues to rise. But beyond the serious medical implications of the virus, it is also provoking fear, suspicion and ethnic stereotyping. Amna Nawaz reports from San Francisco, a city long known for its ties to China and the Chinese-American community. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

Monday, March 9, 2020 | View in browser
(Want to get this briefing by email? Here’s the sign-up.)
Good morning.
We’re covering updates in the coronavirus outbreak and the latest in the Democratic presidential race. We also explain a dispute over classified portions of the U.S. agreement with the Taliban.
 By Chris Stanford
A plunge in stocks to start the week
Global markets fell sharply today, and Wall Street looked set to follow suit, as the effects of the coronavirus outbreak deepened and Saudi Arabia cut oil prices nearly 10 percent over the weekend. Here are the latest market updates.
The Saudi decision was in retaliation for Russia’s refusal to join OPEC in a large production cut as the outbreak continues to slow the global economy.
In the U.S., the number of coronavirus cases has grown to more than 530. On Sunday, the country’s leading expert on infectious diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said regional lockdowns could become necessary and recommended that those at greatest risk — older adults and people with underlying health conditions — abstain from travel.
Here are the latest updates on the virus and a map of where it has spread.
Related: A cruise ship that has been held off California after 21 people aboard tested positive for the virus is set to dock today in Oakland. More than 3,500 passengers and crew members will be taken to military facilities around the country to be quarantined for 14 days. The State Department on Sunday advised Americans against traveling on cruise ships.
Closer look: Dr. Fauci has become the chief explainer of the epidemic, partly because other government scientists have either avoided the spotlight or been reined in by the Trump administration.
News analysis: President Trump, who seems at his strongest politically when he has a human target to attack, has found it harder to confront the threat of an invisible pathogen, our chief White House correspondent writes.
In other developments:
? State and federal officials have yet to require school closings, but more individual districts and schools are shutting down.
? Two members of Congress, including Senator Ted Cruz, said they would self-quarantine after interacting at the Conservative Political Action Conference with a person who tested positive for the virus. Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the meeting last week.
? One of the world’s leading tennis tournaments has been canceled. Qualifying matches for the BNP Paribas Open, known as Indian Wells, were to have begun today.
What to know: Here’s how to quarantine yourself if you need to and answers to questions about the virus.
Italians are urged to respect lockdown
As the site of the worst outbreak of the coronavirus outside Asia, Italy has announced strict measures that limit the movements of about a quarter of the population. To bolster the effort, the country’s leaders have appealed to Italians to reject “furbizia,” the sort of cleverness typically channeled into getting around bureaucracy.
“We are the new Wuhan,” one woman in the closed-off northern region of Lombardy said on Sunday.
Go deeper: The lockdown may save lives, but analysts say it will paralyze Italy’s economic heartland and almost certainly tip Europe into a recession.

Better brain health | DW Documentary

Mar 5, 2020  DW Documentary

Chocolate reduces stress. Fish stimulates the brain. Is there any truth to such popular beliefs? The findings of researchers around the world say yes: It appears we really are what we eat. A study in a British prison found that inmates who took vitamin supplements were less prone to violent behavior. And in Germany, a psychologist at the University of Lübeck has shown that social behavior is influenced by the ingredients consumed at breakfast. But what really happens in the brain when we opt for honey instead of jam, and fish rather than sausage? Scientists around the world are trying to find out. Neuro-nutrition is the name of an interdisciplinary research field that investigates the impact of nutrition on brain health. Experiments on rats and flies offer new insight into the effects of our eating habits. When laboratory rats are fed a diet of junk food, the result is not just obesity. The menu also has a direct influence on their memory performance. The role of the intestinal flora has been known for some time, but scientists are currently discovering other relationships. So-called “brain food” for example: The Mediterranean diet that’s based on vegetables and fish is said to provide the best nutrition for small grey cells. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, for example, protect the nerve cells and are indispensable for the development of the brain – because the brain is also what it eats! ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories

Category  Education

Foldable Phones and Medical Tech – BBC Click

Mar 8, 2020  BBC Click

Click checks out a new foldable phone, but is the technology worth the hype? Also, we meet a man having a microcomputer implanted into his heart. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings | Renzo Piano

Jul 13, 2018  TED

Legendary architect Renzo Piano — the mind behind such indelible buildings as The Shard in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the new Whitney Museum of Art in New York City — takes us on a stunning tour through his life’s work. With the aid of gorgeous imagery, Piano makes an eloquent case for architecture as the answer to our dreams, aspirations and desire for beauty. “Universal beauty is one of the few things that can change the world,” he says. “This beauty will save the world. One person at a time, but it will do it.” Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category  Science & Technology

Ask any deep space navigator like Jill Seubert what makes steering a spacecraft difficult, and they’ll tell you it’s all about the timing; a split-second can decide a mission’s success or failure. So what do you do when a spacecraft is bad at telling time? You get it a clock — an atomic clock, to be precise. Let Seubert whisk you away with the revolutionary potential of a future where you could receive stellar, GPS-like directions — no matter where you are in the universe.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxUCLA, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Jill Seubert · Interplanetary navigator

Jill Seubert navigates spacecraft throughout the solar system, exploring with robots where humans cannot yet go.

ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxUCLA | May 2019

NASA’s Curiosity Has Been On Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?  BoredPanda staff

For us, mere mortals, Mars is a no man’s land where survival seems like a distant dream. After all, no man has ever walked on its surface (as far as we know) and plans to send one to the red planet are only in the early stages of its development. However, humans have touched Mars through the durable wheels of Mars rovers. We’ve had 4 successful robotically operated Mars rovers (all of which were managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA) so far: Sojourner, Opportunity, Spirit, and Curiosity. 

As Opportunity’s mission was declared complete on February 13, 2019 when NASA lost all contact with the vehicle, Curiosity became the lone survivor on the red planet, rolling over its surface to examine and explore the unknown land all by itself. The spacecraft first landed on Mars on August 6, 2012 and started carrying out its objectives throughout the years. In fact, Curiosity did its job so well and held on for so long that its original mission duration of 687 days was expanded indefinitely. 

Here’s how Curiosity looked 7 years ago and now

#1 Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score:  102points 12 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

Curiosity is approaching its 8 year anniversary on Mars and while it is currently the only functional rover on the planet (after we all, unfortunately, had to say goodbye to Oppy), NASA has plans to send it some company in the shape of Mars 2020 rover. The 2020 mission is scheduled to start on 17 July to 5 August 2020 when the rocket carrying the rover will be launched. NASA also announced a student naming contest for the rover that was held in the fall of 2019. The final name will be announced in early March 2020, so we definitely have something to look forward to!

#2 Sunset Sequence In Mars’ Gale Crater

Sunset Sequence In Mars' Gale Crater

NASAReport

Final score:85points  21 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#3 Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

NASAReport

Final score:  84points  69 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#4 Curiosity’s Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

Curiosity's Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

NASAReport

Final score: 76points  29 Reply  View more comments

#5 Martian Rock ‘Harrison’ In Color, Showing Crystals

Martian Rock 'Harrison' In Color, Showing Crystals

NASAReport

Final score: 72points   27 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#6 Curiosity’s Dusty Selfie At Duluth

Curiosity's Dusty Selfie At Duluth

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 51 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#7 Jake Matijevic Rock

Jake Matijevic Rock

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 30 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#8 Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 64points 29 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#9 First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 63points  18 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#10 Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 63points 25 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#11 Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 13 Reply View more comments

#12 Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 26 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#13 Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

NASAReport

Final score: 59points  7 Reply View more comments

#14 Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score: 56points  52 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#15 Curiosity Visited An Area Named “Fracture Town” Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

Curiosity Visited An Area Named "Fracture Town" Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#16 Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  26 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#17 Wheel Scuff Mark At ‘Rocknest’

Wheel Scuff Mark At 'Rocknest'

NASAReport

Final score: 52points  25  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#18 Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

NASAReport

Final score: 49points  44  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#19 Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named “Gobabeb”, Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As “Bagnold”

Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named "Gobabeb", Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As "Bagnold"

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 48points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#20 View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At ‘Shaler’

View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At 'Shaler'

NASAReport

Final score: 47points 19 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#21 Mars Rover Curiosity In ‘Buckskin’ Selfie

Mars Rover Curiosity In 'Buckskin' Selfie

NASAReport

Final score: 45points  32 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#22 Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score:44points  1 Reply  View more comments

#23 Getting To Know Mount Sharp

Getting To Know Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 44points  7 Reply View more comments

#24 Curiosity Tracks In ‘Hidden Valley’ On Mars

Curiosity Tracks In 'Hidden Valley' On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 42points Reply View more comments

#25 Curiosity Rover’s View Of Alluring Martian Geology

Curiosity Rover's View Of Alluring Martian Geology

NASAReport

Final score: 41points 15 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#26 Curiosity Self-Portrait At ‘Windjana’ Drilling Site

Curiosity Self-Portrait At 'Windjana' Drilling Site

NASAReport

Final score: 41points  7 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#27 A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 41points 15  Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#28 Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

NASAReport

Final score: 39points 10 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#29 Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

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#30 Resistant Features In ‘Pahrump Hills’ Outcrop

Resistant Features In 'Pahrump Hills' Outcrop

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Note: this post originally had 44 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

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Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?

Author, BoredPanda staff

As a writer and image editor for Bored Panda, Giedr? crafts posts on many different topics to push them to their potential. She’s also glad that her Bachelor’s degree in English Philology didn’t go to waste (although collecting dust in the attic could also be considered an achievement of aesthetic value!) Giedr? is an avid fan of cats, photography, and mysteries, and a keen observer of the Internet culture which is what she is most excited to write about. Since she’s embarked on her journalistic endeavor, Giedr? has over 600 articles under her belt and hopes for twice as much (fingers crossed – half of them are about cats).

These Exotic Trees Transform Into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

By Jessica Stewart on January 31, 2020

Rainbow Eucalyptus Trees in Hawaii

Photo: Stock Photos from Danita Delmont/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus trees are most known for their fragrant leaves and for being the main food source for koalas, but did you know that they can also be quite colorful? In fact, Eucalyptus deglupta is so colorful that it’s known as the rainbow eucalyptus. When this incredible tree sheds its bark, it almost looks like a colored pencil being sharpened. This makes for a spectacle that is unforgettable.

Also known as the Mindanao gum or rainbow gum, the rainbow eucalyptus is a tall tree that is unique in that it’s the only eucalyptus to live in the rainforest and only one of four species found outside of Australia. It can be found in the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea, where it can soar up to 250 feet in the air. While its height is impressive, it’s really the tree’s multicolor bark that makes it stand out.

As the rainbow eucalyptus sheds, it first reveals a bright green inner bark. Over time, this ages into different colors—blue, purple, orange, and maroon. The colorful striations are created due to the fact that the tree doesn’t shed all at once. Slowly, over time, different layers fall off, while other exposed areas have already begun aging.

This process makes for a spectacular visual, with the rainbow eucalyptus looking like it could be pulled from Alice in Wonderland. Its unique appearance has also made it quite popular amongst garden enthusiasts. It can be found in botanical gardens around the world and is often planted as an ornamental tree in Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, and Southern California, where the frost-free climate allows it to thrive.

Interestingly, the rainbow eucalyptus also has a high commercial value that has nothing to do with its color. The tree is often found at tree plantations, as it’s an excellent source for pulpwood—the main ingredient in making white paper. So the next time you pull out a blank sheet, just remember that it may have originally been something much more colorful.

The rainbow eucalyptus gets its name from its colorful appearance.

Eucalyptus deglupta

Photo: Stock Photos from Sean D. Thomas/Shutterstock

Bark of the Rainbow Eucalyptus

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus deglupta takes on different colors as bark sheds and the inner bark slowly ages.

Rainbow Eucalyptus Tree
Rainbow Gum Tree

Photo: Stock Photos from Martina Roth/Shutterstock

Photo: Stock Photos from Ilya Images/Shutterstock

Mindanao gum tree

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

h/t: [Earthly Mission]

JESSICA STEWART

Jessica Stewart is a writer, curator, and art historian living in Rome, Italy. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London. She cultivated expertise in street art led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book ‘Street Art Stories Roma‘ and most recently contributed to ‘Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini‘. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog

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PBS News, TED Talks, Democracy Now !, Inhabitat, The New York Times, Wonder World, VIVSVIBE, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: Mar 2 – 5, 2020, Washington state coronavirus outbreak ‘a mystery so far’, How the Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice, Greenland Melting (360°), and Yosemite ‘firefall’ slows to a trickle amid drought

TED Talks: David Heymann What we do and don’t know about the coronavirus?

Democracy Now!: Sanders & Socialism: Debate Between Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman & Socialist Economist Richard Wolff

CNN: Fareed Zakaria: I want to talk about Bernie Sanders

Inhabitat: Margot Krasojevic – hydroelectric Art Gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100 self sustaining/

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Thursday, March 5, 2020 – Morning Briefing     

Wonder World: Yosemite Horsetail Falls

VIVSVIBE: Yosemite National Park Firefall 2019 Behind the Scenes | Horsetail Falls Viewing Location and Tips

Thisiscolossal: Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia, 3D Ship Drawn on Three Flat Sheets of Paper by Ramon Bruin, and New Geometric Creatures from TRÜF Creative

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 5, 2020

Mar 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the global impact of novel coronavirus continues to rise as countries close schools and restrict travel. Plus: A former Obama campaign manager on the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race, a troubling report on migrant families separated by the U.S. government, Britain’s defense secretary on crisis in Syria and a preacher’s reminder that “everybody is somebody.” WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The IMF seeks to reduce novel coronavirus’ economic fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oauQ5… News Wrap: Schumer denies threatening Supreme Court justices https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kPth… How Obama’s campaign manager thinks Democrats can beat Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sU9M… Why HHS struggled to reunite separated migrant families https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCAcL… UK defense secretary on Syria crisis, U.S.-Taliban deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Jsm0… A Brief But Spectacular take on how ‘everybody is someb Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 4, 2020

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Congress agrees on $8.3 billion bill to fund virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKOF1… News Wrap: Netanyahu appears to fall short of a majority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XA2q… 2 Democratic strategists on Biden’s Super Tuesday momentum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPKyi… Novel coronavirus fears also drive stigma and stereotypes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOpbS… What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s latest abortion law case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzwuy… Painter Jacob Lawrence’s early American ‘Struggle’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivDIA…

PBS NewsHour 9pm full episode, Mar 3, 2020

Mar 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. public health officials rush to respond to the growing novel coronavirus outbreak. Plus: Super Tuesday results reshape the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination as former Vice President Joe Biden takes the delegate lead, deadly tornadoes slam Tennessee, Iran struggles with its novel coronavirus outbreak and a naturalist inspired by old-growth forests. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 2, 2020

Mar 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, novel coronavirus is now blamed for six deaths in the U.S., all in Washington state — but officials fear there may be more cases not yet diagnosed. Plus: A tumultuous 48 hours in the Democratic primary, Super Tuesday previews of California and North Carolina, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter and what’s next for Afghanistan after a provisional peace deal. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Wash. health officials fear virus may have quietly spread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqXXL… News Wrap: Netanyahu looks victorious in Israeli election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNk5A… After SC winnows field, 2020 Dems prep for Super Tuesday https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmPBP… How California voters are deciding among 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhCgx… Why many NC voters worry they can’t trust election process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gt5u… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden’s pre-Super Tuesday win https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp8YM… How Afghan government feels about U.S.-Taliban peace deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VG7Cg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Washington state coronavirus outbreak ‘a mystery so far’

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The coronavirus has now spread to more than 60 countries and more confirmed cases are being reported in the United States. Washington on Saturday reported the first U.S. death from the virus as new cases continue to emerge in the state. Los Angeles Times Seattle Bureau Chief Richard Read joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on the state’s outbreak. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice

Feb 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The mantra of the Dallas Street Choir is “homeless, not voiceless.” Some 2,000 singers have passed through the group in the last five years, seeking support, artistic expression and community as they contend with life on the streets. The organization also aims to raise awareness of Dallas’ growing homelessness problem, even as the city’s economy booms. Jeffrey Brown reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Greenland Melting (360°)

Sep 20, 2018

NOVA PBS Official

Greenland’s glaciers are melting faster and faster. If they were all to disappear, the sea level around the world would rise by 20 feet, scientists estimate. A FRONTLINE I NOVA I Emblematic collaboration

Category  Science & Technology

What happens if you get infected with the coronavirus? Who’s most at risk? How can you protect yourself? Public health expert David Heymann, who led the global response to the SARS outbreak in 2003, shares the latest findings about COVID-19 and what the future may hold.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

David Heymann · Epidemiologist, professor

David Heymann is a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He led the World Health Organization’s global response to the SARS epidemic in 2003.

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Learn more about the coronavirus disease outbreak from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Check out the World Health Organization’s information and guidance on the coronavirus disease outbreak.

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Currently | February 2020

Sanders & Socialism: Debate Between Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman & Socialist Economist Richard Wolff

Feb 24, 2020  Democracy Now!

As Bernie Sanders’s runaway win in Nevada cements his position as the front-runner for the Democratic nomination, the Democratic Party establishment and much of the mainstream media are openly expressing concern about a self-described democratic socialist leading the presidential ticket. His opponents have also attacked his ambitious agenda. Last week during the primary debate in Las Vegas, Bernie Sanders addressed misconceptions about socialism. Invoking the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Sanders decried what he called “socialism for the very rich, rugged individualism for the poor.” For more, we host a debate on Bernie Sanders and democratic socialism, featuring two well-known economists. Paul Krugman is a New York Times op-ed columnist and author of many books, including his latest, “Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future.” One of his recent columns is headlined “Bernie Sanders Isn’t a Socialist.” Richard Wolff is professor emeritus of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and visiting professor at The New School. He is the founder of Democracy at Work and hosts the weekly national television and radio program “Economic Update.” He’s the author of several books, including “Understanding Socialism.” #DemocracyNow Democracy Now! is an independent global news hour that airs on nearly 1,400 TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9AM ET: https://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: https://democracynow.org/donate FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/demo… Daily Email Digest: https://democracynow.org/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: I want to talk about Bernie Sanders

Mar 1, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria analyzes Bernie Sanders’ economic proposals, and how they have fared in other countries. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Inhabitat: Margot Krasojevic – hydroelectric Art Gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self sustaining/

London-based architect Margot Krasojevic has just unveiled a futuristic art gallery that runs on hydroelectric power. Slated for the coastal Russian region of Sochi, the Hydroelectric Sculpture Gallery will harness enough wave energy to not only be 100% self-sufficient, but it will also be able to channel surplus energy back into the grid, powering around 200 nearby houses and businesses as a result.

large hydroelectric sculpture

The art gallery will be located on Sochi’s coastline, where it will use the exceptionally strong coastal swells from the Black Sea to power a water turbine system. Krasojevic’s vision depicts a sculptural volume that rises out of an existing wooden promenade. The building, which will be partly submerged into the sea, will be strategically angled at 45 degrees to the coastline for maximum wave exposure.

Related: Oil rig off South Korea’s coast to become a floating hotel that operates on tidal energy

large hydroelectric structure on coastline

According to the design plans, the building will “use the environment’s characteristics to generate clean, sustainable energy, without affecting the quality and nature of the landscape.” State-of-the-art engineering will allow the structure to harvest wave energy through oscillating water columns as the waves crash against it. Generating up to 300kW, the system will enable the gallery to operate completely off the grid and channel surplus energy back into the grid. It could supply clean energy to approximately 200 households and businesses in the same area.

immense sculpture on desert landscape

Visitors to the futuristic gallery will enter through a long walkway stretching out from the shore. The robust exterior of the building will comprise various walkways and ramps that wind around the steel structure. Sinuous volumes will conceal the building’s many turbines, which will also be partially submerged underwater.

upclose shot of concrete base of large sculpture

Inside, the spaces will reflect the building’s functions. The various galleries will be laid out into a power plant format, with steel clad ceilings that mimic the rolling waves that crash into the exterior. Irregularly shaped skylights will also create a vibrant, kaleidoscope show of shadow and light throughout the day.

+ Margot Krasojevic

Images via Margot Krasojevic

immense sculpture next to beach deck

The Daily Conversation: The World’s Future MEGAPROJECTS: 2019-2040’s (Season 2 – Complete)

The World’s Future MEGAPROJECTS: 2019-2040’s (Season 2 – Complete)

Jun 22, 2017  The Daily Conversation

A documentary on eight of the most ambitious mega-projects currently under development around the world, featuring: Istanbul’s building boom (Turkey); the Mission to put a human on Mars; the effort to develop Lagos (Nigeria); Africa’s unprecedented clean energy opportunity; the project to probe the nearest Earth-like exoplanet; Atlanta’s stadium of the future (Georgia, United States); India’s effort to modernize its highways; and China’s unprecedented One Belt One Road, “New Silk Road” initiative. Get your free audiobook: http://www.audibletrial.com/TheDailyC… Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConve… Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: By Matt Stewart-Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stew… Alex Gopher: https://soundcloud.com/alexgopher https://www.youtube.com/user/go4music… http://www.go4music.fr/ Glimpse https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Kevin MacLeod http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-… And the YouTube Audio Library Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconve… All images and videos used under the ‘Fair Use’ provision of United States Copyright Law: http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html

Caption author (Portuguese (Brazil))

Romulo Silva

Category  News & Politics

The New York Times – Morning Briefing    nytimes.com

Thursday, March 5, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the state of emergency in California and other responses to the coronavirus outbreak, the latest in the Democratic presidential race, and a rare rebuke from the Supreme Court’s chief justice, John Roberts.

 By Chris Stanford

California holds cruise ship offshore
A ship with suspected links to two coronavirus cases, one fatal, was being held off the coast of San Francisco until everyone on board could be tested, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. At least 21 people on the ship had symptoms.
On Wednesday, a former passenger became the first U.S. coronavirus death outside Washington State and the 11th over all. Here are the latest updates and maps of where the virus has spread.
Federal health officials announced new testing criteria, requiring only a doctor’s agreement. But it’s unclear whether there are enough tests for everybody who’ll want one.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the outbreak in Washington State.
Related: New Jersey has announced its first case, a man in his 30s who had been hospitalized just across the Hudson River from New York City. Nine new cases in New York were connected to a patient in Westchester County.
Closer look: Some patients experienced no physical discomfort from Covid-19, the disease brought on by the virus. Others are still coughing as they recover. Six Americans who have tested positive spoke to The Times about their experiences.
Read more about the symptoms of the coronavirus and the prospects for vaccines and treatments. For an informed guide to the outbreak, sign up for our coronavirus newsletter.
Chloe Lau, a high school student, doing her schoolwork at home in Hong Kong. By Wednesday, 22 countries had announced school closures of varying degrees.  Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times
The toll of the outbreak
The coronavirus has already disrupted the education of nearly 300 million students worldwide, according to the United Nations. A Seattle-area school district said on Wednesday that it would cancel classes for two weeks, the largest virus-related shutdown in the U.S.
Among other effects:
? United Airlines became the first American carrier to announce a widespread cut to domestic service, suggesting that fear was eroding ticket sales even away from the epidemic’s hot spots.
? Congress is expected to vote this week on a funding package, including help for small businesses.
? The London Book Fair and the Geneva International Auto Show were canceled. (The Summer Olympics in Tokyo are still on, for now.)
? The Louvre in Paris reopened after a three-day closure, but guards will not move around to maintain order in the room where the Mona Lisa hangs.
Watch: We used satellite images to show what the outbreak’s effects look like from space.
Joe Biden addressed supporters in Los Angeles on Tuesday, when he won 10 of the 14 states up for grabs.  Josh Haner/The New York Times
A shift of momentum in the Democratic race
Since Joe Biden won the South Carolina primary in a landslide last weekend, much of the Democratic establishment has aligned behind the former vice president.
Mr. Biden was endorsed by Michael Bloomberg on Wednesday, after the former New York City mayor ended his brief, multimillion-dollar candidacy.
Bernie Sanders, who seemed to have a clear advantage a week ago, faces pressure to show that he can expand his political base, and he acknowledged on Wednesday that his campaign hadn’t generated the turnout among young people that he had counted on.
Related: Elizabeth Warren’s campaign manager told staff members that the senator was assessing her options after failing to finish in the top two of any Super Tuesday contest. Here are the near-final results.
What’s next: Most delegates awarded after Super Tuesday are at stake in the East, where Mr. Sanders has underperformed. Our Upshot columnist Nate Cohn looked at the state of the race.
Another angle: Wall Street executives are opening their checkbooks for Mr. Biden. That could be a mixed blessing for a candidate who presents himself as anti-elitist.
If you have 5 minutes, this is worth it
A police tool, and a plaything of the rich

Krista Schlueter for The New York Times

The Times reported in January about a groundbreaking facial recognition system being used by hundreds of law enforcement agencies, developed by a start-up called Clearview AI. In response to subsequent criticism, the company said that its technology was “available only for law enforcement agencies and select security professionals.”
But The Times has found multiple other individuals with access to the technology among Clearview’s investors, clients and friends. They include John Catsimatidis, above, the billionaire owner of the Gristedes grocery store chain in New York, who used Clearview to surveil shoppers and to identify a man he saw on a date with his daughter.
Here’s what else is happening
Supreme Court rebuke: Chief Justice John Roberts denounced remarks by Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, after the Democratic leader criticized President Trump’s two Supreme Court appointees. A spokesman for the lawmaker said his comments had been misrepresented.
Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex
Snapshot: Above, antennas in Australia that are part of the Deep Space Network. The system, which lets spacecraft communicate with Earth, will be taken offline for almost a year starting Monday for upgrades and repairs.
In memoriam: Javier Pérez de Cuéllar, a two-term secretary general of the United Nations during the 1980s and ’90s, died on Wednesday at 100. He helped broker several peace agreements, including the end of a 10-year war between Iran and Iraq, and the withdrawal of Soviet forces from Afghanistan.
Late-night comedy: After Jill Biden confronted protesters who rushed onstage during her husband’s victory rally on Tuesday, Jimmy Fallon said, “Forget first lady — she should be secretary of defense.”
What we’re reading: Anahad O’Connor, a health reporter, highlights a fascinating — and somewhat frightening — new study of coral species that suggests that Earth’s “sixth extinction” may be well underway. The science journalist Emily Laber-Warren tells the story in Newsweek.

Yosemite ‘firefall’ slows to a trickle amid drought

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A natural spectacle called “firefall” happens each February in California’s Yosemite National Park when light from the setting sun strikes the park’s Horsetail Falls, making it look like it’s ablaze with fire. But this year the waterfall slowed to a trickle. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker spoke with University of California Berkeley climate scientist Patrick Gonzalez to learn more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

FIREFALL – Yosemite Horsetail Falls

•Aug 21, 2018  Wonder World

Firefall is one of Yosemite National Park most amazing spectacles. Around the second week of February, the setting sun hits Horsetail Falls at just the right angle, to illuminate the upper reaches of the waterfall, and when conditions are perfect, Horsetail Falls glows orange and red at sunset, giving the illusion it’s on fire. As the sun sets, and dips behind the horizon line, everything will begin to go dark and it will seem, for a moment, as if the Firefall has failed to ignite. But as the last of the sunlight disappears, it will hit and reflect off the falls at the exact right angle, creating a spectacular if short-lived effect, that looks like a beautiful flowing cascade of fluid fire. The phenomenon known as “Firefall” draws scores of photographers to a spot near Horsetail Fall, which flows down the granite face of the park’s famed rock formation, El Capitan. Thanks for watching ___________________________________________________________________ CREDIT LINKS ? AreStraka Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWM… ? AreStraka Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdSfy… ? Amazing Places Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYWJ… ? Amazing Places Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANSOd… ? mrbsellers72 Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcuu… ? mrbsellers72 Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8TcJ… ? Yosemitebear62 Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTyF… ? Yosemitebear62 Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLQo2… ___________________________________________________________________ ? Wonder World Twitter – https://twitter.com/WonderWorld_YTC For business enquiries, content submission or copyright concerns or disputes, please contact me

Category  Entertainment

Yosemite National Park Firefall 2019 Behind the Scenes | Horsetail Falls Viewing Location and Tips

Jan 29, 2020  VIVSVIBE

Every year in February the light hits Horsetail falls perfectly and creates a firey illusion. Firefall has been captured many times over the years and continues to grow in popularity as it becomes more and more well-known. In order to get a picture of this phenomenon, the conditions have to be perfect. Even a single cloud can mess up the colors and vibrancy of Firefall. The natural beauty of this phenomenon is epic, but what I found even more outstanding was the effort, time and the sheer number of people who made the trek out in the freezing cold to witness the cascade of “fire” down El Cap. My feet froze the first and second night, so by the third night, I was bundled up real nice and stayed warm while watching the show. If you’re going to witness Firefall, it’s wise if you can block out a few days, you might not get it first the first day… this gives you a few chances to see and capture the falls. Even one cloud can hinder the glow of the falls, as we experienced the last night we watched. Even if you take the trip out to Yosemite and don’t get to witness the glow, the park and people are amazing! I hope this gives y’all a better idea of what to expect and what it takes to capture Firefall. Thanks for watching! Enjoy! Things to do in Yosemite while you wait: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzKI0… Huge thanks to David Bobbitt for editing the footage!

Horsetail Waterfall becomes Firefall at Yosemite National Park on February 15-26, 2018

Horsetail Waterfall, Firefall at Yosemite National Park, California

My Modern Met – Spectacular Yosemite Firefall Ignites Waterfall in Brilliant Blaze

The firefall!

Horsetail Waterfall, Firefall at Yosemite National Park, California – Shiyu Photography

Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia

FEBRUARY 20, 2020  GRACE EBERT

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

In 1832, artist John Jesse Barker added depth to a drawing by Philadelphia-based William G. Mason to create an optical illusion titled “Horizontorium.” Part of a tradition of anamorphic works, this depiction of the Bank of Philadelphia is one of the two surviving works looking at the historic financial building designed by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. At the time, it was the unofficial bank of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that sat at the southwest corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets. The structure was razed in 1836.

Horizontoriums became popular throughout England and France in the 18th century, although this piece is the only one known to be made in America. Viewers would set the lithograph on a flat surface and perpendicularly position their face at the center of the work (note the semicircle on this lithograph suggesting a spot for a chin) to peer over the image. The sharp angle would produce a distorted perspective that appears to project the building and its passersby upward. Sometimes, viewers even would peek through a small hole carved out of paper or cardboard to block out their peripheral vision and give the work a more distinct look. (via Graphic Arts CollectionThe Morning News)

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

3D Ship Drawn on Three Flat Sheets of Paper by Ramon Bruin

JUNE 17, 2013  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

boat-1

Artist Ramon Bruin (previously) recently drew this fun anamorphic illusion that appears to be a 3D ship but is actually a skewed drawing on three sheets of flat paper. You can see more of his recent work over on deviantART. (via my modern met)

New Geometric Creatures from TRÜF Creative

OCTOBER 15, 2019  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Charming new illustrations by TRÜF Creative (previously) combine a conservative color palette with wildly imaginative interpretations of animals. An ongoing passion project by the Santa Monica-based design studio, the series’s latest chapter is titled “Animals Strike Curious Poses,” (which is a reference to Prince, for fans who are wondering). The TRÜF team describes the project as “our minimalistic and strange interpretation of the animal kingdom that only exists in our heads.” If you’d like to make one of their geometric birds, whales, or fish your own, find prints in their online store.

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PBS News, DW History Documentary, TED Talks, The New York Times, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Inspiration Grid

PBS News: February 28, 29 and March 1, 2020, New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank, and In the Age of AI (full film) – FRONTLINE,

DW History Documentary: Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology

TED Talks: Rebecca Knill How technology has changed what it’s like to be deaf?, and Sinead Burke Why design should include everyone

The New York Times: Morning Briefing – March 1, 2020

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 1, 2020

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 1, a look ahead to what’s at stake on Super Tuesday, new concerns over the coronavirus outbreak in Washington, the legacy of photographer Jim Marshall lives on through his iconic imagery, and climate change’s impact on a natural spectacle in California’s Yosemite National Park. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 29, 2020

Feb 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 29, President Trump addresses the first U.S. death from the novel coronavirus, South Carolina’s Democratic presidential primary takes center stage, the U.S. and the Taliban sign a peace agreement, and Venezuela’s second largest city of Maracaibo was once an oil-wealthy playground, now it’s a ghost town. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 28, 2020

Feb 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, global disruption from novel coronavirus increases, as governments and businesses shut down travel and large events. Plus: Renewed fighting between Syria and Turkey, the U.S. and the Taliban prepare to sign a provisional peace deal, South Carolina gets ready to go to the polls, Shields and Brooks analyze the week’s political news and a Dallas choir gives the homeless hope. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How U.S. government should react to virus’ economic impact https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t05u_… A pandemic expert questions speed of U.S. COVID-19 response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQoaL… News Wrap: Appeals court blocks ‘remain in Mexico’ policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NakPJ… As fighting escalates, Idlib’s humanitarian crisis worsens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynSu6… Afghans nurture hope for peace ahead of U.S.-Taliban deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjABT… How SC Democratic voters are weighing 2020 primary choice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brU3-… Shields and Brooks on SC stakes, Trump’s virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6Fz… How Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrKi-… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The fallout from the 2008 global financial crisis revealed that some of the world’s most powerful banks were involved in reckless financial dealings. Germany’s Deutsche Bank took a particularly aggressive approach — the consequences of which are still playing out now, more than a decade later. Paul Solman talks to The New York Times’ David Enrich, who has written a new book on the subject. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In the Age of AI (full film) | FRONTLINE

Dec 2, 2019  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

A documentary exploring how artificial intelligence is changing life as we know it — from jobs to privacy to a growing rivalry between the U.S. and China. FRONTLINE investigates the promise and perils of AI and automation, tracing a new industrial revolution that will reshape and disrupt our world, and allow the emergence of a surveillance society. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #ArtificialIntelligence #Automation #documentary Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category News & Politics

Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology | DW History Documentary

Oct 7, 2018  DW Documentary

Today modern archaeology often works with digital technology. Geophysics has allowed thousands of ancient sites to be located – a huge gain for science. The dig is no longer the be-all and end-all of archeology. We accompany some archeologists on their journey into the virtual past. Geophysics comprises a range of techniques with various geological and military functions. Geomagnetism is used to locate enemy submarines or potential reserves of oil or other minerals. Now, German and Irish archeologists have teamed up to use it to trace prehistoric grave systems. Researchers in western Germany are applying it to locate ancient procession and pilgrimage routes. Shipping archeologists in Bremerhaven are availing of digital technology to create virtual models of shipwrecks and, in Berlin, archeologists and game designers have also embarked on a joint project. As luck would have it, they scanned every millimeter of a temple in the Syrian city of Aleppo, not suspecting that, soon afterwards, the complex would be largely destroyed in the country’s civil war. Their virtual model is evidence that the study of the past can have uses for the present, just as technologies of the present can help us to study the past. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

“Complete silence is very addictive,” says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. “Technology has come so far,” Knill says. “Our mindset just needs to catch up.”

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with Wells Fargo. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rebecca Knill · Writer, business systems consultant manager

A writer and a part-time cyborg, Rebecca Knill embraces the humor in her bionic journey while balancing life as a deaf person with cochlear implants which enable her to hear.

TAKE ACTION  PARTICIPATE

Support Dogs for Better Lives to match assistance dogs with individuals who are Deaf or with hearing loss.

Sinéad Burke is acutely aware of details that are practically invisible to many of us. At 105 centimeters (or 3′ 5″) tall, the designed world — from the height of a lock to the range of available shoe sizes — often inhibits her ability to do things for herself. Here she tells us what it’s like to navigate the world as a little person and asks: “Who are we not designing for?”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sinéad Burke · Writer, educator

Sinéad Burke amplifies voices and instigates curious conversations.

MORE RESOURCES

As Me with Sinéad

Sinéad Burke   Lemonada Media ()

“Poorly designed public toilets aren’t just annoying, they’re dehumanizing”

Sinead Burke discusses the need for more accessible accommodations in public spaces with Quartz.

More at qz.com ?

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Donate to Little People of Ireland.

TEDNYC | March 2017

The New York Times Morning Briefing March 1, 2020

Your Weekend Briefing
By Tom Wright-Piersanti and Stephen Reiss
Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.

Grant Hindsley for The New York Times

1. The first known death in the United States from the coronavirus was reported in Kirkland, Wash., near Seattle.
The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there was no evidence that the person had traveled recently or had contact with someone known to have the virus, adding to growing signs that the virus might be spreading in the United States. Above, EvergreenHealth Medical Center, where the patient had been treated.
The number of confirmed cases around the globe passed 85,000 on Saturday, according to a tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University, and more than 2,900 infected people have died. While the virus’s growth appeared to slow in China last week, it was accelerating elsewhere, with many new cases linked to an outbreak in Italy.
How prepared is the U.S. for an outbreak? It’s better positioned than most countries, according to experts, though there could be shortages of ventilators and protective equipment. The most important thing you can do: Wash your hands often.
Sign up for our new coronavirus newsletter, which will have the latest developments and expert advice about prevention and treatment. 2
Continue reading the main story
Maddie McGarvey for The New York Times
2. Joe Biden won the South Carolina primary with 49 percent of the vote,a victory that could provide his candidacy with a much-needed jolt after disappointing results in the earlier contests.
Bernie Sanders finished in a distant second with 20 percent, followed by Tom Steyer, who dropped out of the presidential race on Saturday night. Mr. Steyer, a billionaire hedge fund executive, had spent considerable resources in South Carolina, and had pinned the hopes of his campaign on the state.
Continue reading the main story
He said on Saturday night: “I said that if I didn’t see a path to winning, I would suspend my campaign. And I honestly don’t see a path.”
Pete Buttigieg finished in fourth, and Elizabeth Warren in fifth. See full results here.
South Carolina’s Democrats were the first predominantly black electorate to vote in the race. Many said they were eager to send a message to the Democratic Party: that their views on electability — which candidate is best suited to beat President Trump — would not be shaped by outcomes in overwhelmingly white states like Iowa and New Hampshire.
Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times
3. The U.S. signed a deal with the Taliban on Saturday that laid out a timetable for the final withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, setting the stage to end America’s longest war.
Continue reading the main story
“When historians look back at the moment,” David Sanger writes in an analysis of the news, “they may well conclude that Washington ended up much like other great powers that entered Afghanistan’s rugged mountains and punishing deserts: frustrated, immobilized, no longer willing to bear the huge costs.”
The agreement unlocks a difficult but crucial next step: negotiations between the Taliban and other Afghans, including the government, which the Taliban has refused to recognize. Here are four takeaways.
Aly Song/Reuters
4. Stock markets suffered their worst week since 2008, with the S&P 500 index falling 11.5 percent amid worries that the coronavirus outbreak could become a worldwide pandemic.
The Federal Reserve and other central bankers are poised to respond, suggesting they may cut interest rates as soon as next month. But their efforts may only go so far: Rates are historically low across advanced economies, and it’s doubtful a rate cut can do much to restart production lines hobbled by workers placed in quarantine.
“If a potential coronavirus downturn were a fire,” Neil Irwin writes in The Upshot, “the recession-fighters would be like a fire brigade low on supplies, fighting among themselves, and probably lacking the right chemicals to quench the flames anyway.”
Cengiz Yar for The New York Times
5. For migrants on the Mexican border, Friday was a day of hopes uplifted, and then quickly dashed.
A federal appeals court ruled that the so-called Remain in Mexico policy — which has forced asylum seekers to wait there for months while their cases are reviewed — was legally invalid, leading to cheers and hugs at the Good Samaritan shelter in Ciudad Juárez. But by the end of the day, nothing had changed, as the court stayed the ruling to allow the government time to appeal.
And in Turkey, thousands of migrants trying to reach Europe clashed with riot police on the Greek border on Saturday morning, signaling a new and potentially volatile phase in the migration crisis.
Jessica Pons for The New York Times
6. The country’s richest state doesn’t feel that way.
California’s unaffordability crisis — wide-scale homelessness, poverty and the stress of making ends meet — has emerged as a foundational issue as the state prepares to vote in the Super Tuesday primaries.
Nearly 150,000 homeless people sleep on sidewalks, in alleys, on vacant lots and in vehicles. “I pay the bills and I have nothing extra,” Mark Marquez, above, said.
Esme Gibson
7. In memoriam: Joseph Coulombe, the founder of Trader Joe’s, died Friday at age 89.
In the mid-1960s, when he started the grocery chain, he thought the rise in international travel could lead Americans to be more interested in exotic foods. Soon he was emphasizing organic foods, and had launched Trader Joe’s own label for numerous products, many of them at low prices.
In 2011, he told The Los Angeles Times that he envisioned the stores as being “for overeducated and underpaid people, for all the classical musicians, museum curators, journalists.”
Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times
8. Meet the “dirt spoons” of South Korea.
In Seoul, many of the urban poor live in semi-basements, a reality captured in the Oscar-winning film “Parasite.” Just like in the movie, the elevation of one’s home in the congested city? often reflects wealth and status.
“They keep going higher ?and higher, ?so they won’t have to smell the smell down below,” said a 63-year-old taxi driver. “Those living up there must look down on people like me like pigs.” For more information Please visit the following link: [Message clipped]  View entire message  

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

March 1, 1872
Establishment of Yellowstone as world’s first national park

Yellowstone National Park

NATIONAL PARK, UNITED STATES

WRITTEN BY:   Kenneth Pletcher

LAST UPDATED: Feb 26, 2020 See Article History

Behold Yellowstone's hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal species

Behold Yellowstone’s hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal speciesOverview of Yellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.See all videos for this article

Yellowstone National Park, the oldest, one of the largest, and probably the best-known national park in the United States. It is situated principally in northwestern Wyoming and partly in southern Montana and eastern Idaho and includes the greatest concentration of hydrothermal features in the world. The park was established by the U.S. Congress on March 1, 1872, as the country’s first national park. It is also generally considered to have been the first national park in the world, though some naturalists and others have argued that there is evidence that indicates that the creation of Yellowstone was predated by the creation of Bogd Khan Mountain National Park in Mongolia, which may date from as early as 1778. Yellowstone was designated a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage site in 1978. The park, which forms a squarelike rectangle with an irregular eastern side, is 63 miles (101 km) from north to south and 54 miles (87 km) from east to west at its widest point and covers an area of 3,472 square miles (8,992 square km). The John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway, an 80-mile (130-km) scenic roadway that was established in 1972, connects Yellowstone with Grand Teton National Park to the south. In addition, Yellowstone is surrounded by Gallatin (northwest and north), Custer (northeast), Shoshone (northeast and east), Bridger-Teton (southeast and south), and Caribou-Targhee (southwest) national forests. Headquarters are at Mammoth Hot Springs near the northern entrance to the park.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National ParkYellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States, designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1978.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Natural Environment: Geology

Yellowstone is situated in a region that has been volcanically and seismically active for tens of millions of years. Tectonic movement of the North American Plate has thinned Earth’s crust in the area, forming a hot spot (a place where a dome of magma, or molten rock, comes close to the surface). About 2.1 million years ago a subsurface magma dome that had been building up in the Yellowstone area blew up in one of the world’s most cataclysmic volcanic eruptions. Some 600 cubic miles (2,500 cubic km) of rock and ash were ejected, equivalent to about 6,000 times the amount of volcanic material that was released during the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980. (Observations made in the early 21st century indicated that this single eruption actually consisted of two events about 6,000 years apart: one very large and a second much smaller one. Subsequent massive eruptions occurred about 1,300,000 and 640,000 years ago—the last event (consisting in large part of lava flows) producing about two-fifths as much material as the first one.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

Each of those eruptions caused the magma dome that had built up to collapse as its contents were released, leaving an enormous caldera. The present-day Yellowstone Caldera, the product of the third eruption, is a roughly oval-shaped basin some 30 by 45 miles (50 by 70 km) that occupies the west-central portion of the national park and includes the northern two-thirds of Yellowstone Lake. Two resurgent magma domes—one just north of and the other just west of Yellowstone Lake—have been forming in the caldera, and the western dome underlie many of the park’s best-known hydrothermal features.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

00:4302:38

The Yellowstone region is also extremely active seismically. A network of faults associated with the region’s volcanic history underlies the park’s surface, and the region experiences hundreds of small earthquakes each year. The great majority of those quakes are of magnitude 2.0 or less and are not felt by people in the area, but occasionally a more powerful temblor will strike in the region and have effects in the park. One such event, a deadly quake that struck in 1959 in southern Montana just outside the northwestern corner of the park, affected a number of hydrothermal features in Yellowstone, including its iconic geyserOld Faithful.

Eagle Peak in the Absaroka Range, the highest point in Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.R Lake/U.S. National Park Service

Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Scenics of America/PhotoLink/Getty Images

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, north-central Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© magmarcz/Shutterstock.com

Morning Glory Pool hot spring, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park,

 northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

©Ferenc Cegled(/Shutterstock.com)

Yellowstone National Park: Castle Geyser

Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

©Kenneth Keifer/Fotolia

Travertine terraces at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© Jason Maehl/Shutterstock.com

Grove of aspen trees in autumn, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.S. Gniadik/U.S. National Park Service

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://www.britannica.com/place/Yellowstone-National-Park/Physical-features

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

ARTPHOTOGRAPHY

Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung                                             Published Sep 4, 2019        

Korean artist and photographer ChangKi Chung creates incredible, gravity-defying still life compositions of stacked fruits and vegetables.More art on the grid via Colossal

POSTED BY

IG Team       214

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://theinspirationgrid.com/balancing-act-still-life-photography-by-changki-chung/

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PBS News, BBC Click, BBC Horizon, DW Documentary, My Modern Met, TED Talks, Design Bolts, Thisiscolossal and NAD Lembeh Resort

PBS News: February 25- 27.2020 and India’s immigrant crackdown leaves nearly 2 million in limbo

BBC Click: Click At CES in Las Vegas

BBC Horizon: Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity — Jim Al-Khalili

DW Documentary: Soyalism

My Modern Met: Bees Create Heart-Shaped Hive When There Aren’t Frames Up to Guide Them

TED Talks: Annie Murphy Paul What we learn before we reborn?, Laura Schulz The surprisingly logical minds of babies?, and How fast are you moving right now? – Tucker-Hiatt – TED-Ed

Design Bolts: Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Thisiscolossal: Pouring a Thermos of Hot Tea at -40°C Near the Arctic Circle  and Underwater Footage Captures a Blanket Octopus Revealing Her Billowing Iridescent Membrane

NAD Lembeh Resort: The Blanket Octopus and it’s AMAZING Blanket!!

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 27, 2020

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, an infectious disease specialist on novel coronavirus transmission and severity. Plus: Virus fears cause economic instability, 2020 Democrats make their final pitches in South Carolina, a conversation with Mike Bloomberg, should foreign ISIS fighters return home for trial and a new book explores the reckless financial dealings that contributed to the 2008 economic crash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How Americans can prepare for broader outbreak of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhe78… What novel coronavirus might mean for 2020 global economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXOpz… News Wrap: Major military clash erupts between Turkey, Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cegP2… 2020 Democrats chase votes in SC, Super Tuesday states https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p5bO… Michael Bloomberg on crisis preparation, management skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWGC3… Kosovo offers Europe a test run for handling former jihadis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-Ava… New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zkzR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 26, 2020

Feb 26, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, China’s novel coronavirus outbreak has slowed, but the information battle between Chinese activists and the government continues. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a raucous Charleston debate ahead of the South Carolina primary, the medicine of migraine disease, a Silicon Valley whistleblower, the film “Seberg” and how U.S. officials are planning for possible pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Deadly shooting at Molson Coors in Milwaukee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtOyb… In China, critics of state virus response have disappeared https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dywyh… How 2020 Democrats are reacting to combative SC debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=houOy… Why migraine disease involves more than just a headache https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8K-7… How Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler took on toxic culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhc77… How American actress Jean Seberg became a target of the FBI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtj3G… Trump defends virus response, announces new measures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhUo3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 25, 2020

Feb 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. health officials express rising alarm over the possibility that novel coronavirus could become a global pandemic. Plus: Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak dies at age 91, previewing the 2020 Democrats’ South Carolina debate, conversations with a prosecutor and a defense attorney in the Harvey Weinstein sex crimes case and Venezuela’s crumbling health system. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Why U.S. officials are escalating concerns over COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKt5h… News Wrap: Trump criticizes Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC1uc… Polarizing former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak dies at 91 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjs3R… Is South Carolina still Joe Biden’s firewall?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wy3J… Manhattan DA on Weinstein conviction, prosecuting sex crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifaIn… Weinstein defense attorney says media ‘pressure’ swayed jury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLHdC… Sick Venezuelans lack power, water, medicine — and hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtmWa… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

India’s immigrant crackdown leaves nearly 2 million in limbo

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Immigration from Bangladesh into India’s northeastern state of Assam has long been a contentious issue, often boiling over into violence. Last year the government declared nearly 2 million people there to be non-citizens in an effort that has been widely criticized. Many now fear similar measures across the country. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Click At CES in Las Vegas – BBC Click

Jan 17, 2020  BBC Click

Click comes from CES in Las Vegas, the world’s largest tech show. With the latest announcements from the show and a look at trends for the year ahead. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Soyalism | DW Documentary

Feb 21, 2020  DW Documentary

Industrial agriculture is increasingly dominating the world market. It’s forcing small farmers to quit and taking over vast swathes of land. This documentary shows how destructive the lucrative agribusiness is. Whether in the USA, Brazil, Mozambique or China, agricultural giants rule the market. Food production has become a gigantic business as climate change and population growth continue. This is having devastating consequences for small farmers and for the environment. On the banks of North Carolina’s New River, there’s a vile stench. Clean water activist Rick Dove takes a flight to show us what’s causing the smell. Scores and scores of pigs are living upriver, in so many pens the farms look more like small towns. “We have eight to ten million pigs here. And the problem is that they are kept so close together and their excrement pollutes and threatens the water and natural life on the North Carolina coastline.” From above, you can see large cesspools everywhere, shimmering red-brown in the sun. Dove is giving us a bird’s-eye view of industrialized agriculture. In the late 1970s, companies in the US began to industrialize farming. Large corporations like Smithfield built entire value chains, from raising livestock to slaughter to packaging and sales. A Chinese holding company bought Smithfield a few years ago. Industrial meat production is supposed to support increased Chinese demand for meat as the country’s prosperity grows. Dan Basse is the head of a company analyses global agriculture. He says calorie demand will also increase in countries like India, Bangladesh and Nigeria in the next few years.” And with it, the demand for even more inexpensive meat of the kind agribusinesses produce and market. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia

Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity — Jim Al-Khalili BBC Horizon

•May 27, 2015  Trev M

Part 1 – Spark 0:00 Part 2 – The Age of Invention 58:30 Part 3 – Revelations and Revolutions 1:56:50 ——— In this three-part BBC Horizon documentary physicist and science communicator Jim Al-Khalili takes the viewer on a journey exploring the most important historical developments in electricity and magnetism. This documentary discusses how the physics (and the people behind the physics) changed the world forever. ——— BBC Horizon 2011

https://mymodernmet.com/heart-shaped-beehive/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=2020-02-21

Category  Science & Technology

Bees Create Heart-Shaped Hive When There Aren’t Frames Up to Guide Them

By Jessica Stewart on February 10, 2020

If you ever needed evidence that bees were artists, take a look at this incredible photograph posted by The National Trust. Left to their own devices, the bees at Bodiam Castle in Robertsbridge, United Kingdom made quite the spectacle. Within the structure of their hive, they created a delightful heart-shaped honeycomb that looks as sweet as it tastes.

This may seem like an odd sight, but that’s only because we’re used to beekeepers placing rectangular frames within the hive. The bees then deposit their honey and build a comb directly onto the frame, which can be easily taken out and harvested by the beekeeper. But the reality is, bees will use as much space as they have to store honey. In fact, natural hives can take on all shapes and sizes.

For instance, sugarbag bees, which are native to Australia, make hives that form large spiraling structures. In temperate climates, some bees will even form an “open colony” where the entire hive is exposed. These can hang off of trees, fences, or overhangs and take on impressive oblong shapes.

Still, the photograph from Bodiam Castle is fascinating because it was formed within the wood frame of a hive. Beekeeper gregthegregest2 mentioned on Reddit that this is a common occurrence when the bees are left a large gap between the top of the frames and the roof of the hive. Of course, it makes good sense that these hard workers would take advantage of every inch given to them. While the shape is beautiful, this can be a headache for beekeepers when looking to harvest their honey. They need to cut away the extra honeycomb in order to free the frames below.

Of course, the skill of bees is well known. In fact, even artists have taken advantage of their capabilities by working with bees to create everything from sculptures to embroidery. So the next time you see a honey bee buzzing from flower to flower, just imagine what interesting artistry might happen when it makes its way back to the hive.

When left to their own devices, bees are incredible architects.

They can create incredible shapes from their honeycomb, whether in boxes or out in nature.

How fast are you moving right now? – Tucker Hiatt

Jan 27, 2014  TED-Ed

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-fast-ar… “How fast are you moving?” seems like an easy question, but it’s actually quite complicated — and perhaps best answered by another question: “Relative to what?” Even when you think you’re standing still, the Earth is moving relative to the Sun, which is moving relative to the Milky Way, which is…you get the idea. Tucker Hiatt unravels the concepts of absolute and relative speed. Lesson by Tucker Hiatt, animation by Zedem Media.

Category  Education

Pop quiz: When does learning begin? Answer: Before we are born. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks through new research that shows how much we learn in the womb — from the lilt of our native language to our soon-to-be-favorite foods.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Annie Murphy Paul · Science author

Annie Murphy Paul investigates how life in the womb shapes who we become.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

How do babies learn so much from so little so quickly? In a fun, experiment-filled talk, cognitive scientist Laura Schulz shows how our young ones make decisions with a surprisingly strong sense of logic, well before they can talk.

Show 1 correction

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Laura Schulz · Cognitive scientist

Developmental behavior studies spearheaded by Laura Schulz are changing our notions of how children learn.

https://www.designbolts.com/2020/02/16/awe-inspiring-nokia-5g-paper-cut-creative-illustrations-by-eiko-ojala

TED2015 | March 2015

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Hey there guys! So, we are back with yet another interesting blog of ours and we are hopeful that you are going to love it as much as we do – mainly because it is one of our favorite topics to cover (and we are sure that you know this too!) and also because well, it feels so great to come across artists who put in their brain, heart and hands to create magic. Our today’s blog will cover Nokia 5G paper cut illustrations by Eiko Ojala and we would like to get started right now.

Before we start explaining what paper cut illustrations really are and introduce you guys with Eiko’s work, let’s have a look at Eiko Ojala as an illustrator first. So, he is an Estonian artist who was born in 1982 in Tallinn. He has studied interior design and it was prior to when he brought himself to the world of creating illustrations (read: stunning). Eiko knows how to create amazing digital paper cut illustrations by combining them with his traditional techniques and making sure that his work speaks volumes.

We would also like to share this here that Eiko has been working with The New York Times, the Harvard Business Review, the Weird Magazine and has also been associated with the V&A Museum. Oh, and just by the way the master of creating paper cut illustrations has also won a Young Illustrators award in 2013 and an ADC Young Gun award by the Art Directors Club.

Isn’t it just great that all the artists around the world stun us with their creativity, imagination and work on a daily basis and we share that here on our blog because we want to inspire you guys and to encourage you too so that you can also get into the field and see if that is working for you.

As far as the paper cut illustrations are concerned, we believe that, this technique requires a lot of time, efforts and patience especially when you are creating your illustrations on digital mediums. There are a number of layers involved in order to recreate the original idea by adding depth and meaning to the illustrations.

Now, we know that different artists have different tricks to work on what they love to create but about Eiko’s illustrations, one thing is for final that you will require a great deal of time to tell if the illustrations were made using paper or did Eiko created them using his digital editing skills. Yes, you read that right. That is how clean and real his illustrations are that you cannot differentiate between a paper one and a digital one.

You must be wondering that only a few artists could create paper cut illustrations as this requires time, skills and a lot more than that but believe us when we say this, that nothing is impossible or too difficult if we really want to do it for ourselves and once you find your peace and happiness in the things that you do and create then there is no going back. It becomes interesting, it becomes fun and you want to improve yourself in order to get to the bigger goal and that is how it should be.

We can bet that even Eiko must have created illustrations which he would not have considered anything, he must have also discarded a few of his creations here and a few of them there because well, we judge ourselves more than others do and while we are evaluating our work and thought process, we tend to exclude most of the stuff because we want perfection.

What we are trying to say here is that if you think that you have it in you to try out a new skill in 2020 then make it more about paper cut illustrations – both with actual paper as well as on digital platforms like Illustrator. In this way, you will be able to know if you can do it or not and although we know that you are going to ace it, we would also want to say that go easy on yourself and also be patient if you fail because that is going to help you in the longer run.

Coming back to Eiko’s illustrations, we love each one of them and we are sharing them in our blog as well but let’s take a cursory glance too before we leave you with the magical illustrations for you to look at in detail. The first one is the Nokia 5G one in which you can see the number and the alphabet and there is world in these two elements. Vehicles, humans, trees and birds as well as the scenery is making this illustration that has a story to tell.

Moving on, you can see multiple shapes and backgrounds on which Eiko has used his imagination to create illustrations that are significant and interesting to look at. And from building and monuments to human beings and their cars, trees, birds and clouds – we think that looking at these mind blowing illustrations is a treat for the eyes. So, feel free to share the blog with your friends and family members too and we are sure they are going to like it too.

Credit: be.net/eiko

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Pouring a Thermos of Hot Tea at -40°C Near the Arctic Circle

DECEMBER 21, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

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Ontario-based photographer Michael Davies timed this impressive shot of his friend Markus hurling a thermos of hot tea through the air yesterday in -40°C weather. At such frigid temperatures water freezes instantly to form a dramatic plume of ice. For the last decade Davies has worked as a photographer in the fly-in community of Pangnirtung in Canada’s High Arctic, only 20km south of the Arctic Circle, a place that sees about two hours of sunlight each day during the winter. He shares via email that almost nothing was left to chance in creating the photo, as so many things had to be perfectly timed:

Around 1pm I jumped on my skidoo along with my friend Markus and we drove 45 minutes to the top of a nearby mountain where the light (which is almost always pink near the solstice) would hit the hills. Prepared with multiple thermoses filled with tea, we began tossing the water and shooting. Nothing of this shot was to chance, I followed the temperature, watched for calm wind, and planned the shot and set it up. Even the sun in the middle of the spray was something I was hoping for, even though it’s impossible to control.

You can see more of Davies’ most recent photography over on Flickr.

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Underwater Footage Captures a Blanket Octopus Revealing Her Billowing Iridescent Membrane

FEBRUARY 24, 2020  GRACE EBERT

In a short clip captured during a blackwater night dive in the Lembeh Straita blanket octopus unfolds and displays a colorful web multiple times her original size. The aquatic animal’s iridescent body and

tentacles glow against the nighttime water before she releases her translucent blanket that connects her dorsal and dorsolateral arms. Only adult females are equipped with the lengthy membrane that reaches as long as six feet and dwarfs male octopi, which are less than an inch in size and most often die immediately after mating. Generally, the females only unfurl their color-changing blankets to appear larger and more intimidating to potential predators. Shared by NAD Lembeh Resort, the underwater video was taken on a RED Gemini with a 50 millimeter Zeiss Macro lens. You might also want to check out this footage of a blanket octopus in waters near the Philippines. (via The Kids Should See This)

The Blanket Octopus and it’s AMAZING Blanket!!

Mar 24, 2019  NAD Lembeh Resort

The Blanket Octopus, shot in the Lembeh Straits on a Blackwater Night Dive with NAD Lembeh. Footage shot on RED Gemini with 50mm Zeiss Macro lens. Copyright Simon Buxton 2019.

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, BBC Click, The New York Times, My Modern Met, China Icons, TED Talks, To Scale, Thisiscolossal and Adrien M & Claire B

PBS News: February 21 – 24, 2020

BBC Click: Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry

The New York Times: Morning Briefing by Chris Stanford – Learning how to reverse an overdose

My Modern Met: Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

China Icons: FAST – The World’s Largest Telescope

TED Talks: Alexander Tsiaras Conception to birth visualized

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Thisiscolossal: Go See This Eclipse, Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse and The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

Adrien M & Claire B – Vimeo:  The movement of air / The movement of air

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 24, 2020

Feb 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, as novel coronavirus spreads far beyond China, how is it affecting the global economy? Plus: The latest medical concerns about COVID-19, Harvey Weinstein’s conviction, Sen. Bernie Sanders’ Nevada caucus victory, political analysis with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, President Trump’s trip to India and Los Angeles remembers NBA legend Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS With COVID-19 outbreaks, are we on ‘precipice’ of pandemic? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hewq… Why economic impact of COVID-19 might outlast the outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQ_F… News Wrap: Man drives into German parade, injuring dozens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wi-TD… Mogul Harvey Weinstein convicted on 2 felony sex charges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La6iR… What Weinstein verdict means for the MeToo movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp2ua… After Nevada win, how strong is Sanders’ 2020 momentum? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfdVZ… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sanders’ Nevada victory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cwEG… Trump’s India visit prompts both hero’s welcome and protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jogSC… In Los Angeles, 20,000 gather to honor Kobe, Gianna Bryant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbSDg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 23, 2020

Feb 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 23, Sen. Bernie Sanders gains a foothold after the Nevada caucuses, a new documentary explores who killed Malcolm X, and a new concept in caring for people with dementia. Plus, updates on the novel Coronavirus’ spread in Italy and Asia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 22, 2020

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 22nd, voters turnout for Saturday’s Democratic caucuses in Nevada, and a look at how gender is playing a role in local Nevada and South Carolina politics. Also, the first report in our series of stories from India explores exclusionary citizenship laws that are leaving nearly 2 million people in limbo. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 21, 2020

Feb 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. and the Taliban begin a week-long “reduction in violence” in Afghanistan. Plus: Political uproar over a report that Russia is again trying to intervene in a U.S. election on behalf of President Trump, a Nevada caucus preview, political analysis with Shields and Brooks, the suffering of Venezuela’s children and Major League Baseball’s cheating scandal. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: WHO warns about novel coronavirus’ global spread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVziw… What’s in short-term U.S.-Taliban deal over Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQkLD… Why politicization of intelligence leaves U.S. ‘vulnerable’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyB2k… How will 2020 Democrats fare in more diverse Nevada? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLYp7… Shields and Brooks on Las Vegas debate, Trump’s pardons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-xxw… Venezuela’s suffering children could yield lost generation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKs82… Why MLB players are upset over Astros’ lack of punishment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBIld… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry – BBC Click

Nov 7, 2019  BBC Click

We head to Taiwan to find out what ‘Made in Taiwan’ really means in the 21st century; from healthcare artificial intelligence to solving the pollution crisis. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Learning how to reverse an overdose nytimes.com Morning Briefing Monday, February 24, 2020, by Chris Stanford
Mike Belleme for The New York Times Carter County, Tenn., is one of many American communities hit hard by the opioid crisis. In an effort to save lives, county health officials have embraced a practical — if radical — strategy: teaching children as young as 6 how to reverse an overdose, using a nasal spray called Narcan. Above, after a training session at a library, each child received a blue bag containing two doses of Narcan to take home.
But in a socially conservative region, where addiction is often seen as a sin, health workers have encountered strong opposition to the training.

Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

By Emma Taggart on February 14, 2020

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Followtheflow/Shutterstock

Homelessness is a problem all over the world, but Finland is leading the way with an initiative that could provide a long-term solution. In 2008, the Northern European nation introduced the “Housing First” policy. The concept is simple: everyone is entitled to a small apartment, even those with mental health and financial issues. Since then, the number of homeless people has fallen drastically, and continues to decline.

Like most cities, Finland previously provided short-term shelters for the homeless, but found that the quick fix didn’t help people to get back on their feet permanently and build a stable life. Affordable rental housing providers such as Y-Foundation began renovating old flats, and the NGO even turned former emergency shelters into apartments in order to offer long-term housing. “It was clear to everyone that the old system wasn’t working; we needed radical change,” says Juha Kaakinen, CEO of Y-Foundation. “We had to get rid of the night shelters and short-term hostels we still had back then. They had a very long history in Finland, and everyone could see they were not getting people out of homelessness. We decided to reverse the assumptions.”

In the last 10 years, the Housing First initiative provided 4,600 homes in Finland, making it the only country in Europe where homelessness is on the decline. Not only does the country now provide shelter to anyone that needs it, but the government also helps support people to integrate into their community. Social workers are available for counseling and to help people apply for social benefits. The extra support helps encourage people to find a job and become financially independent, as well as to take care of their physical and mental health.

Find out more about Housing First on the Y-Foundation website.

Thanks to its Housing First policy, Finland is the only country in Europe where homelessness is in decline.

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Subodh Agnihotri/Shutterstock

h/t: [Reddit]

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Finland Is Offering Free Trips to Teach People the Finnish Art of Happiness

FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope | A China Icons Video

Sep 25, 2016  China Icons

What’s really out there? In September 2016, China unveiled the world’s largest telescope – an instrument engineered so finely it is 3 times more sensitive than Arecibo and may help in the international search for understanding more on the origin of the universe and the Big Bang. Sadly, since filming this video, FAST’s chief engineer and scientist, Professor Nan Rendong lost his fight with cancer. Not only was Professor Nan a talented and well-respected scientist who dedicated over 20 years to the FAST project, but we found him to be a kind, intelligent and dedicated man who took the time to explain his work and the importance of it to us. The Five-Hundred-Metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, known as FAST had been constructed over five years in a remote area of Guizhou province, south central China. It was built in a 45 million year old crater, unlikely to be affected by flooding and far from human interference. The 500m dish surpasses Arecibo radio telescope, built in Puerto Rico in 1963, as the world’s largest and is three times more sensitive in detecting radio waves thousands of light years away. FAST consists of 4450 individual panels and Chinese project engineers had to design a cable net of ten thousand cables to manipulate it to detect signals. FAST’s focus cabin is also unique thanks to a directional tracking system. A key mission for the telescope will be detecting pulsars, the matter that remains when a star eight times the size of the sun explodes. These pulsars rotate thousands of times per second and are the universe’s most accurate clock. Experience the construction and meet the creators of FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope. For more insights and guides to China, SUBSCRIBE to China Icons. Join in the conversation on our Facebook site www.facebook.com/ChinaIcons. Get the latest news as it happens from our Twitter page https://twitter.com/chinaicons. We’re also on Instagram! Follow us for exclusive behind-the-scenes photography and more. www.instagram.com/china_icons. Remember to check out our official website too with our blog! www.chinaicons.com.

Category  Science & Technology

Image-maker Alexander Tsiaras shares a powerful medical visualization, showing human development from conception to birth and beyond. (Some graphic images.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Alexander Tsiaras · Medical image maker

Using art and technology, Alexander Tsiaras visualizes the unseen human body.

MORE RESOURCES BOOK

From Conception to Birth

Alexander Tsiaras

Doubleday (2002)

INK Conference | December 2010

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Aug 14, 2017   To Scale:

On August 21st, 2017, the United States will host its first total solar eclipse in nearly forty years. While a partial eclipse will be visible throughout the continental US, only a thin strip across fourteen states will experience what is regarded as the most astounding celestial event one can witness: a total solar eclipse. This film is about why you should do everything you can to go see it. “Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him, or as flying in an airplane does to falling out of an airplane.” — Annie Dillard

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh

AUGUST 15, 2017  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. Just make sure you’re prepared.

Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse

MAY 9, 2013  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

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Shot by Czech photographer Miloslav Druckmüller from the Brno University of Technology, these amazing composite images capture the moon during a total solar eclipse revealing a vast solar corona. To achieve the crystal clear effect the shots are comprised from some 40+ photos taken with two different lenses. Additional clarity was achieved due to the incredibly remote location chosen to view the eclipse from, a pier just outside the Enewetak Radiological Observatory on the Marshall Islands, smack dab in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. You can see several more images from the project at Druckmüller’s website and don’t miss this much higher resolution version including some 209 stars. All images courtesy the photographer. (via this isn’t happiness)

The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

NOVEMBER 11, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

Artist duo Adrien M & Claire B have lifted the curtain on their latest acrobatic dance performance utilizing digital projection titled The Movement of Air. Seen in this video is a handful of moments taken from an hour-long piece performed in France last month by a trio dancers. Unlike more common uses of digital project mapping where a recorded animation or scene is projected in a space, Adrien M & Claire B instead utilize fully interactive “scenes” that respond to human interaction. Nothing you see on the set is animated beforehand.

“This ‘living light’ is produced by video projectors and generated in real time by a set of algorithms,” Adrien shares with us. “It is a mix of control room operated human interventions and onstage data sensors that outlines a precise writing of motions and generative behaviors. Thus, the images are never pre-recorded for a rigid show on an imposed rhythm: on the contrary, they breathe and move with the dancers and organize a new space for them to explore.”

The overall effect is dizzying, and in many ways enhances the dancer’s work instead of looking like a gimmick added as an afterthought. A great marriage of physical performance and digital special effects. You can watch several earlier interactive creations by Adrien & Claire here on Colossal including Pixel and Kinetic Sand.

RESIDENCE CREATION CIE AM-CBADRIEN MONDOT / CLAIRE BARDAINNELE MOUVEMENT DE L AIRTHEATRE DE L ARCHIPEL / SCENE NATIONALEPERPIGNAN 01/02 OCTBORE 2015.
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The movement of air / The movement of air

Adrien M & Claire B PLUS

2015 creation of the company Adrien M / Claire B

Conception, artistic direction, scenography and staging: Claire Bardainne & Adrien Mondot
IT design: Adrien Mondot
Choreography: Yan Raballand
Dance: Rémi Boissy, Farid-Ayelem Rahmouni, Maëlle Reymond
Choreographic collaboration: Guillaume Bertrand
Original music and interpretation: Jérémy Chartier
Lumière : David Debrinay
Costumes: Marina Pujadas
Construction & flight systems: Silvain Ohl and Eric Noël
Light management: alternating
General management: Pierre Xucla
Sound management, alternating: Christophe Sartori, Régis Estreich
Stage management & flight systems : Arnaud Gonzalez
Technical director: Alexis Bergeron
Production and distribution: Charlotte Auché, Marek Vuiton, Margaux Létang
The IT development of the show was carried out with the help of the Anomes team and Millumin v2 software.

Production
Adrien M / Claire B

Coproductions
Théâtre de L’Archipel, national stage of Perpignan
Le Cirque-Théâtre d’Elbeuf
La Brèche, National Pole of Circus Arts, Cherbourg-Octeville
GREC Festival, Barcelona (Spain)
With the support of Adami. The Adami, society of performers, manages and develops their rights in France and around the world for fair compensation for their talent. It also supports them with its financial aid for artistic projects.
With the participation of DICRéAM
Fondazione Romaeuropa – Arte e Cultura (Italy)
Center des Arts d’Enghien-les-Bains, scene approved for digital writing
Maison des Arts, national scene of Créteil and Val-de-Marne
Espace Jean Legendre Theater of Compiegne, national stage of the Oise foreshadowing
Odyssey, National Institute of Arts of mime and gesture Périgueux
L’Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts-Sciences – Meylan
National Choreographic Center of Créteil and Val de-Marne / Cie Käfig, as part of Accueil Studio

Support
Le Toboggan, scene approved by Décines
Les Subsistances, international laboratory for artistic creation, Lyon

The company Adrien M / Claire B is approved by the DRAC Rhône-Alpes, by the Rhône-Alpes Region and supported by the City of Lyon.

Photos © Romain Etienne / item and © AMCB
Video © Adrien M / Claire B – with the precious help of Guillaume Faure

“The movement of the air” is a frontal spectacle for three dancers evolving according to a choreographic score in an immersive environment made up of projected images, generated and animated live.
The purpose of the show is to give body to the imperceptible: to make visible the invisible of a movement of air, in its trajectories with infinite nuances, imaginary varying from the most gentle and slow, to the most lively and transparent, from the most powerful at the most subtle. A journey between the dream of flight and the anxiety of falling.
A suspension device allows the bodies to get rid of their weight.
The original music is performed live on stage.

2 Credits  Adrien M & Claire B,  Design  Millumin, Software dev

4 Categories  Arts & Design  Animation  Projection Mapping

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PBS News, BBC News, Scientific American, TED Talks, Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids, Abolitionist, Biography, Thisiscolossal, and Dezeen

PBS News: February 14 – 20, 2020

BBC News: How mattresses could solve hunger 

Scientific American: The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

TED Talks: Debbie  Millman How Symbols and brands shape our humanity?, Rayma Suprani dictators hate political cartoons so I keep drawing them#t-87937 and Patrick Chappatte A free world needs satire

Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids , Abolitionist – Mini Bio: Susan B. Anthony

Biography: Grant Wood

Thisiscolossal: 50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles and Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Dezeen: Second Home Hollywood – Architecture

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 20, 2020

Feb 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Trump associate Roger Stone is sentenced to 40 months in prison after a public drama involving commentary from President Trump. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a fiery Las Vegas debate, analyzing the 2020 Democratic race, Venezuela’s political dynamics a year after Juan Guaido tried to seize power, California’s homelessness problem and saving for retirement after job loss. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Stone sentenced to 40 months in prison after DOJ drama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6VH4… News Wrap: Germany reels from deadly shooting rampage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4xHK… Bloomberg takes criticism at Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=086dG… 3 political experts on 2020 Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kosiH… A year after Guaido’s rise, Venezuelans wait for change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kPne… Can California solve its major problem with homelessness? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SoEP… When older workers are laid off and can’t afford to retire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFGf8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 19, 2020

Feb 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, six Democratic rivals face off in Las Vegas ahead of the Nevada caucuses. Also: A look at the billionaire businessman shaking up the presidential race, the world-wide spread of novel coronavirus, inhuman conditions grow bleaker in a Greek migrant camp, the melting block of ice threatening the world’s sea level and author Kevin Wilson on his new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Pentagon official resigns in impeachment fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXkzD… What to watch as Democrats’ Nevada competition ramps up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzS6V… What Bloomberg’s record means for his White House bid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8X2A… People may be catching novel coronavirus without symptoms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6-De… Children yearn for peace in hellish Greek refugee camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwLdu… Visiting the ‘doomsday glacier’ that’s melting away https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ782… This novel makes fun of your child’s meltdown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pie33… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 17, 2020

Feb 17, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, hundreds of American passengers are evacuated from cruise ships stranded by novel coronavirus in Asia. Plus: 2020 Democrats prepare for the Nevada caucuses, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, a migrant crisis builds on the Greek island of Lesbos, a book about presidential authors and the moment comedians Steve Martin and Martin Short became friends. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 16, 2020

Feb 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 16, the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates turn to Nevada as early voting takes place ahead of the upcoming caucuses, a look back at the historic Baldwin-Buckley race debate and how it is still resonating, and in Arizona an experimental program is being used to battle a decades-long drought. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 15, 2020

Feb 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 15, new cases of the coronavirus decrease in China, early voting begins in Nevada’s caucuses, the intersection of politics and architecture in North Macedonia, the Trump administration plans to ramp up enforcement in sanctuary cities, and a vital tuna industry struggles to stay afloat amid a perfect storm of obstacles. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 14, 2020

Feb 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, conflict looms over the Justice Department, as President Trump continues to tweet about pending cases. Plus: The U.S. reaches an agreement with the Taliban to wind down the war in Afghanistan, 2020 Democrats head south and west, political analysis with Mark Shields and Michael Gerson, consequences of Trump’s asylum policies and why young Brits are playing the cello. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS 2 former DOJ officials on Trump, Barr and the rule of law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlRDX… News Wrap: Army says Vindman won’t be investigated https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ4XS… U.S., Taliban agree on short-term plan to pave way for peace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFhes… Nevada, South Carolina offer next tests for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oez9… Mark Shields and Michael Gerson on NH primary, Trump v. DOJ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9asIb… What’s happening to asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VkvS… A 20-year-old classical cellist inspires other youth to play  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZYgi… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/video_and_audio/headlines/51466978/how-mattresses-could-solve-hunger

How mattresses could solve hunger 

BBC News

Syrian refugees at Zaatari camp in Jordan and scientists from the University of Sheffield are working together to create a way to grow healthy, fresh food with nothing but water and old mattress foam.

These ‘recycled gardens’ use the mattresses in place of the soil, which solves two problems in one: It reuses the mountain of plastic mattresses that have piled up in the camp and it allows everyone to grow fresh food in a crowded, desert environment.

Victoria Gill has been to the camp in Jordan to see how it’s working.

Produced by Vanessa Clarke. Filmed and edited by Stephen Fildes.

12 Feb 2020

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/eye-of-the-storm/january-2020-earths-warmest-january-on-record/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-02-13_top-stories

January 2020: Earth’s Warmest January on Record

The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

      By Jeff Masters on February 13, 2020

January 2020: Earth's Warmest January on Record

Fire and Rescue personnel run to move their truck as a bushfire burns on December 19, 2019 near Sydney, Australia. Fires in Australia were the most expensive weather-related disaster so far in 2020, with damages estimated in the billions by insurance broker Aon. Credit: David Gray Getty Images

January 2020 was the planet’s warmest January since record keeping began in 1880, said NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) on Thursday. Global ocean temperatures during January 2020 were the second warmest on record, and global land temperatures were the warmest on record. Global satellite-measured temperatures in January 2020 for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were the warmest or second warmest in the 42-year record, according to the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) and RSS, respectively.

January 2020 had the fourth highest departure of temperature from average of any month since 1880. Only March 2016, February 2016 and December 2015 had a greater temperature departure. Impressively, the warmth of January 2020 came without an El Niño event being present. Furthermore, we are also near the nadir of one of the least active solar cycles in the past century–a time when it is more difficult to set global heat records, due to the reduced amount of solar energy Earth receives. Thus, the remarkable warmth of January 2020 is a strong reminder that human-caused global warming is the primary driver of our warming climate.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 1. Departure of temperature from average for January 2020, the warmest January for the globe since record keeping began in 1880. Record warm January surface temperatures were present across parts of Scandinavia, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the central and western Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, and Central and South America. No land or ocean areas had record cold January temperatures. Credit: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

TWO BILLION-DOLLAR WEATHER DISASTERS IN JANUARY 2020

Two billion-dollar weather-related disaster hit the Earth last month, according to the January 2020 Catastrophe Report from insurance broker Aon:

U.S. severe weather outbreak: A powerful winter storm over central and eastern sections of the U.S. from January 10 – 12 killed 12 and did $1.2 billion in damage. The storm brought a multi-day severe weather outbreak to parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia, with 79 confirmed tornadoes.

Australia wildfires: Intense heat and drought over much of Australia in January caused destructive wildfires blamed for billions of dollars in damages. The combined death toll for the 2019/20 Australia bushfire season stands at 34, with more than 5,900 homes and other structures destroyed. Guardian Australia has launched the first of six very impressive immersive multimedia features on climate change, reported through the experiences of people living through it in Australia. The first episode–on bushfires–is best viewed on a large screen (not mobile) with the sound on.

NEUTRAL EL NIÑO CONDITIONS REIGN

NOAA’s February 13 monthly discussion of the state of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) stated that neutral ENSO conditions existed, with neither an El Niño nor a La Niña event in progress. Over the past month, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño3.4 region of the eastern tropical Pacific, though warmer than average, have been below the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions.

Forecasters at NOAA and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) are calling for a roughly 60% chance of neutral conditions continuing through Northern Hemisphere spring, and a 50% chance of continuing through summer. They put the odds of an El Niño event during the August-September-October peak of the hurricane season at 23%, and the odds of a La Niña event during that period at 33%.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 2. Departure of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño 3.4 region (in the equatorial Pacific) ending on February 13, 2020. Over the past month, SSTs were about 0.3°C above average, falling short of the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions. Credit: Levi Cowan, tropicaltidbits.com.

ARCTIC SEA ICE: EIGHTH LOWEST JANUARY EXTENT ON RECORD

Arctic sea ice extent during January 2020 was tied for eighth lowest in the 41-year satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The ice extent was higher than seen in recent years thanks to a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which kept cold air bottled up in the Arctic. Antarctic sea ice extent in January 2020 was the tenth lowest on record.

NOTABLE GLOBAL HEAT AND COLD MARKS FOR JANUARY 2020

Hottest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January
Coldest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: -66.0°C (-86.8°F) at Geo Summit, Greenland, 3 January (dubious data)
Hottest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: 48.9°C (120.0°F) at Penrith, Australia, 4 January
Coldest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: -47.4°C (-53.3°F) at Concordia, Antarctica, 31 January

 (Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

MAJOR WEATHER STATIONS THAT SET (NOT TIED) NEW ALL-TIME HEAT OR COLD RECORDS IN JANUARY 2020

Among global stations with a period of record of at least 40 years, 28 set new all-time heat records in January, and 3 set all-time cold records:

Canberra (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Newcastle (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January    
Katoomba (Australia) max. 39.8°C, 4 January   
Parramatta (Australia) max. 47.0°C, 4 January  
Bankstown (Australia) max. 47.0 °C, 4 January  
Taralga (Australia) max. 40.5°C, 4 January
Goulburn Airport (Australia) max. 42.0°C, 4 January  
Albury (Australia) max. 46.1°C, 4 January
Burrinjuck Dam (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Grenfell (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Young (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January  
Gundagai (Australia) max. 45.2°C, 4 January  
Cootamundra (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Temora (Australia) max. 46.4°C, 4 January
Narrandera (Australia) max. 47.4°C, 4 January  
Griffith (Australia) max. 47.2°C, 4 January
Calama (Chile) max. 31.2 °C, 12 January
Fraserburg (South Africa) max. 42.4°C, 16 January
Pofadder (South Africa) max. 43.0°C, 16 January
Willowmore (South Africa) max. 42.2°C, 16 January
Beaufort West (South Africa) max. 44.5°C, 16 January
Saint Raphael-Cargados Islands (Mauritius) max. 35.6°C, 9 January
Honiara Downtown (Solomon Islands) max. 35.4°C, 3 January
Veguitas (Cuba) min. 7.0 °C, 23 January
Pinares de Mayari (Cuba) min. 6.5°C, 23 January
Conakry Airport (Guinea) max. 38.0°C, 24 January
Kalewa (Myanmar) min. 6.6°C, 26 January
Cabramurra (Australia) max. 34.0°C, 31 January
Hobart Airport (Australia) max. 41.4°C, 31 January
Maydena (Australia) max. 38.2°C, 31 January
Gisborne (New Zealand) max. 38.2°C, 31 January

No all-time national heat or cold records have been set thus far in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

THIRTEEN MONTHLY NATIONAL/TERRITORIAL HEAT RECORD BEATEN OR TIED IN 2020 AS OF FEBRUARY 13

As of February 13, 13 national monthly all-time heat records have been beaten or tied in 2020:

January (10): Norway, South Korea, Angola, Congo Brazzaville, Dominica, Mexico, Indonesia, Guinea Bissau, Gambia, Sao Tome and Principe

February (3): Spain, Antarctica, Azerbaijan

No monthly national cold records have been beaten or tied in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

HEMISPHERICAL AND CONTINENTAL TEMPERATURE RECORDS IN 2020

Highest minimum temperature ever recorded the Northern Hemisphere in January: 29.1°C (84.4°F) at Bonriki, Kiribati, 17 January.

Highest maximum temperature ever recorded in North America in January: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January.

Highest temperature ever recorded in continental Antarctica and highest February temperature ever recorded in Antarctica plus the surrounding islands: 18.4°C (65.1°F) at Base Esperanza, 6 February.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Jeff Masters

Jeff Masters worked as a hurricane scientist with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. After a near-fatal flight into category 5 Hurricane Hugo, he left the Hurricane Hunters to pursue a safer passion–a 1997 Ph.D. in air pollution meteorology from the University of Michigan. In 1995, he co-founded the Weather Underground, and served as its chief meteorologist until the company was sold to the Weather Company in 2012. Since 2005, his Wunderblog (now called Category 6) has been one of the Internet’s most popular sources of extreme weather and climate change information, and he is one of the most widely quoted experts in the field. He can be reached at weatherman.masters@gmail.com.

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“Branding is the profound manifestation of the human spirit,” says designer and podcaster Debbie Millman. In a historical odyssey that she illustrated herself, Millman traces the evolution of branding, from cave paintings to flags to beer labels and beyond. She explores the power of symbols to unite people, beginning with prehistoric communities who used them to represent beliefs and identify affiliations to modern companies that adopt logos and trademarks to market their products — and explains how branding reflects the state of humanity.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Debbie Millman · Design evangelist

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TEDWomen 2019 | December 2019

“A political cartoon is a barometer of freedom,” says Rayma Suprani, who was exiled from her native Venezuela for publishing work critical of the government. “That’s why dictators hate cartoonists.” In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent railing against totalitarianism, Suprani explores how cartoons hold a mirror to society and reveal hidden truths — and discusses why she keeps drawing even when it comes at a high personal cost. (In Spanish with consecutive English translation)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rayma Suprani · Political cartoonist

An award-winning satirist, Venezuelan cartoonist Rayma Suprani’s life’s work is speaking truth to power — even when being outspoken comes at a steep price.

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We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_B._Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

American women’s rights activist

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women’s rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. Wikipedia

BornFebruary 15, 1820, Adams, MA

DiedMarch 13, 1906, Rochester, NY

Full nameSusan Brownell Anthony

SiblingsMary Stafford AnthonyDaniel Read AnthonyMORE

Quotes

Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.

I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.

Independence is happiness.

Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO

Oct 17, 2012  Biography

Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 to March 13, 1906), better known as Susan B. Anthony, was an American writer, lecturer and abolitionist who was a leading figure in the women’s voting rights movement. Raised in a Quaker household, Anthony went on to work as a teacher. She later partnered with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and would eventually lead the National American Woman Suffrage Association. #Biography Subscribe for more Biography: http://aetv.us/2AsWMPH Delve deeper into Biography on our site: http://www.biography.com Follow Biography for more surprising stories from fascinating lives: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Biography Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/biography Twitter – https://twitter.com/biography Biography.com captures the most gripping, surprising, and fascinating stories about famous people: The biggest break. The defining opportunity. The most shattering failure. The unexpected connection. The decision that changed everything. With over 7,000 biographies and daily features that highlight newsworthy and compelling points-of-view, we are the digital source for true stories about people that matter. Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO https://www.youtube.com/user/Biograph…

Rating  No mature content   Category  Entertainment

Susan B. Anthony, Fighter for Women’s Rights!

Mar 9, 2017 Simon Kids

Susan B. Anthony knew from a young age that women deserved the same rights as men, especially the right to vote! Read along as Susan strives for equality through delivering speeches, handing in a new declaration to Congress and even getting arrested! Come #readalong with us in SUSAN B. ANTHONY, FIGHTER FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS by Deborah Hopkinson! To find more great Ready-to-Read books visit http://www.readytoread.com .

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Grant-Wood

Grant Wood AMERICAN ARTIST

WRITTEN BY: The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

LAST UPDATED: Feb 9, 2020 See Article History

Grant Wood, (born February 13, 1891, near Anamosa, Iowa, U.S.—died February 12, 1942, Iowa City, Iowa), American painter who was one of the major exponents of Midwestern Regionalism, a movement that flourished in the United States during the 1930s.

Wood was trained as a craftsman and designer as well as a painter. After spending a year (1923) at the Académie Julian in Paris, he returned to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where in 1927 he was commissioned to do a stained-glass window. Knowing little about stained glass, he went to Germany to seek craftsmen to assist him. While there he was deeply influenced by the sharply detailed paintings of various German and Flemish masters of the 16th century. Wood subsequently abandoned his Impressionist style and began to paint in the sharply detailed, realistic manner by which he is now known.

A portrait of his mother in this style, Woman with Plants (1929), did not attract attention, but in 1930 his American Gothic caused a sensation when it was exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago. The hard, cold realism of this painting and the honest, direct, earthy quality of its subject were unusual in American art. The work ostensibly portrays a farmer and his daughter—modelled for Wood by his dentist, B.H. McKeeby, and Wood’s sister, Nan—in front of their farmhouse. As a telling portrait of the sober and hardworking rural dwellers of the Midwest, the painting has become one of the best-known icons of American art.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.SuperStock

The meaning of American Gothic has been subjected to scrutiny since Wood painted it. Was it meant to be an homage to the strong values in the Midwest or was it a satire? Is it a husband and wife or a father and daughter? Wood’s own statements on its meaning were wishy-washy, leading to further ambiguity and debate. Open to so much interpretation, the American Gothic trope lent itself to countless parodies in popular culture as well as in the political arena, in advertisements, in television shows such as The Simpsons, in albums, in comic books, on magazine covers, and by Jim Henson’s Muppets.

Get exclusive access to content from our 1768 First Edition with your

Wood became one of the leading figures of the Regionalist movement.

Daughters of Revolution

Painting by Grant Wood

Daughters of Revolution is a painting by American artist Grant Wood; he claimed it as his only satire. Wikipedia

ArtistGrant Wood

Created1932

PeriodRegionalism

GenrePortrait

MediumMasonite

Dimensions50.8 cm × 101.4 cm (20.0 in × 39.9 in)

Another well-known painting by him is Daughters of Revolution (1932), a satirical portrait of three unattractive old women who appear smugly satisfied with their American Revolutionary ancestry. In 1934 Wood was made assistant professor of fine arts at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. Among his other principal works are several paintings illustrating episodes from American history and a series of Midwestern rural landscapes that communicate a strong sense of American ambience by means of a skillful simplification of form.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Naomi Blumberg, Assistant Editor.

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Grant Wood American Gothic Paintings,  Art….biography.com

From 1920 to 1928 he made four trips to Europe, where he studied many styles of painting, especially impressionism and post- impressionism. Influenced by the work of Jan Van Eyck. From 1924 to 1935 he lived in the loft of a carriage house that he turned into his personal studio Wood helped found the Stone City Art Colony near his hometown to help artists get through the Great Depression. He became a great proponent of regionalism in the arts.

50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles

DECEMBER 12, 2019   GRACE EBERT

Designed by Spanish architects SelgasCano, a Los Angeles workspace has popped up in a formerly empty parking lot in Hollywood. The recently opened SecondHome Hollywood boasts a 50,000-square-foot garden of 6,500 trees and plants and 700 tons of soil and vegetation. It is Los Angeles’s densest urban forest and is also home to 112 native species.

The Hollywood location, which is the first in the United States, contains sixty yellow-roofed office pods. It also encompasses the Anne Banning Community House, a ’60s building designed by prominent architect Paul Williams who is known for defining much of Los Angeles’s architectural aesthetic throughout the 20th century. (via Jeroen Apers)

Second Home Hollywood | Architecture | Dezeen

•Dec 4, 2019  Dezeen

Second Home Hollywood, the first US location from the British co-working company, is revealed in this captioned video produced by Dezeen for Second Home. Spanish architecture practice SelgasCano transformed a former Hollywood parking-lot into a sprawling co-working complex that will house 250 companies. It has previously worked with Second Home to create other spaces in London and Lisbon. In Los Angeles, the architects filled the site with sixty oval-shaped office pods of varying sizes, which are topped with bright-yellow rooftops that resemble a cluster of lily pads when seen from above. The site has been populated with more than 6,500 plants and trees from 112 species native to Los Angeles, in order to create a tranquil working environment for members. The site also incorporates the former Anne Banning Community House, a historic 1960s building which SelgasCano renovated to accommodate 30 additional office spaces for Second Home members. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1442212 WATCH NEXT: Watch our talk with Thomas Heatherwick from Second Home LA – https://youtu.be/Blx2gF63xJ4 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/

Category  Entertainment

https://theinspirationgrid.com/food-artworks-by-tatiana-shkondina-sasha-tivanov/

Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Published Oct 3, 2017

Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov worked in collaboration to produce incredible food artworks inspired by famous paintings.

More food art via Behance

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PBS News, Scientific American, Ted Talks, Genius Channel, DW Documentary, Indian Diplomacy, mortrek, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: February 8 – 13, 2020

Scientific American: The World Health Organization chose the name based on the type of virus and the year the first cases were seen

TED Talks: Alicia Eggert  Imaginative sculptures that explore how  we perceive reality? and Alejandro Duran How I use art to tackle plastic pollution in our oceans

Genius Channel: Albert Einstein Part 1: The Biography, Albert Einstein Part 2: The Formula and Albert Einstein Part 3: The Mind

DW Documentary: Oil and ruin — exodus from Venezuela

Indian Diplomacy: Mahatma – A Great Soul of 20th Century

mortrek: Time Lapse of Sunflower from Seed to Flower

Thisiscolossal: Remarkable High Speed Photos of Birds Catching Fish by Salah Baazizi and Miniature Seascapes and Cities Top Elaborate Paper Wigs by Asya Kozina and Dmitriy Kozin

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 13, 2020

Feb 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, a conversation with Sen. Bernie Sanders, one of the current leaders in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary. Plus: Ongoing political fallout in China over the novel coronavirus outbreak, measles makes a deadly comeback, a book with an inside look at the Trump presidency, controversy over school shooting drills and a Brief But Spectacular take on revolutionary poetry. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Barr decries public criticism of Roger Stone case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krEie… How 2020 Democrats are positioning themselves after NH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELKp8… Bernie Sanders on Culinary Workers Union, Medicare for All https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43q5B… In China, political fallout from novel coronavirus continues https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmaoF… How vaccine hesitancy is causing deadly measles resurgence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0oKa… ‘A Very Stable Genius’ offers inside look at Trump’s tenure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zy3kj… Why education unions dispute value of active shooter drills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmFBH… How Tongo Eisen-Martin looks to poetry to create revolution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMWOR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 12, 2020

Feb 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, what the results in New Hampshire mean for Democratic presidential candidates. Also: Former Mayor Pete Buttigieg on his second-place finish in the Granite State, crisis at the Justice Department as President Trump tries to take the law into his own hands, a possible solution for the nation’s crumbling infrastructure, and a new novel from Isabel Allende. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS 2020 Dems look to more diverse states after N.H. primary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aCSO… Buttigieg: Results are proving he’s ‘a serious contender’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kkiaf… News Wrap: New novel coronavirus infections declining https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syiWY… Does the Roger Stone fight hurt the Justice Department? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPKmO… What N.H. primary results mean for the 2020 race https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrae_… U.S. needs safer bridges. Super strong concrete could help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg7CB… In Allende’s new novel, a familiar story of refugee life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8D8X… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 11, 2020

Feb 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, voting is underway in New Hampshire, the first state to hold a primary during the 2020 election cycle. Plus: Controversy over Roger Stone’s sentence, how China is coping with its deadly novel coronavirus outbreak, Sudan’s Omar al-Bashir is closer to facing prosecution, new efforts to clean India’s Ganga River and a woman helping perfect technology for a bionic limb. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 10, 2020

Feb 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, 2020 Democrats make final pitches to voters in New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday’s first-in-the-nation primary. Plus: The death toll from novel coronavirus surpasses that of SARS as China struggles to contain the outbreak, what’s in President Trump’s proposed 2021 budget, Politics Monday, Denmark’s rising anti-Semitism troubles Auschwitz survivors and a milestone Oscars night. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS NH voters battle indecision as Democratic primary nears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs21… News Wrap: Turkish, Syrian forces clash again in Idlib https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nx-EG… Can China’s information about novel coronavirus be trusted? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onE6X… What’s in Trump’s proposed 2021 budget https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgVDh… Lauren Chooljian and James Pindell preview NH primary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_x4n… In Denmark, Auschwitz survivors lament rise of anti-Semitism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ycxV… What best picture for ‘Parasite’ means for foreign films https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsL8o… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 9, 2020

Feb 9, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 9, Democratic presidential candidates canvass New Hampshire in the final push ahead of Tuesday’s primary, the death toll from the novel coronavirus continues to climb, a 15-year battle heats up over Oregon’s Jordan Cove pipeline project, and a look at misconceptions about race and culture. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 8, 2020

Feb 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 8, the Democratic presidential candidates look to New Hampshire for support, new cases of the novel coronavirus emerge, Louisiana oyster farmers feel a changing tide along the Mississippi Delta, and internet satellites are launched into space with the hope of expanding broadband coverage. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/disease-caused-by-the-novel-coronavirus-officially-has-a-name-covid-19/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-02-11_top-stories&spMailingID=63452364&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1821626956&spReportId=MTgyMTYyNjk1NgS2

Disease Caused by the Novel Coronavirus Officially Has a Name: COVID-19

The World Health Organization chose the name based on the type of virus and the year the first cases were seen

     By Andrew JosephSTAT on February 11, 2020

Disease Caused by the Novel Coronavirus Officially Has a Name: COVID-19

Coronavirus. Credit: Getty Images

The disease caused by the novel coronavirus has a name: COVID-19.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organization, announced the name Tuesday, giving a specific identifier to a disease that has been confirmed in more than 42,000 people and caused more than 1,000 deaths in China. There have been fewer than 400 cases in 24 other countries, with one death.

In choosing the name, WHO advisers focused simply on the type of virus that causes the disease. Co and Vi come from coronavirus, Tedros explained, with D meaning disease and 19 standing for 2019, the year the first cases were seen.

The virus that causes the disease has been known provisionally as 2019-nCoV. Also on Tuesday, a coronavirus group from the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, which is responsible for naming new viruses, proposed designating the novel coronavirus as SARS-CoV-2, according to a preprint of a paper posted online. (Preprints are versions of papers that have not yet been peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal.) The name reflects the genetic similarities between the new coronavirus and the coronavirus that caused the SARS outbreak of 2002-2003.

In selecting COVID-19 as the name of the disease, the WHO name-givers steered clear of linking the outbreak to China or the city of Wuhan, where the illness was first identified. Although origin sites have been used in the past to identify new viruses, such a namesake is now seen as denigrating. Some experts have come to regret naming the infection caused by a different coronavirus the Middle East respiratory syndrome.

“Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” Tedros said. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.”

Viruses and the disease they cause do not have to have related names—think HIV and AIDS—but more recently those responsible for the formal naming process have kept them associated. For example, SARS, the disease, is caused by SARS-CoV, the virus.

The provisional name of the new virus stemmed from the year it was first seen (2019), the fact that it was new (n), and a member of the coronavirus family (CoV).

A clear name could also stop the ad hoc identifiers that have sprung up in the press and online, many of which, like the Wuhan virus or Wu Flu, linked the virus to the city.

Republished with permission from STAT. This article originally appeared on February 11 2020

Andrew Joseph

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