Ing’s Peace Project and Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum Part 3

Ing’s Peace Project

And

Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum

Music by Steeve Sam, Janine Salinas and Andy Plants

On Friday, October 10, 2014

Part 3

Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum on Friday, October 10, 2014 at 5 – 9 PM.  There were drinks and dancing to the sounds of Djs Janine Salinas, Andy Plants, and the drummer is Rocky with Steeve Sam as the host.

I am grateful and appreciate Steeve Sam and Janine Salinas who invited me to present my peace project with the event.  Everyone enjoyed the music with rhythms that encouraged people to step on the dance floor presenting their fancy movements being altogether in an atmosphere of happiness and joy.

Most of the people were willing to express with their thoughts on peace.  Sharing with friends their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”  Some were taking turn to snap photos while writing their peace comments

I brought three designs of my Peace Poster and two of my artwork of Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”

Comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”

I have to compliment the Newark Museum for arranging this event.  The good influence that Newark Museum provided inspired young and old alike to have a good time and a good feeling.  People were enjoying the music and dancing with friends and others surrounded by the artwork of the museum.  It was nourishment for the mind to see the creative artwork.  At the same time people were thinking about peace and then writing down their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”  It was a pleasant time as people got together with positive influences, which is better than hanging around on street corners, drinking, smoking and being tempted by drug dealers.

Institutions such as museums, schools or various government organizations have to provide a positive atmosphere for the population.  This is especially true for youngsters who need to be introduced to creative ways of thinking motivating them to do the better.

The alternative has often been to incarcerate people at a great financial cost government at all levels.  This money could be spent for scholarships to students, especially to low income children.  For example in New York the educational cost elementary/secondary school is about twenty thousand dollars, while the cost of incarceration is about sixty thousand dollars per person each year.  If there is a healthy environment for youngsters that allow them to go on to become successful in school, they will be able to lead better lives for themselves and society.

We will not have peace if there is still a great difference between the rich and the poor. The inequality in society causes suffering and hardship for the poor.  Desperation for survival causes the poor to sometimes be involved in illegal activities which lead to incarceration.  With the cutting back of food stamps and education budgets there is less opportunity for the poor and uneducated to survive. We cannot have equality for the poor in a society where the wealth of a nation is not distributed in a more amicable way.  We cannot blame the poor and uneducated people if there is lack of programs to help them.

Angela Davis have argued that prisons in the U.S. have “become venues of profit as well as punishment;” as mass incarceration has increased, the prison system has become more about economic factors than criminality.The rich corporations benefit from high number of incarceration by subcontracting prison facilities from the government.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, October 27, 2014

The following is the research I gathered from the Internet showing the unemployment rate, The Crisis in Black and Brown Youth Unemployment, Education vs. prison costs and Incarceration in the United States:

Credit: NPR

http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2014/07/21/329864863/the-youth-unemployment-crisis-hits-african-americans-hardest

Young people are being chased out of the labor market. Though the national unemployment rate has fallen steadily in recent months, youth unemployment remains stubbornly high, and the jobless rate is even higher among young minorities. For young people between the ages of 16 and 24, unemployment is more than twice the national rate, at 14.2 percent. For African-Americans, that rate jumps to 21.4 percent.

Of course, discrimination could be a factor. But according to William Spriggs, an economist at Howard University, the trend is also being driven by a sluggish economy. As he told Morning Edition’s Renee Montagne, there is still a backlog of Americans who are unemployed or underemployed as a result of the Great Recession, creating more competition for even minimum wage jobs. In a job market where many people with a college education are settling for jobs outside of their fields, a teenager looking for a summer job will find the market crowded.

Another big problem, says Spriggs, is the absence of adequate job information. In most states, companies are not required to publicly list all of their job openings. As a result, there are huge disparities in labor market information, based as much on who you know as what you know.

RACE AND ECONOMIC JUSTICE     

WITH IMARA JONES

http://colorlines.com/archives/2014/01/youth_unemployment.html

The Crisis in Black and Brown Youth Unemployment

As the White House prepares to launch a major economic opportunity effort, record high unemployment among black and Latino youth underscores how essential it is to create job opportunities for young people of color.

The critical issue here is that the ages of 16 to 24 are make or break years for lifelong earning potential. With one out four blacks and one out of six Latinos under the age of 25 without work, a generation of youth of color risks falling behind.

The situation for black and Latino unemployed youths is so alarming that leading think tanks and economists are raising red flags about it at a staggering pace. One report on the topic by Demos, the public policy organization, argues that the “exclusion of young people of color” from job opportunities “weakens the promise of America.”*

Why’s that?

With wealth in African-American and Latino communities already the lowest on record, a loss of income on a generational scale would likely harden existing inequities and set back economic progress in the country for decades. That’s because there are simply so many young blacks and Latinos who want work but can’t find it.

The School-to-Prison Pipeline

But there are two additional challenges that magnify black and Latino youth joblessness.

The first is that lower college graduation rates for youth of color puts African-Americans and Latinos at a severe disadvantage. As more workers with higher education compete for jobs that were once dominated by high school graduates, the hill for people of color becomes steeper. That’s because a third less blacks and half as an many Latinos have college degrees as whites. But there’s more at work here.

Disproportionate school discipline directed at blacks and Latinos is a driving force behind lower education attainment rates for these two groups, further damaging lifelong earning potential.

Though students from these communities make up less than four out of 10 of kids in school, they make up seven out of 10 of children “involved in school-related arrests or referrals to law enforcement.” As the Advancement Project points out, students who’ve been suspended are up to five times more likely to not finish high school [PDF]. Given the condition of the labor market, the lack of a high school diploma is simply a non-starter.

The second is the way that higher incarceration rates damage the job prospects of youth of color. With six out 10 individuals in prison black or Latino, over 300,000 people of color are released from incarceration each year [PDF]. As Colorlines editorial director Kai Wright pointed out in a recent article, almost all employers perform a background check on job applicants, even those for low-wage positions. Astoundingly, 90 percent of all African-Americans with criminal records are passed over for employment. That’s a rate a three times higher than whites with a similar history. Skewed incarceration is
another headwind that youth of color face in the job market.

The reason that any of this matters is that youth unemployment means lower incomes and fewer life opportunities for those without work. Since employment between the ages of 16 to 24 is vital to setting the pace for an individuals’ future earning power, joblessness experienced by young people has severe consequences. Just six months of unemployment can mean $45,000 in lower wages. It can take up to a decade to make up lost ground. The longer unemployment lasts, the larger the longterm earnings hole grows. Young people 20 to 24 will lose $20 billion over the next decade in lost wages. Writ large this translates into an amount that will be difficult for black and Latino communities, still reeling from the recession, to absorb.

Turning It Around

The good news is that youth unemployment is entirely fixable. The most important thing is to jumpstart overall job growth and get the economy functioning normally again.

Consequently raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, lowering the wage gap between men and women, and expanding tax breaks for low-income workers—including those without children—would be great places to start. Together these programs would raise the incomes of tens of millions and lift millions more out of poverty. A shot in the arm to the economy on such a scale would help push the labor to function more normally, allow older workers to move up the earnings scale, and clear the way for young people.

But an even more targeted effort to end black and Latino youth unemployment is desperately needed. As Tom Allison, policy analyst at the under-34 advocacy group Young Invicibles puts it, “If the goal is to improve the economy, we have to focus on those who are suffering the most.”

Breaking the school-to-prison pipeline, structuring a way for more people of color to attend college, lowering incarceration rates, and ending employment discrimination for non-violent offenders are all essential.

With an entire generation of black and Latino youth hanging in the balance, the country doesn’t have a second to waste.

Piece has been updated since publication.

Education vs. prison costs

Data from 40 states depict how much government money is spent per year to educate an elementary/secondary school student compared to the cost of keeping an inmate imprisoned.

http://money.cnn.com/infographic/economy/education-vs-prison-costs/

Source: U.S. Census Data and Vera Institute of Justice Graphic: Tal Yellin / CNNMoney

Methodology

Education data was collected by the U.S. Census and covers public school children prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Prison data from the Vera Institute was collected in each state using a department of corrections survey. Corrections departments from 40 states completed and returned the survey, which asked respondents to provide prison expenditures paid by the department of corrections, as well as prison costs paid by other agencies.

Handgun homicides in the United States

The gun control debate has focused on assault rifles – but in many states handguns are responsible for far more deaths.

Left: Total incarceration in the United States by year

Right: Inmates held in custody in state or federal prisons or in local jails, December 31, 2000, and 2009–2010.[2]

Incarceration in the United States of America is one of the main forms of punishment, rehabilitation, or both for the commission of felony and other offenses. The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world. At year-end 2009, it was 743 adults incarcerated per 100,000 population.[3][4][5][6][7]

Comparison with other countries

Race

See also: Race and crime in the United States and Racial inequality in the American criminal justice system

On June 30, 2006, an estimated 4.8% of black non-Hispanic men were in prison or jail, compared to 1.9% of Hispanic men of any race and 0.7% of white non-Hispanic men. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics.[39]


Midyear 2010 incarceration rates by race and gender per 100,000 US residents of all ages (adult rates would be higher).[40]

Ethnicity

Male

Female

Total

White non-Hispanic 678 91
Black non-Hispanic 4,347 260
Hispanic of any race 1,775 133
All inmates 1,352 126 732

According to the US Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) non-Hispanic blacks accounted for 39.4% of the total prison and jail population in 2009 (841,000 black males and 64,800 black females out of a total of 2,096,300 males and 201,200 females).[41] According to the 2010 census of the US Census Bureau blacks (including Hispanic blacks) comprised 13.6% of the US population.[42][43][44] Of ethnic groups, native Black Americans, Puerto Rican Americans, and American Indians have, by far, some of the highest rates incarceration.[45][46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53] Though, of these groups, the black population is the largest, and therefore make up a very large portion of those incarcerated in US prisons and jails.[54]

Hispanics (of all races) were 20.6% of the total jail and prison population in 2009.[41] Hispanics comprised 16.3% of the US population according to the 2010 US census.[42][55] The Northeast has the highest incarceration rates of Hispanics in the nation.[56] Connecticut has the highest Hispanic-to-White incarceration ratio with 6.6 Hispanic males for every white male. The National Average Hispanic-to-White incarceration ratio is 1.8. Other states with high Hispanic-to-White incarcerations include Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New York.[57]

As the Hispanic community is not monolithic, variations are seen in incarceration rates. Among the Hispanic community, Puerto Ricans have the highest incarceration rate. Located primarily in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states, they are up to six times more likely to be incarcerated than whites, which may explain the higher incarceration rates for Hispanics overall in the Northeast region.[58][59][60][61][62][63][64][65][66] Illegal immigrants, usually Mexican nationals, also make up a substantial number of Hispanics incarcerated.[67][68][69]

In 2010 black non-Hispanic males were incarcerated at the rate of 4,347 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents of the same race and gender. White males were incarcerated at the rate of 678 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents. Hispanic males were incarcerated at the rate of 1,755 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents.[40][70] (For female rates see the table below.) Asian Americans, however, have lower incarceration rates than any other racial group, including whites.[71]

Black majority cities have similar crime statistics for blacks as do cities where majority of population is white. For example, white-majority San Diego has a slightly lower crime rate for blacks than does Atlanta, a city which has black majority in population and city government.[72]

In 2013, by age 18, 30% of black males, 26% of Hispanic males, and 22% of white males have been arrested. By age 23, 49% of black males, 44% of Hispanic males, and 38% of white males have been arrested.[73]

Women

Main article: Incarceration of women in the United States

As of December 31, 2009 the female prison population of federal and state prisons in the United States was 113,462.[74] Within the US, the rate of female incarceration increased fivefold in a two decade span ending in 2001; the increase occurred because of increased prosecutions and convictions of offenses related to recreational drugs, increases in the severities of offenses, and a lack of community sanctions and treatment for women who violate laws.[75] In the United States, authorities began housing women in correctional facilities separate from men in the 1870s.[76]

Youth

Census of juveniles in residential placement, 1997–2011.[10][18]

Count

Male

Female

Total

1997

90,771 14,284 105,055

1999

92,985 14,508 107,493

2001

89,115 15,104 104,219

2003

81,975 14,556 96,531

2006

78,998 13,723 92,721

2007

75,017 11,797 86,814

2010

61,358 9,434 70,792

2011

53,079 8,344 61,423

Main article: Youth incarceration in the United States

Through the juvenile courts and the adult criminal justice system, the United States incarcerates more of its youth than any other country in the world, a reflection of the larger trends in incarceration practices in the United States. This has been a source of controversy for a number of reasons, including the overcrowding and violence in youth detention facilities, the prosecution of youths as adults and the long term consequences of incarceration on the individual’s chances for success in adulthood. In 2014, the United Nations Human Rights Committee criticized the United States for about ten judicial abuses, including the mistreatment of juvenile inmates.[77]

According to federal data from 2011, around 40% of the nation’s juvenile inmates are housed in private facilities.[78]

Cost

U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Not adjusted for inflation. To view the inflation-adjusted data:[123]

In 2007, around $74 billion was spent on corrections.[123] The total number of inmates in 2007 in federal, state, and local lockups was 2,419,241.[18] That comes to around $30,600 per inmate. Church Publishing estimates the 50 states plus federal government expenditure amounts to $56.9 billion dollars spent on U.S. corrections. The company’s additional 7.5 billion dollar estimate excludes ‘double-counting’ state or federal subsidies for local lock-ups which vary to reach $64.4 billion dollars spent on U.S. corrections annually by 2014.[124]

In 2005, it cost an average of $23,876 dollars per state prisoner. State prison spending varied widely, from $45,000 a year in Rhode Island to $13,000 in Louisiana.[16][121]

In California in 2008, it cost the state an average of $47,102 a year to incarcerate an inmate in a state prison. From 2001 to 2009, the average annual cost increased by about $19,500.[125]

In 2003 among facilities operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, it cost $25,327 per inmate.[126]

Housing the approximately 500,000 people in jail in the USA awaiting trial who cannot afford bail costs $9 billion a year.[127] Most jail inmates are petty, nonviolent offenders. Twenty years ago most nonviolent defendants were released on their own recognizance (trusted to show up at trial). Now most are given bail, and most pay a bail bondsman to afford it.[128] 62% of local jail inmates are awaiting trial.[129]

To ease jail overcrowding over 10 counties every year consider building new jails. As an example Lubbock County, Texas has decided to build a $110 million megajail to ease jail overcrowding. Jail costs an average of $60 a day nationally.[128][130] In Broward County, Florida supervised pretrial release costs about $7 a day per person while jail costs $115 a day. The jail system costs a quarter of every county tax dollar in Broward County, and is the single largest expense to the county taxpayer.[131]

Bondsmen have lobbied to cut back local pretrial programs from Texas to California, pushed for legislation in four states limiting pretrial’s resources, and lobbied Congress so that they won’t have to pay the bond if the defendant commits a new crime. Behind them, the bondsmen have powerful special interest group and millions of dollars. Pretrial release agencies have a smattering of public employees and the remnants of their once-thriving programs.

National Public Radio, January 22, 2010.[131]

The National Association of State Budget Officers reports: “In fiscal 2009, corrections spending represented 3.4 percent of total state spending and 7.2 percent of general fund spending.” They also report: “Some states exclude certain items when reporting corrections expenditures. Twenty-one states wholly or partially excluded juvenile delinquency counseling from their corrections figures and fifteen states wholly or partially excluded spending on juvenile institutions. Seventeen states wholly or partially excluded spending on drug abuse rehabilitation centers and forty-one states wholly or partially excluded spending on institutions for the criminally insane. Twenty-two states wholly or partially excluded aid to local governments for jails. For details, see Table 36.”[132]

As of 2007 the cost of medical care for inmates was growing by 10 percent annually.[16][121]

Criticism

See also: United States incarceration rate § Causes, Torture in the United States § Domestic police and prisons and Human rights in the United States § Prison system

High rates of incarceration may be due to sentence length, which is further driven by many other factors. Shorter sentences may even diminish the criminal culture by possibly reducing re-arrest rates for first-time convicts.[133] The U.S. Congress has ordered federal judges to make imprisonment decisions “recognizing that imprisonment is not an appropriate means of promoting correction and rehabilitation.”[134]

Critics have lambasted the United States for incarcerating a large number of non-violent and victimless offenders;[135][136] half of all persons incarcerated under state jurisdiction are for non-violent offenses, and 20% are incarcerated for drug offenses (in state prisons, federal prison percentages are higher).[41][137] “Human Rights Watch believes the extraordinary rate of incarceration in the United States wreaks havoc on individuals, families and communities, and saps the strength of the nation as a whole.”[135] The population of inmates housed in prisons and jails in the United States exceeds 2 million, with the per capita incarceration population higher than that officially reported by any other country.[121] Criminal justice policy in the United States has also been criticized for a number of other reasons.[138] Critics such as Angela Davis have argued that prisons in the U.S. have “become venues of profit as well as punishment;” as mass incarceration has increased, the prison system has become more about economic factors than criminality.[139] In the 2014 book The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap, journalist Matt Taibbi argues that the expanding disparity of wealth and the increasing criminalization of those in poverty have culminated in the U.S. having the largest prison population “in the history of human civilization.”[140]

Reporting at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (August 3, 2008), Becky Pettit, associate professor of sociology from the University of Washington and Bryan Sykes, a UW post-doctoral researcher, revealed that the mammoth increase in the United States’s prison population since the 1970s is having profound demographic consequences that affect 1 in 50 Americans. Drawing data from a variety of sources that looked at prison and general populations, the researchers found that the boom in prison population is hiding lowered rates of fertility and increased rates of involuntary migration to rural areas and morbidity that is marked by a greater exposure to and risk of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV or AIDS.[141]

Guilty plea bargains concluded 97% of all federal cases in 2011.[142]

As of December 2012, two state prison systems segregated prisoners based on their HIV status. On December 21, U.S. District Court Judge Myron Thompson ruled in a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on behalf of several inmates that Alabama’s practice in doing so violated federal disabilities law. He noted the state’s “outdated and unsupported assumptions about HIV and the prison system’s ability to deal with HIV-positive prisoners.” The other state with a similar segregation policy was South Carolina.[143]

Please visit the following links for more information:

Incarceration in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://www.google.com/#q=cost+of+incarceration+in+the+us

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Ing’s Peace Project and Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum Part 2

Ing’s Peace Project

And

Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum

Music by Steeve Sam, Janine Salinas and Andy Plants

On Friday, October 10, 2014

Part 2

Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum on Friday, October 10, 2014 at 5 – 9 PM.  There were drinks and dancing to the sounds of Djs Janine Salinas and Andy Plants with Steeve Sam as the host.

I brought three designs of my Peace Poster and two of my artwork of Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

1.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Shadow of Peace”

2.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Peace with Nature”

3.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Shadow of Peace and Thai Art”

4.  Ing’s Artwork            Gandhi “Man of Peace and His Words

5.  Ing’s Artwork            Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have A Dream”

I enjoyed seeing people dance with rhythms of the drum that gives rise to every step on the floor.  Thump, thump, thump the beats are fast and energetic.  As I listen for a little while the rhythms are echoing  in my brain.  Since I promote Peace I always associate and vision words that can give music more meaning.  I finally came up with some verses that can help anyone concerned with peace.  These verses would have the words of peace echoing in their ears and their brain.

Peace Peace Peace

 

Peace! Peace! Peace!

On earth now

We are us

 

Us, us, us

 

Together with rhythms

And music

 

 Peace! Peace! Peace!

On earth now

We are us

 

Us, us, us

 

Together with rhythms

And music

 

Humans we are together

Having good times

Laughing, smiling

Happy together

 

Peace! Peace! Peace!

On earth now

We are us

 

Us, us, us

 

Together with rhythms

And music

 

No religion, race or sexuality

Between us

We are us

 

Us, us, us

 

Together with rhythms

And music

 

Peace! Peace! Peace!

On earth now

We are us

Us, us, us

Together with rhythms

And music

 Save Us

 

Save nature

Save the forests

Save the sea

And all creatures

On earth

 

They are all us

Peace, peace, peace

On earth now

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, October 10, 2014

Comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”

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Ing’s Peace Project And Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum

Ing’s Peace Project

And

Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum

Music by Steeve Sam, Janine Salinas and Andy Plants

On Friday, October 10, 2014

Part 1

 Open Doors Party at the Newark Museum on Friday, October 10, 2014 at 5 – 9 PM.  There were drinks and dancing to the sounds of Djs Janine Salinas and Andy Plants with Steeve Sam as the host.

I am grateful and appreciate Steeve Sam and Janine Salinas who invited me to present my peace project with the event.  Everyone enjoyed the music with rhythms that encouraged people to step on the dance floor presenting their fancy movements being altogether in an atmosphere of happiness and joy.

Most of the people were willing to express with their thoughts on peace.  Sharing with friends their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”  Some were taking turn to snap photos while writing their peace comments

I brought three designs of my Peace Poster and two of my artwork of Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

1.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Shadow of Peace”

2.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Peace with Nature”

3.  Ing’s Peace Poster “Shadow of Peace and Thai Art”

4.  Ing’s Artwork            Gandhi “Man of Peace and His Words

5.  Ing’s Artwork            Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have A Dream”

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Peace and Swallowtail Butterfly

 Peace and Swallowtail Butterfly

 Artwork by

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

In My Dream

Golden wings span wide

Soaring in the sky

Circling to find nectar

That gives life to go on

                                                                    

Tired from long trip

Passing through

The troubled world

 

They do not see

My beautiful wings

They are busy fighting

 

My short life will be gone

Before they realize that

Peace is what they need

 

This garden in downtown Newark

Gives me nectar extending my life

The flowers of the butterfly bush

Are dazzling

I will use the flowers

To form the peace symbol

To show humans that

Their greed and separation

Brings them destruction

 

I hope they will see that

Kindness and compassion

Will save civilization

 

Let them see my Peace symbol


Let them change their minds

Let them stop selling weapons

To destroy one another

 

Let them sit eating together

Enjoying life

 

Let them plant gardens

For my children

They will be here soon

I will lay my eggs

Hoping that their first sight of the world

Will see civilized human beings

Happy people

Loving and helping one another

 

Hopefully my offspring will see

Beautiful gardens all around

 

I see my children

Soaring pretty wings

In fresh and healthy air

With all human children

Laughing, running and playing

Free and happy far and wide

 

The children are together

With my offspring

Dancing and singing

 

Peace on earth is everywhere

That is a joyful world

In my dream

 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wednesday, September 03, 2014, 9:02 pm

 Swallowtail Butterfly Making a Peace Symbol

Passing through the rectangular window in the kitchen my eyes aimed at the butterfly bush trees in the garden. I saw the butterfly bush flowers blossom beautifully in late spring, waiting for the bees and butterflies come to taste the sweet nectar.  On the nice bright sunshine afternoon of Tuesday, August 12, I spotted some yellow object on one of butterfly bush flower.  As fast as I could, I grabbed my camcorder and went to the garden.  My heart was beating fast with excitement seeing a beautiful and very large Swallowtail butterfly.  I started to record in video and still pictures at the same time.  All year long I waited for you, now you finally came.  My hard work of taking care of the garden was worthwhile.  Even though you visited me for only a short time I will have a good memory of you until next year when I will wait for you in our garden here in downtown Newark.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, October 12, 2014

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Winning the 6th International Poetry Contest UPF Argentina

Roads and Bridges for Peace

Winning the 6th International Poetry Contest

UPF Argentina

Monday, September 22, 2014

Diplomas and gifts for the authors of winning poems, International Poetry Competition – UPF Argentina “Roads and Bridges for Peace”, membership of the International Day of Peace 2014, International Day of Peace on Monday, September 22, 2014 In Spanish Club, Buenos Aires,  Argentina

International Day of Peace 2014 on Monday, September 22, 2014 in Spanish Club, Buenos Aires, Argentina

I received an email from UNIVERSAL PEACE FEDERATION (UPF) Argentina, which  notified me about the winning authors of the, “Roads and bridges for peace”, the 6th International Poetry Contest. 

Thank you very much Ing!!!

I send report in English and photos!!!

Congratulations!!

Miguel

 

International Day of Peace: “The Right of Peoples to Peace”

UPF Argentina celebrates this day at Club Español of Buenos Aires

Our commitment for peace was reaffirmed once more during the artistic,

cultural, interreligious meeting organized by the UPF Argentina in relation

to the International Day of Peace (UN date), under the motto: “The Right of

Peoples to Peace”. It was held on September 22nd at Club Español of Buenos

Aires, where the prizes of the 6th edition of the International Poetry

Contest “Bridges and Roads for Peace” were given, which had 343 participants

from 25 countries.

 

The celebration, sponsored by the Information Center of United Nations for

Argentina and Uruguay and the Ministry of Culture of the Autonomous City of

Buenos Aires, sought to revalue the significance of culture and spiritual

values in peace consolidation, in a critical time when the world is

surrounded by conflicts and crisis, which can be thought as a transition

point towards new paradigms. 100 and 75 years after the First and Second

World Wars, respectively, and almost 70 years after the rise of the UN,

which appeared with the noble purpose of avoiding a new world war.

 

Peacemakers

The Chorus of the Higher Institute of Religious Culture, directed by Andrés

Aciar, was the prelude of the event. At the same time, the UN Secretary

General’s Message for this date, read by Horacio Daboul, Director of El Faro

del Sur, was being introduced to the audience of the Autonomies Room of the

beautiful and historical Hispanic center, which was declared a cultural site

of Buenos Aires City in 2004. After the reading, there was a minute of

silence for all the victims of violence. Then, we listened to the

reflections and prayers by the representatives of different faith

communities. They watered an olive tree, symbol of good will and universal

peace in different traditions, as a sign of commitment. The representatives

were Norma Terzo (Hinduism – Ramakrishna Order in Argentina), and the

Islamic and Jewish representatives were Sheij Abdel Nabi Al Hafnawy

(Al-Ahmad Mosque), and Dr. Julio Schlosser (DAIA), who embraced each other

as brothers.

 

Other prayers were from Father Maghakia Amiryan (Orthodox Christianism –

Armenian Apostolic Church), Pastor David Calvo (Evangelism – Evangelic

Lutheran Church), and Fray Jorge Bender (Catholicism – Francis of Assisi’s

Abby), who finished with “Make Me an Instrument of Your Peace”, the

beautiful prayer by Francis of Assisi. Other representatives of different

religions joined the significant act to sum up 12 cups. This section was

closed by Carlos Varga, Director of the Unification Movement, who also

integrates the UPF. He emphasized that “there is no peace without

reconciliation or forgiveness,” and also the importance of “joining again”

with the “Supreme Being” and making “a happier world”, with the powerful

energy of “true love.”

The emotional and expected reading of poems by their authors: “Por puentes y

caminos”, by Irma Droz, and “Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos.” by Cecilia

María Labanca (who shared the First Prize), were the culmination of the

distinctions delivery of the 6th edition of the International Poetry Contest

organized by the UPF Argentina, in relation to the International Day of

Peace 2014. The poem “Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos.” included a surprise,

since it was inspired by the 2000 Graduates of the Gaiman’s Camwy School

(Chubut Province), who had an admirable gesture of solidarity in that year:

they donated the money of their graduation trip for a child’s surgery (read

the news). An emotional story revived by this poem, which was framed for the

institution. All the members of that valuable human group were given a

diploma of recognition. The gifts were given to Sebastián Fernández, from

the Culture Section of Casa de Chubut in Buenos Aires, so he could send them

to those teenagers, who are now adults of more than 30 years.

The Contest was declared of educational interest by the Secretary of

University Policies of the Education Ministry of the Nation (Resolution 3287

SPU). Many writers participated from countries such as Algeria, Bolivia,

France, El Salvador, the United States, Honduras, England, Iran, Israel,

Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Dominican Republic, and Sweden. The nations with

more participants, after Argentina (225 from 20 provinces), were Spain (27

participants), Mexico (19), Uruguay (13), Colombia (11), Chile (8),

Venezuela (7), Brazil (6), Cuba (6), Peru (5), and Ecuador (2).

The diplomas and gifts for the authors of the winning and selected poems

were given by the Jury, composed of: Mrs. Bertha Bilbao Richter, literary

critic, member of the ILCH (Hispanic Cultural and Literary Institute) and

the Argentinean Society of Writers (SADE); Mrs. Liria Guedes, writer and

Honorable Belt of the SADE, member of the American Poetry Association, and

the ILCH; writer and plastic artist Mabel Fontau, Honorable Belt of the

SADE, member of the ILCH and “Men of Letters”; the poet Donato Perrone, from

the Argentinean Poetry Athenaeum “Alfonsina Storni”, coordinator of the

Lyrical Corner of Tortoni Cafe, and representative of the Group of Poets

Livres of Santa Catarina (Brazil); and Mr. Miguel Werner, Secretary General

of UPF-Argentina. No words could describe our gratitude for their commitment

in this new edition, after gathering four times to finish deciding the

winning and selected poems.

We were also grateful for the Godmothers: writer and poet Juana Alcira

Arancibia, founder and chairman of the ILCH and director-editor of the

prestigious international literary magazine “Alba de América”; the Brazilian

poet Marina Fagundes Coello, bilingual writer (Portuguese-Spanish), member

of the ILCH, and member of different and prominent literary groups in

America, and who travelled from this neighboring country so as not to miss

the party; and the writer and poet Nélida Pessagno, vice-president of the

SADE and Councilor of the Foundation “El Libro” (The Book), who was

distinguished as an Ambassador for Peace, an UPF initiative through which

wants to encourage leadership from different fields as peacemakers. They

considered the work of the entity and expressed their appreciation with

emotion.

Peace in minds and hearts

It was also emotional the moment in which Marcelo Gustavo Sánchez, Director

of “La gaceta del veterano de Guerra de Malvinas” (The gazette of the

Malvinas war veteran) gave the UPF a container with archipelago peat and

rocks from the Darwin cemetery, place where the bodies of the Malvinas

heroes rest, being this a sad episode of the recent Argentinean history.

Marcelo participated, as a way of reaffirming his commitment for peace,

along with Timoteo Herrera, another Malvinas war veteran, who also donated a

replica of the image of the Virgin of Luján.

The artistic moment was in charge of tenor Ángel Emilio Cerricchio, who sang

one of the many versions of Hallelujah (Hallelujah, Il Divo): “So that love

will be the norm / And not government corruption / But the good and the best

of a pure soul / Because God will protect us from a tragic ending/ Because

one day we will be able to learn our lesson / From that which could end in

such fury, Hallelujah / Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah,

Hallelujah, Hallelujah.” Then, as another sign of collective commitment, he

sang along with the Higher Institute of Religious Culture chorus, directed

by Andrés Aciar, the “Hymn for reconciliation”, written by Concepción

Rodríguez de Garaventa, winning poem of the first contest organized by the

UPF Argentina in 2009, in that time related to the International Year of

Reconciliation (UN Resolution: A/RES/61/17). This had been composed by

Teresa Guedes, with the voice of Peruvian tenor Miguel Murguía Ruíz, musical

arrangement and orchestration by Víctor Marchand, and general production by

Dr. Luis Guedes.

The intonation of “Each with their log, / Feeding the fire / Of solidarity.

/ Each, / keeping it alive /the fire of LIFE, / the fire of LOVE, / the fire

of PEACE” was the corollary of a meeting that sought to strengthen

commitment, to revitalize faith and spirituality, and to revalue cultural

and universal values as essential elements to build peace. According to the

important paragraph of the UNESCO’s Preamble (1945) which leads the Contest

bases: “Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that

the defenses of peace must be constructed.”

The participants fraternized during the snacks and could take a piece of

work with the winning and selected poems of the Contest, which also had the

Jury’s decision for giving the shared First Prize, and a Peace Statement of

the UPF (see at the bottom). The winners received 10 copies of these

publications, books donated by the Jury, and the UPF founder’s

Autobiography: “As a Global Peace-loving Citizen”.

The event was sponsored by the Center of Information of the United Nations

for Argentina and Uruguay (CINU) and the Ministry of Culture of the

Autonomous City of Buenos Aires (RESOL-2014-7302-MCGC); it was supported by

the IFLAC Latin America – International Forum for a Literature and Culture

of Peace / Peace Council of Argentina / University of Mercantile Marine /

Higher Institute of Religious Studies / Association “Friends of National

Parks” / “Pacis Nuntii” Movement / Joining Nations / Apostolic and Prophetic

Christian Ministry for a Better World / Association of Educators from Latin

America and The Caribbean (AELAC) – City of Buenos Aires affiliate / A. F.

R. I. C. A. – Federal Association of Refugees and Residents from the African

Collectivity in Argentina / Argentinean Poetry Space “Alfonsina Storni” /

SADE – Atlantic Section – Mar del Plata / Chamber of Commerce, Industry,

Tourism, and Services from Parque de los Patricios / Committee of Gender

Equality – Advisory Council of the non-profit association of the Argentinean

Chancery / World Federation for Ladies Grand Masters / Human Neurocapital /

Argentinean School of Yoga and Ayurveda / Argentinean Austrian Culture

Association in Buenos Aires / “Read me a book” – Argentinean virtual

magazine of   children’s literature / Newspaper “El Faro del Sur” / La

gaceta del veterano de guerra de Malvinas / School of Puppets of

Montecarlo – Misiones / Paranin Association – Member of the CONIN Family /

Federation of Association of Italian-Argentinean Ladies (FADIA) /

Association “Sister City” of San Clemente – International Program of Sister

Schools – Worldwide Network for Peace.

This activity supported the 7th edition of ROUND OF PEACE 2014: “Peace in

our hearts. Peace in the world.”

Olive tree “for life and peace”

With another gesture supporting the International Day of Peace, also on

September 22nd at noon, the UPF Argentina participated in an olive tree

planting “for life and peace” in the park of Nueva Pompeya, in front of the

Parish Nuestra Señora del Rosario of Nueva Pompeya. The participants were

the priest of the temple and the Sanctuary “San Antonio de Padua” from

Parque Patricios, representatives of the CGP 4, the Association of Cultural

and Social Arab League, Rotary Club from Parque de los Patricios, Rotary

Club from Nueva Pompeya, and the Chamber of Commerce, Industry, Tourism, and

Services from Parque de los Patricios.

6th International Poetry Contest – UPF Argentina

“Roads and Bridges for Peace” – Supporting the International Day of Peace

2014

“Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the

defenses of peace must be constructed.” Preamble of UNESCO’s Constitution

(1945).

FIRST PRIZE (shared)

“Por puentes y caminos”

Irma Droz

Santa María de Punilla – Province of Córdoba – Argentina

“Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos.”

Cecilia María Labanca

Martín Coronado – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

LOS JÓVENES YA ALZAN SUS BRAZOS…

Inspired by the 2000 Graduation from the Gaiman’s Camwy School, Province of

Chubut, Argentina

Por doquier, la guerra y la muerte se ensañan

y esparcen agonías y harapos,

burlas y mentiras.

Pero.”¡Basta ya!”, gritan los más jóvenes.

Vienen avanzando desde auroras lejanas, clamando justicia.

La solidaridad empieza a encarnarse

en venas y entrañas: una nueva conciencia se levanta,

contagia a multitudes

y son muchos los que trabajan porque sí, para otros…

porque entienden que el reino del Amor

ya no puede no ser de este mundo.

Rechazan la fuerza, el orgullo inútil,

la injusticia, el dolor que se puede aliviar…

Vienen marchando y alzan sus brazos entonando cantos:

piden por los que no tienen voz:

quieren sembrar alas en los corazones resecos de tanto sufrir,

borrar angustias y alumbrar milagros.

Una luz nueva ilumina sus rostros:

son ellos que enseñan,

ruegan,

denuncian

golpean mil puertas

y también otras mil.

Está cercano el día en que el hombre comprenda

la perfecta organización

de la hormiga;

y será un gozo sentir una mano tibia latir junto a otra,

saber que ojos limpios mirarán el sol

y que las propias huellas en la arena hundidas

ya no irán más solas: el hombre junto al hombre

habrá descubierto.

que es posible la Paz.

Cecilia María Labanca

Martín Coronado – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

Literature teacher at University “del Salvador”. Author of poems and stories

for children, essayist, and translator. “Lugar Editorial” published her book

“Changes in education – Coincidences with Montessori in the 21st Century.”

She received many prizes and mentions in poetry. She exposed repeatedly at

the Book Fair in Buenos Aires and in many Congresses in Argentina and Spain

about education and children and youth literature.

POR PUENTES Y CAMINOS

“Only with a sincere heart that gives it all, we can build a peaceful

world.”

Reverend Sun Myung Moon

Aún son ellos, los elegidos,

los que “Construyen puentes con Dios

y entre los hombres” (1)

haciéndose uno más, entre nosotros,

para aliviarnos el camino.

Que nos conducen desde siempre

con “La enseñanza de los iluminados” (2)

Porque llegaron a este mundo

para indicarnos la Luz, como destino.

Que nos advierten, en cada esquina:

“No hay caminos para la Paz, la Paz es el camino” (3)

Y sus voces aún resuenan, están entre nosotros.

Son los Maestros que conducen, que iluminan.

Es el momento de responder.

En el hogar se inicia el primer paso.

Allí comienza el trayecto.

Y elevaremos un puente de manos tendidas

para cruzar el río de egoísmos

y de ambiciones desmedidas.

Porque “Los hombres construyen demasiados muros

y no suficientes puentes” (4), que nos comuniquen.

Avanzaremos confiados y felices.

“La paz comienza con una sonrisa” (5).

Los Maestros nos guían.

No será fácil la empresa

pero asumimos el compromiso

conscientes de la verdad que nos identifica:

“Si quieres lograr la Paz, tendrás que defender la Vida” (6).

(1) Pope Francis / (2) Buddha / (3) Mahatma Gandhi / (4) Isaac Newton / (5)

Mother Teresa of Calcutta / (6) Paul VI

Irma Droz

Santa María de Punilla – Province of Córdoba – Argentina

Founder and General Director of “AMÉRICA MADRE”, International Cultural

Institution with worldwide subsidiaries and representatives (April, 1991).

“Messenger of Peace”, distinguished by UNESCO (2000). Founder President of

SADE in Santa María de Punilla (2001). “Universal Ambassador for Peace”,

designated by Cercle Universel des Ambassadeurs de la Paix, Geneva,

Switzerland (2008).

 

HONORABLE MENTIONS

“Propuesta”

Corina Beatriz Alegre Mustoni

Autonomous City of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“De la mano de Dios”

Raquel Graciela Fernández

Avellaneda – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“… ¡Y tuve que llevarte a la palabra!”

Elena Nilda Pahl

Río Cuarto – Province of Córdoba – Argentina

“Misiva a la paz”

Verónica Stockmayer

Montecarlo – Misiones – Argentina

“Amar la paz”

Hilda Norma Vale

Ituzaingó – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Paz, Salam, Shalom”

Ángel Juan Vota

Haedo – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

SPECIAL MENTIONS

“La paz es luz y un canto a la alegría”

Amparo Bonet Alcón

Valencia – Spain

“La paz en el corazón”

Esteban Conde Choya

Cerdanyola del Vallés – Barcelona – Spain

“Verbo y paz”

Esteban Fauret

Pehuajó – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Abrazo en la paz”

Leticia Liliana Marconi

Punta Alta – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“El camino de la paz”

Teresa de Jesús Rodríguez Lara

San Cristóbal de La Laguna – Canary Islands – Spain

 

MENTIONS

“¿Por qué?”

Wilson González Alfonzo

Durazno – Uruguay

“Alborada.”

Hugo López Pénelas

Villa Ballester – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Tender puentes”

María Cristina Sorrentino

Autonomous City of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Vivir para la paz”

Noé Zenón Suárez Casielles

Dolores – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

 

SELECTED POEMS

“Mereces la paz”

Milagros Alonso

Trelew – Province of Chubut – Argentina

“El lenguaje de la paz”

Alicia Bibiana Berini

Tigre – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La paz”

Adriana Gladys Burgos

Ezeiza – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Otro Jerusalén más verde”

Manuel González Álvarez

Madrid – Spain

“Palabra paz”

Raquel Piñeiro Mongiello

Funes – Province of Santa Fe – Argentina

“Paz en la guerra”

Carlos Daniel Mubarqui

Córdoba – Province of Córdoba – Argentina

“La palabra”

Elsa Teresa Pohl

Autonomous City of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La memoria de la paz”

Mara de Riesco

Autonomous City of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Hacer el intento”

Digna Sabaté

Pergamino – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La palabra paz”

María Soledad Salazar Valenzuela

Santiago de Chile – Chile

“Andamio de versos”

Teresa Díaz Sánchez

San Carlos – Maldonado Department – Uruguay

“La pregunta”

Juana Rosa Schuster

Villa Ballester – Province of Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Ciudad de concilios”

Honoria Zelaya de Nader

San Miguel de Tucumán – Province of Tucumán – Argentina

International Day of Peace 2014

 

STATEMENT

First: Conflict and violence are rooted in the absence of dialogue in human

relationships, and they originate from the removal of our highest ideals and

hopes. Aggression is a symptom of social, moral, and spiritual failure. If

we really want to end violence and weapons of mass destruction, we should

commit ourselves for a moral and spiritual awakening.

Second: An everlasting peace cannot be ensured by simply avoiding the use of

weapons and nuclear arsenals. It should depend on the growth of solidarity

in the realm of the community and the recognition that we are all brothers

and sisters who share the same planetary home, the same origin and spiritual

heritage, an inalienable dignity. The understanding that we are a great

family under the same and one God raises the collective will of ending

violent conflicts.

Third: Family, being the cornerstone of society, is like the primary school

of ethics, the institution where children must learn about respect, values,

and living for others. By strengthening marriage and such families, we can

establish a culture of coexistence and fraternity. The countless resources

which are now used for weapons, for not solving the conflicts by peaceful

means, can be reassigned to human development, starting with that “basic

cell”, for the progress of societies and peoples.

 

Fourth: Only law cannot change the culture of violence. It has to be upheld

by significant educational programs related to character development,

conflict resolution, and the promotion of a “culture of encounter”,

dialogue, cooperation, and service to others, transcending ethnicities,

nationalities, and religions. Men and women who have been educated by these

values will fulfill their duties and responsibilities to others, and will

respect and live for the sake of their community and nation. Goodness and

harmony with other peoples and cultures will result in the coexistence with

our natural environment.

 

UPF Argentina embraces and celebrates the International Day of Peace,

established in 1981 by the UN’s Resolution 36/67, which calls us to dedicate

every September 21st “to reinforce the ideals of peace in all nations and

peoples of the world.”

 

Buenos Aires, September 21st, 2014.-

UNIVERSAL PEACE FEDERATION (UPF) – Status ECOSOC ONU

UPF Argentina: Av. Rivadavia 755 – 3° Floor “F” – Buenos Aires – Tel:

4343-3005 / argentina@upf.org / www.upf.org

 

Lic. Miguel Werner

Sec. Gral. UPF Argentina

Tel: (011) 4343-3005 / Cel: 15-4158-4596

argentina@upf.org / unaprensa@yahoo.com.ar

Facebook/ Youtube: UPF Argentina

http://noticiasdeunificacion.blogspot.com

Diplomas and gifts for the authors of winning poems, International Poetry Competition – UPF Argentina “Roads and Bridges for Peace”, membership of the International Day of Peace 2014, International Day of Peace on Monday, September 22, 2014 In Spanish Club, Buenos Aires,  Argentina

The following contents are in Spanish:

Comparto a continuación una referencia de la celebración del día internacional de la paz de este lunes en el Club Español.

Tenemos a disposición la publicación con todos los poemas premiados y seleccionados como obsequio que se puede retirar de nuestra sede de lunes a viernes (Av. Rivadavia 755 – 3° Piso “F”).

Cordiales saludos.

Miguel

Día Internacional de la Paz “Derecho de los pueblos a la paz”

Celebración de la fecha por UPF Argentina en Buenos Aires

El compromiso por la paz fue reafirmado una vez más con diversos gestos durante el encuentro artístico-cultural-interreligioso que organizó UPF Argentina en adhesión al Día Internacional de la Paz (fecha ONU), este año bajo el lema “Derecho de los pueblos a la paz”. El mismo tuvo lugar este lunes 22 de septiembre, en el Club Español de Buenos Aires, donde se entregaron los premios de la sexta edición del Concurso Poético Internacional “Caminos y puentes para la paz”, que tuvo 343 participantes de 25 países.

La celebración se da en un momento crítico, cuando el mundo luce un polvorín de conflictos y crisis, que podría interpretarse como un punto de transición hacia nuevos paradigmas, a 100 y 75 años del inicio de la Primera y Segunda Guerra Mundial, respectivamente, y a casi 70 del nacimiento de la ONU, surgida con el noble propósito de evitar una nueva conflagración mundial.

Hacedores de paz

El Coro del Instituto de Cultura Religiosa Superior, dirigido por Andrés Aciar, fue el preludio del acto, mientras el Mensaje del Secretario General de la ONU para la fecha, leído por Horacio Daboul, Director de El Faro del Sur, fue introduciendo al tema al auditorio del colmado Salón Autonomías del hermoso e histórico centro hispano, declarado sitio de interés cultural de la ciudad de Buenos Aires en el 2004. Enseguida llegaron las reflexiones y oraciones de representantes de distintas comunidades de fe, que regaron un árbol de olivo, símbolo de buena voluntad y paz universal en distintas tradiciones, como signo de compromiso. Cumplieron con el gesto Norma Terzo por el hinduismo (Orden Ramakrishna en Argentina) y por las comunidades islámica y judía el Sheij Abdel Nabi Al Hafnawy (Mezquita Al-Ahmad) y el Dr. Julio Schlosser (DAIA), quienes se dieron un fraternal y emotivo abrazo. Hizo lo propio por el cristianismo ortodoxo el Padre Maghakia (Iglesia Apostólica Armenia), por el evangelismo el Pastor David Calvo (Iglesia Evangélica Luterana Unida) y por el catolicismo Fray Jorge Bender (Convento de San Francisco de Asís), quien cerró con Hazme instrumento de tu paz”, la bella oración atribuida a Francisco de Asís. Al significativo acto se sumaron luego representantes de otras confesiones para completar un total de 12 vasos. La sección la cerró Carlos Varga, Director del Movimiento de Unificación, que también integra la UPF, quien enfatizó que “no existe paz sin reconciliación, sin perdón”. Habló de la importancia de “religarnos” con el “Ser Supremo” para hacer “un mundo más feliz” a través de la poderosa energía del “amor verdadero”.

El emotivo y esperado recitado de los poemas por sus autoras: “Por puentes y caminos”, de Irma Droz, y “Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos…”, de Cecilia María Labanca (Primer Premio compartido), fue el culmen de la entrega de las distinciones de la sexta edición del Concurso Poético Internacional organizado por UPF Argentina, en adhesión al Día Internacional de la Paz 2014. Del mismo participaron escritores de Argelia, Bolivia, Francia, El Salvador, Estados Unidos, Honduras, Inglaterra, Irán, Israel, Italia, Japón, Nueva Zelanda, República Dominicana y Suecia. Las naciones con mayor presencia, después de Argentina (225 de 20 provincias), fueron España (27 participantes), México (19), Uruguay (13), Colombia (11), Chile (8), Venezuela (7), Brasil (6), Cuba (6), Perú (5) y Ecuador (2). El Poema “Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos…” deparó una sorpresa, puesto que fue inspirado en la Promoción 2000 del Colegio Camwy de Gaiman (Provincia de Chubut), quienes en aquel año tuvieron un admirable gesto solidario: donar lo recaudado para su viaje de egresados para la operación de un niño (ver nota periodística). Una emotiva historia que revive dicho poema, que fue enmarcado para la institución, mientras que a cada uno de los integrantes de aquel valioso grupo humano se le hizo un diploma de reconocimiento. Los presentes fueron entregados a Sebastián Fernández, de la Sección de Cultura de la Casa de Chubut en Buenos Aires, para que se los haga llegar a aquellos adolescente, ahora ya adultos de más de 30 años.

Los diplomas y obsequios para los autores de los poemas premiados y seleccionados fueron entregados por el Jurado, integrado por la Lic. Bertha Bilbao Richter, crítica literaria, miembro del Instituto Literario y Cultural Hispánico (ILCH) y de la Sociedad Argentina de Escritores (SADE); la Lic. Liria Guedes, escritora y Faja de Honor de la SADE, integrante de la Asociación Americana de Poesía y del ILCH; la escritora y artista plástica Mabel Fontau, Faja de Honor de la SADE, miembro del ILCH y de Gente de Letras; el poeta Donato Perrone, del Ateneo Poético Argentino “Alfonsina Storni”, Coordinador del Rincón Lírico del Café Tortoni y representante del Grupo de Poetas Livres de Santa Catarina (Brasil); y el Lic. Miguel Werner, Secretario General de UPF Argentina. No bastaron las palabras para agradecer su compromiso en esta nueva edición, tras reunirse en cuatro ocasiones para terminar de dilucidar a los poemas premiados y seleccionados. La gratitud también fue para las Madrinas: la escritora y poeta Juana Alcira Arancibia, fundadora y presidente del ILCH y directora-editora de la prestigiosa revista literaria internacional Alba de América; la escritora bilingüe brasileña Marina Fagundes Coello, miembro del ILCH e integrante de distintos círculos literarios de destacada trayectoria en América, quien viajó desde el vecino país como años anteriores para no perderse la fiesta. Y la escritora y poeta Nélida Pessagno, vicepresidenta de la SADE y Consejera Titular de la Fundación El Libro, quien fue distinguida como Embajadora para la Paz, una iniciativa de la UPF a través de la cual busca incentivar al liderazgo de distintos campos como hacedores de paz. Ambas ponderaron la labor de la entidad y expresaron palabras de agradecimiento llenas de emoción.

Paz en mentes y corazones

Resultó igualmente emotivo el momento en el que Marcelo Gustavo Sánchez, Director de “La gaceta del veterano de guerra de Malvinas”, entregó a UPF un recipiente conteniendo turba del archipiélago y piedras del cementerio de Darwin, lugar donde descansan los restos de los héroes de Malvinas, un triste y doloroso episodio de la historia reciente de Argentina. Participó de la celebración, como una forma de afirmar su compromiso por la paz, junto con Timoteo Herrera, otro veterano de la guerra de Malvinas, quienes también donaron en la ocasión una réplica de la imagen de la Virgen de Luján.

El cierre artístico estuvo a cargo del tenor Ángel Emilio Cerricchio, quien interpretó una de tantas versiones de Aleluya (Hallelujah, Il Divo): “Porque la norma sea el amor / Y no gobierne la corrupción sino / Lo bueno y lo mejor del alma pura / Porque Dios nos proteja de un mal final / Porque un día podamos escarmentar / Porque acaben con tanta furia Aleluya / Aleluya, Aleluya, Aleluya, Aleluya / Aleluya, Aleluya”. Luego, como un singo más de compromiso colectivo, cantó junto al coro del Instituto de Cultura Religiosa Superior, dirigido por Andrés Aciar, y todos los presentes el “Himno a la reconciliación: Cada cual”, letra de Concepción Rodríguez de Garaventa, poema ganador del primer concurso que organizara UPF Argentina en el 2009, en aquel entonces en adhesión al Año Internacional de la Reconciliación (Resolución ONU: A/RES/61/17). El mismo había sido musicalizado por Teresa Guedes, contó con la voz del tenor peruano Miguel Murguía Ruíz, el arreglo musical y orquestación del Maestro Víctor Marchand y la producción general del Dr. Luis Guedes.

La entonación de “Cada cual con su leño, / alimentando el fuego / de la solidaridad. / Cada cual, / manteniendo encendido / el fuego de la VIDA, / el fuego del AMOR, / el fuego de la PAZ” fue el corolario de un encuentro que buscó fortalecer el compromiso, revitalizar la fe y la espiritualidad, revalorizar la cultura y los valores universales como elementos esenciales para cimentar la paz. En línea con el significativo párrafo del Preámbulo de la UNESCO (1945) que encabeza cada año las bases del Concurso: “Puesto que las guerras nacen en la mente de los hombres, es en la mente de los hombres donde deben erigirse los baluartes de la paz”. Los participantes confraternizaron luego en el refrigerio y pudieron llevarse una obra con los poemas seleccionados y premiados del Concurso, que además contiene la fundamentación del Jurado para otorgar el Primer Premio compartido y una Declaración de Paz de la UPF.

El acto fue auspiciado por el Centro de Información de las Naciones Unidas para Argentina y Uruguay y contó con la adhesión de IFLAC Latinoamérica – Foro Internacional por una Literatura y una Cultura para la Paz / Consejo de Paz de la República Argentina / Universidad de la Marina Mercante / Instituto Superior de Estudios Religiosos / Asociación Amigos de los Parques Nacionales / Movimiento “Pacis Nuntii” / Acercando Naciones / Ministerio Cristiano Apostólico y Profético por un Mundo Mejor / Asociación de Educadores de Latinoamérica y el Caribe (AELAC) – Filial Ciudad de Buenos Aires / A. F. R. I. C. A. – Asociación Federal de Refugiados y Residentes Integrantes de la Colectividad Africana en Argentina / Ateneo Poético Argentino Alfonsina Storni / SADE – Seccional Atlántica – Mar del Plata / Cámara de Comercio, Industria, Turismo y Servicios de Parque de los Patricios / Comisión de Equidad de Genero – Consejo Consultivo de la Sociedad Civil de la Cancillería Argentina / World Federation for Ladies Grand Masters / Neurocapital Humano / Escuela Argentina de Yoga y Ayurveda / Asociación Argentina Cultural Austria en Buenos Aires / “Léeme un cuento” – Revista virtual argentina de literatura infantil / Periódico El Faro del Sur / La gaceta del veterano de guerra de Malvinas / Escuela de Títeres de Montecarlo – Misiones / Asociación Paranin – Miembro de la Familia CONIN / Federación de Asociaciones de Damas Italo-Argentinas (FADIA) / Asociación Ciudad Hermana de San Clemente – Programa Internacional de Escuelas Hermanas – Cadena Mundial para la Paz. La actividad estuvo adherida a la VII edición RONDA DE PAZ 2014 “Paz en nuestros corazones… Paz en el Mundo”.

VI Concurso Poético Internacional – UPF Argentina

“Caminos y puentes para la paz”

Adhesión al Día Internacional de la Paz 2014

“Puesto que las guerras nacen en la mente de los hombres, es en la mente de los hombres donde deben erigirse los baluartes de la paz”; Preámbulo de la Constitución de la UNESCO (1945).

PRIMER PREMIO (compartido)

“Por puentes y caminos”

Irma Droz

Santa María de Punilla – Provincia de Córdoba – Argentina

“Los jóvenes ya alzan sus brazos…”

Cecilia María Labanca

Martín Coronado – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

LOS JÓVENES YA ALZAN SUS BRAZOS…

Inspirado en la Promoción del año 2000 del Colegio Camwy de Gaiman, Provincia de Chubut, Argentina

Por doquier, la guerra y la muerte se ensañan

y esparcen agonías y harapos,

burlas y mentiras.

Pero…“¡Basta ya!”, gritan los más jóvenes.

Vienen avanzando desde auroras lejanas, clamando justicia.

La solidaridad empieza a encarnarse

en venas y entrañas: una nueva conciencia se levanta,

contagia a multitudes

y son muchos los que trabajan porque sí, para otros…

porque entienden que el reino del Amor

ya no puede no ser de este mundo.

Rechazan la fuerza, el orgullo inútil,

la injusticia, el dolor que se puede aliviar…

Vienen marchando y alzan sus brazos entonando cantos:

piden por los que no tienen voz:

quieren sembrar alas en los corazones resecos de tanto sufrir,

borrar angustias y alumbrar milagros.

Una luz nueva ilumina sus rostros:

son ellos que enseñan,

ruegan,

denuncian

golpean mil puertas

y también otras mil.

Está cercano el día en que el hombre comprenda

la perfecta organización

de la hormiga;

y será un gozo sentir una mano tibia latir junto a otra,

saber que ojos limpios mirarán el sol

y que las propias huellas en la arena hundidas

ya no irán más solas: el hombre junto al hombre

habrá descubierto…

que es posible la Paz.

Cecilia María Labanca

Martín Coronado – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

Profesora en Letras por la Universidad del Salvador. Autora de poesías y cuentos para chicos, ensayista y traductora. Lugar Editorial publicó su libro “Cambios en la educación – Coincidencias con Montessori en el siglo XXI”. Recibió diversos premios y menciones en poesía. Expuso varias veces en la Feria del Libro de Buenos Aires y en numerosos congresos de Argentina y España sobre educación y literatura infantil y juvenil.

POR PUENTES Y CAMINOS

“Sólo con un corazón sincero, que da todo de sí, se puede construir un mundo de paz”.Reverendo Sun Myung Moon

Aún son ellos, los elegidos,

los que “Construyen puentes con Dios

y entre los hombres” (1)

haciéndose uno más, entre nosotros,

para aliviarnos el camino.

Que nos conducen desde siempre

con “La enseñanza de los iluminados” (2)

Porque llegaron a este mundo

para indicarnos la Luz, como destino.

Que nos advierten, en cada esquina:

“No hay caminos para la Paz, la Paz es el camino” (3)

Y sus voces aún resuenan, están entre nosotros.

Son los Maestros que conducen, que iluminan…

Es el momento de responder.

En el hogar se inicia el primer paso.

Allí comienza el trayecto.

Y elevaremos un puente de manos tendidas

para cruzar el río de egoísmos

y de ambiciones desmedidas.

Porque “Los hombres construyen demasiados muros

y no suficientes puentes” (4), que nos comuniquen.

Avanzaremos confiados y felices.

“La paz comienza con una sonrisa” (5).

Los Maestros nos guían.

No será fácil la empresa

pero asumimos el compromiso

conscientes de la verdad que nos identifica:

“Si quieres lograr la Paz, tendrás que defender la Vida” (6).

(1) Papa Francisco / (2) Buda / (3) Mahatma Gandhi / (4) Isaac Newton / (5) Madre Teresa de Calcuta / (6) Pablo VI

Irma Droz

Santa María de Punilla – Provincia de Córdoba – Argentina

Fundadora y Directora General de “AMÉRICA MADRE”, Institución Cultural Internacional con filiales y representaciones en el mundo (abril de 1991). “Mensajero de la Paz”, distinguida por UNESCO (2000). Presidente Fundadora de SADE Seccional Santa María de Punilla (2001). “Embajadora Universal de la Paz”, designada por el Cercle Universel des Ambassadeurs de la Paix, Ginebra, Suiza (2008).

MENCIONES DE HONOR

“Propuesta”

Corina Beatriz Alegre Mustoni

Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“De la mano de Dios”

Raquel Graciela Fernández

Avellaneda – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“… ¡Y tuve que llevarte a la palabra!”

Elena Nilda Pahl

Río Cuarto – Provincia de Córdoba – Argentina

“Misiva a la paz”

Verónica Stockmayer

Montecarlo – Misiones – Argentina

“Amar la paz”

Hilda Norma Vale

Ituzaingó – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Paz, Salam, Shalom”

Ángel Juan Vota

Haedo – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

MENCIONES ESPECIALES

“La paz es luz y un canto a la alegría”

Amparo Bonet Alcón

Valencia – España

“La paz en el corazón”

Esteban Conde Choya

Cerdanyola del Vallés – Barcelona – España

“Verbo y paz”

Esteban Fauret

Pehuajó – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Abrazo en la paz”

Leticia Liliana Marconi

Punta Alta – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“El camino de la paz”

Teresa de Jesús Rodríguez Lara

San Cristóbal de La Laguna – Islas Canarias – España

MENCIONES

“¿Por qué?”

Wilson González Alfonzo

Durazno – Uruguay

“Alborada…”

Hugo López Pénelas

Villa Ballester – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Tender puentes”

María Cristina Sorrentino

Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Vivir para la paz”

Noé Zenón Suárez Casielles

Dolores – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

POEMAS SELECCIONADOS

“Mereces la paz”

Milagros Alonso

Trelew – Provincia de Chubut – Argentina

“El lenguaje de la paz”

Alicia Bibiana Berini

Tigre – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La paz”

Adriana Gladys Burgos

Ezeiza – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Otro Jerusalén más verde”

Manuel González Álvarez

Madrid – España

“Palabra paz”

Raquel Piñeiro Mongiello

Funes – Provincia de Santa Fe – Argentina

“Paz en la guerra”

Carlos Daniel Mubarqui

Córdoba – Provincia de Córdoba – Argentina

“La palabra”

Elsa Teresa Pohl

Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La memoria de la paz”

Mara de Riesco

Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Hacer el intento”

Digna Sabaté

Pergamino – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“La palabra paz”

María Soledad Salazar Valenzuela

Santiago de Chile – Chile

“Andamio de versos”

Teresa Díaz Sánchez

San Carlos – Departamento de Maldonado – Uruguay

“La pregunta”

Juana Rosa Schuster

Villa Ballester – Provincia de Buenos Aires – Argentina

“Ciudad de concilios”

Honoria Zelaya de Nader

San Miguel de Tucumán – Provincia de Tucumán – Argentina

FEDERACIÓN PARA LA PAZ UNIVERSAL (UPF) – Status ECOSOC ONU

UPF Argentina: Av. Rivadavia 755 – 3° Piso “F” (C1002AAF) – Buenos Aires – Tel/Fax: (+54-11) 4343-3005

argentina@upf.org / www.upf.org

Lic. Miguel Werner
Sec. Gral. UPF Argentina
Tel: (011) 4343-3005 / Cel: 15-4158-4596
argentina@upf.org / unaprensa@yahoo.com.ar
Facebook/ Youtube: UPF Argentina
http://noticiasdeunificacion.blogspot.com

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