Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

AXIOS PM, January 17, 2022

2.  King family urges action on voting rights

March for voting rights in D.C. today. Photo: Sophia Cai/Axios

In near-freezing temperatures, nearly a thousand activists and residents from every D.C. ward joined members of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s family in a march across the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge to demand federal voting rights legislation.

·  Axios’ Sophia Cai reports that at the foot of the bridge, MLK’s 13-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King — bundled up in a black, hooded parka — banged on the sides of a wooden lectern as she led the crowd in a fiery chant:

Spread the word! Have YOU all heard? All across the nation! We are going to be! A great generation!

Videos of the march.

Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images

At Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, attendees listen to Vice President Harris, speaking from the White House to the Martin Luther King Jr. Beloved Community Service(More on the service.)

·  “Today, our freedom to vote is under assault,” the vice president said.

Screenshot: MSNBC

The backdrop is tomorrow’s Senate debate on voting legislation.

AXIOS PM, January 17, 2022 by

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

 

The following photos are the march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights leads by Martin Luther King Jr.’s family

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Martin Luther King III speaks during the “March On for Washington and Voting Rights” on the National Mall on August 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. The event was organized to honor the 58th anniversary of the March On Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and also urge the Senate to pass voting rights legislation. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

ABC News: Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

“Let the Senate hear you!” said King’s granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King.

By Briana Stewart and Rachel Scott

January 17, 2022, 6:24 PM

Voting rights take center stage on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King III, along with other civil rights leaders, marched in Washington, D.C…Read More

Carlos Barria/Reuters

As voting rights legislation remains stalled in Congress, Martin Luther King Jr.’s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, and his 13-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King, were among a coalition of civil rights activists who led the annual Peace Walk in Washington on Monday to honor the legacy of the civil rights icon and demand action on voting rights.

MORE: Democrats back where they started on voting rights: The Note

“What we want is for Americans to be engaged,” King III told ABC News anchor Linsey Davis, adding that the need for federal safety guards is more urgent than ever. “This year, we are laser focused on getting the right to vote sustained and getting the right to vote empowered.”

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Yolanda Renee King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks as her father Marti…Read More

MORE: Advocates launch hunger strikes, hold events throughout US to push for voting rights

The march comes as lawmakers are expected to take up a vote to change the Senate rules as early as Tuesday that encompasses both the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. If voted to proceed, it would be the first time this Congress takes up a debate on voting rights in the Senate.

Without the support of 10 Republicans needed to overcome a GOP filibuster to block the legislation, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is expected to raise rules change vote as early as Tuesday, according to a Democratic aide familiar. But with moderate Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema making clear they will not vote to end the Senate’s filibuster — even though both support the underlying legislation — the fate of the reforms that activists are demanding action on is unclear.

Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“Let the Senate hear you! Let the White House hear you all! Spread the word!” said King’s granddaughter before her family led hundreds of marchers across a snow-capped Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge.

Yolanda Renee King had sharp words for lawmakers, calling out Senators Manchin and Sinema by name.

“Sen. Sinema, Sen. Manchin, our future hinges on your decision and history will remember what choice you make. So, join me in demanding action for today, tomorrow and generations to come,” Yolanda Renee King said.

She added, “For all the elected leaders out there who are tweeting, posting and celebrating my grandfather, Dr. King, today, my message to you is simple do not celebrate, legislate!”

Manchin released a statement Monday celebrating the life and legacy of King, but made no mention of voting rights.

Carlos Barria/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“We celebrate and honor the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the most inspiring and important figures in American history. Dr. King taught us to stand up for what we believe in through civil, peaceful means to unite our nation instead of divide it,” the statement read.

When asked if Manchin’s words are enough, King III told ABC News, “First of all, I would say that, you know, it’s kind of frustrating for people to be releasing statements and you really have not totally adhered to my father’s ideals. My father not only gave his life, but he fought for the right to vote, and he and others gave their lives. And again, Sen. Manchin says he supports a bill but he won’t move or is not so far moved on a pathway to say that there’s a pathway for it.”

He added, “So my hope and my message to him would be senator, you got to go further. You can’t say, ‘I’m for something’ but don’t have a pathway to [it], and that’s anybody who’s talking about dad today, because I’m sure [there are also] many senators also on the Republican side, who ought to be ashamed of themselves, who have shut down the process for voter expansion, voter protections.”

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Martin Luther King III and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi embrace during a press co…Read More

At least 19 states have passed new restrictive voting laws since the 2020 election. There have been 34 such new laws in total across the country, according to the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice, and most of them in states controlled by Republicans.

Many of the new laws, fueled by false claims of widespread election fraud by former President Donald Trump, take aim at mail-in voting, implement stricter voter ID requirements, allow fewer early voting days and limit ballot drop boxes.

MORE: Clyburn asks senators ‘which side are you on?’ for voting rights

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined the King family Monday for a voting rights rally at Washington’s Union Station outside Capitol Hill, where she spoke in support of expanding voter access, alongside other members of Congress and activists, including Congressional Black Caucus Chair Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, and Rev. Al Sharpton.

Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“The Congress and I give great credit to the Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer for his relentless and persistence and trying to get this done, and to the president for his leadership, but we have to get this done,” Pelosi said, before launching into an argument for changing Senate rules to make way for election reform legislation.

MORE: Sinema, Manchin rejects Biden push to change filibuster for voting rights

Mike Theiler/Reuters

Visitors walk past the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial as the sun breaks through clouds…Read More

“While it may be true to them that the filibuster is an important custom, it is not the Constitution of the United States, the truth is,” Pelosi said. “If you really truly want to honor Dr. King, don’t dishonor him by using compression of custom as an excuse for our democracy.”

Megan Varner/Getty Images, FILE

President Joe Biden delivers remarks on voting rights legislation at the Atlanta University…Read More

Beatty, following Pelosi, told the crowd of supporters, “Silence is not an option.”

“We will not yield our efforts to enshrine voting rights legislation into law, nor will we allow a filibuster to filibuster away our democracy and our voting rights,” she said.

ABC News’ Libby Cathey contributed to this report.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://abcnews.go.com/US/martin-luther-king-jrs-family-leads-march-urging/story?id=82300731

Martin Luther King Jr’s family, activists urge Congress to pass voting rights legislation

Jan 17, 2022  CBS News

Family members of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. are honoring the late civil rights leader by pressing Congress to act to pass voting rights legislation. Nsé Ufot, CEO of the New Georgia Project, joins CBSN’s Tanya Rivero to discuss what’s at stake. CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

Speakers at, Family of Martin Luther King Jr. hold news briefing after march for voting rights

WATCH LIVE: Family of Martin Luther King Jr. hold news briefing after march for voting rights

Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022PBS NewsHour   Dr. King was 93 Today

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

MLK Jr. would be ‘greatly disappointed’ by Senate inaction on voting reform, son says

Jan 17, 2022  PBS NewsHour

Monday has been a day to remember the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and also a day of calls to action on voting rights. Demonstrators marched through streets in Washington in support of voting legislation now stalled in the U.S. Senate, and Vice President Harris warned the freedom to vote is under assault. Judy Woodruff discusses the day with the King Jr.’s son, Martin Luther King III. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

#NightlyNews #WinterStorm #Omicron

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Jan. 17

Jan 17, 2022  NBC News

Winter storm slams East Coast, investigation underway after hostage standoff at Texas synagogue, and omicron appears to have peaked in some states. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

2022 King Holiday Observance – Beloved Community Commemorative Service

Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022  The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

The culminating program for the week-long celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life and legacy is the 2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Beloved Community Commemorative Service. This event will be televised locally on FOX 5 Atlanta, Monday, January 17, 2022 beginning at 10:00 A.M. EST. and live-streamed on Facebook, Youtube and thekingcenter.org.

Music in this video

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I Got It (Live)

Artist

Pastor Mike Jr.

Album

Big: Freedom Session

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Entertainment One U.S., LP (on behalf of Worldwide Music); BMI – Broadcast Music Inc., ASCAP, Polaris Hub AB, and 1 Music Rights Societies

MLK Day Virtual Event 2022 ?The State of Civil Rights in Maine

1,324 views

Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022  UMaine Alumni

This event is co-hosted by the University of Maine Alumni Association and the Greater Bangor Branch of the NAACP.

President Biden’s Challenges

Jan 22, 2022  Washington Week PBS

On the anniversary of taking office, President Biden faces challenges on all fronts and seeks to distance himself from the progressive wing of his party. The panel discussed new reporting about Chief of Staff Ron Klain, the future of voting rights and what’s to come in 2022. Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leads a march to the courthouse in Montgomery, Ala., on March 17, 1965. AP

MLK Talks ‘New Phase’ Of Civil Rights Struggle, 11 Months Before His Assassination | NBC News

Apr 4, 2018  NBC News

In 1967, at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, Martin Luther King spoke with NBC News’ Sander Vanocur about the “new phase” of the struggle for “genuine equality.” » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC MLK Talks ‘New Phase’ Of Civil Rights Struggle, 11 Months Before His Assassination | NBC News

An Intimate Conversation with Martin Luther King | David Susskind Meets MLK | Timeline

Oct 19, 2021  Timeline – World History Documentaries

David Susskind’s historical, long and intimate interview with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Originally aired on June 9, 1963 by WPIX-TV New York. Among the subjects discussed were the current state of the American Civil Rights Movement and the recent (at that time) events in Birmingham, Alabama. Recently restored by the Paley Center. ? It’s like Netflix for history… Sign up to History Hit, the world’s best history documentary service and get 50% off using the code ‘TIMELINE’ http://bit.ly/3a7ambu You can find more from us on: https://www.facebook.com/timelineWH https://www.instagram.com/timelineWH Content licensed from MVD to Little Dot Studios. Any queries, please contact owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18.

Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image

USA TODAY: Mobilize everyday people to fight Republican attacks on voting, just like in 1965: MLK III

The backlash is a reminder of how far we’ve come, how much we have to defend and how far we have to go. The world we want will take a lifetime of work.

Martin Luther King III

Opinion contributor

Shortly after Congress passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, my father, Martin Luther King Jr., visited President Lyndon Johnson alongside other civil rights leaders and urged him to support the Voting Rights Act. President Johnson was reluctant. He had used up all his political capital on civil rights, he said. He had no power to push through a bill to secure the right to vote for Black Americans.

Dad and his allies weren’t giving up. Their response was to go back to the South, mobilize the people and “go get him some power.” They sparked massive mobilizations for voting rights across the South: among them the Selma to Montgomery march, immortalized on “Bloody Sunday.” In its aftermath, President Johnson introduced the Voting Rights Act, which was signed exactly 56 years ago.

Today though, the rights it enshrined are under threat from dozens of voter suppression laws being passed in states across the country. To resist them we have to understand, like Dad did, that power doesn’t just come from a single election, or negotiations in the Senate. It comes from us: everyday people who demand justice and equality in America.

We won’t stop demanding justice

I was reminded of this last week, as my wife, Arndrea, and I joined the Rev. Al Sharpton and Texas Democrats in meetings on Capitol Hill. We asked members and senators to fight to pass the For the People Act and the  the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act to protect the sanctity of our votes. We demanded equal congressional representation for the over 700,000 residents of majority Black and brown Washington, D.C. And we called on them to bypass the filibuster – that old Jim Crow relic – to secure these basic constitutional rights for all Americans. The message we heard was that once again, they need the power of the people to mobilize and push Congress to pass this vital legislation.

 LBJ daughters:Our dad, Lyndon Johnson, showed that civil rights could be bipartisan. Where is that now?

Later this month, when we commemorate the 58th anniversary of the March on Washington, we’ll be bringing that power to Washington and to demonstrations all over the country. Our demand is that Congress act to defend our voting rights and secure our democracy for the next generation.

For some of us, it’s discouraging to know this fight isn’t yet won. In 2020, millions of us took to the streets for the largest demonstrations in American history. We held panels and made speeches, we registered thousands of new voters, and more than 81 million of us cast our votes to sweep President Joe Biden and Democrats into the White House and Congress. Some of us will ask why, after all that, it’s still our duty to fight.

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At these moments I look back on what my mother often said, “Struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation.”

She taught me that for every step forward there will always be backlash, but that it’s our duty to keep pushing forward. Less than three weeks after the 1963 March on Washington, when activists like my father were riding high on hope, a domestic terrorist bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four precious little girls. Still, activists stood up and organized Freedom Summer the next year, sending hundreds of volunteers to the South to register Black voters and paving the way for the Civil Rights Act.

We need courage from our leaders

Now, less than a year after Black and brown voters cast the deciding votes in the biggest election of our lives, the backlash has been swift and brutal. Republican-controlled states are creating new voting restrictions to block Black and brown people from the polls. Many are openly discussing how to break up majority-minority districts through redistricting.

In my home state of Georgia, the legislature has even given itself power to take over local elections and overturn results they dislike.

That backlash is a reminder of how far we’ve come, how much we have to defend and how far we have to go as a nation. We don’t have the luxury to sit down or leave the fight. This moment calls us instead to lift our voices and show once again that the power lies in our hands. We have to call on our leaders – Democrats and Republicans – to act with courage and moral conviction to defend our democracy. We have to demand that when they quote my father, or say they loved John Lewis, they show that love in their actions.

Don’t let rights slip away: Pass ‘Manchin Plus’ voting and election protection with or without Republicans

That will be our demand when we gather in Washington this month, and we won’t stop. The world we are called to build – one based on love, sister and brotherhood, justice and peace – will not be won in a single summer of protest or an autumn of campaigning. It will be won in a lifetime of work, fueled by the power of our conviction, and we will then be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.

Martin Luther King III (@OfficialMLK3) is a global human rights activist and chairman of the Drum Major Institute.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2021/08/06/voting-rights-act-republicans-attack-king-legacy-mlk-iii/5465958001/

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – Human Rights and Nonviolence, Ing’s Peace Project

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – Human Rights and Nonviolence, Ing’s Peace Project

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have A Dream”  

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I did this artwork in 2010.  I enjoyed doing the research, reading Dr. King’s biography and his speeches.  Dr. King was a great writer and orator.  He could captivate the audiences with his great writing and presentation.  I would like everyone who views my artwork on Dr. King to be able to read and have some understanding of his feelings.   With his wit and energy he devoted himself to human rights and nonviolence.  It is not only his family that lost and mourned his death for the world has lost a great man.   Humanity had lost Dr. King’s ability to help bring progress to the world by achieving more civilized interaction for the human race as a whole.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, January 15, 2016 

Martin Luther King – I Have A Dream Speech – August 28, 1963

Jan 20, 2011  SullenToys.com

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King’s Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

President Barack Obama & His First Inauguration Speech Portrait and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have A Dream” two of my artworks displayed at Lincoln School auditorium for the cerebration of Dr. King’s Birthday event in 2015.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, January 15, 2016 

For more information please visit please visit the following link:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/12/14/lincoln-school-the-annual-spring-concert-and-student-art-exhibition-part-3/

Martin Luther King, Jr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Martin Luther King” and “MLK” redirect here. For other uses, see Martin Luther King (disambiguation) and MLK (disambiguation).

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Born

Michael King, Jr.
January 15, 1929
Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.

Died

April 4, 1968 (aged 39)
Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.

Cause of death

Assassination

Monuments

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

Alma mater

Occupation

clergyman, activist

Organization

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)

Movement

African-American Civil Rights Movement, Peace movement

Religion

Christianity

Denomination

Baptist (Progressive National Baptist Convention)

Spouse(s)

Coretta Scott King (m. 1953–1968; his death)

Children

Parent(s)

Awards

Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister, activist, humanitarian, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience based on his Christian beliefs.

King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia (the Albany Movement), and helped organize the 1963 nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history.

On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1965, he helped to organize the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the following year he and SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing. In the final years of his life, King expanded his focus to include poverty and speak against the Vietnam War, alienating many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled “Beyond Vietnam“.

In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People’s Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. His death was followed by riots in many U.S. cities.

King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a holiday in numerous cities and states beginning in 1971, and as a U.S. federal holiday in 1986. Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor, and a county in Washington State was also renamed for him. The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was dedicated in 2011.

For more information, please visit Wikipedia, the link is: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther_King,_Jr.

Dr. Martin Luther King’s Day

Happy Birthday Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Monday, January 17, 2022

Thanks to Linda Leonard-Nevels , School Library Media Specialist of Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey.  She came to our store.  After her shopping I took advantage to explain to her about my Peace Project.  Linda came back on Friday, October 1. 2014 and took six of my Peace Project posters to distribute to the teachers in her school for their students to write comments on my peace posters.  She returned three of my Peace posters with student comments on Friday, December 12, 2014.

Working on artwork for Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” I realized that this month on Monday, January 19 is Dr. Martin Luther King’s Day.  I recalled that Dr. King received a Nobel Peace Prize on 1964.  I am sure these students know this.  I did research on Dr. King’s acceptance speech.  I was impressed with his speech.  Lately there is increasing conflict between the black youth and police.  So, I decided to do some artwork on Dr. King’s Nobel Prize Acceptance speech in the same project of the Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students Peace comments.

 I hope that young people today realize that it takes time for human progress and it takes all generations to be aware of human rights and put effort into improving the transition for all humanity to reach equality and harmony in our world.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, January 19, 2015

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Day

Monday, January 17, 2022

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway

I accept the Nobel Prize for Peace at a moment when twenty-two million Negroes of the United States of America are engaged in a creative battle to end the long night of racial injustice. I accept this award in behalf of a civil rights movement which is moving with determination and a majestic scorn for risk and danger to establish a reign of freedom and a rule of justice.

I am mindful that only yesterday in Birmingham, Alabama, our children, crying out for brotherhood, were answered with fire hoses, snarling dogs and even death. I am mindful that only yesterday in Philadelphia, Mississippi, young people seeing to secure the right to vote were brutalized and murdered. And only yesterday more than 40 houses of worship in the State of Mississippi alone were bombed or burned because they offered a sunctuary to those who would not accept segregation.

I am mindful that debilitating and grinding poverty afflicts my people and chains them to the lowest rung of the economic ladder.

Therefore, I must ask why this prize is awarded to a movement which is beleaguered and committed to unrelenting struggle; to a movement which has not won the very peace and brotherhood which is the essence of the Nobel Prize.

After contemplation, I conclude that this award which I receive on behalf of that movement is profound recognition that nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral question of our time — the need for man to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to violence and oppression.

Civilization and violence are antithetical concepts. Negroes of the United States, following the people of India, have demonstrated that nonviolence is not sterile passivity, but a powerful moral force which makes for social transformation. Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace, and thereby transform this pending cosmic elegy into a creative psalm of brotherhood.

If this is to be achieved, man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love. The tortuous road which has led from Montgomery, Alabama, to Oslo bears witness to this truth. This is a road over which millions of Negroes are travelling to find a new sense of dignity.

This same road has opened for all Americans a new ear of progress and hope. It has led to a new Civil Rights bill, and it will, I am convinced, be widened and lengthened into a superhighway of justice as Negro and white men in increasing numbers create alliances to overcome their common problems.

I accept this award today with an abiding faith in America and an audacious faith in the future of mankind. I refuse to accept despair as the final response to the ambiguities of history. I refuse to accept the idea that the “isness” of man’s present nature makes him morally incapable of reaching up for the eternal “oughtness” that forever confronts him.

I refuse to accept the idea that man is mere flotsom and jetsom in the river of life unable to influence the unfolding events which surround him. I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.

I refuse to accept the cynical notion that nation after nation must spiral down a militaristic stairway into the hell of thermonuclear destruction. I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant.

I believe that even amid today’s motor bursts and whining bullets, there is still hope for a brighter tomorrow. I believe that wounded justice, lying prostrate on the blood-flowing streets of our nations, can be lifted from this dust of shame to reign supreme among the children of men.

I have the audacity to believe that peoples everywhere can have three meals a day for their bodies, education and culture for their minds, and dignity, equality and freedom for their spirits. I believe that what self-centered men have torn down, men other-centered can build up. I still believe that one day mankind will bow before the altars of God and be crowned triumphant over war and bloodshed, and nonviolent redemptive goodwill will proclaim the rule of the land.

“And the lion and the lamb shall lie down together and every man shall sit under his own vine and fig tree and none shall be afraid.”

I still believe that we shall overcome.

This faith can give us courage to face the uncertainties of the future. It will give our tired feet new strength as we continue our forward stride toward the city of freedom. When our days become dreary with low-hovering clouds and our nights become darker than a thousand midnights, we will know that we are living in the creative turmoil of a genuine civilization struggling to be born.

Today I come to Oslo as a trustee, inspired and with renewed dedication to humanity. I accept this prize on behalf of all men who love peace and brotherhood. I say I come as a trustee, for in the depths of my heart I am aware that this prize is much more than an honor to me personally.

Every time I take a flight I am always mindful of the man people who make a successful journey possible — the known pilots and the unknown ground crew.

So you honor the dedicated pilots of our struggle who have sat at the controls as the freedom movement soared into orbit. You honor, once again, Chief (Albert) Luthuli of South Africa, whose struggles with and for his people, are still met with the most brutal expression of man’s inhumanity to man.

You honor the ground crew without whose labor and sacrifices the jet flights to freedom could never have left the earth.

Most of these people will never make the headlines and their names will not appear in Who’s Who. Yet when years have rolled past and when the blazing light of truth is focused on this marvelous age in which we live — men and women will know and children will be taught that we have a finer land, a better people, a more noble civilization — because these humble children of God were willing to suffer for righteousness’ sake.

I think Alfred Nobel would know what I mean when I say that I accept this award in the spirit of a curator of some precious heirloom which he holds in trust for its true owners — all those to whom beauty is truth and truth beauty — and in whose eyes the beauty of genuine brotherhood and peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold.

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

For more information, please visit the following link:

http://nobelprizes.com/nobel/peace/MLK-nobel.html

#MLK: Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech in Oslo, Norway, 1964 // #Nonviolence365

Dec 28, 2015

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change   12:01

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Nobel Peace Prize Lecture from Oslo, 11 Dec. 1964 (full audio)

Jan 20, 2016  Nobel Prize   52:42

Audio: © NRK – Norsk Rikskringkasting AS / Text: © The Nobel Foundation 1964 Dr. Martin Luther King’s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Lecture. “One of his most important speeches”, comments Dr. Clayborne Carson, Director of The King Institute at Stanford University, on the lecture.

The following are the Peace comments from Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students

Ing’s Peace Comments Poster 1

Ing’s Peace Project Poster 1

Comments  By Malcolm X Shabazz Hight School’s Students

 On “What does Peace mean to you?”

 Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels, School Library Media Specialist, Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey

December 2014

Ing’s Peace Comments Poster 2

From Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students

Ing’s Peace Project Poster 2

Comments  By Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students

 On “What does Peace mean to you?”

 Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels, School Library Media Specialist, Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015),

Newark, New Jersey

December 2014

Ing’s Peace Comments Poster 3

From Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students

Dr. King and Gandhi’s Ing Artwork Display in Public for the First Time in 2021 and Kai, 5-year-old Street Artist on Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

For more information, please visit the following link:

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Gandhi’s Ing Artwork Display in Public for the First Time in 2021 and Kai, 5-year-old Street Artist on Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

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Live Science: Surgeons transplant pig’s heart into dying human patient in a first, NASA’s Perseverance rover is clogged up with pebbles, & more, and PBS News, NBC News

Live Science: Surgeons transplant pig’s heart into dying human patient in a first, NASA’s Perseverance rover is clogged up with pebbles, & more, and PBS News, NBC News

Live Science:  <livescience@smartbrief.com> January 14, 2022

NASA’s Perseverance rover is clogged up with pebbles

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Curvature of space-time measured using ‘atomic fountain’

(R. Hurt/Caltech-JPL)

In 1797, English scientist Henry Cavendish measured the strength of gravity with a contraption made of lead spheres, wooden rods and wire. In the 21st century, scientists are doing something very similar with rather more sophisticated tools: atoms.

Full Story: Live Science (1/14)

AMAZING EARTH
Striking satellite photo captures Mount Vesuvius peering through a hole in the clouds

(Joshua Stevens/Landsat/NASA Earth Observatory)

One of the world’s most dangerous volcanoes, Mount Vesuvius, appears to “peer up” into the sky through an eerily circular hole in the clouds in this striking satellite image.

The Operational Land Imager onboard the Landsat-8 satellite snapped the photo, which was released Jan. 10 by NASA’s Earth Observatory. The volcano’s summit caldera — a large bowl-like depression that forms when a volcano erupts and collapses — is clearly visible in the new image, as well as a section of large mountainous ridge to the north, which is a remnant of Mount Somma — an ancient volcano that once stood in the same spot as Mount Vesuvius, before the newer volcano’s cone grew from it’s center.

Full Story: Live Science (1/14)

Earth inhales and exhales carbon in mesmerizing animation

(Markus Reichstein /Creative Commons license)

The Earth seems to inhale and exhale in a new animation that shows how carbon is taken up and released as the seasons change.

The animated continents seem to deflate during summertimes, indicating times and places where vegetation is growing and plants are sucking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. When it’s winter, the continents seem to inflate, indicating that vegetation is dying off and carbon is being released.

Full Story: Live Science (1/13)

LIFE’S LITTLE MYSTERIES
How are stalactites and stalagmites formed?

(Getty)

Stalactites and stalagmites decorate caves the world over. Stalactites hang down from the ceiling, while stalagmites rise up from the ground. They grow incredibly slowly, and some are so ancient that they predate modern humans, Live Science previously reported.

These tooth-like rock formations grow when dripping water comes into contact with the cave air, according to the National Park Service website. The water carries dissolved minerals, picked up on its journey from Earth’s surface. As it passes through the cave, it leaves tiny traces of those minerals behind, building each stalactite drip by drip.

Full Story: Live Science (1/14)

SPACE EXPLORATION
NASA’s Perseverance rover is clogged up with pebbles

(NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

A small pile of pebbles is clogging up the Perseverance Mars rover’s operations.

The rover, which is collecting rock samples for eventual return to Earth, began to struggle on Dec. 29, after extracting a core from a rock the mission team nicknamed “Issole.” According to a NASA blog, the problem occurred in the device that transfers the drill bit and sample out of the rover’s drill arm and into a carousel inside the rover’s chassis for storage. During the transfer, sensors within the rover recorded a higher-than-normal amount of friction at an unexpected point in the process.

Full Story: Live Science (1/13)

YOUR HEALTH
The virus behind ‘mono’ might trigger multiple sclerosis in some

(Kateryna Kon via Shutterstock)

Multiple sclerosis — an autoimmune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord — may emerge after infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).

An estimated 90% to 95% of people catch EBV, also called human herpesvirus 4, by the time they reach adulthood, according to the clinical resource UpToDate. In children, the virus typically causes an asymptomatic or very mild infection, but in teens and young adults, EBV can cause infectious mononucleosis, better known as “mono.” Despite EBV being a commonly-caught virus, there’s evidence to suggest that infections with the virus are a risk factor for multiple sclerosis, a far less common condition.

Full Story: Live Science (1/13)

CURIOUS CREATURES
These birds have been singing the same songs for literally a million years

(JayHendry/Getty Images)

A million years ago, the soundtrack of the “sky island” mountains of East Africa may have been very similar to what it is today. That’s because a group of tiny, colorful birds has been singing the exact same tunes for more than 500,000 years — and maybe as long as 1 million years, according to a new study.

Sunbirds in the family Nectariniidae are colorful, tiny, nectar-feeding birds that resemble hummingbirds and are common throughout Africa and Asia. They are the “little jewels that appear before you,” senior author Rauri Bowie, a professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley, and a curator in the school’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, said in a statement.

Full Story: Live Science (1/14)

Live Science:  <livescience@smartbrief.com> January 11, 2022

Rare ‘bionic’ armor discovered in 2,500-year-old China burial

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Surgeons transplant pig’s heart into dying human patient in a first

(University of Maryland Medical Center)

Doctors have transplanted the heart from a genetically modified pig into the chest of a man from Maryland in a last-ditch effort to save his life. The first-of-its-kind surgery is being hailed as a major step forward in the decades-long effort to successfully transplant animal organs into humans.

Although it’s been tried before — one of the earliest subjects, known as Baby Fae, survived 21 days with a baboon’s heart in 1984, according to Time — the practice has fallen into disuse because the animal organs are usually quickly rejected by their human host.

But doctors say this new transplant is a breakthrough because the donor pig had undergone gene-editing to remove a specific type of sugar from its cells that’s thought to be responsible for previous organ rejections in patients.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY
Rare ‘bionic’ armor discovered in 2,500-year-old China burial

(Dongliang Xu/Turfan Museum)

About 2,500 years ago, a man in northwest China was buried with armor made of more than 5,000 leather scales, a military garment fashioned so intricately, its design looks like the overlapping scales of a fish, a new study finds.

The armor, which resembles an apron-like waistcoat, could be donned quickly without the help of another person. “It is a light, highly efficient one-size-fits-all defensive garment for soldiers of a mass army,” said study lead researcher Patrick Wertmann, a researcher at the Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies of the University of Zurich.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

Hungry badger accidentally unearths hundreds of ancient Roman coins in Spain

(Shutterstock)

A hungry badger searching for food seems to have uncovered what turned out to be hundreds of Roman coins in a Spanish cave, according to a new study.

Archaeologists first discovered several coins laying on the ground at the entrance to a small cave in the woodlands outside Grado in northern Spain in April 2021. The researchers suspect that the coins were unearthed by a European badger (Meles meles) from a nearby den after a heavy storm dumped several feet of snow on the ground, making it harder for animals to find food. The hungry badger probably ventured into the cave looking for something to eat but came across the coins instead.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

Remains of a man and dog trying to escape ancient tsunami found on Aegean coast

(Vasif ?aho?lu)

Roughly 3,600 years ago, the massive Thera volcano in the Aegean Sea blew its top, unleashing massive tsunamis. Now, archaeologists in western Turkey have unearthed the bones of a young man and a dog killed by one of those tsunamis.

It’s the first time that any victims of the ancient eruption have been found in their archaeological context, and it’s the northernmost evidence found of the tsunamis that followed it.

Full Story: Live Science (1/10)

Enormous sea dragon fossil from 180 million years ago discovered in England

(Courtesy of Anglian Water)

The remains of a monstrous, 33-foot-long (10 meters) “sea dragon” that swam in the seas when dinosaurs were alive some 180 million years ago have been unearthed on a nature reserve in England. The behemoth is the biggest and most complete fossil of its kind ever discovered in the U.K.

“It is a truly unprecedented discovery and one of the greatest finds in British palaeontological history,” excavation leader Dean Lomax, a paleontologist and visiting scientist at the University of Manchester, said in a statement.

Though many such ichthyosaurs have been found in the U.K., none have been as large as the current discovery.

Full Story: Live Science (1/10)

LIFE’S LITTLE MYSTERIES
How do energy saving light bulbs work?

(Getty Images)

Energy saving light bulbs were invented as a greener alternative to traditional bulbs, needing 90% less electricity to produce the same light, according to the Centre of Sustainable Energy. But how do they do it?

As bright ideas go, it’s almost impossible to overstate the impact the humble light bulb has had on human civilization. Before Thomas Edison had the original ‘light bulb moment’ and patented his invention all the way back in 1879 people were literally living in the dark ages, according to the Franklin Institute. People depended on oil or gas lamps and candles to light their rooms and streets, and when the sun went down the world would look much duller than it does today.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS
‘Diamond rain’ on Uranus and Neptune seems likely

(Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

The ice giants Uranus and Neptune don’t get nearly enough press; all the attention goes to their larger siblings, mighty Jupiter and magnificent Saturn.

At first glance, Uranus and Neptune are just bland, boring balls of uninteresting molecules. But hiding beneath the outer layers of those worlds, there may be something spectacular: a constant rain of diamonds.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

Scientists watched a star explode in real time for the first time ever

(W. M. Keck Observatory/Adam Makarenko)

Astronomers have watched a giant star blow up in a fiery supernova for the first time ever — and the spectacle was even more explosive than the researchers anticipated.

Scientists began watching the doomed star — a red supergiant named SN 2020tlf and located about 120 million light-years from Earth — more than 100 days before its final, violent collapse, according to a new study published Jan. 6 in the Astrophysical Journal. During that lead-up, the researchers saw the star erupt with bright flashes of light as great globs of gas exploded out of the star’s surface.

Full Story: Live Science (1/10)

Live Science:  <livescience@smartbrief.com> January 7, 2022

Rare and fragile fossils found at a secret site in Australia’s ‘dead heart’

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Bizarre cloud of gas is one of the longest structures in the Milky Way

(ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO & T. Müller/J. Syed/MPIA)

Astronomers have discovered what may be the longest structure in the Milky Way: an unusual cloud of hydrogen.

The gigantic structure, which is more than 3,900 light-years long and around 150 light-years wide, is located roughly 55,000 light-years away from the solar system, according to a statement by researchers. (Previously, the largest known clouds of gas in the Milky Way were thought to be about 800 light-years across.) The team named the lengthy cloud “Maggie,” which is short for the Magdalena River, the longest river in Colombia.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

COVID-19
Rapid tests may not detect omicron early in infection

(PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)

Rapid antigen tests for COVID-19 may not reliably detect the omicron variant during the first few days of infection, even when a person is shedding the virus in high enough quantities to be contagious, preliminary evidence hints.

For the new study, posted Wednesday (Jan. 5) to the preprint database medRxiv, researchers looked at 30 people from five different workplaces in New York and California, all of whom tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in December 2021.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY
Rare and fragile fossils found at a secret site in Australia’s ‘dead heart’

(Michael Frese)

Buried in Australia’s so-called dead heart, a trove of exceptional fossils, including those of trapdoor spiders, giant cicadas, tiny fish and a feather from an ancient bird, reveal a unique snapshot of a time when rainforests carpeted the now mostly-arid continent.

Paleontologists discovered the fossil treasure-trove, known as a Lagerstätte (“storage site” in German) in New South Wales, in a region so arid that British geologist John Walter Gregory famously dubbed it the “dead heart of Australia” over 100 years ago. The Lagerstätte’s location on private land was kept secret to protect it from illegal fossil collectors, while scientists excavated the remains of plants and animals that lived there sometime between 16 million and 11 million years ago.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

AMAZING EARTH
Weird structures near Earth’s core may be scars from a primordial interplanetary collision

(Tim Bertelink, CC 4.0)

A group of mysterious, ultradense structures just outside Earth’s core may be the remnants of an ancient interplanetary collision, new research suggests.

These strange structures are known as ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs), because seismic waves generated by earthquakes travel about 50% more slowly through these zones than through the surrounding mantle. That means the ULVZs are also much denser than the rest of the mantle, and possibly made of heavier elements.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

MATH & PHYSICS
China’s $1 trillion ‘artificial sun’ fusion reactor just got five times hotter than the sun

(VCG via Getty Images)

China’s “artificial sun” has set a new world record after superheating a loop of plasma to temperatures five times hotter than the sun for more than 17 minutes, state media reported.

The EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) nuclear fusion reactor maintained a temperature of 158 million degrees Fahrenheit (70 million degrees Celsius) for 1,056 seconds, according to the Xinhua News Agency. The achievement brings scientists a small yet significant step closer to the creation of a source of near-unlimited clean energy.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

Nuclear-powered US submarine collided with a hidden underwater mountain, Navy reveals

(Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

A nuclear-powered U.S. submarine that ran aground in the South China Sea last month collided with an uncharted seamount, according to a U.S. Navy investigation.

The USS Connecticut, a Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine, collided with an unknown object in international waters on Oct. 2, causing minor to moderate injuries to 11 crewmembers, NPR reported. The damaged submarine surfaced and made it to a port in Guam unassisted. The Navy hasn’t disclosed the full extent of the damage, and all the Navy said about the incident at the time was that “it was not another submarine” that had collided with the vessel, The Associated Press reported.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

YOUR HEALTH

U.K.’s first human case of H5N1 avian flu detected in man with pet ducks

(Wagner Lessa / EyeEm via Getty Images)

A 79-year-old man named Alan Gosling, who kept pet ducks at his home in Devon, England, recently became the first U.K. resident to catch the H5N1 strain of bird flu, DevonLive reported.

A flock of more than 100 ducks lived outside on Gosling’s property in Buckfastleigh, and after feeding the animals for some time, Gosling brought 20 of the ducks into his home to keep as pets. In December 2021, a few of the ducks in the outdoor flock fell ill, Gosling noticed.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS
The sun used to have rings like Saturn

(Andrea Isella/Rice University)

Before Earth and the other planets in our solar system existed, the sun may have been surrounded by giant rings of dust similar to Saturn’s, according to a new study.

Those rings of dust may have prevented Earth from growing into a “super-Earth” — a type of planet that is about twice the size of Earth and up to 10 times its mass, according to NASA. Astronomers have discovered super-Earths orbiting about 30% of sun-like stars in our galaxy.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

‘Cosmic wildfires’ burn bright in new photo of the Flame Nebula

(ESO/Th. Stanke & ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA. Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit)

A fiery new photograph of the Flame Nebula depicts the emissions from brand-new stars, burning through space like cosmic wildfires.

These wildfires don’t actually burn hot — the orange and yellow regions captured in this image are actually only a few tens of degrees warmer than absolute zero, the point at which the movement of atoms and other fundamental particles freezes, according to the European Southern Observatory (ESO). But the emissions are revealing. By pointing the SuperCam instrument aboard the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment in the Chilean desert at this region, researchers were able to discover a brand-new nebula and explore two dusty interstellar clouds, Messier 78 and NGC 2071.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

 

 

CURIOUS CREATURES
Wild video shows goldfish ‘driving’ a water-filled car in weird experiment

(Shachar Givon, Matan Samina, Prof. Ohad Ben Shahar, Prof. Ronen Segev/BGU)

Fish may not need bicycles, but they seem to like cars.

A supremely weird new video shows a goldfish driving a water-filled, motorized “car” from one end of a room to another, bobbing and weaving to avoid obstacles along the way. Scientists performed the odd experiment to better understand how goldfish navigate terrestrial environments.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

 

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan. 14, 2022

Jan 14, 2022  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, health systems buckle under the latest surge of hospitalizations from COVID-19 as schools struggle to keep the virus at bay. Also, millions of Kenyans face hunger and ethnic conflict exacerbated by the global climate crisis, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart consider the push in Congress for voting rights and the Supreme Court’s decision on vaccine mandates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Ukraine blames Russia for sweeping cyberattack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHN4J… Health systems buckle under surge of COVID hospitalizations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKZlI… How Boston’s sky-high COVID count impacts teachers, staff https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0Ggr… Djokovic battles with Australia after violating COVID rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=403GF… Brooks and Capehart on voting rights, partisanship https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxRqv… Deadly drought in Kenya creates humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnp5t… Immersive Van Gogh exhibits paint new experiences with art https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kq4lf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Jan. 14

Jan 14, 2022  NBC News

Millions across the U.S. are under winter weather alerts, inside a Pittsburgh children’s hospital overwhelmed by Covid cases, and bodycam video shows dramatic rescues from Colorado wildfire. 00:00 Intro 01:44 Millions in U.S. under winter weather alerts 03:48 Inside children’s hospital overwhelmed by Covid cases 06:30 Novak Djokovic facing deportation, again 08:08 U.S. warning Russia may be prepping Ukraine invasion 09:05 Trump set for first rally of 2022 11:34 Bodycam video from Colorado wildfire 13:10 Covid testing company investigation 15:33 Critics blame China for Mekong River environmental disaster 19:16 Chicago’s oldest hot dog stand’s special community connection » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #NBCNews #FullBroadcast

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Happy New Year Everyone, Grandpa John and Grandson Kai Drawings

Happy New Year Everyone, Grandpa John and Grandson Kai Drawings

🙂  Happy New Year Everyone, Grandpa John and Grandson Kai Drawings 🙂

🙂 For the Love of family and all the creatures on earth for 2022 and always🙂

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Grandpa John and Grandma Ing cannot see our two grandsons that often.  Since the earliest lockdown, we call our daughter’s family, and spend time talking to them in the evening almost every day on Face-Time.  Our older grandson Kai is six years old, he started school in September, 2021.  Eventually the school had to close because of the problem of COVID-19.  Grandpa John has some ideas for learning activities to help Kai.  He gives Kai reading and drawing lessons.  They explore any kind of artwork that Kai and John enjoy.  Kai loves to do artwork but is less enthusiastic about reading.  Because he is a good kid, he agrees to the reading lesson before doing his artwork.  From time to time, he will request a vacation or holiday, to omit his reading lesson.

The following are the result of some artworks from Grandpa John and Grandson Kai to cheer up everyone for the new year.  We hope that will give everyone a smile and a happy moment.  We all need it. 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, January 11, 2022

🙂 🙂 Happy New Year Everyone for 2022 and always 🙂 🙂

After Finishing the reading, Grandson Kai, and Grandpa John, are ready to have a good time drawing.  Kai did a very fast drawing and he colored his artwork in a very short time.

Finally, Grandpa finished his drawing.  Kai Started the next drawing, he finished the drawing and was coloring his second art work.

After Kai finished coloring his second drawing, he went to get a roll of tape and a pair of scissors.  Then he turned his two drawings on the other sides, putting them together.  He cut the adhesive tape in short lengths and taped them on the back of his drawing in 4 places evenly in a horizontally position.  Next, he took out a long piece of tape, pressed it on the joining line of the artworks vertically.  Then he turned his artwork over to the drawing side, and drew a line from one figure to the other horizontally to visually join them as one artwork.  He did this process very quickly then lifted his drawing up to us, showing his finished artwork.  I really am impressed by the way he achieved his finished drawing.  I asked him, who taught you how to join your drawing?  “My teacher” Kai answered.  I am glad he learned something from school.  He went to school for only short period of time, then the school had to close because of the COVID-19 pandemic.    

Next day, started with reading time for Kai with Grandpa John before they enjoyed drawing.

In drawing time, Kai did his artwork very fast, showing us his first character.  After he did his second drawing, he joined them into one artwork in the same procedure he did before.

Kai is proudly exhibiting his artwork on his mother’s cabinet door.  Grandpa John also did an exotic character that he created on Sunday, January 2, 2022.

During a summer session, Jacob, one of Kai’s friends came to study drawing with John when Kai came to visit Grandpa John & Grandma Ing on a Thursday.  We are glad to have Jacob.  He is a good student and Kai enjoys having his friend do artwork and playing with him.

This is the latest of Jacob’s drawings with teacher, John on Thursday, October 7, 2021.  I like Jacob’s drawing; he is only 7 years old but he can follow John’s instructions very well.

Reading Lesson: Kai reading with Grandpa John, with some help from Mommy Mali.

Time to have fun drawing, after the reading lesson with Grandpa John

 Grandpa John’s Drawings

Kai’s Drawings

I think Kai got some idea for the baby dinosaur inside the mother dinosaur, by seeing his mother pregnant with his younger brother, Bodhi.

Kai’s drawings, Thursday, 12, 30, 2021

Kai’s drawings, Friday, 12, 17, 2021

Kai’s Sculptures, Saturday, 12, 18, 2021

Kai’s drawing of his father surfing on a wave, Monday, 12, 6, 2021.  Kai is 6 years and 3 months old.

Kai’s drawing of his mother, Mali’s portrait, Saturday, 12, 11, 2021

This is his mother laughing, hea, hea, hea,——— after she saw her portrait by her son, Kai.

Kai’s recent drawing this year, Thursday, January 6, 2022

John & Kai are drawing while Bodhi wants to participate.  He is watching intensively, Tuesday, 8, 31, 2021

Kai is helping his little brother, Bodhi to climb to the 2nd floor, Grandpa John’s exhibition room to seeing his Godzilla movie design.

Kai’s Godzilla movie design, Sunday, 12,26,2021

Bodhi is copying his older brother, Kai reading when he saw Kai was reading with Grandpa John, Monday, 12, 27, 2021.  Bodhi is 1 year and 9 months old.

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Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

Mercury News: Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

AXIOS AM: Mike Allen Jan 1, 2022, Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood. Parting shot: Ball drop, behind the scenes

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021, by Ian Prasad Philbrick, Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show,

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Global News Dec 31, 2021 

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines, Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy New Year Live! ? London Fireworks 2022, Streamed live 3 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  BBC

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022, Started streaming 2 hours ago,

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE, Started streaming 14 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  MH Noticias,

Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video, Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Countdown to 2022 from all over the world, Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022, Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show, Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

New Year’s celebrations around the world

Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sat January 1, 2022

With the rapid spread of the new Omicron coronavirus variant, many cities across the world scaled back their New Year’s celebrations.

In New York City, for example, the traditional event in Times Square allowed fewer revelers and everyone was required to wear a mask.

Some major cities canceled their events altogether, while others moved forward with their plans.

People observe candles lit to bring luck in the upcoming New Year at the Hasedera Buddhist temple in Kamakura, Japan, south of Tokyo.  Hoon/Reuters Kim Kyung

People watch the light show by St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Millennium Bridge in London.

Matt Dunham/AP                       

People gather to welcome the new year in Chongqing, China.

Li Xiaoxiang/VCG/Getty Images

Fireworks explode over the the St. Basil’s Cathedral and the Kremlin with Red Square sitting empty due to pandemic restrictions during New Year’s celebrations in Moscow.

Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/AP

Berlin has no live audience during its televised New Year’s Eve display at the Brandenburg Gate. Adam Berry/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt at Expo 2020 as part of the New Year’s festivities in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

AFP/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt over the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand.

Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

A light show illuminates the Sky Tower and Harbour Bridge in Auckland, New Zealand. The light show, “Auckland Is Calling,” replaced the city’s traditional fireworks show this year.

Dave Rowland/Getty Images for Auckland Unlimited

Fireworks explode over Sydney Harbour during New Year’s celebrations in Australia.

Jaimi Joy/Reuters

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/31/world/gallery/2022-new-year-celebrations/index.html

Mercury News:

Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

The world says goodbye to 2021, a year where the pandemic still lingered impacting all aspects of life

By GIESON CACHO | gcacho@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group

PUBLISHED: December 31, 2021 at 4:58 p.m. | UPDATED: January 1, 2022 at 4:36 p.m.

Fireworks explode at the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, during the New Year’s Eve celebration in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

The world said goodbye to 2021, a year that was hamstrung by the lingering COVID-19 pandemic, and welcomed 2022 with high hopes. Celebrations around some areas were scaled back because of the rising number of cases blamed on the spread of the omicron variant.

In places in Serbia and France, revelers stood shoulder to shoulder awaiting festivities. Other places such as India had more subdued festivities. In New York, the annual Times Square celebration was scaled back but still welcomed celebrants unlike last year, which had no public event.

According to the Associated Press, “The city said it would limit the number of people it lets into Times Square to witness a 6-ton ball, encrusted with nearly 2,700 Waterford crystals, descend above a crowd of about 15,000 in-person spectators.”

Here are images from around the world:

CHINA

Artiste Kong Ning wears her latest work entitled “Earth’s Snowflake” to usher in 2022 on the eve of the New Year in Beijing, China, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) 

INDIA

Laser lights are seen at the Bandra Worli sea link on New year in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool) 

Indians, wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus, hold the cutouts to welcome 2022 on New Year’s Eve in Ahmedabad, India, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki) 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Ras Al Khaimah New Year’s Eve dazzled with a never seen before fireworks display that smashed two Guiness World Records at Al Marjan Island on Jan. 1, 2022, in Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. (Cedric Ribeiro/Getty Images for Marjan) 

TURKEY

Fireworks explode over the Ottoman-era Mecidiye mosque in Ortakoy square next to ‘July 15th Martyrs’ bridge, known as Bosphorus bridge, during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, early Saturday, Jan 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel) 

UNITED KINGDOM

Drones create a lion in the sky above the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich to bring in the New Year on Jan. 1, 2022, in London. The countries that make up the U.K. have differing COVID measures in place over the festive period. In Scotland, a maximum of 500 people can attend outdoor events where physical distancing of one meter is in place meaning the traditional Edinburgh Hogmanay celebrations have been canceled. In England, the government has not introduced any new measures. (Rob Pinney/Getty Images) 

SPAIN

Fireworks explode during New Year’s celebrations at the Madrid’s Puerta del Sol in downtown Madrid, Spain, early Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez) 

BRAZIL

People bring in the New Year as they watch fireworks explode over Copacabana Beach, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Bruna Prado) 

Revelers enjoy the fireworks and celebrate the New Years on Copacabana beach on Jan. 01, 2022, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Due to the spread of the Omicron variant and the surge of cases, Mayor Eduardo Paes announced cancellation of massive and traditional celebration in the beach of Copacabana known as Reveillon. The event that every New Year’s Eve gathers hundreds of thousands of locals and tourists will consist of only a 16 minute fireworks display, with no live music shows nor massive gatherings. (Photo by Wagner Meier/Getty Images)

NEW YORK

The New Year’s Eve Ball touches down to mark the beginning of the new year on January 1, 2022 in New York City. People began celebrating New Year’s Eve at Times Square in 1904, in 1907 the New Year’s Eve Ball made its first descent from the flagpole at One Times Square. (David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/12/31/photos-new-years-eve-celebrations-welcome-2022-around-the-world/

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Revelers around the world bid farewell to another year marred by the pandemic.

/ Updated Dec. 31, 2021 / 8:47 PM EST20 PHOTOS

New York City

Revelers gather ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations in Times Square. Despite record numbers of Covid-19 cases across the city and nationwide, New York City moved forward with New Year’s Eve celebrations.

— Dieu-Nalio Chery / Reuters

Switzerland

Revelers use lights to paint “2022” for a long-exposure photograph in Arolla, Switzerland.

— Jean-Christophe Bott / EPA

Athens

Fireworks explode over the ancient Parthenon temple at the Acropolis in Athens.

— Yorgos Karahalis / AP

Paris

A couple looks out at the Eiffel Tower lit up in blue to mark France hosting the rotating presidency of the European Union.

Paris canceled its annual New Year’s Eve fireworks display.

— Julien De Rosa / AFP – Getty Images

Australia

A girl watches the family fireworks with her mother at Alexandra Garden during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Melbourne.

— Diego Fedele / Getty Images

Philippines

Fireworks explode over Quezon Memorial Circle in Metro Manila, Philippines. Large celebrations to ring in the new year were staged in Metro Manila despite Covid cases surging over the Christmas week.

— Ezra Acayan / Getty Images

Taiwan

Fireworks light up the Taipei skyline.

— Gene Wang / Getty Images

Sydney

Fireworks light up the sky over Sydney Harbor as the clock strikes midnight.

— Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/hello-2022-muted-celebrations-ring-new-year-around-world-n1286814

 

AXIOS AM:

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> Jan 1, 2022

  1. Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood

Photo: Stefano Mazzola/Awakening/Getty Images

This violin-shaped boat — “Violin of Noah,” built during the pandemic — paraded in Venice, Italy, in September with a string quartet aboard.

Why it matters: The zen of the standing instrumentalists, the glee of the spectators, the whimsy of the design, the supportive fleet — all captured a joyful resilience that I pray propels you into ’22.

  1. COVID New Year II

Photo: Kiichiro Sato/AP

Despite COVID cutbacks around the globe, including this one in Tokyo …

Photo: Craig Ruttle/AP

… Times Square still put on a show, with about 15,000 revelers — about a quarter of the usual 58,000.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/ Getty Images

Above, a sanitation worker takes on his first job of ’22.

  1. New York’s new Hizzoner

Photo: Ben Hider/Invision/AP

Eric Adams holds a framed photo of his mother at his swearing-in as New York mayor during the Times Square New Year’s celebration.

  • Adams made no remarksbut told Ryan Seacrest on “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve”: “We’re ready for a major comeback because this is New York.”

AXIOS PM: by Mike Allen ·Dec 31, 2021

  1. Parting shots: Ball drop, behind the scenes

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

With his inauguration postponed due to COVID, Eric Adams will be sworn in as New York mayor in Times Square in the wee hours, shortly after the midnight ball drop.

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Fun facts: The ball is actually a geodesic sphere — 12 feet in diameter, and weighs 11,875 pounds (6 tons), according to a Times Square fact sheet.

  • 2,688 Waterford Crystal triangles are bolted to 672 LED modules, attached to the aluminum frame.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021

   
By Ian Prasad Philbrick

Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

Ringing in 1973 in Times Square.Michael Evans/The New York Times

New Year’s Eve

David Carr, the late Times columnist and media critic, starred in videos years ago that were shot in Times Square. At the end of them, he cheerily said: “They call it Times Square for a reason.”
Carr’s point was that many people don’t know that the square is named for the newspaper. New York City changed the name from Longacre Square in 1904, in honor of The Times moving its offices there.
Adolph Ochs, who was the publisher of The Times at the time, celebrated the move by staging a New Year’s Eve fireworks display in the square. He organized the first midnight ball drop three years later, a tradition that continues even though The Times no longer occupies the building at the center of the square.
This year’s celebrations will be muted as coronavirus cases surge. Attendance will be limited to 15,000 people instead of the usual 58,000. Paris, Los Angeles and other cities are also downsizing their celebrations.
Today, we’re looking back. We focused on past New Year’s events that resonated in this unusual year.

The Times’s first New Year’s: The newspaper, founded in September 1851, covered its first New Year’s Eve less than four months later. It advertised religious ceremonies “appropriate to the close of the year” and stores selling New Year’s presents. On Jan. 1, the paper listed the past year’s notable deaths and “principal events,” including a gale that struck Massachusetts, a world’s fair in London and a coup in France.

The Civil War: On Dec. 30, 1862, Union troops near Murfreesboro, Tenn., played “Yankee Doodle” and “Hail Columbia.” Their Confederate foes answered with “Dixie,” and the two sides ended the night playing “Home, Sweet Home” together. The battle that followed, fought between New Year’s Eve and Jan. 2, 1863, was among the war’s deadliest.

Also on New Year’s Eve 1862, abolitionists held vigils as they waited for President Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. He did so the next day, freeing enslaved people in the states that had seceded from the Union. The vigils became the origin of the New Year’s Eve services that some African American churches still hold.

World War I: America entered World War I in 1917, and Times Square on New Year’s Eve that year was “thoroughly sedate and solemn,” The Times reported. Soldiers and sailors, forbidden to drink, sat in restaurants and hotels. Sugar was rationed, and dinner at the Waldorf Astoria was meatless. Broadway, “ankle-deep in confetti” a year before, was “gloomy, deserted and silent.”

Flu pandemic: New Year’s Eve 1918 also took place during a pandemic. A brutal fall and winter wave had killed tens of thousands of Americans. By Dec. 31, some cities had loosened their public health measures, inviting a more joyous holiday. “Hotels and clubs and other places where revelers congregate to greet the new year are overdoing themselves in the way of entertainment,” The Chicago Daily News reported.

And an image that may resonate in 2021: At a Milwaukee hotel ball, dancers wore masks as prescribed by the health department.
World War II: New Year’s Eve 1941 — less than a month after the U.S. joined World War II — found Times Square upbeat and patriotic. More than half a million people cheered and sang the national anthem under Broadway’s neon lights. “If Axis ears did not hear last night’s revelry in Times Square it was not that New Yorkers didn’t try,” The Times reported the next day.

Still, the square featured a robust police presence, street signs with evacuation instructions and loudspeakers in the event of an air raid. And later wartime holidays were less festive. Because of the “dim outs” meant to conceal the city from a possible attack, 1942 and 1943 were the only New Year’s Eves since 1907 that did not feature Times Square ball drops.

Transition to television: Today, most people experience New Year’s Eve in Times Square as a television show with musical interludes. The Canadian-born musician Guy Lombardo and his band, the Royal Canadians, were early pioneers. They broadcast over the radio starting in the 1920s and, in later decades, on television, an example Dick Clark, Carson Daly and others built on. This year, too, live television will be flush with celebrity-driven countdowns. If you’ll be ringing in the New Year from home, here’s what to watch.

Related:
·         Eric Adams postponed his indoor inauguration ceremony, and will instead be sworn in as New York City’s mayor after midnight in Times Square.

·         Follow along as the world enters 2022.

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Once again Sydney, Australia went all out with their famous fireworks show over the harbour and Opera House, ringing New Year’s 2022 with music, lights and a full display for over 8 minutes after midnight. For the second year in a row, crowds around Sydney harbour were limited in an effort to keep them safe amid COVID-19. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Hong Kong rings in the New Year with a light show and fireworks, a countdown display on a 65.8-metre-tall LED facade, and to the classical music from a live orchestra performance. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

 

#GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Thailand ushered in the New Year with a 6-minute long fireworks display, spanning across the Chao Phraya River bend in Bangkok. Here’s just one of the raw angles from the show. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global Nws on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Dubai, United Arab Emirates welcomed the new year with a mesmerizing display of fireworks from the world’s tallest building, the iconic Burj Khalifa. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines

Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy new year everyone! Thank you for supporting my Youtube channel in 2021. Wishing you health, wealth, and happiness in the New Year ahead. 00:00 Fireworks shots from IP 12 Pro Max 17:16 Fireworks shots from Osmo Pocket 2 – Walk with me and enjoy the city/nature atmosphere! [no talking, no bgm] – Walking Route Map: http://bit.ly/3qWWlUN Time: Jan, 2022 12AM – Camera Setting: 4K 60fps – Feel free to comment which place that you like me to walk next 🙂 SUPPORT ME: – Patreon : https://www.patreon.com/slowwalks – Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/slowwalks or Click “Join” or https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7GC… at my youtube home page to support me with just 1usd/month Thanks and enjoy the video! FOLLOW ME: – Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/slow_walks/

#BBC #BBCiPlayer #NewYearsEve

Happy New Year Live! ? London Fireworks 2022 ? BBC

Streamed live 3 hours ago  BBC

Subscribe and ? to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube ? https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Big Ben rings in the new year. New Year’s Eve 2022 | BBC #BBC #BBCiPlayer #NewYearsEve #HappyNewYear2022 #2022 #Fireworks All our TV channels and S4C are available to watch live through BBC iPlayer, although some programmes may not be available to stream online due to rights. If you would like to read more on what types of programmes are available to watch live, check the ‘Are all programmes that are broadcast available on BBC iPlayer?’ FAQ ? https://bbc.in/2m8ks6v.

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022

Started streaming 2 hours ago  MH Noticias

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022 Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022 Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE

Started streaming 14 hours ago   MH Noticias

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE

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SPACE NEEDLE

Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

The Seattle Space Needle New Year’s 2022 fireworks and Augmented Reality Show! Brought to you by T-Mobile. ?Don’t forget to hit that like button and to subscribe! https://bit.ly/3pDbMQX ?https://linktr.ee/EmilioExploring?? #Seattle #NewYears #SpaceNeedle

Suggested by SME   Beyoncé – Halo

Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video

Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Though with a smaller crowd this time, confetti and fireworks still popped at midnight to ring in another year from the heart of New York City’s Times Square.

#HappyNewYear #Fireworks #NewYearsEve

Countdown to 2022 from all over the world

Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Highlights from New Year’s Eve celebrations around the globe. Watch Brazil’s dazzling firework show by the water to bring in 2022. WATCH the ABC News Livestream: https://bit.ly/3rzBHum SUBSCRIBE to ABC News: https://bit.ly/2vZb6yP WATCH MORE on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc #HappyNewYear #Fireworks #NewYearsEve #World #Countdown #2022

#NYE #Fireworks #NewYear

Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022

Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

From Australia to New York City, onlookers around the globe gathered to celebrate the New Year with fireworks and dazzling light shows. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NYE #Fireworks #NewYear

#HappyNewYear #NewYearsFireworks #NewYearsEve

LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show

Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

LIVE New Years Fireworks around the world! From Sydney to Seattle, see a dazzling New Years Eve Fireworks show as we say goodbye 2021 and Happy New Year 2022! Happy New Year 2022 Everyone! Also enjoy our fantastic New Years Eve Music Playlist as you watching the amazing New Years Fireworks Show! New Year Fireworks Show Around the World – New Year’s Eve Fireworks Live. Happy New Years 2022 LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show Mix New Years Eve Fireworks Around The World Sydney Fireworks / London Fireworks / New York Fireworks / Singapore Fireworks Sydney New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / Sydney New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. New York New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / New York New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. London New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / London New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. Tokyo New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / Tokyo New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. Auckland New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / Auckland New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. Los Angeles New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / Los Angeles New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. Paris New Years Eve 2021 Fireworks Show / Paris New Year 2022 Fireworks Show. #HappyNewYear #NewYearsFireworks #NewYearsEve #NewYearsEveFireworks #HappyNewYear2022 #NewYearFireworks #NewYearsFireworksAroundTheWorld #FireworksAroundTheWorld new year’s eve fireworks [ New Year’s Eve fireworks,New Years fireworks,New Years eve fireworks,New Years fireworks around the world,New years eve fireworks around the world,Happy new years,Happy new year,Happy new year 2022,Happy New Years 2022,Happy new year 2021,Happy New Years 2021,new years eve,nye,fireworks,new year fireworks,nye fireworks,fireworks live,live fireworks,london fireworks,new year,new year’s eve ]

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Happy Holidays Everyone, Peace with Nature, The Discoverer – The Most Beautiful Christmas Trees Around the World, and How to Celebrate St. David’s Day, Wales’ National Holiday

Happy Holidays Everyone, Peace with Nature, The Discoverer – The Most Beautiful Christmas Trees Around the World, and How to Celebrate St. David’s Day, Wales’ National Holiday

Peace with Nature: Photographs and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

the Discoverer: The Most Beautiful Christmas Trees Around the World, and  

How to Celebrate St. David’s Day, Wales’ National Holiday by Julia Hammond

 Peace with Nature: Photographs and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Happy Holidays Everyone from Our Family

Ing’s newest logo

 On Sunday, April 4th, 2021 I sat under our rose tree in the garden with my work book and sketched some drawings.  The end result was a peace sign that I will use as one of my logos. It is a good opportunity, and the first time for me to launch my peace artwork on the 4th Of July.  By focusing on peace for the US and the world, came the message of, “KEEP PEACE IN YOUR HEART”, “LOVE” and “NATURE”. This concluded my wishes for myself and everyone on our planet.  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, July 4, 2021

 Peace with Nature

Happy Holidays Everyone from Our Family

John Watts and Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Saturday, December 25, 2021

The Discoverer: The Most Beautiful Christmas Trees Around the World

For many cities, the annual tradition of putting up a Christmas tree is a treasured one. Many of them have a story behind them and all of them provide a little dash of joy to our lives as the nights draw in and the temperatures fall. Here are our picks for the most beautiful Christmas trees around the world!

London, England

Credit: shanneong/Shutterstock

The tree that stands in Trafalgar Square is gifted each year from Oslo. Since 1947, a tree has symbolized the friendship between the two nations. It’s a token of their gratitude for the support shown by Britain during the Second World War, when the Norwegian government and its Royal family were forced into exile during the Nazi occupation. This year’s Norwegian spruce came from Ullevålsseter in Nordmarka and the tree always features vertical strings of lights, typical of the Scandinavian nation’s pared back style.

New York City, United States

Credit: Andrew F Kazmierski/iStock

The iconic tree that stands in front of New York’s Rockefeller Center was originally designed as a pick-me-up for New Yorkers during the Great Depression in the 1930s. The first tree was erected on the site in 1931 by a bunch of local construction workers – two years later it would become an official city tradition. The ice rink followed in 1936. This year saw the 86th tree-lighting ceremony, and once the holiday’s over, the tree will be cut into lumber and donated to Habitat for Humanity, who’ll use it in home construction.

Tallinn, Estonia

Credit: KavalenkavaVolha/iStock

The Estonian capital claims to have been the first in Europe to erect a municipal Christmas tree, though this is disputed by neighboring Latvia, which asserts that Riga’s predated it. Both cities tell the story of the Brotherhood of the Blackheads, a merchant association that donated a tree. Each year, the tree is installed with much ceremony, though never more so than in 1711 when Peter the Great, the Russian Emperor showed up to oversee the proceedings.

Bethlehem, Palestine

Credit: gary yim/Shutterstock

A Christmas tree is especially meaningful in Bethlehem, where it stands in Manger Square in front of the Church of the Nativity. Christians are a minority population here in the town commonly believed to be the birthplace of Jesus, though the town receives thousands of visitors in the run up to this important festival.

Paris, France

Credit: Felix Catana/Shutterstock

The window displays are delightful but it’s the tree inside the French capital’s most famous department store, Galeries Lafayette, that’s breathtaking. Each year, there’s a different theme – last year, it was the Dream Factory, sponsored by luxury watchmaker Piaget. In 2017, the opulent displays featured a tree made of balloons, thought by some to top the amazing upside-down tree that decorated the store a few years back.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Credit: dabldy/iStock

Rio’s Árvore de Natal da Lagoa returned last year after a two-year absence due to lack of sponsorship. That’s good news for Yuletide fans as it’s thought to be the world’s largest floating Christmas tree, occupying a prime spot in the Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon and lit with over 900000 LED bulbs. Thanks to the support of Petrobras, the 70-meter high tree was lit as part of a spectacular music and lights show.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thediscoverer.com/blog/most-beautiful-christmas-trees-around-the-world/XvHyVpKgiwAG5alP?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1413691281

The Discoverer: How to Celebrate St. David’s Day, Wales’ National Holiday

In the UK, there’s no such thing as Independence Day, because although everyone from the Romans to the Normans has arrived over the years, there’s never been a situation where you’d call it a hostile takeover. In fact, the UK holds a dubious honor: it holds the record for the greatest number of countries which gained independence from a single nation. Over 60 countries commemorate their independence from the UK or Great Britain, including, of course, the United States.

But despite a strong national identity, there’s no British national day. Instead, separate commemorations take place around the nation. In England, St. George’s Day (April 23rd) celebrations waned after the union with Scotland in the 18th century, though St. Andrew’s Day (November 30th) is still an official public holiday north of the border. Northern Ireland adopted St Patrick’s Day (March 17th) as a bank holiday in 2000. The Welsh national day, meanwhile, is held annually on March 1st. Here’s how to celebrate St. David’s Day.

Learn A Little About St. David

St. David’s Cathedral in Pembrokeshire, Wales. Photo by jax10289

St David, the patron saint of Wales, was born in the 6th century. When he was baptized, some believe that the blind monk who held him regained his sight. Following this miracle, the boy David was taught by monks and later adopted their monastic ways. Once, according to legend, he was preaching to a crowd who were struggling to hear him. A dove flew onto his shoulder, the ground lifted up, and his voice was amplified.

Although no one knows exactly when he died, perhaps 589 AD, his death is traditionally agreed to be March 1st. His body was buried at the cathedral in St. David’s in Pembrokeshire, the place that bears his name. In 1123, Pope Calixtus II canonized him and declared that two visits to the saint’s tomb were equivalent to one pilgrimage to Rome. Since then, the day has been important to the Welsh. Read more about St David in this book by Welsh author and historian Gerald Morgan.

Wear a Daffodil – Or a Leek

Daffodil and leek on Welsh flag. Photo by JurassicPaul.

In St. David’s time, records weren’t exactly reliable, but some sources suggest that he may have existed on a diet of leeks and water. Whether that’s true or not, living at the monastery he certainly would have had an austere existence. Some historians think that the tradition of wearing a leek might stem from a 7th century battle; soldiers fighting for the king of Gwynedd, Cadwaladr wore the vegetable to identify themselves against the enemy – a kind of uniform, if you like. Shakespeare, writing Henry V in 1599, mentions in a conversation between Gower and Fluellen the practice of wearing a leek on St. David’s Day. The custom possibly refers to Edward the Black Prince defeating the French at the Battle of Crécy in 1346, when his archers fought in a field of leeks.

One man changed all that: the only Welshman to hold the office of British Prime Minister, David Lloyd George. He encouraged his fellow countrymen to wear a daffodil instead. One myth that perpetuates suggests that Lloyd George wore the flower at a ceremony where the future Edward VIII became Prince of Wales in 1911, though as that took place in July and daffodils bloom in spring, that’s highly unlikely.

Others will point out that one of the Welsh names for daffodil is Cenhinen Bedr, or Peter’s leek, so maybe something got lost in translation. Regardless, Lloyd George was an advocate for the flower, which would have smelled a whole lot better on his lapel than a pungent leek. Grab yourself some bulbs to plant in the fall, wear this pretty pin and bookmark this roundup of the best places to see daffodils in Wales for when travel resumes.

Cook Some Delicious Welsh Food

Traditional Welsh cawl. Photo by CKP1001.

Good news – some of Wales’ best dishes are super easy to cook. Cawl is probably the nearest you’ll get to a Welsh national dish. This tasty stew traditionally uses lamb or mutton, but you can make it with brisket or gammon too. Chunks of meat are slow-cooked with leeks, potatoes, onions, carrots and rutabaga in a meat stock to create a hearty dish that’s both filling and nutritious.

If you’re in the mood for a tasty snack, try a variation of cheese on toast called Welsh Rarebit. Pronounced “rabbit” by some and “rare-bit” by others, a thick cheesy sauce spiked with mustard is grilled over thick slices of crusty bread. Another quintessentially Welsh treat is Bara Brith, a fruit loaf containing tea, once made with yeast but these days much quicker to prepare. Finally, knock up a batch of Welsh cakes. They’re a kind of flatbread whose flavor is boosted by the addition of fat, sugar, and dried fruit before they’re cooked on a griddle pan.

Listen to a Welsh Choir Online

The 2018 National Eisteddfod Welsh Culture Festival in the Bay of Cardiff. Photo by Andreas Zerndl

Music and poetry are of great significance in Wales. For centuries, singing has been a way to pass stories and traditions down from generation to generation. It’s helped, in part, by the poetic nature of the Welsh language. (Incidentally, that didn’t go unnoticed by the author J.R.R Tolkien who appropriated certain characteristics of Welsh for the Elvish language he used in the Lord of the Rings.) Today, Eisteddfodau, the name given to competitive festivals of music and poetry in Wales, are still held on a regular basis, both on St David’s Day and in the summer. The next national Eisteddfod is scheduled for 2022.

After the Industrial Revolution, miners found solace from the hideous conditions of their day job in communal song – by 1900 there were an estimated 5,000 choirs across the country. And because mining was predominantly a male occupation, men-only choirs became common. One of the best is the Treorchy Male Choir, whose members once traveled to Windsor to sing for Queen Victoria. You can listen to them here.

Try a Welsh Tongue Twister

The Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch train station. Photo by hipproductions.

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch boasts the longest place name not only in Wales, but anywhere in the UK. Translated into English, it means St. Mary’s Church in the hollow of the white hazel near to the rapid whirlpool of Llantysilio of the red cave. Its 58 character moniker is often shortened to Llanfair PG which is considerably easier to fit on an envelope and simpler to pronounce so long as you can master the Welsh “ll” sound. Advanced Welsh speakers could try these fun tongue twisters too.

Dydd G?yl Dewi Hapus! Happy St David’s Day!

About the author: Julia Hammond | Travel Writer

Enthusiastic advocate for independent travel and passionate geographer, Julia considers herself privileged to earn a living doing something she loves. When not roaming the globe, you’ll find her windswept but smiling, chatting away to her two dogs as they wander the Essex marshes.

Top photo by ComposedPix

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Happy Holidays Everyone, 25 Stunning Photos of The Most Colorful Places on Earth, The Discoverer, BBC Earth, and TEDMED

Happy Holidays Everyone, 25 Stunning Photos of The Most Colorful Places on Earth, The Discoverer, BBC Earth, and TEDMED

The Discoverer: 25 Stunning Photos of the Most Colorful Places on Earth

Baby Penguin Tries to Make Friends | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 18, 2021  BBC Earth

Baby Penguin Must Find Mother Before Freezing | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 19, 2021  BBC Earth

Baby Penguin Transfer | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 12, 2021  BBC Earth

TEDMED: Frans de Waal – The Surprising Science of Alpha Males?

The Discoverer: 25 Stunning Photos of the Most Colorful Places on Earth

Natural pink lakes, rainbow mountains and vibrantly-colored towns — this planet is home to a striking kaleidoscope of colors. Certain beguiling corners make for visually bold journeys. For curious wanderers and photographers chasing landscapes of rainbow hues and jewel tones, discover these 25 most colorful places on Earth.

St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

Credit: Elena Elisseeva/Shutterstock

Set on the eastern island of Newfoundland, St. John’s is composed of a maze of hilly streets, lined with candy-colored row houses that have earned the nickname “Jelly Bean Row.” Though it’s Newfoundland’s largest city, St. John’s population of artists, musicians and cozy neighborhood pubs exude a refreshing Canadian small-town vibe.

Cartagena, Colombia

Credit: Chrispictures/Shutterstock

Perched at the top of South America on Colombia’s Caribbean Coast, Cartagena is a beautifully preserved historic city of old world charm. Its UNESCO World Heritage Old Town is bound by an eight-mile stone wall that encloses a beguiling blend of colorful colonial buildings, leafy plazas and historic cobbled alleyways.

The Wave, Arizona, USA

Credit: ronnybas frimages/ Shutterstock

The monumental waves were carved into the sandstone formation of Arizona’s Vermilion Cliffs National Monument by way of wind erosion, giving the geologic wonder its name — The Wave. This attraction currently limits the number of daily visitors to 20 to protect its fragile beauty, and 10 of the daily permits can be reserved online four months in advance through a lottery system.

Grand Prismatic Spring, Yellowstone, USA

Credit: Wisanu Boonrawd/ Shutterstock

Measuring 121 feet deep and 370 feet wide, the Grand Prismatic Spring is America’s largest hot spring, and the world’s third largest. Its steaming turquoise pool is encircled by rainbow-colored bands of algae in Wyoming’s Yellowstone National Park, which houses half the world’s collection of geysers, fumaroles and mud pots.

Northern Lights

Credit: Atiketta Sangasaeng/Shutterstock

Seen in high latitude regions of the world, the northern lights are a natural phenomenon where vibrant shades of green and pink dance across the night sky. There a few places in the world to observe this colorful light display — Alaska, the Yukon, Iceland and the northernmost reaches of Norway and Sweden. Though it’s difficult to predict the exact occurrence of the northern lights, they can generally be observed between late August and mid-April in the most intensely dark hours of the night from 930 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Havana, Cuba

Credit: Swedishnomad.com – Alex W/Shutterstock

This Caribbean city’s cobbled streets, elegantly aging facades and classic American vintage cars give Havana an old world charm and colorful atmosphere. Calle Obispo is the Cuban capital’s vibrant commercial hub, its collection of art galleries, lively cafes and handicraft shops heavily trafficked by locals and tourists.

Elafonisi Beach Beach, Crete, Greece

Credit: Patryk Kosmider/Shutterstock

Once upon a time, this pink-sand beach was a well-protected local secret. But these days, visitors flock to southern Crete to enjoy this shallow, warm lagoon and sandbar. The surrounding area also comes alive with color in the spring when more than 100 rare plants and flowers bloom. Consistently ranked as one of the world’s top beaches by international beach bums, its soft sands appear a dusty pink under the bright sunlight, and transforms into a shade of deep rose under the glittering light of dawn and dusk.

Willemstad, Curaçao

Credit: SirimasB/ Shutterstock

A Dutch Caribbean Island, Curaçao represents a slice of Europe in Caribbean paradise. A succession of hidden beaches and stretches of rugged coastline make up the spellbinding landscape of this island nation, and its rich marine life makes it a top destination for snorkeling and diving. Visit Curaçao’s bustling capital of Willemstad, where the enclave of colorful Dutch colonial buildings is the city’s highlight.

Antigua, Guatemala

Credit: Fotos593/ Shutterstock

The pastel dwellings of Antigua are ringed by three volcanoes and surrounded by coffee plantations that offer ample opportunity for avid exploration. This Spanish colonial town once ruled as the nation’s capital for 200 years, but its reign was ended by a catastrophic earthquake that struck the city in 1773. The multitude of Spanish language schools attracts a steady stream of keen foreigners to this Unesco World Heritage destination and has become a favorite weekend getaway for middle-class Guatemalans.

Cinque Terre, Italy

Credit: Anna Om/ Shutterstock

The five medieval fishing villages of Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Riomaggiore and Manarola make up Cinque Terre, a UNESCO destination situated on the steep cliffs of the dramatic Italian Riviera. With car traffic in Cinque Terre heavily restricted, visitors travel between villages by regional train, ferry, or footpaths along the rugged coastline that pass terraced vineyards and fragrant olive groves.

Fly Geyser, Nevada, USA

Credit: Lukas Bischoh Photograph/ Shutterstock

Natural geothermal pressure met with human error resulted in the part-manmade geologic wonder of Fly Geyser in 1964. Situated on private land in Nevada’s Washoe County, this rainbow geyser was an attempt to drill a well that went wrong. Though it’s located on private property, three-hour guided walking tours of Fly Geyser and its surrounding environment are offered throughout the year on select days of the week.

Jardin Majorelle, Marrakesh, Morocco

Credit: Balate Dorin/ Shutterstock

This 12-acre botanical garden in Marrakesh was first the vision of French painter Jacques Majorelle in 1924 and was subsequently owned by fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent, who purchased the property to preserve Majorelle’s vision. A striking desert mirage of cactus gardens and bamboo groves, Jardin Majorelle showcases 300 species of flora from five continents of the world, which provide a visually stunning contrast to the electric shades of Majorelle blue and loud yellows that paint the garden’s facades.

Laguna Colorada, Bolivia

Credit: Byelikova Oksana/ Shutterstock

You’ll find this shallow, burnt-orange and pink lake perched 14000 feet above sea level in Bolivia’s Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve. Laguna Colorada’s rusty hues derive from the algae which flourish in the mineral-rich lake, contrasted by the white deposits of borax and sodium that envelop its waters. Visitors to Laguna Colorada witness all three species of South America’s flamingos breed here.

Burano, Italy

Credit: StevsnZZ/ iStock

Drawing fewer visitors than bustling Venice, the island of Burano in the northern Venetian lagoon is a welcome respite from the aggressive crowds of its mainland counterpart. This destination was once known for its tradition of intricate handmade lace, but is now just as famous for its brightly-painted houses that line the island’s boat-filled canals.

Five Flower Lake, Sichuan, China

Credit: Efired/ Shutterstock

Ji?zhàig?u National Park in China’s Sichuan province is one of the nation’s main natural highlights, with Five Flower Lake a top attraction. Hike the path to the clifftop overlook of Tiger Mouth for a bird’s eye view of the multihued lake, its crystal clear waters shifting between shades of green, blue and yellow against a backdrop of snow-dusted peaks.

Lavender Fields, Provence, France

Credit: nevodka/ Shutterstock

The romantic purple fields of Provence have attracted visitors for decades. Home to an abundance of fragrant fields in the region, those belonging to Plateau de Valensole are by far the most famous and photographed. Lavender season in France begins the final week of June through to the beginning of August, but time your visit for the peak blooming season in early July to witness endless seas of purple.

Rainbow Mountains, Peru

Credit: Seumas Christie-Johnston/ Shutterstock

Considered a holy site by many Peruvians, Rainbow Mountains, known locally as Vinicuna, lay deep within the Andes Mountains. With a lofty peak of over 17000 feet above sea level, access to this wild landscape and rainbow bands of turquoise, maroon and gold requires several days of arduous trekking, plus its trailhead is three hours southeast of Cusco by car.

Keukenhof, Netherlands

Credit: Olena Z/ Shutterstock

Attracting over 1.4 million visitors annually, Keukenhof Gardens is one of the Netherlands’ top destinations. Seven million flower bulbs are planted in the garden’s 32 hectares by 40 gardeners each year, and in the spring the entire landscape erupts in a colorful explosion of yellow daffodils, fragrant hyacinths and gorgeous tulips. Open for an eight-week period between March and May every year, the Keukenhof Gardens can be accessed by bus from Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, or via car and bike from the nearby town of Lisse.

Guatapé, Colombia

Credit: Jess Kraft/Shutterstock

A seaside town on the edge of the artificial lake, Embalse Guatapé, is a favorite destination for Colombian weekenders and popular day trip for travelers from Medellín, some 70 km west. This holiday town has been widely regarded as the world’s most colorful destination — the bottom half of all its residents’ brightly colored homes are adorned in paintings of animals, shapes and people.

Red Sea Coral Reef, Egypt

Credit: Vlad61/Shutterstock

Egypt’s Red Sea is a renowned destination among international scuba divers, with warm waters year round and a collection of shipwrecks to explore, including some from World War II. With water temperatures rarely dipping below 71°F even in the Egyptian winters, Sharm El Sheikh, Marsa Alam and Hurghada are three of the Red Sea’s favorite dive spots, and many of its 1100 species of fish are unique to the region.

Menton, France

Credit: Xantana/ iStock

This delightful seaside town on the Côte d’Azur is revered by locals for its distinctive lemons, celebrated in February annually at the Lemon Festival. But Menton’s Old Town of pastel-hued dwellings and sun-kissed beaches entice travelers to make the trek to this quaint corner.

Chefchaouen, Morocco

Credit: Vixit/ Shutterstock

The Blue Pearl of Morocco sits beneath the twin peaks of the dramatic Rif Mountains. The town is painted in shades of blue that range from powder to navy, making this town arguably the nation’s most charming destination. The mountain village’s color scheme was brought by Jewish refugees seeking respite from Hitler in the 1930s, who brought with them the tradition of coloring items blue, a symbol of heaven.

Bo-Kaap, Cape Town, South Africa

Credit: littlewormy/Shutterstock

Situated at the foothills of Signal Hill, the brightly-painted building of Bo-Kaap are part of Cape Town’s oldest residential area, where Cape Malay slaves were housed in the 1760s. An artistic blend of Cape Dutch and Cape Georgian architectural styles line its quaint cobbled streets making the low roof homes one of the city’s most photographed attraction.

St. Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia

Credit: Baturina Yuliya/ Shutterstock

An iconic symbol of Russia, St. Basil’s Cathedral stands at the southern end of Moscow’s Red Square, its nine onion-shaped domes a collection of whimsical colors and patterns. St. Basil’s Cathedral was commissioned by Ivan the Terrible to commemorate his 1552 capture of the Tatar stronghold of Kazan, and remains one of the most recognizable monuments of the country.

Batu Caves, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Credit: Damian Pankowiec/Shutterstock

Situated 13 km north of Kuala Lumpur, a day-long excursion from the Malaysian capital to Batu Caves is an unmissable and colorful experience. The succession of limestone caves is accessed via a set of 272 rainbow stairs, guarded by an immense gold painted statue of Hindu deity Lord Murugan.

Zh?ngy? D?nxiá National Geopark, Gansu, China

Credit: HelloRF Zcool/ Shutterstock

Officially designated a national geopark in 2011, Zh?ngy? D?nxiá in the Chinese province of Gansu is a magnet for outdoor enthusiasts and photographers. Mineral deposits paint these rainbow mountains a striking blend of oranges, yellows and browns, which are best viewed at the break of dawn when the early morning light dances across the rolling hills.

About the author: Vivian Chung | Writer for The Discoverer

Dreamer extraordinaire. Ardent food lover. Vivian is prone to wander and escaping from responsibilities. At heart, she is a curious backpacker with a thirst for adventure. Based in Vancouver, Canada, Vivian is perpetually browsing through seat sales and scheming her next getaway.

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Baby Penguin Tries To Make Friends | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 18, 2021  BBC Earth

In order to gain its independence, this young penguin must become used to interacting with their peers. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Watch more: Planet Earth http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthPlaylist Blue Planet http://bit.ly/BluePlanetPlaylist Planet Earth II http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthIIPlaylist Planet Dinosaur https://bit.ly/PlanetDinosaurPlaylist Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale This enchanting film follows the adventures of one charismatic emperor penguin from the time he emerges from the egg to the moment he leaves for the sea. Emperor penguins grow up during the winter in one of the coldest places on Earth – the Antarctic. The conditions are harsh and chicks must endure temperatures of minus 60 degrees Celsius and terrifying blizzards. This film follows the trials and tribulations of one adorable fluffy chick – from his first tentative steps on the ice, to getting lost, to hanging out with the other chicks. It also shows the lengths his parents will go to provide food, overcoming huge obstacles, avoiding predators like leopard seals, and enduring freezing conditions. Full of tense and moving moments as well as comedy and character, Snow Chick follows the emperor penguin’s life story in a level of detail never attempted before. Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you’ll find 50 years worth of entertaining and thought-provoking natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn’t get more exciting than this. Want to share your views with the team? Join our BBC Studios Voice: https://www.bbcstudiosvoice.com/register This is a commercial page from BBC Studios. Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback-…

Baby Penguin Must Find Mother Before Freezing | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 19, 2021  BBC Earth

In the bitter cold, this chick’s baby fluff won’t keep it warm enough to survive and it needs to find mum or dad soon. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Watch more: Planet Earth http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthPlaylist Blue Planet http://bit.ly/BluePlanetPlaylist Planet Earth II http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthIIPlaylist Planet Dinosaur https://bit.ly/PlanetDinosaurPlaylist Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale This enchanting film follows the adventures of one charismatic emperor penguin from the time he emerges from the egg to the moment he leaves for the sea. Emperor penguins grow up during the winter in one of the coldest places on Earth – the Antarctic. The conditions are harsh and chicks must endure temperatures of minus 60 degrees Celsius and terrifying blizzards. This film follows the trials and tribulations of one adorable fluffy chick – from his first tentative steps on the ice, to getting lost, to hanging out with the other chicks. It also shows the lengths his parents will go to provide food, overcoming huge obstacles, avoiding predators like leopard seals, and enduring freezing conditions. Full of tense and moving moments as well as comedy and character, Snow Chick follows the emperor penguin’s life story in a level of detail never attempted before. Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you’ll find 50 years worth of entertaining and thought-provoking natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn’t get more exciting than this. Want to share your views with the team? Join our BBC Studios Voice: https://www.bbcstudiosvoice.com/register This is a commercial page from BBC Studios. Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback-…

Baby Penguin Transfer | Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale | BBC Earth

Dec 12, 2021  BBC Earth

The transfer of a baby penguin from parent to parent, must be done as quickly as possible, otherwise the chick is in serious danger. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Watch more: Planet Earth http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthPlaylist Blue Planet http://bit.ly/BluePlanetPlaylist Planet Earth II http://bit.ly/PlanetEarthIIPlaylist Planet Dinosaur https://bit.ly/PlanetDinosaurPlaylist Snow Chick: A Penguin’s Tale This enchanting film follows the adventures of one charismatic emperor penguin from the time he emerges from the egg to the moment he leaves for the sea. Emperor penguins grow up during the winter in one of the coldest places on Earth – the Antarctic. The conditions are harsh and chicks must endure temperatures of minus 60 degrees Celsius and terrifying blizzards. This film follows the trials and tribulations of one adorable fluffy chick – from his first tentative steps on the ice, to getting lost, to hanging out with the other chicks. It also shows the lengths his parents will go to provide food, overcoming huge obstacles, avoiding predators like leopard seals, and enduring freezing conditions. Full of tense and moving moments as well as comedy and character, Snow Chick follows the emperor penguin’s life story in a level of detail never attempted before. Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you’ll find 50 years worth of entertaining and thought-provoking natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn’t get more exciting than this. Want to share your views with the team? Join our BBC Studios Voice: https://www.bbcstudiosvoice.com/register This is a commercial page from BBC Studios. Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback-…

In this fascinating look at the “alpha male,” primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males — generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping — and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. “Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male,” de Waal says.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Frans de Waal · Primatologist

Frans de Waal studies primate social behavior — how they fight and reconcile, share and cooperate.

TEDMED 2017 | November 2017

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HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE: Colossal, Live Science, and  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE: Colossal, Live Science, and  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

Colossal: Exceptionally Slow-Motion Footage Documents Tropical Butterflies Bursting from Their Chrysalises and Taking Flight, Tropical Butterflies in Slow Mo & Behind the Scenes!”  Dec 14, 2021  Ant Lab

A New Infrared View of the Dolomites by Paolo Pettigiani Shows Craggy Landscapes in Cotton Candy Colors, MARCH 26, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Live Science: TOP SCIENCE NEWS

X-ray analysis reveals ‘highly decorated’ Viking sword caked in dirt and rust

Rare wispy ice formations streak across the sea near Antarctica in beautiful satellite images

Physicists create new state of matter from quantum soup of magnetically weird particles

Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

“Open” 2021 Art Exhibition – Part 1 – Overall and Painting Categories, Aug 2, 2021  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

“Open” 2015 Online Art Exhibition – Part 2 – Painting Category, Sep 2, 2015  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

Colossal: Exceptionally Slow-Motion Footage Documents Tropical Butterflies Bursting from Their Chrysalises and Taking Flight, DECEMBER 15, 2021,  GRACE EBERT

In an extravagant display of evolutionary tricks and mating rituals, new footage by Adrian Smith of the wildly popular Ant Lab YouTube channel focuses on six tropical butterflies. The extremely slow-motion montage zeroes in on a trio of tropical creatures as they crack open and emerge from their chrysalises and others like the striking Blue Morpho as they take flight. Smith paired the spectacular clips with behind-the-scenes footage of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences Living Conservatory, which fosters a climate-controlled environment that hundreds of butterflies hatch from every few weeks. If you haven’t seen his previous footage yet, make sure you watch these moths and an unusual muppet-esque troupe as they lift off the ground. (via The Kids Should See This)

Photography Science

Tropical Butterflies in Slow Mo & Behind the Scenes!” 

Dec 14, 2021  Ant Lab

I filmed slow motion flight and time-lapse eclosion sequences of tropical butterflies, and give a behind-the-scenes tour of our museum’s walk-in tropical rainforest exhibit. Check out https://naturalsciences.org/ for info about when to visit our museum and the butterflies. [Right now (Dec, 2021) the exhibit is closed due to pandemic-related safety measures. But we’re all hoping we can lift restrictions and get it open to all again soon!] Content 00:00 – owl butterfly 01:09 – behind the scenes 02:22 – timelapse eclosion 03:29 – longwings 04:13 – blue morpho 05:14 – malachite 05:38 – cattleheart 06:21 – blue morpho Butterfly species (in order of appearance) “Owl butterfly” – Caligo eurilochus “Blue-frosted Banner” Male – Catonephele numilia “Heliconious Longwing” – Heliconius hecale “Monarch” – Danaus plexippus “Heliconious Longwing” (on left) – Heliconius melpomene “Heliconious Longwing” (on right) – Heliconius hecale “Blue Morpho” – Morpho peleides “Malachite” – Siproeta stelenes “Cattleheart” – Parides arcas Music licensed from soundofpicture.com Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dradriansmith/ Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAdrianSmith#BUTTERFLIES #INSECTS #VIDEO

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2021/12/adrian-smith-butterflies/?mc_cid=760adfbb14&mc_eid=e0479fdbb0

A New Infrared View of the Dolomites by Paolo Pettigiani Shows Craggy Landscapes in Cotton Candy Colors

MARCH 26, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

26-year old photographer Paolo Pettigiani (previously) has been taking pictures since age 11, and in the last few years has produced several series of eye-popping infrared images. Pettigiani’s most recent work showcases the Dolomites, a craggy mountain range in the northeastern region of his native Italy.

Infrared photography uses a special film or light sensor that processes the usually not-visible wavelengths of infrared light (specifically near-infrared, as opposed to far-infrared, which is used in thermal imaging.) The resulting images from Pettigiani depict the stands of coniferous trees as watermelon-pink, while surfaces that don’t reflect IR light stay more true to their nature hues. You can see more of the artist’s photographs on his website, as well as on Behance and Instagram. Pettigiani also offers prints of his work via Lumas.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2018/03/dolomites-by-paolo-pettigiani/

Live Science: TOP SCIENCE NEWS

X-ray analysis reveals ‘highly decorated’ Viking sword caked in dirt and rust

(Historic Environment Scotland)

Archaeologists in Scotland have revealed the ornate hilt of a Viking sword after scanning it with X-rays. The sword is highly corroded and covered in dirt, but the new images show the weapon in a new light and reveal its striking design.

The sword is part of a hoard of Viking treasures unearthed in 2015 at a burial site on Papa Westray, one of the Orkney Islands located north of mainland Scotland. Archaeologists found the sword laid atop human remains. The burial also contained a buckle, arrows and a shield boss — the metal, central part of a shield. The site likely dates back to the first-generation Norwegian settlers, who came to the Orkney Islands during the 10th century, according to Historic Environment Scotland.

Full Story: Live Science (12/14)

Live Science: AMAZING EARTH
Rare wispy ice formations streak across the sea near Antarctica in beautiful satellite images

(NASA Earth Observatory/Joshua Stevens/Landsat 8)

Strong winds and unusual ocean currents helped paint a breathtaking icescape on the surface of the ocean near Antarctica, and the rare phenomenon was recently captured in a stunning satellite image.

The incredible image was taken on Nov. 20 by the Operational Land Imager onboard Landsat 8, a collaboration between NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey, and was released on Dec. 8 by NASA’s Earth Observatory. The picture focuses on a channel of water about 3.7 miles (6 kilometers) across between the Ronne Ice Shelf — a permanent floating extension of the main Antarctic Ice Sheet, which birthed A-76, the world’s largest iceberg, in May — and a large chunk of sea ice in the Weddell Sea.

Full Story: Live Science (12/14)

Live Science: MATH & PHYSICS
Physicists create new state of matter from quantum soup of magnetically weird particles

(Phillip Tur via Shutterstock)

Scientists have spotted a long hypothesized, never-seen-before state of matter in the laboratory for the first time.

By firing lasers at an ultracold lattice of rubidium atoms, scientists have prodded the atoms into a messy soup of quantum uncertainty known as a quantum spin liquid. The atoms in this quantum magnetic soup quickly became connected, linking up their states across the entire material in a process called quantum entanglement. This means that any change to one atom causes immediate changes in all of the others in the material; this breakthrough could pave the way for the development of even better quantum computers, the researchers said in a paper describing their findings Dec. 3 in the journal Science.

Full Story: Live Science (12/14)

“Open” 2021 Art Exhibition – Part 1 – Overall and Painting Categories

Aug 2, 2021  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

Visit our Website https://www.lightspacetime.art Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery is pleased to announce that its 11th Annual “Open” 2021 Art Exhibition is now posted on its website and ready to be viewed online. 2D and 3D, artists were asked to submit their best representational and/or abstract art. The gallery received submissions from 26 different countries around the world and 36 different states including the District of Columbia. Overall, the gallery received 879 entries that were judged for this art competition. Congratulations to Overall 1st Place winner, John H. Diephouse, and all the artists designated as this month’s winners, along with the Special Merit and Special Recognition artists. To proceed to the gallery’s 11th Annual “Open” online art exhibition follow this link: https://www.lightspacetime.art/open-a….

“Open” 2015 Online Art Exhibition – Part 2 – Painting Category

Sep 2, 2015  Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery

Visit our Website https://www.lightspacetime.art Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery is pleased to announce that the September 2015 Open Art Exhibition is now posted on their website and is ready to be viewed online. The “Open” is a No Theme Art Competition, whereby artists were asked to submit their best representational or abstract artworks on any subject matter. An art competition was held in August 2015 which determined and judged the art for this exhibition. The gallery received submissions from 19 different countries from around the world and they also received entries from 34 different states and the District of Columbia. Overall, there were 734 entries judged for this art competition. The Guest Judge for this competition was Jeffrey Shonkwiler the Founder of Florida Artists Registry, a member supported arts organization, created in 2000. He is past director of Gallery at Avalon Island where he curated over 60 exhibits. http://artistsregistry.com. Congratulations to the artists who have been designated as this month’s category winners, along with the winning Special Merit and Special Recognition artists. The gallery commends all of the winning artists for their artistic skill and their creativity, as this online art exhibition is indicative of their creativity. To proceed to the gallery’s “Open” online art exhibition follow this link https://www.lightspacetime.art/open-n….

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NASA Image of the Day, JPL News Month in Review, Total Solar Eclipse, and Announces 2021 Class of Astronaut Candidates, Part 1

NASA Image of the Day, JPL News Month in Review, Total Solar Eclipse, and Announces 2021 Class of Astronaut Candidates, Part 1

NASA Image of the Day

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory – Thursday, December 2, 2021, MONTH IN REVIEW 

What’s UP – December 2021,

Are Water Plumes Spraying from Europa? NASA’s Europa Clipper Is on the Case, Nov 30, 2021

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Sends a Picture Postcard from Mars, Nov 23, 2021

New Deep Learning Method Adds 301 Planets to Kepler’s Total Count, Nov 22, 2021

NASA’s Perseverance Captures Challenging Flight by Mars Helicopter, Nov 18, 2021

One Year from Launch: US-European Satellite to Track World’s Water, Nov 17, 2021

Twin of NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover Begins Terrain Tests, Nov 17, 2021

Live Feed of the Dec. 4, 2021 Total Solar Eclipse

Streamed live 23 hours ago 12.3.2021  NASA

NASA Announces 2021 Class of Astronaut Candidates

Streamed live on Dec 6, 2021  NASA

NASA Image of the Day

Snoopy to Fly Aboard Artemis I

Snoopy, the Zero G Indicator for the Artemis I mission, was delivered to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 2 2021.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches with NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) spacecraft onboard from Launch Complex 39A, Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The IXPE spacecraft is the first satellite dedicated to measuring the polarization of X-rays from a variety of cosmic sources, such as black holes and neutron stars. Launch occurred at 1:00 a.m. EST. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches with NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) spacecraft onboard from Launch Complex 39A, Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021

Observing a Dark Nebula

This stunning image captures a small region on the edge of the inky Coalsack Nebula, aldwell

Exploring the Secrets of the Universe

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket launches on the Department of Defense’s Space Test Program 3 (STP-3) mission from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The mission’s Space Test Program Satellite-6 (STPSat-6) spacecraft hosts NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) and the NASA-U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph (UVSC) Pathfinder. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Lifts Off!

NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration, or LCRD, launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021.

Eclipse Over Antarctica

This image of our home planet shows how Earth looked from more than 950,000 miles, or 1.5 million kilometers, away during the total solar eclipse visible in Antarctica on Dec. 4, 2021

Become a Flight Director … And Perhaps a Legend

Christopher Kraft, flight director during Project Mercury, works at his console inside the Flight Control area at Mercury Mission Control.

Photographing Mars

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its black-and-white navigation cameras to capture panoramas of this scene at two times of day on Nov. 16, 2021

Eagle, Omega Nebula, Trifid, and Lagoon: Four Famous Nebulae

These four nebulae are known for their breathtaking beauty: the Eagle Nebula (which contains the Pillars of Creation), the Omega Nebula, the Trifid Nebula, and the Lagoon Nebula

GMT312_ISS_Flyaround_Part2_1087

Dragons-Eye View

As the Crew-2 mission departed the International Space Station aboard SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour, the crew snapped this image of the station.

Hubble’s View of Planetary Nebula Reveals Complex Structure

NGC 6891 is a bright, asymmetrical planetary nebula in the constellation Delphinus, the Dolphin

Black Hole Collision May Have Exploded with Light

This artist’s concept shows a supermassive black hole surrounded by a disk of gas

Hubble Witnesses Shock Wave of Colliding Gases in Running Man Nebula

Mounded, luminous clouds of gas and dust glow in this Hubble image of a Herbig-Haro object known as HH 45.

Stay Tuned for DART!

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) will help determine if intentionally crashing a spacecraft into an asteroid is an effective way to change its course

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

 

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory <jplnewsroom@jpl.nasa.gov> 

Thursday, December 2, 2021

MONTH IN REVIEW

 

 

 

What’s Up – December 2021
December 2021 skywatching highlights: A string of sunset planets, a chance to spy 2021’s brightest comet, and the annual Geminid meteor shower won’t be completely squashed by a bright Moon.
› Watch now

What are some skywatching highlights in December 2021? See three planets after sunset, but say goodbye to Venus as the “Evening Star” at the end of the month. Then have a hunt for newly discovered Comet Leonard in the early morning through mid-month. Finally, get up early on Dec. 14 to watch for Geminid meteors after local moonset, around 2 a.m.

Transcript:

What’s Up for December? Your early evening highlights, a chance to catch a comet, and the annual Geminid meteors.

On December 6th through the 10th, look westward following sunset for the Moon visiting Venus, Saturn, and Jupiter in turn. The Moon’s crescent fills out as it appears higher in the sky each evening over the course of the week.

Enjoy the view of dazzling Venus as the “evening star” while it lasts, though. Our cloud-covered neighbor planet will sink ever closer to the horizon during the month, disappearing for most of us by New Years’. It’ll reappear in late January as a morning planet preceding the sunrise, and won’t be back in evening skies until December of next year.

Next in December, there’s a recently discovered comet on its way into the inner solar system that might be worth trying to observe. It’s known as Comet Leonard, and it will be at its closest to Earth on December 12th, just a couple of weeks before it reaches its closest distance from the Sun.

Now, comets are notoriously difficult to predict in terms of brightness and visibility. Comet Leonard is predicted to peak at a brightness that will probably require binoculars to spot it. There’s a chance it could be bright enough to see with the unaided eye, but again, with comets, you really never know.

In the first couple of weeks of December, Comet Leonard can be found in the east before sunrise, passing between Arcturus and the handle of the Big Dipper. It approaches the horizon right around the time of its closest approach to Earth, meaning it’ll likely be brighter but more challenging to observe. It then switches over to being an evening object after around Dec. 14th, for just a little while after the Sun sets – as it begins its long haul outward from the Sun again, progressively fading in brightness.

Finally, the Geminid meteors are a highlight of December skies each year. This year’s meteor shower peaks overnight on December 13th and 14th. Apart from the weather, the phase of the Moon is usually the main factor in whether a meteor shower will have good viewing any given year. This year, the Moon will be almost 80% full at the peak of the Geminids, which isn’t ideal. However, that bright Moon will set somewhere around 2 a.m. wherever you’re located, leaving a couple of hours for meteor watching before dawn.

The meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Gemini, which you’ll find high in the west. Now while most annual meteor showers are caused by Earth passing through trails of dust-sized particles of comet debris, the Geminids are one of the few meteor showers that are caused by debris from an asteroid that crosses Earth’s orbit – in this case, one called Phaethon.

Recently, NASA scientists shared findings that suggest the difference between an asteroid and a comet might be less clear than we realized, with fizzing sodium on Phaethon playing the same role as vaporizing ice on comets.

And whether you catch a glimpse of Comet Leonard, or meteors from Asteroid Phaethon, both are reminders of the deep connections between Earth and the rest of the solar system that we discover because we look outward, and we explore.

Here are the phases of the Moon for December. You can catch up on all of NASA’s missions to explore the solar system and beyond at nasa.gov. I’m Preston Dyches from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and that’s What’s Up for this month.

What’s Up: December 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA  3:19

Dec 2, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

What are some skywatching highlights in December 2021? See three planets after sunset, but say goodbye to Venus as the “Evening Star” at the end of the month. Then have a hunt for newly discovered Comet Leonard in the early morning through mid-month. Finally, get up early on Dec. 14 to watch for Geminid meteors after local moonset, around 2 a.m. Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/videos/whats-up-december-2021?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

 

Are Water Plumes Spraying from Europa? NASA’s Europa Clipper Is on the Case

Nov 30, 2021

This triptych image shows views of Jupiter’s moon Europa as taken by various NASA spacecraft, including Voyager 1, Voyager 2 and Galileo.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Full Image Details

Finding plumes at Europa is an exciting prospect, but scientists warn it’ll be tricky, even from up close.

In 2005, images of a brilliant watery plume erupting from the surface of Saturn’s moon Enceladus captivated the world. The giant column of vapor, ice particles, and organic molecules spraying from the moon’s south polar region suggested that there’s a liquid water ocean below Enceladus’ ice shell and confirmed the moon is geologically active. The plume also thrust Enceladus and other worlds in the outer solar system, with no atmospheres and far from the heat of the Sun, toward the top of NASA’s list of places to search for signs of life.

Scientists now are preparing for a mission to another ice-covered ocean world with possible plumes: Jupiter’s moon Europa. Scheduled to launch in 2024, NASA’s Europa Clipper spacecraft will study the moon from its deep interior to its surface to determine whether it has ingredients that make it a viable home for life.

This composite image shows suspected plumes of water vapor erupting from Jupiter’s moon Europa. The image of the plume was made from data collected by NASA’s Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in 2014. The image of Europa itself is made from data from NASA’s Galileo and Voyager missions. Credit: NASA/ESA/W. Sparks (STScI)/USGS Astrogeology Science Center Full Image Details

Like Enceladus, Europa is geologically dynamic, meaning both ice-covered moons generate heat inside as their solid layers stretch and flex from the gravitational tug-of-war with their host planets and neighboring moons. This, instead of heat from the Sun, keeps subsurface water from freezing. The heat may also help produce or circulate life’s chemical building blocks at their seafloors, including carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur.

But that’s where the similarities end.

“A lot of people think Europa is going to be Enceladus 2.0, with plumes constantly spraying from the surface,” said Lynnae Quick, a member of the science team behind Clipper’s Europa Imaging System (EIS) cameras. “But we can’t look at it that way; Europa is a totally different beast,” said Quick, who’s based at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Evidence suggests Europa may vent water from its subsurface just like Enceladus. For example, scientists using NASA’s Galileo spacecraftNASA’s Hubble Telescope, and large Earth-based telescopes have reported detections of faint water plumes or their chemical components at Europa.

But no one is certain. “We’re still in the space where there’s really intriguing evidence, but none of it is a slam dunk,” said Matthew McKay Hedman, a member of Europa Clipper’s Mapping Imaging Spectrometer for Europa (MISE) science team and associate professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Idaho.

This image of the water jets at Saturn’s moon Enceladus was captured by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Nov. 27, 2005. Enceladus is backlit by the Sun. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Full Image Details

Scientists are drawn to plumes for a couple of reasons. First, they’re undeniably cool: “We’re scientists, but we’re also human,” said Shawn Brooks, who is working with Europa Clipper’s Europa Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Europa-UVS) science team and is based at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

But more practically, Brooks said, plumes offer scientists easier access to Europa’s interior. “It all comes down to whether Europa is habitable, and that comes down to having some understanding of what is happening below the surface, which we can’t reach yet,” he said.

In other words, the magic of Europa, an archetype for a potentially habitable world, is hidden from view deep within the moon. Compared to Enceladus, which is the size of Texas, Europa is about a quarter of Earth’s size, or a bit smaller than Earth’s moon. And evidence suggests Europa has a much deeper saltwater ocean than Enceladus, possibly 40 to 100 miles (about 60 to 160 kilometers) deep, which means it could contain about twice as much water as Earth’s oceans. Some scientists hypothesize that Europa’s ocean could be reacting with superheated rocks below its seafloor, possibly through hydrothermal vents. On Earth, such areas are hotbeds of chemical activity that nourishes innumerable creatures.

Scientists say there also could be large pockets of melted water in Europa’s ice shell, which are more likely than the ocean to be the source of plumes. These pockets could produce cozy habitats for organisms as well.

Because it’s much closer to Jupiter than Enceladus is to Saturn, more heat is generated at Europa from friction produced as it circles its host planet. Given that internal heat stimulates geological activity on rocky worlds, Europa is expected to have more extensive geology than Enceladus. Some scientists predict that Europa has plate tectonics that shift and recycle the icy blocks making up the moon’s surface. If so, Europa could be circulating nutrients produced on the surface by radiation from Jupiter, such as oxygen, to pockets of liquid in the ice shell or perhaps to the ocean itself. Through Europa Clipper, scientists will have a chance to test some of their predictions by analyzing the chemical makeup of plumes or the traces they may leave on the surface.

Scientists warn that Europan plumes, even if they’re there, could be hard to detect even from close-up. They may be sporadic, and they may be small and thin, given that Europa’s gravity, which is much stronger than Enceladus’, likely would keep these water plumes close to the surface. That’s a drastic departure from Enceladus’ spectacular vapor column: It’s always on and bigger than the moon itself, spraying icy particles hundreds of miles above the surface. “Even if they’re there, Europa’s plumes may not be that photogenic,” Hedman said.

Though Europa Clipper scientists are devising a variety of creative strategies to find active plumes when the spacecraft begins exploring Europa in 2031, they’re not relying on them to understand what’s going on inside the moon. “We don’t have to catch one for a successful mission,” Quick said.

Quick added that every instrument aboard Clipper can contribute evidence of habitable conditions below the surface, regardless of active plumes.

A few examples of how the science team will search for potential plumes include Europa Clipper’s camera suite, EIS. It will scout for plumes near Europa’s surface partly by looking for their silhouettes at Europa’s limb, or edge, when the moon is illuminated by the light of Jupiter as it passes in front of the planet. EIS will snap photos of plumes should they appear, as well as plume deposits that might be visible on the surface. The Europa-UVS will also strive to detect plumes in ultraviolet light, including at the edge of the moon when Europa passes in front of nearby stars, and can measure the chemical makeup of such plumes. A thermal camera, the Europa Thermal Emission Imaging System (E-THEMIS), will look for hotspots on the surface that may be evidence of active or recent eruptions.

The Europa Clipper team is set to succeed whether or not researchers find plumes at Europa, though many scientists hope for a spectacular water show to enrich the mission and our understanding of Europa. “I do suspect Europa is active and letting some material escape,” Hedman said. “But I expect that when we actually get to understand how it’s doing that, it’s not going to be what anyone expected.”

More About the Mission

Missions such as Europa Clipper contribute to the field of astrobiology, the interdisciplinary research on the variables and conditions of distant worlds that could harbor life as we know it. While Europa Clipper is not a life-detection mission, it will conduct detailed reconnaissance of Europa and investigate whether the icy moon, with its subsurface ocean, has the capability to support life. Understanding Europa’s habitability will help scientists better understand how life developed on Earth and the potential for finding life beyond our planet.

Managed by Caltech in Pasadena, California, JPL leads the development of the Europa Clipper mission in partnership with the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Planetary Missions Program Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, executes program management of the Europa Clipper mission.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/are-water-plumes-spraying-from-europa-nasas-europa-clipper-is-on-the-case?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

More information about Europa can be found here:

europa.nasa.gov

News Media Contact

Gretchen McCartney

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-6215

gretchen.p.mccartney@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

Written by Lonnie Shekhtman

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

2021-233

 

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Sends a Picture Postcard From Mars
An artistic interpretation of Curiosity’s view high up on a Martian mountain was created by mission team members who were stunned by the sweeping landscape.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Sends a Picture Postcard From Mars

Nov 23, 2021

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its navigation cameras to capture panoramas of this scene. Blue, orange, and green color was added to a combination of the panoramas for an artistic interpretation of the scene.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Full Image Details

An artistic interpretation of Curiosity’s view high up on a Martian mountain was created by mission team members who were stunned by the sweeping landscape.

NASA’s Curiosity rover captured a remarkable image from its most recent perch on the side of Mars’ Mount Sharp. The mission team was so inspired by the beauty of the landscape, they combined two versions of the black-and-white images from different times of the day and added colors to create a rare postcard from the Red Planet.

Curiosity captures a 360-degree view of its surroundings with its black-and-white navigation cameras each time it completes a drive. To make the resulting panorama easier to send to Earth, the rover keeps it in a compressed, low-quality format. But when the rover team saw the view from Curiosity’s most recent stopping point, the scene was just too pretty not to capture it in the highest quality that the navigation cameras are capable of.

Many of the rover’s most stunning panoramas are from the color Mastcam instrument, which has far higher resolution than the navigation cameras. That’s why the team added colors of their own to this latest image. The blue, orange, and green tints are not what the human eye would see; instead, they represent the scene as viewed at different times of day.

On Nov. 16, 2021 (the 3,299th Martian day, or sol, of the mission), engineers commanded Curiosity to take two sets of mosaics, or composite images, capturing the scene at 8:30 a.m. and again at 4:10 p.m. local Mars time. The two times of day provided contrasting lighting conditions that brought out a variety of landscape details. The team then combined the two scenes in an artistic re-creation that includes elements from the morning scene in blue, the afternoon scene in orange, and a combination of both in green.

At the center of the image is the view back down Mount Sharp, the 3-mile-tall (5-kilometer-tall) mountain that Curiosity has been driving up since 2014. Rounded hills can be seen in the distance at center-right; Curiosity got a closer view of these back in July, when the rover started to see intriguing changes in the landscape. A field of sand ripples known as the “Sands of Forvie” stretches a quarter- to a half-mile (400 to 800 meters) away.

At the far right of the panorama is the craggy “Rafael Navarro Mountain,” named after a Curiosity team scientist who passed away earlier this year. Poking up behind it is the upper part of Mount Sharp, far above the area Curiosity is exploring. Mount Sharp lies inside Gale Crater, a 96-mile-wide (154-kilometer-wide) basin formed by an ancient impact; Gale Crater’s distant rim stands 7,500 feet tall (2.3 kilometers), and is visible on the horizon about 18 to 25 miles away (30 to 40 kilometers).

The Curiosity mission is led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is managed by Caltech in Pasadena, California.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-curiosity-rover-sends-a-picture-postcard-from-mars?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/home/

and

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html

News Media Contact

Andrew Good

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-2433

andrew.c.good@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

2021-232

New Deep Learning Method Adds 301 Planets to Kepler’s Total Count
Scientists have added a whopping 301 newly confirmed exoplanets to the total exoplanet tally.
› Read the full story

New Deep Learning Method Adds 301 Planets to Kepler’s Total Count

Nov 22, 2021

Over 4,5000 planets have been found around other stars, but scientists expect that our galaxy contains millions of planets. There are multiple methods for detecting these small, faint bodies around much larger, bright stars.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Scientists have added a whopping 301 newly confirmed exoplanets to the total exoplanet tally.

Scientists recently added a whopping 301 newly validated exoplanets to the total exoplanet tally. The throng of planets is the latest to join the 4,569 already validated planets orbiting a multitude of distant stars. How did scientists discover such a huge number of planets, seemingly all at once? The answer lies with a new deep neural network called ExoMiner.

When a planet crosses directly between us and its star, we see the star dim slightly because the planet is blocking out a portion of the light. This is one method scientists use to find exoplanets. They make a plot called a light curve with the brightness of the star versus time. Using this plot, scientists can see what percentage of the star’s light the planet blocks and how long it takes the planet to cross the disk of the star.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Deep neural networks are machine learning methods that automatically learn a task when provided with enough data. ExoMiner is a new deep neural network that leverages NASA’s Supercomputer, Pleiades, and can distinguish real exoplanets from different types of imposters, or “false positives.” Its design is inspired by various tests and properties human experts use to confirm new exoplanets. And it learns by using past confirmed exoplanets and false positive cases.

ExoMiner supplements people who are pros at combing through data and deciphering what is and isn’t a planet. Specifically, data gathered by NASA’s Kepler spacecraft and K2, its follow-on mission. For missions like Kepler, with thousands of stars in its field of view, each holding the possibility to host multiple potential exoplanets, it’s a hugely time-consuming task to pore over massive datasets. ExoMiner solves this dilemma.

NASA’s Eyes on Exoplanets shows the location of over 4,500 planets around other stars outside our solar system. Users can also see information about the physical features of the planets (where known) and the stars they orbit. View the full interactive experience at Eyes on Exoplanets.

“Unlike other exoplanet-detecting machine learning programs, ExoMiner isn’t a black box – there is no mystery as to why it decides something is a planet or not,” said Jon Jenkins, exoplanet scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. “We can easily explain which features in the data lead ExoMiner to reject or confirm a planet.”

What is the difference between a confirmed and validated exoplanet? A planet is “confirmed,” when different observation techniques reveal features that can only be explained by a planet. A planet is “validated” using statistics – meaning how likely or unlikely it is to be a planet based on the data.

In a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal, the team at Ames shows how ExoMiner discovered the 301 planets using data from the remaining set of possible planets – or candidates – in the Kepler Archive. All 301 machine-validated planets were originally detected by the Kepler Science Operations Center pipeline and promoted to planet candidate status by the Kepler Science Office. But until ExoMiner, no one was able to validate them as planets.

The paper also demonstrates how ExoMiner is more precise and consistent in ruling out false positives and better able to reveal the genuine signatures of planets orbiting their parent stars – all while giving scientists the ability to see in detail what led ExoMiner to its conclusion.

“When ExoMiner says something is a planet, you can be sure it’s a planet,” added Hamed Valizadegan, ExoMiner project lead and machine learning manager with the Universities Space Research Association at Ames. “ExoMiner is highly accurate and in some ways more reliable than both existing machine classifiers and the human experts it’s meant to emulate because of the biases that come with human labeling.”

None of the newly confirmed planets are believed to be Earth-like or in the habitable zone of their parent stars. But they do share similar characteristics to the overall population of confirmed exoplanets in our galactic neighborhood.

“These 301 discoveries help us better understand planets and solar systems beyond our own, and what makes ours so unique,” said Jenkins.

As the search for more exoplanets continues – with missions using transit photometry such as NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, and the European Space Agency’s upcoming PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars, or PLATO, mission – ExoMiner will have more opportunities to prove it’s up to the task.

“Now that we’ve trained ExoMiner using Kepler data, with a little fine-tuning, we can transfer that learning to other missions, including TESS, which we’re currently working on,” said Valizadegan. “There’s room to grow.”

NASA Ames managed the Kepler and K2 missions for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. JPL managed Kepler mission development. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation operates the flight system with support from the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/new-deep-learning-method-adds-301-planets-to-keplers-total-count?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

News Media Contact

Rachel Hoover

650-604-4789

rachel.hoover@nasa.gov

Calla Cofield

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

626-808-2469

calla.e.cofield@jpl.nasa.gov

2021-231

NASA’s Perseverance Captures Challenging Flight by Mars Helicopter
Recently downlinked imagery of a September flight has allowed the rover imaging team to put together a video of rotorcraft performing to near-perfection.
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Challenging Flight by Mars Helicopter

Nov 18, 2021

Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s Flight 13: Zoomed-In View From Perseverance

Unlisted

Nov 17, 2021  JPLraw

Video from the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover captures a closeup view of the 13th flight of the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, on Sept. 4, 2021. For more information about Perseverance: mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/ nasa.gov/perseverance Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Recently downlinked imagery of a September flight has allowed the rover imaging team to put together a video of rotorcraft performing to near-perfection.

Video from the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover captures a closeup view of the 13th flight of the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, on Sept. 4, 2021.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Video footage from NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s 13th flight on Sept. 4 provides the most detailed look yet of the rotorcraft in action.

Ingenuity is currently prepping for its 16th flight, scheduled to take place no earlier than Saturday, Nov. 20, but the 160.5-second Flight 13 stands out as one of Ingenuity’s most complicated. It involved flying into varied terrain within the “Séítah” geological feature and taking images of an outcrop from multiple angles for the rover team. Acquired from an altitude of 26 feet (8 meters), the images complement those collected during Flight 12, providing valuable insight for Perseverance scientists and rover drivers.

Captured by the rover’s two-camera Mastcam-Z, one video clip of Flight 13 shows a majority of the 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) rotorcraft’s flight profile. The other provides a closeup of takeoff and landing, which was acquired as part of a science observation intended to measure the dust plumes generated by the helicopter.

“The value of Mastcam-Z really shines through with these video clips,” said Justin Maki, deputy principal investigator for the Mastcam-Z instrument at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. “Even at 300 meters [328 yards] away, we get a magnificent closeup of takeoff and landing through Mastcam-Z’s ‘right eye.’ And while the helicopter is little more than a speck in the wide view taken through the ‘left eye,’ it gives viewers a good feel for the size of the environment that Ingenuity is exploring.”

Video footage from the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover provides a big-picture perspective of the 13th flight of the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, on Sept. 4, 2021.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

During takeoff, Ingenuity kicks up a small plume of dust that the right camera, or “eye,” captures moving to the right of the helicopter during ascent. After its initial climb to planned maximum altitude of 26 feet (8 meters), the helicopter performs a small pirouette to line up its color camera for scouting. Then Ingenuity pitches over, allowing the rotors’ thrust to begin moving it horizontally through the thin Martian air before moving offscreen. Later, the rotorcraft returns and lands in the vicinity of where it took off. The team targeted a different landing spot – about 39 feet (12 meters) from takeoff – to avoid a ripple of sand it landed on at the completion of Flight 12.

Though the view from Mastcam-Z’s left eye shows less of the helicopter and more of Mars than the right, the wide angle provides a glimpse of the unique way that the Ingenuity team programmed the flight to ensure success.

“We took off from the crater floor and flew over an elevated ridgeline before dipping into Séítah,” said Ingenuity Chief Pilot Håvard Grip of JPL. “Since the helicopter’s navigation filter prefers flat terrain, we programmed in a waypoint near the ridgeline, where the helicopter slows down and hovers for a moment. Our flight simulations indicated that this little ‘breather’ would help the helicopter keep track of its heading in spite of the significant terrain variations. It does the same on the way back. It’s awesome to actually get to see this occur, and it reinforces the accuracy of our modeling and our understanding of how to best operate Ingenuity.”

Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s 13th Flight: Wide-Angle Video From Perseverance (Annotated)

Unlisted

Nov 17, 2021  JPLraw

Video footage from the Mastcam-Z instrument aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover provides a big-picture perspective of the 13th flight of the agency’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, on Sept. 4, 2021. For more information about Perseverance: mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/ nasa.gov/perseverance Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

The wide-angle view also shows how Ingenuity maintains altitude during the flight. After an initial ascent to 26 feet (8 meters) altitude, the helicopter’s laser altimeter notes a change in elevation of the terrain below as it heads northeast toward the ridgeline. Ingenuity automatically adjusts, climbing slightly as it approaches the ridge and then descending to remain 26 feet (8 meters) above the undulating surface. Once it flies to the right, out of view, Ingenuity collects 10 images of the rocky outcrop with its color camera before heading back into frame and returning to land in the targeted location.

After Flight 13, Ingenuity went quiet in October, along with NASA’s other Mars spacecraft during Mars solar conjunction, when the Red Planet and Earth are on opposite sides of the Sun, precluding most communications. Following conjunction, Ingenuity performed a short experimental flight test before undertaking Flight 15, which began the multi-flight journey back to the vicinity of “Wright Brothers Field,” its starting point back in April.

More About Ingenuity

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was built by JPL, which also manages the operations demonstration activity during its extended mission for NASA Headquarters. It is supported by NASA’s Science, Aeronautics Research, and Space Technology mission directorates. NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, and NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, provided significant flight performance analysis and technical assistance during Ingenuity’s development. AeroVironment Inc., Qualcomm, and SolAero also provided design assistance and major vehicle components. Lockheed Martin Space designed and manufactured the Mars Helicopter Delivery System.

More About Perseverance

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith.

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-perseverance-captures-challenging-flight-by-mars-helicopter?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

nasa.gov/perseverance

News Media Contact

DC Agle

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-9011

agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

2021-230

One Year From Launch: US-European Satellite to Track World’s Water
The Surface Water and Ocean Topography spacecraft enters the home stretch as an international team prepares this next-generation satellite for launch in 2022.
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Satellite to Track World’s Water

Nov 17, 2021

Engineers integrate separate parts of the SWOT satellite into one in a clean room facility in Cannes, France.

Credit: Thales Alenia Space

The Surface Water and Ocean Topography spacecraft enters the home stretch as an international team prepares this next-generation satellite for launch in 2022.

An international team of engineers and technicians has finished assembling a next-generation satellite that will make the first global survey of Earth’s surface water and study fine-scale ocean currents. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is just a year out from launch, and the final set of tests on the spacecraft have started.

SWOT is a collaboration between NASA and the French space agency Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), with contributions from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and the United Kingdom Space Agency (UK Space Agency). The SUV-size satellite will collect data on the height of Earth’s salt- and fresh water – including oceans, lakes, and rivers – enabling researchers to track the volume and location of water around the world.

“SWOT will be our first global snapshot of all surface water that we have now, how the water moves around the planet, and what happens to it in a new climate.”

Nadya Vinogradova Shiffer, SWOT Program Scientist

SWOT will help to measure the effects of climate change on the planet’s water, such as the processes by which small, swirling ocean currents absorb excess heat, moisture, and greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The mission’s measurements will also aid in following how much water flows into and out of the planet’s lakes, rivers, and reservoirs, as well as regional shifts in sea level.

“SWOT will be our first global snapshot of all surface water that we have now, how the water moves around the planet, and what happens to it in a new climate,” said Nadya Vinogradova Shiffer, SWOT program scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

A team at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California shipped the scientific heart of the satellite to Cannes, France, in June. Ever since, they’ve been working with colleagues from CNES and the French space agency’s contractor, Thales Alenia Space, to connect the part of the spacecraft holding the science instruments to the rest of the satellite and ensure that the electrical connections function properly.

“The best part has been seeing two complex systems that were built across the world from each other by different teams come together and work,” said JPL’s Said Kaki, the deputy project manager for SWOT. Kaki, along with an initial team of about 25 people from JPL, followed the mission’s science instruments to France in June. There are certain tests and procedures that the team needs to conduct in person, so they are living and working thousands of miles from home until the SWOT satellite is shipped to its launch site at Vandenberg Space Force Base in Central California in September 2022.

“Being far away from home for so long is not always easy, but luckily, I’m surrounded by amazing coworkers,” Nacer Chahat, the JPL payload system engineer for the mission, said from Cannes. He has been onsite overseeing the spacecraft testing and helping to troubleshoot any challenges that arise.

Testing Phase

The next six months or so will involve three phases of testing to make sure the satellite will be able to survive the rigors of launch and the harsh environment of space. Engineers and technicians will attach the satellite to a device called a shake table, which simulates the intense vibrations and rattling of launch. Then the spacecraft will move into an acoustic chamber to bombard it with high-decibel sounds similar to those of blastoff. Next, they’ll move SWOT into a chamber that mimics the temperature swings and vacuum of space. Last but not least, engineers will put the satellite through additional tests to make sure its systems can withstand any electromagnetic interference, including signals from various parts of the spacecraft and from other satellites.

“After that, we button up the spacecraft and ship it to the launch site,” said Kaki. At Vandenberg, the team will put the finishing touches on the satellite to ready it for launch, which is scheduled for no earlier than November 2022.

The mission’s science team is also in full swing, preparing for when the spacecraft is in orbit. Researchers are using simulated data to put their analytic tools through their paces, as well as prepping for the period right after launch called “calibration and validation.” This is when researchers compare data from the satellite with measurements taken on the ground in order to ensure the science instruments are collecting data properly and measuring what they’re supposed to be measuring.

The international nature of the mission means that, like the engineering team, the science team spans continents. “The best part of my job as the mission’s project scientist is being able to work with a large international research team with diverse interests and backgrounds in oceanography and hydrology,” said Lee-Lueng Fu, the JPL project scientist for SWOT. “This experience has broadened the horizon of my scientific career even after 40 years of devotion to Earth research.”

More About the Mission

SWOT is being jointly developed by NASA and CNES, with contributions from the CSA and the UK Space Agency. JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, leads the U.S. component of the project. For the flight system payload, NASA is providing the Ka-band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn) instrument, a GPS science receiver, a laser retroreflector, and a two-beam microwave radiometer. CNES is providing the Doppler Orbitography and Radioposition Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) system, nadir altimeter, the KaRIn RF subsystem (with support from the UK Space Agency), the platform, and ground control segment. CSA is providing the KaRIn high-power transmitter assembly. NASA is providing associated launch services.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/one-year-from-launch-us-european-satellite-to-track-worlds-water?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

To learn more about the mission, visit:

https://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/

Check Our Planet’s Vital Signs With NASA’s Eyes on the Earth

News Media Contact

Jane J. Lee / Ian J. O’Neill

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-354-0307 / 818-354-2649

jane.j.lee@jpl.nasa.gov / ian.j.oneill@jpl.nasa.gov

2021-229

Twin of NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover Begins Terrain Tests
OPTIMISM, the full-scale engineering model of Perseverance, begins a series of rigorous tests to assess the risk of potential driving hazards on the surface of the Red Planet.
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Twin of NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover Begins Terrain Tests

Nov 17, 2021

Updated with new features, the twin of NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover arrives at JPL’s Mars Yard garage on October 29, 2021.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Full Image Details

OPTIMISM, the full-scale engineering model of Perseverance, begins a series of rigorous tests to assess the risk of potential driving hazards on the surface of the Red Planet.

On a recent day in November, the car-size rover rolled slowly forward, then stopped, perched on the threshold of a Martian landscape. But this rover, named OPTIMISM, wasn’t on the Red Planet. And the landscape was a boulder-strewn mock-up of the real Mars – the Mars Yard at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

OPTIMISM, a twin of the Perseverance rover that is exploring Jezero Crater on Mars, will perform a crucial job in the weeks ahead: navigating the Mars Yard’s slopes and hazards, drilling sample cores from boulders, and storing the samples in metal tubes – just like Perseverance is doing in its hunt for signs of ancient microbial life. Short for Operational Perseverance Twin for Integration of Mechanisms and Instruments Sent to Mars, OPTIMISM is more generically known as a vehicle system test bed, and the recently upgraded rover begins testing out new equipment for the first time this month.

The tests help ensure that OPTIMISM’s twin on Mars can safely execute the commands sent by controllers on Earth. They also could potentially reveal unexpected problems Perseverance might encounter.

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“The size and shape of rocks in the visual field – will they turn into obstacles or not?” said Bryan Martin, the flight software and test beds manager at JPL. “We test a lot of that, figure out what kinds of things to avoid. What we have safely traversed around here has informed rover drivers in planning their traverses on Mars. We’ve done so much testing on the ground we can be confident in it. It works.”

About as long as a doubles tennis court and twice as wide, the Mars Yard has served as a testing ground for many a fully-engineered rover twin – from the engineering model of the very first, tiny Sojourner that landed on Mars in 1997 to the Spirit and Opportunity missions that began in 2004 to the Curiosity and Perseverance rovers exploring Mars today.

In each case, a rover double has scaled slopes, dodged obstacles, or helped rover planners puzzle out new paths on the simulated patch of Mars. OPTIMISM first rolled out into the Mars Yard in September 2020, when it conducted mobility tests.

But it recently received some key updates to match features available on Perseverance, including additional mobility software and the bulk of the exquisitely complex sample caching system. And while the team has already performed tests using the coring drill at the end of OPTIMISM’s robotic arm, they’ll be testing the newly installed Adaptive Caching Assembly for the first time in the Mars Yard. The assembly on Perseverance is responsible for storing rock and sediment samples. Some or all of these initial samples could be among those returned to Earth by a future mission.

“Now we can do it end-to-end in the test bed,” said the Vehicle System Ted Bed systems engineering lead, Jose G. Trujillo-Rojas. “Drill into the rock, collect the core sample, and now we have the mechanism responsible to cache that sample in the cylinder.”

And if problems arise on Perseverance on Mars, OPTIMISM can be used as a platform to figure out what went wrong and also how to fix it.

Twin Twins

On this November day, a heavy-duty vehicle transported OPTIMISM from a JPL test lab to the Mars Yard garage. Recently expanded, the structure also provides shelter to one of Curiosity’s Earthly counterparts: MAGGIE, or Mars Automated Giant Gizmo for Integrated Engineering. A second Curiosity double, a skeletal version called “Scarecrow” that lacks a computer brain, is housed in a separate shed in the Mars Yard.

MAGGIE would be joining OPTIMISM in the Mars Yard garage in the days ahead.

Engineering models of the Curiosity Mars rover (foreground) and the Perseverance Mars rover share space in the garage at JPL’s Mars Yard.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Full Image Details

But, for now, the test-bed crew was focused on OPTIMISM. “Straight 5 meters forward: Ready?” Leann Bowen, a test bed engineer, called out from a computer console inside the garage.

“All right, bring her home, Leann,” Trujillo-Rojas said.

With a whine of electric motors, OPTIMISM crept forward on its six metal wheels, stopping right on the mark on the garage’s concrete floor as members of the test-bed team looked on in their white lab coats. Through a wide-open door ahead of the rover, the Mars Yard beckoned.

Drilling core samples from terrestrial rocks in the Mars Yard and sealing them in metal tubes is not as straightforward as it might sound. JPL’s Mars team provides a variety of rock types for OPTIMISM to drill through, since the exact nature of the rock Perseverance will encounter often can’t be known in advance. Terrain is a variable, too: One previous test with the robotic arm involved parking the rover on a slope, then instructing it to drill.

“There was a possibility that the rover might slip,” Trujillo-Rojas said. “We wanted to test that first here on Earth before sending instructions to the rover on Mars. That was scary, because you can imagine if you drill this way, and the rover slightly slipped back, the drill could have gotten stuck.”

OPTIMISM drilled the core successfully, suggesting Perseverance also could pull off drilling on a slope if required.

Test Drive

With longer drives in Perseverance’s near future, another job for the Earth-bound twin will involve presenting new challenges to the rover’s autonomous navigation system, or AutoNav. Perseverance uses a powerful computer to make 3D maps using rover images of the terrain ahead, and uses those maps to plan its drive with minimal human assistance.

In Mars Yard tests, the twin rover might pause as it “thinks through” several possible choices – or even decides, unexpectedly, to avoid obstacles altogether and just go around.

“Seeing the rover autonomously move in the Mars Yard, you kind of get that sense of being connected to the rover on Mars,” he said. “It gives you that visual connection.”

Of course, OPTIMISM and its human team must contend with environmental factors very different from those encountered by Perseverance, which is built for freezing temperatures and intense radiation. Earth’s stronger gravity required OPTIMISM’s metal wheels to be thicker than its Martian counterpart’s. And its electronics sometimes must be cooled to avoid damage from Southern California’s summer temperatures – the opposite of the problem caused by deep cold on Mars.

“On Mars, we try to keep the rover warm,” Trujillo-Rojas said. “Here, we’re trying to keep it cool.”

Deer, bobcats, tarantulas, even occasional snakes, find their way into the Mars Yard. Wildfire in the region can fill the air with smoke. And testing and staffing schedules had to contend with COVID-19.

“We’ve been through a lot of challenges with this rover,” he said. “As soon as we were going to start building it, with hands-on integration, the pandemic happened. And then we had rains, and we got a lot of fire. We had to leave the lab – smoky!”

Now, a revamped OPTIMISM is ready to get back to work.

“It’s a big milestone for our team,” Trujillo-Rojas said.

More About the Mission

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/twin-of-nasas-perseverance-mars-rover-begins-terrain-tests?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211202-13

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

nasa.gov/perseverance

Where Is Perseverance Right Now?

‘AR’ Mobile App Features 3D NASA Spacecraft

Help Train NASA’s Rovers

News Media Contact

DC Agle / Andrew Good

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-9011 / 818-393-2433

agle@jpl.nasa.gov / andrew.c.good@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

Written by Pat Brennan

2021-228

This message was sent to ingpeaceproject@gmail.com from jplnewsroom@jpl.nasa.gov

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Live Feed of the Dec. 4, 2021 Total Solar Eclipse

Streamed live 23 hours ago 12.3.2021  NASA

Weather permitting, NASA TV will air a view of the Dec. 4, 2021, total solar eclipse from Union Glacier, Antarctica. The stream will start at 1:30 a.m. EST (06:30 UTC) and end at 3:37 a.m. EST (08:47 UTC). Totality begins at 2:44 a.m. EST (07:44 UTC). This stream is provided courtesy of Theo Boris and Christian Lockwood of the JM Pasachoff Antarctic Expedition. For more details about this total solar eclipse, visit https://www.nasa.gov/content/dec-4-20…. (The stream will not have audio from the source.)

NASA Announces 2021 Class of Astronaut Candidates

Streamed live on Dec 6, 2021  NASA

After evaluating more than 12,000 applications, we’ll introduce our 2021 astronaut candidates live at a ceremony at Ellington Field near NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. After completing training, these women and men could be eligible for a variety of flight assignments including missions on and around the Moon under Artemis. The astronaut candidates will join NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy, Johnson Center Director Vanessa Wyche, and Flight Operations Director Norm Knight on stage at the event. More info: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/na…

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Month in Review, NASA’s JPL, November 2021 Skywatching, The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Triumph at Saturn, PBS new and NBC News

Month in Review, NASA’s JPL, November 2021 Skywatching, The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Triumph at Saturn, PBS new and NBC News

JPL News – Month in Review, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Tuesday, November 2, 2021

What’s Up: November 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA

The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, Nov 17, 2021

How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, Nov 15, 2021

NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Oct 28, 2021

Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Nov. 19 & 20, 2021

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Nov. 19 & 20, 2021

 

JPL News – Month in Review

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory <jplnewsroom@jpl.nasa.gov> 

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

 

 

MONTH IN REVIEW

 

 

What’s Up – November 2021
Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies.
› Watch now

NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere
NASA’s Jovian orbiter lends deeper understanding of what happens below the gas giant’s striking clouds.
› Read the full story

Getting NASA Data to the Ground With Lasers
Two optical ground stations, including one managed by JPL, will support NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration mission when it launches this fall.
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How to Find Hidden Oceans on Distant Worlds? Use Chemistry
A new study shows how the chemicals in an exoplanet’s atmosphere can, in some cases, reveal whether or not the temperature on its surface is too hot for liquid water.
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NASA 3502527

Upgrading the Space Station’s Cold Atom Lab With Mixed Reality
NASA is looking into whether mixed reality technology could help with repairs and upgrades on the cutting-edge Cold Atom Lab aboard the space station.
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You Can Help Train NASA’s Rovers to Better Explore Mars
Members of the public can now help teach an artificial intelligence algorithm to recognize scientific features in images taken by NASA’s Perseverance rover.
› Read the full story

A ‘Monster’ Star-Forming Region Spied by NASA’s Spitzer
Just like clouds on Earth, clouds of gas and dust in space can sometimes resemble familiar objects, or even popular movie creatures.
› Read the full story

‘Roving With Perseverance’: NASA Mars Rover and Helicopter Models on Tour
Catch Mars mania as a traveling exhibit visits more than a dozen towns across the U.S. with lifelike models of NASA’s Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter.
› Read the full story

NEID Spectrometer Lights Up Path to Exoplanet Exploration
A new NASA instrument will look for planets by detecting subtle wobbles from their parent stars. To prepare, it will study the Sun.
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Hear Sounds From Mars Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover
Two microphones aboard the six-wheeled spacecraft add a new dimension to the way scientists and engineers explore the Red Planet.
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Online Film Premiere: ‘Triumph at Saturn’ (Part I)
Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.
› Read the full story

My Favorite Martian Image: the Ridges of ‘South Séítah’
NASA’s Perseverance rover captures a geologic feature with details that offer clues to the area’s mysterious past.
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NASA Leadership Visits JPL, Discusses Climate Change and Mars
NASA Administrator Bill Nelson and Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy met with elected officials about Earth science and visited mission control for the Perseverance Mars rover.
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NASA Turns to the Cloud for Help With Next-Generation Earth Missions
As satellites collect larger and larger amounts of data, engineers and researchers are implementing solutions to manage these huge increases.
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With First Martian Samples Packed, Perseverance Initiates Remarkable Sample Return Mission
NASA, along with the European Space Agency, is developing a campaign to return the Martian samples to Earth.
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Icy ‘Glue’ May Control Pace of Antarctic Ice-Shelf Breakup
As the ice-and-snow rubble known as mélange melts in Antarctica’s ice shelves, rifts can grow and icebergs break off even in the brutal cold of winter.
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NASA’s Perseverance Sheds More Light on Jezero Crater’s Watery Past
Pictures from NASA’s latest six-wheeler on the Red Planet suggest the area’s history experienced significant flooding events.
› Read the full story

Working Overtime: NASA’s Deep Space Atomic Clock Completes Mission
Geared toward improving spacecraft navigation, the technology demonstration operated far longer than planned and broke the stability record for atomic clocks in space.
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Science of Psyche: Unique Asteroid Holds Clues to Early Solar System
Set to launch next year, NASA’s Psyche mission marks the first time the agency has set out to explore an asteroid richer in metal than rock or ice.
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What’s Up: November 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA

Nov 2, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

What are some skywatching highlights in November 2021? Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies. In particular, note that several destinations of NASA’s Lucy mission are located near the Pleiades. Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies. In particular, note that several destinations of NASA’s Lucy mission are located near the Pleiades.

Transcript:

What’s Up for November? Sunset planets, a partial lunar eclipse, and the return of the winter stars.

From November 6th through the 11th, watch the Moon glide past Venus, Saturn, and Jupiter after sunset in the south/southwest. In particular, if you step outside for a look on November 7th, you’ll find the four-day-old crescent Moon just about 2 degrees away from Venus. Should be really pretty, so don’t miss it.

And from now through early December, you’ll find Jupiter and Saturn drawing a little closer to Venus each night.

A partial lunar eclipse is on the way, taking place overnight on November 18th and 19th, when the Moon slips into Earth’s shadow for a couple of hours. Weather permitting, the eclipse will be visible from any location where the Moon appears above the horizon during the eclipse. Depending on your time zone, it’ll occur earlier or later in the evening for you.

Now that’s a huge swath of the planet that’ll be able to see at least part of the eclipse, including North and South America, Eastern Asia, Australia and the Pacific Region. So check the timing of its visibility for your area.

For U.S. East Coast observers, the partial eclipse begins a little after 2 a.m., reaching its maximum at 4 in the morning. For observers on the West Coast, that translates to beginning just after 11 p.m., with a maximum at 1 a.m.

Partial lunar eclipses might not be quite as spectacular as total lunar eclipses – where the Moon is completely covered in Earth’s shadow – but they occur more frequently.

And that just means more opportunities to witness little changes in our solar system that sometimes occur right before our eyes.

All month long, if you’re up late and cast your gaze toward the east, you’ll notice some familiar companions have begun rising late in the night. The familiar stars of Northern winter skies are returning, rising late at night and sitting high in the south by dawn.

You’ll find the Pleiades star cluster leading the constellations Taurus the bull and the hunter Orion, followed by the brightest star in the sky, Sirius – all of them back to keep us company on the long winter nights here in the Northern Hemisphere. (And for those in the Southern Hemisphere, they’re keeping you company on shorter nights as spring gives way to summer there.)

A fun note about the Pleiades this month is that several of the 8 asteroids to be visited by NASA’s Lucy mission are located in that part of the sky. The Lucy spacecraft launched on Oct. 16th on its 12-year mission to visit a bunch of special asteroids called the Trojans. They share the orbit of Jupiter, with a group of them leading the planet, and another group following behind it.

Lucy will be the first space mission to explore this unique group of asteroids, providing new insights about the formation and early history of our solar system.

Here are the phases of the Moon for November. You can catch up on all of NASA’s missions to explore the solar system and beyond at nasa.gov. I’m Preston Dyches from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and that’s What’s Up for this month.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzeK4TcOSPU

The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos

Nov 17, 2021

CONTEXT IMAGE

This diagram shows the orbit of binary asteroid Didymos around the Sun. Didymos consists of a large, nearly half-mile-wide (780-meter-wide) asteroid orbited by a smaller, 525-foot-wide (160-meter-wide) asteroid, or moonlet. Didymos’ orbital path around the Sun is shown as the thin white ellipse and Earth’s orbit is the thick white line. In the background are the orbits for 2,200 other known potentially hazardous asteroids.

A potentially hazardous asteroid is classified as an asteroid wider than about 460 feet (140 meters) with an orbit that brings it within 5 million miles (8 million kilometers) of Earth’s orbit.

Didymos’ smaller asteroid is the target of NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) mission. The DART spacecraft is a kinetic impactor designed to collide with the moonlet to see how its orbit around the larger asteroid will be changed by the impact. The outcome of this mission will help NASA determine whether the method could be used to modify the trajectory of an asteroid should one threaten Earth in the future. Didymos is not a danger to our planet.

This orbital diagram was produced by the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. CNEOS characterizes every known near-Earth asteroid (NEA) orbit to improve long-term impact hazard assessments in support of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO).

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/the-orbit-of-asteroid-didymos

How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts

Nov 15, 2021

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its Mast Camera, or Mastcam, to capture this image of an outcrop with finely layered rocks within the “Murray Buttes” region on lower Mount Sharp on Sept. 8, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS Full Image Details

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its Mars Hand Lens Imager, or MAHLI, to take this selfie at the “Quela” drilling location in the “Murray Buttes” area on lower Mount Sharp between Sept. 17 and 18, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS Full Image Details

This pit crater was created by an empty lava tube in Mars’ Arsia Mons region. The image was captured by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Aug. 16, 2020.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

A radiation sensor aboard the spacecraft is providing new data on the health risks humans would face on the surface.

Could lava tubes, caves, or subsurface habitats offer safe refuge for future astronauts on Mars? Scientists with NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover team are helping explore questions like that with the Radiation Assessment Detector, or RAD.

Unlike Earth, Mars doesn’t have a magnetic field to shield it from the high-energy particles whizzing around in space. That radiation can wreak havoc on human health, and it can seriously compromise the life support systems that Mars astronauts will depend on, as well.

Based on data from Curiosity’s RAD, researchers are finding that using natural materials such as the rock and sediment on Mars could offer some protection from this ever-present space radiation. In a paper published this summer in JGR Planets, they detailed how Curiosity remained parked against a cliff at a location called “Murray Buttes” from Sept. 9 to 21, 2016.

While there, RAD measured a 4% decrease in overall radiation. More significantly, the instrument detected a 7.5% decrease in neutral particle radiation, including neutrons that can penetrate rock and are especially harmful to human health. These numbers are statistically high enough to show it was due to Curiosity’s location at the foot of the cliff rather than normal changes in the background radiation.

“We’ve been waiting a long time for the right conditions to get these results, which are critical to ensure the accuracy of our computer models,” said Bent Ehresmann of the Southwest Research Institute, lead author of the recent paper. “At Murray Buttes, we finally had these conditions and the data to analyze this effect. We’re now looking for other locations where RAD can repeat these kinds of measurements.”

How’s the Weather on Mars? (NASA Mars Report) (November 15, 2021)

Nov 15, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Seasons change even on Mars and NASA’s fleet of explorers are helping scientists learn more about the effects on the Red Planet. NASA’s Perseverance and Curiosity rovers provide daily weather reports by measuring conditions such as humidity, temperature, and wind speed on the surface. Orbiters including Odyssey, Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) survey the scope and scale of storms from above. Changing weather conditions can be challenging for the spacecraft. The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter recently increased its rotor speed from 2,537 rpm to 2,700 rpm to fly in a thinner summer atmosphere. Meanwhile, NASA’s InSight lander, which is studying Mars’ interior, recently measured one of the biggest, longest-lasting marsquakes the mission has ever detected. For more information on NASA’s Mars missions, visit mars.nasa.gov. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/ASU/MSSS

Seasons change even on Mars and NASA’s fleet of explorers are helping scientists learn more about the effects on the Red Planet.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/ASU/MSSS

A Space Weather Outpost on Mars

Most of the radiation measured by RAD comes from galactic cosmic rays – particles cast out by exploding stars and sent pinballing throughout the universe. This forms a carpet of “background radiation” that can pose health risks for humans.

Far more intense radiation sporadically comes from the Sun in the form of solar storms that throw massive arcs of ionized gas into interplanetary space.

“These structures twist in space, sometimes forming complex croissant-shaped flux tubes larger than Earth, driving shock waves that can efficiently energize particles,” said Jingnan Guo, who led a study, published in September in The Astronomy and Astrophysics Review, analyzing nine years of RAD data while she was at Germany’s Christian Albrecht University.

“Cosmic rays, solar radiation, solar storms – they are all components of space weather, and RAD is effectively a space weather outpost on the surface of Mars,” says Don Hassler of the Southwest Research Institute, principal investigator of the RAD instrument.

Solar storms occur with varying frequency based on 11-year cycles, with certain cycles bearing more frequent and energetic storms than others. Counterintuitively, the periods when solar activity is at its highest may be the safest time for future astronauts on Mars: The increased solar activity shields the Red Planet from cosmic rays by as much as 30 to 50%, compared to periods when solar activity is lower.

“It’s a trade-off,” Guo said. “These high-intensity periods reduce one source of radiation: the omnipresent, high-energy cosmic ray background radiation around Mars. But at the same time, astronauts will have to contend with intermittent, more intense radiation from solar storms.”

“The observations from RAD are key to developing the ability to predict and measure space weather, the Sun’s influence on Earth and other solar system bodies,” said Jim Spann, space weather lead for NASA’s Heliophysics Division. “As NASA plans for eventual human journeys to Mars, RAD serves as an outpost and part of the Heliophysics System Observatory – a fleet of 27 missions that investigates the Sun and its influence on space – whose research supports our understanding of and exploration of space.”

The top of the Radiation Assessment Detector can be seen on the deck of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

RAD has measured the impact of more than a dozen solar storms to date (five while traveling to Mars in 2012), although these past nine years have marked an especially weak period of solar activity.

Scientists are just now starting to see activity pick up as the Sun comes out of its slumber and becomes more active. In fact, RAD observed evidence of the first X-class flare of the new solar cycle on Oct. 28, 2021. X-class flares are the most intense category of solar flares, the largest of which can lead to power outages and communications blackouts on Earth.

“This is an exciting time for us, because one of the important objectives of RAD is to characterize the extremes of space weather. Events such as solar flares and storms are one type of space weather that happens most frequently during increased solar activity – the time we are approaching now,” Ehresmann said. More observations are needed to assess just how dangerous a really powerful solar storm would be to humans on the Martian surface.

RAD’s findings will feed into a much larger body of data being compiled for future crewed missions. In fact, NASA even equipped Curiosity’s counterpart, the Perseverance rover, with samples of spacesuit materials to assess how they hold up to radiation over time.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/how-nasas-curiosity-rover-is-making-mars-safer-for-astronauts

For more information:

https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/home/

and

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html

News Media Contact

Andrew Good

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-2433

andrew.c.good@jpl.nasa.gov

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

2021-226

NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere

Oct 28, 2021

NASA’s Jovian orbiter lends deeper understanding of what happens below the gas giant’s striking clouds.

The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures a Jovian cyclone known as a barge type in polar jet stream called “Jet N4.”

Credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS. Image processing: Gerald Eichstädt CC BY

New findings from NASA’s Juno probe orbiting Jupiter provide a fuller picture of how the planet’s distinctive and colorful atmospheric features offer clues about the unseen processes below its clouds. The results highlight the inner workings of the belts and zones of clouds encircling Jupiter, as well as its polar cyclones and even the Great Red Spot.

Researchers published several papers on Juno’s atmospheric discoveries today in the journal Science and the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. Additional papers appeared in two recent issues of Geophysical Research Letters.

“These new observations from Juno open up a treasure chest of new information about Jupiter’s enigmatic observable features,” said Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Each paper sheds light on different aspects of the planet’s atmospheric processes – a wonderful example of how our internationally-diverse science teams strengthen understanding of our solar system.”

Juno entered Jupiter’s orbit in 2016. During each of the spacecraft’s 37 passes of the planet to date, a specialized suite of instruments has peered below its turbulent cloud deck.

“Previously, Juno surprised us with hints that phenomena in Jupiter’s atmosphere went deeper than expected,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio and lead author of the Science journal paper on the depth of Jupiter’s vortices. “Now, we’re starting to put all these individual pieces together and getting our first real understanding of how Jupiter’s beautiful and violent atmosphere works – in 3D.”

Juno’s microwave radiometer (MWR) allows mission scientists to peer beneath Jupiter’s cloud tops and probe the structure of its numerous vortex storms. The most famous of these storms is the iconic anticyclone known as the Great Red Spot. Wider than Earth, this crimson vortex has intrigued scientists since its discovery almost two centuries ago.

The new results show that the cyclones are warmer on top, with lower atmospheric densities, while they are colder at the bottom, with higher densities. Anticyclones, which rotate in the opposite direction, are colder at the top but warmer at the bottom.

The findings also indicate these storms are far taller than expected, with some extending 60 miles (100 kilometers) below the cloud tops and others, including the Great Red Spot, extending over 200 miles (350 kilometers). This surprise discovery demonstrates that the vortices cover regions beyond those where water condenses and clouds form, below the depth where sunlight warms the atmosphere.

Jupiter’s banded appearance is created by the cloud-forming weather layer. This composite image shows views of Jupiter in infrared and visible light taken by the Gemini North telescope and NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

Credit: International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/NASA/ESA, M.H. Wong and I. de Pater (UC Berkeley) et al.

Full Image Details

This illustration combines an image of Jupiter from the JunoCam instrument aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft with a composite image of Earth to depict the size and depth of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.

Credit: JunoCam Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSSJunoCam Image processing by Kevin M. Gill (CC BY)Earth Image: NASA

Full Image Details

Data collected by the JunoCam imager and microwave radiometer from a flyover of the Great Red Spot on July 11, 2017 provides a glimpse of the inner-workings of Jupiter’s most iconic anticyclone.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS Image processing: Kevin Gill CC BY

During a flyby of Jupiter in July 2019, mission scientists conducted an experiment measuring minute velocity changes in the Juno spacecraft as a result in the gravity field near the Great Red Spot.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI

Full Image Details

The height and size of the Great Red Spot means the concentration of atmospheric mass within the storm potentially could be detectable by instruments studying Jupiter’s gravity field. Two close Juno flybys over Jupiter’s most famous spot provided the opportunity to search for the storm’s gravity signature and complement the MWR results on its depth.

With Juno traveling low over Jupiter’s cloud deck at about 130,000 mph (209,000 kph) Juno scientists were able to measure velocity changes as small 0.01 millimeter per second using a NASA Deep Space Network tracking antenna, from a distance of more than 400 million miles (650 million kilometers). This enabled the team to constrain the depth of the Great Red Spot to about 300 miles (500 kilometers) below the cloud tops.

“The precision required to get the Great Red Spot’s gravity during the July 2019 flyby is staggering,” said Marzia Parisi, a Juno scientist from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and lead author of a paper in the journal Science on gravity overflights of the Great Red Spot. “Being able to complement MWR’s finding on the depth gives us great confidence that future gravity experiments at Jupiter will yield equally intriguing results.”

Belts and Zones

In addition to cyclones and anticyclones, Jupiter is known for its distinctive belts and zones – white and reddish bands of clouds that wrap around the planet. Strong east-west winds moving in opposite directions separate the bands. Juno previously discovered that these winds, or jet streams, reach depths of about 2,000 miles (roughly 3,200 kilometers). Researchers are still trying to solve the mystery of how the jet streams form. Data collected by Juno’s MWR during multiple passes reveal one possible clue: that the atmosphere’s ammonia gas travels up and down in remarkable alignment with the observed jet streams.

“By following the ammonia, we found circulation cells in both the north and south hemispheres that are similar in nature to ‘Ferrel cells,’ which control much of our climate here on Earth,” said Keren Duer, a graduate student from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and lead author of the Science journal paper on Ferrel-like cells on Jupiter. “While Earth has one Ferrel cell per hemisphere, Jupiter has eight – each at least 30 times larger.”

Juno’s MWR data also shows that the belts and zones undergo a transition around 40 miles (65 kilometers) beneath Jupiter’s water clouds. At shallow depths, Jupiter’s belts are brighter in microwave light than the neighboring zones. But at deeper levels, below the water clouds, the opposite is true – which reveals a similarity to our oceans.

“We are calling this level the ‘Jovicline’ in analogy to a transitional layer seen in Earth’s oceans, known as the thermocline – where seawater transitions sharply from being relative warm to relative cold,” said Leigh Fletcher, a Juno participating scientist from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom and lead author of the paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets highlighting Juno’s microwave observations of Jupiter’s temperate belts and zones.

Polar Cyclones

Juno previously discovered polygonal arrangements of giant cyclonic storms at both of Jupiter’s poles – eight arranged in an octagonal pattern in the north and five arranged in a pentagonal pattern in the south. Now, five years later, mission scientists using observations by the spacecraft’s Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) have determined these atmospheric phenomena are extremely resilient, remaining in the same location.

“Jupiter’s cyclones affect each other’s motion, causing them to oscillate about an equilibrium position,” said Alessandro Mura, a Juno co-investigator at the National Institute for Astrophysics in Rome and lead author of a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters on oscillations and stability in Jupiter’s polar cyclones. “The behavior of these slow oscillations suggests that they have deep roots.”

JIRAM data also indicates that, like hurricanes on Earth, these cyclones want to move poleward, but cyclones located at the center of each pole push them back. This balance explains where the cyclones reside and the different numbers at each pole.

More About the Mission

JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission. Juno is part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built and operates the spacecraft.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-juno-science-results-offer-first-3d-view-of-jupiter-atmosphere?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211102-19

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter, and get more information about Juno online at:

https://www.nasa.gov/juno

Ride With Juno Past the Solar System’s Biggest Moon

NASA’s Juno Mission Expands Into the Future

The Dark Origins of One of Jupiter’s Grand Light Shows

News Media Contact

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

DC Agle

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-9011

agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Deb Schmid

Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

210-522-2254

dschmid@swri.org

2021-220

Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

The latest in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory series of historical documentaries, “Triumph at Saturn” chronicles the story of NASA’s Cassini mission. Part I of this two-part story will premiere on JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT; part II will premiere there at the same time on Oct. 22.

These films use rare archival footage and interviews with pioneering engineers and scientists in retelling the story of humanity’s first steps into the cosmos. The films go with 12 others in the series “JPL and the Space Age,” which documents everything from JPL’s origins to the Voyager spacecraft to the Mars Pathfinder mission and beyond. Each episode of was written, produced, and directed by JPL Fellow Blaine Baggett.

The full “Triumph at Saturn” film is planned to be available on this webpage in the near future.

Caltech, in Pasadena, California, manages JPL for NASA.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/online-film-premiere-triumph-at-saturn-part-i?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211102-19

News Media Contact

Gretchen McCartney

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-6215

gretchen.p.mccartney@jpl.nasa.gov

Triumph at Saturn (Part I)

Premiered Oct 15, 2021   NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Chronicling the story of NASA’s Cassini mission, this is the latest in our series of documentaries, “JPL and the Space Age.” These films use rare archival footage and interviews with pioneering engineers and scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in retelling the stories of many of humanity’s first steps into the cosmos. Part I of this two-part story will premiere here on Oct. 15, 2021 at 3 p.m. Pacific time; part II will premiere here at the same time on Oct. 22: https://youtu.be/oGsajLIALJE. Other films in this series are available for viewing at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/who-we-are/d…. “Triumph at Saturn” is planned to be added to this collection in the near future.

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Nov. 19, 2021

Nov 19, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Kyle Rittenhouse is cleared on all charges in a case that sparked national debate over racial injustice, guns and self-defense. Then, the U.S. House of Representatives passes the president’s priority Build Back Better bill, sending it on to the Senate. And, why those who were wrongfully convicted still face great struggles when adjusting to their post-prison life. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Does the Rittenhouse acquittal set a precedent? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXC56… News Wrap: ‘Unite the Right’ trial jurors begin deliberating https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awcXo… Child care, climate change and more in Build Back Better Act https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiQR-… Here’s what you need to know about COVID boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzGm-… How the exonerated struggle to heal from ‘wounds’ of prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umJdh… Capehart and Abernathy on Rittenhouse trial, Dem social bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2TKH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend, Full Episode November 20, 2021

Nov 20, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 20th, protests, celebration, and talk of reform after Kyle Rittenhouse was found not guilty on all five charges, new pressure to protect frontline communities from oil and gas drilling in California, and, ‘if at first you don’t succeed’—lessons learned at the Museum of Failure. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

#NightlyNews #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Nov. 19, 2021

Nov 19, 2021  NBC News

Kyle Rittenhouse acquitted on all charges in homicide trial, FDA and CDC authorize 3rd Pfizer, Moderna Covid shots for all adults, and airlines under pressure as millions expected to travel for Thanksgiving. 00:00 Intro 02:08 Kyle Rittenhouse Not Guilty 05:14 Vaccine Boosters For All 07:40 Holiday Travel Trouble 10:53 House Passes Biden Plan 13:56 Charlottesville Jury Deliberations 16:12 The Cost Of Care: Caregiving Financial Toll » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

Nightly News Full Broadcast – November 20th

Nov 20, 2021  NBC News

Chaos erupts at Atlanta Airport amidst Thanksgiving travel, Protests across the U.S. over Kyle Rittenhouse trial verdict, and CDC greenlights Covid boosters for all adults. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #AtlantaAirport #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

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