Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 19

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Chinese guardian figure beside a gate in Wat Pho

“The temple grounds contain 91 small chedis (stupas or mounds), four great chedis, two belfries, a bot (central shrine), a number of viharas (halls) and other buildings such as pavilions, as well as gardens and a small temple museum. Architecturally the chedis and buildings in the complex are different in style and sizes.[19] A number of large Chinese statues, some of which depict Europeans, are also found within the complex guarding the gates of the perimeter walls as well as other gates within the compound. These stone statues were originally imported as ballast on ships trading with China.[19]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho was also intended to serve as a place of education for the general public. To this end a pictorial encyclopedia was engraved on granite slabs covering eight subject areas, namely history, medicine, health, custom, literature, proverbs, lexicography, and the Buddhist religion.[20][24]

“These plaques, inscribed with texts and illustration on medicine, Thai traditional massage, and other subjects, are placed around the temple,[25] for example, within the Sala Rai or satellite open pavilions. Dotted around the complex are 24 small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand, and one, called the Contorting Hermit Hill, contains some statues showing methods of massage and yoga positions.[19][24]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

 Fish pond in small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

Chinese guardian figure beside a gate in Wat Pho

 

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

Fish pond in small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Reclining Buddha of Wat Pho

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“One of the most famous and impressive temples in Bangkok is Wat Pho. Also known as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha for the 46-meter long Buddha image it houses, it’s a must-see attraction when visiting the Thai capital.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://blogs.transparent.com/thai/wat-pho-temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

 

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimon Mangkhalaram Ratchaworamahawihan, more commonly referred to as Wat Pho, is one of the six temples in Thailand that are of the highest grade of first class Royal temples. Wat Pho serves as home to the massive 46-meter long reclining Buddha image, the size of which must be experienced in person as it is simply breathtaking. The amazing feeling of taking in the sight of the enormous golden figure of the ‘enlightened one’ cannot be explained with words, and even more rarely captured in photos due to its massive size. You have to visit this amazing site to see it for yourself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://yourthaiguide.com/temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

 “The Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Reclining Buddha standing at 15 meters tall and stretching 46 meters in length, it barely fits in the building.

The Buddha’s feet are 3 x 4.5 meters and are decorated in shiny mother-of-pearl. They also display the 108 auspicious characteristics of Buddha.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://blogs.transparent.com/thai/wat-pho-temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

The Reclining Buddha of Wat Pho

 

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Wat Pho , also spelt Wat Po, is a Buddhist temple complex in the Phra Nakhon District, Bangkok, Thailand. It is on Rattanakosin Island, directly south of the Grand Palace.[2] Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn[1]Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimonmangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan;  The more commonly known name, Wat Pho, is a contraction of its older name Wat Photaram .[4]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Phra Mondop or the ho trai is the Scripture Hall containing a small library of Buddhist scriptures. The building is not generally open to the public as the scriptures, which are inscribed on palm leaves, need to be kept in a controlled environment for preservation.[36] The library was built by King Rama III. Guarding its entrance are figures called Yak Wat Pho (Wat Pho’s Giants) placed in niches beside the gates.[37] Around Phra Mondop are three pavilions with mural paintings of the beginning of Ramayana.

 

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The temple is first on the list of six temples in Thailand classed as the highest grade of the first-class royal temples.[5][6] It is associated with King Rama I who rebuilt the temple complex on an earlier temple site, and became his main temple where some of his ashes are enshrined.[7] The temple was later expanded and extensively renovated by Rama III. The temple complex houses the largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand, including a 46 m long reclining Buddha. The temple is considered the earliest centre for public education in Thailand, and the marble illustrations and inscriptions placed in the temple for public instructions has been recognised by UNESCO in its Memory of the World Programme. It houses a school of Thai medicine, and is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage which is still taught and practiced at the temple.[8]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho is open every day from 8am until 6:30pm.

Admission Price: 100 Baht per person (free entry for children under 120 centimeters).

Things you should be aware of when visiting the Wat Pho:

  • Respectful attire is required. Wat Pho is a functioning Thai Buddhist temple, and a such the management insists that visitors dress in a respectful manner. This means that men must wear long pants and short-sleeved or long-sleeved shirts (no tank tops or sleeveless shirts). Women must wear skirts or pants extending at least to the knee, and also should not wear a top that reveals bare shoulders.
  • Visitors are allowed to take photographs in any area of the complex.
  • It is recommended that you wear shoes that can be easily removed as you’ll need to take them off when entering any structure in the complex.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://yourthaiguide.com/temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 18

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

“Wat Pho, also spelt Wat Po, is a Buddhist temple complex in the Phra Nakhon District, Bangkok, Thailand. It is on Rattanakosin Island, directly south of the Grand Palace.[2] Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn[1] Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimonmangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan; IPA: The more commonly known name, Wat Pho, is a contraction of its older name Wat Photaram (Wat Photharam).[4]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

“Wat Pho: The temple is first on the list of six temples in Thailand classed as the highest grade of the first-class royal temples.[5][6] It is associated with King Rama I who rebuilt the temple complex on an earlier temple site, and became his main temple where some of his ashes are enshrined.[7] The temple was later expanded and extensively renovated by Rama III. The temple complex houses the largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand, including a 46 m long reclining Buddha. The temple is considered the earliest centre for public education in Thailand, and the marble illustrations and inscriptions placed in the temple for public instructions has been recognised by UNESCO in its Memory of the World Programme. It houses a school of Thai medicine, and is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage which is still taught and practiced at the temple.[8]

“Wat Pho is one of Bangkok’s oldest temples. It existed before Bangkok was established as the capital by King Rama I. It was originally named Wat Photaram or Podharam, from which the name Wat Pho is derived.[4][9] The name refers the monastery of the Bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya, India where Buddha is believed to have attained enlightenment.[6][10] The older temple is thought to have been built or expanded during the reign of King Phetracha (1688–1703), but date and founder unknown.[6][11] The southern section of Wat Pho used to be occupied by part of a French Star fort that was demolished by King Phetracha after the 1688 Siege of Bangkok.[12]

 

“After the fall of Ayutthaya to the Burmese, King Taksin moved the capital to Thonburi where he located his palace beside Wat Arun on the opposite side of the river from Wat Pho. The proximity of Wat Pho to this royal palace elevated it to the status of a wat luang (royal monastery).[6]

 

“In 1782, King Rama I moved the capital from Thonburi across the river to Bangkok and built the Grand Palace adjacent to Wat Pho. In 1788, he ordered the construction and renovation at the old temple site of Wat Pho, which had by then become dilapidated.[1] The site, which was marshy and uneven, was drained and filled in before construction began.”

 

 “Wat Pho: During its construction Rama I also initiated a project to remove Buddha images from abandoned temples in Ayutthaya, Sukhothai, as well other sites in Thailand, and many of these Buddha images were kept at Wat Pho.[13] These include the remnants of an enormous Buddha image from Ayuthaya‘s Wat Phra Si Sanphet destroyed by the Burmese in 1767, and these were incorporated into a chedi in the complex.[14] The rebuilding took over seven years to complete. In 1801, twelve years after work began, the new temple complex was renamed Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklavas in reference to the vihara of Jetavana, and it became the main temple for Rama I.[15][16]

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“The complex underwent significant changes in the next 260 years, particularly during the reign of Rama III (1824-1851 CE). In 1832, King Rama III began renovating and enlarging the temple complex, a process that took 16 years and seven months to complete. The ground of the temple complex was expanded to 22 acres, and most of the structures now present in Wat Pho were either built or rebuilt in this period, including the chapel of the reclining Buddha. He also turned the temple complex into a public center of learning by decorating the walls of the buildings with diagrams and inscriptions on various subjects.[9]:90 ] On 21 February 2008, these marble illustrations and inscriptions was registered in the Memory of the World Programme launched by UNESCO to promote, preserve and propagate the wisdom of the world heritage.[17][18]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

“Wat Pho is regarded as Thailand’s first university and a center for traditional Thai massage. It served as a medical teaching center in the mid-19th century before the advent of modern medicine, and the temple remains a center for traditional medicine today where a private school for Thai medicine founded in 1957 still operates.[19][20]

 

“The name of the complex was changed again to Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm during the reign of King Rama IV.[1] Apart from the construction of a fourth great chedi and minor modifications by Rama IV, there had been no significant changes to Wat Pho since. Repair work, however, is a continuing process, often funded by devotees of the temple. The temple was restored again in 1982 before the Bangkok Bicentennial Celebration.[21]

 

“The Temple complex

Phra Mondop of Wat Pho. Beside its entrances are statues of Yak Wat Pho.

Wat Pho is one of the largest and oldest wats in Bangkok with an area of 50 rai, 80,000 square metres,[22] and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images, as well as one of the largest single Buddha images at 150 feet (46 m) in length.[23]

 

“The Wat Pho complex consists of two walled compounds bisected by Chetuphon Road running in the east–west direction. The larger northern walled compound, the phutthawat, is the part open to visitors and contains the finest buildings dedicated to the Buddha, including the bot with its four directional viharn, and the temple housing the reclining Buddha.[15] The southern compound, the sankhawat, contains the residential quarters of the monks and a school. The perimeter wall of the main temple complex has sixteen gates, two of which serve as entrances for the public (one on Chetuphon Road, the other near the northwest corner).[10]

 

“The temple grounds contain 91 small chedis (stupas or mounds), four great chedis, two belfries, a bot (central shrine), a number of viharas (halls) and other buildings such as pavilions, as well as gardens and a small temple museum. Architecturally the chedis and buildings in the complex are different in style and sizes.[19] A number of large Chinese statues, some of which depict Europeans, are also found within the complex guarding the gates of the perimeter walls as well as other gates within the compound. These stone statues were originally imported as ballast on ships trading with China.[19]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho was also intended to serve as a place of education for the general public. To this end a pictorial encyclopedia was engraved on granite slabs covering eight subject areas, namely history, medicine, health, custom, literature, proverbs, lexicography, and the Buddhist religion.[20][24]

“These plaques, inscribed with texts and illustration on medicine, Thai traditional massage, and other subjects, are placed around the temple,[25] for example, within the Sala Rai or satellite open pavilions. Dotted around the complex are 24 small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand, and one, called the Contorting Hermit Hill, contains some statues showing methods of massage and yoga positions.[19][24]

 

“There are also drawings of constellations on the wall of the library, inscriptions on local administration, as well as paintings of folk tales and animal husbandry.[20]

 

“Phra Ubosot (Phra Uposatha) or bot is the ordination hall, the main hall used for performing Buddhist rituals, and the most sacred building of the complex. It was constructed by King Rama I in the Ayuthaya style, and later enlarged and reconstructed in the Rattanakosin style by Rama III. The bot was dedicated in 1791, before the rebuilding of Wat Pho was completed.[26] This building is raised on a marble platform, and the ubosot lies in the center of courtyard enclosed by a double cloister (Phra Rabiang).”

“Inside the ubosot is a gold and crystal three-tiered pedestal topped with a gilded Buddha made of a gold-copper alloy, and over the statue is a nine-tiered umbrella representing the authority of Thailand.[19] The Buddha image, known as Phra Buddha Theva Patimakorn and thought to be from the Ayutthaya period, was moved here by Rama I from Wat Sala Si Na (now called Wat Khuhasawan) in Thonburi.[27][28]

 

“Rama IV later placed some ashes of Rama I under the pedestal of the Buddha image so that the public may pay homage to both Rama I and the Buddha at the same time. There are also ten images of Buddha’s disciples in the hall; Moggalana is located to the left of Buddha and Sariputta to the right, with eight Arahants below.[1][29]

 

“The exterior balustrade surrounding the main hall has around 150 depictions in stone of the epic, Ramakien, the ultimate message of which is transcendence from secular to spiritual dimensions.[10]

“The stone panels were recovered from a temple in Ayuthaya. The ubosot is enclosed by a low wall called kamphaeng kaew,[30] which is punctuated by gateways guarded by mythological lions, as well as eight structures that house the bai sema stone markers that delineate the sacred space of the bot.”

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Phra Rabiang – This double cloister contains around 400 images of Buddha from northern Thailand selected out of the 1,200 originally brought by King Rama I.[10] Of these Buddha images, 150 are located on the inner side of the double cloister, another 244 images are on the outer side.[29] These Buddha figures, some standing and some seated, are evenly mounted on matching gilded pedestals. These images are from different periods in Thai history, such as the Chiangsaen, Sukhothai, U-Thong, and Ayutthaya eras, but they were renovated by Rama I and covered with stucco and gold leaves to make them look similar.[29]

 

“The Phra Rabiang is intersected by four viharns. The viharn in the east contains an 8 metre tall standing Buddha, the Buddha Lokanatha, originally from Ayutthaya. In its antechamber is Buddha Maravichai, sitting under a bodhi tree, originally from Sawankhalok of the late Sukhothai period.”

 

“The one on the west has a seated Buddha sheltered by a naga, the Buddha Chinnasri, while the Buddha on the south, the Buddha Chinnaraja, has five disciples seated in front listening to his first sermon. Both Buddhas were brought from Sukhothai by Rama I. The Buddha in the north viharn called Buddha Palilai was cast in the reign of Rama I.[29] The viharn on the west also contains a small museum.[31]

“Phra Prang – There are four towers, or phra prang, at each corner of the courtyard around the bot. Each of the towers is tiled with marbles and contains four Khmer-style statues which are the guardian divinities of the Four Cardinal Points.[32]

“Phra Maha Chedi Si Rajakarn

This is a group of four large stupas, each 42 metres high. These four chedis are dedicated to the first four Chakri kings.[8] The first, in green mosaic tiles, was constructed by Rama I to house the remnants of the great Buddha from Ayuthaya, which was scorched to remove its gold covering by the Burmese. Two more were built by Rama III, one in white tiles to hold the ashes of his father Rama II, another in yellow for himself. A fourth in blue was built by Rama IV who then enclosed the four chedis leaving no space for more to be built.[33]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Viharn Phranorn

The viharn or wihan contains the reclining Buddha and was constructed in the reign of Rama III emulating the Ayutthaya-style. The interior is decorated with panels of mural.[34]

Adjacent to this building is a small raised garden (Missakawan Park) with a Chinese-style pavilion; the centrepiece of the garden is a bodhi tree which was propagated from the Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi tree in Sri Lanka that is believed to have originally came from a tree in India where Buddha sat while awaiting enlightenment.[35]

 

Phra Mondop

“Phra Mondop or the ho trai is the Scripture Hall containing a small library of Buddhist scriptures. The building is not generally open to the public as the scriptures, which are inscribed on palm leaves, need to be kept in a controlled environment for preservation.[36] The library was built by King Rama III. Guarding its entrance are figures called Yak Wat Pho (Wat Pho’s Giants) placed in niches beside the gates.[37] Around Phra Mondop are three pavilions with mural paintings of the beginning of Ramayana.”

“Phra Chedi Rai – Outside the Phra Rabiang cloisters are dotted many smaller chedis, called Phra Chedi Rai. Seventy-one of these small chedis were built by Rama III, each five metres in height. There are also four groups of five chedis that shared a single base built by Rama I, one on each corner outside the cloister.[38] The 71 chedis of smaller size contain the ashes of the royal family, and 20 slightly larger ones clustered in groups of five contain the relics of Buddha.[19]

 

“Sala Karn Parien – This hall is next to the Phra Mondop at the southwest corner of the compound, and is thought to date from the Ayutthaya period. It serves as a learning and meditation hall.[39] The building contains the original Buddha image from the bot which was moved to make way for the Buddha image currently in the bot.[26] Next to it is a garden called The Crocodile Pond.”

 

“Sala Rai – There are 16 satellite pavilions, most of them placed around the edge of the compound, and murals depicting the life of Buddha may be found in some of these. Two of these are the medical pavilions between Phra Maha Chedi Si Ratchakarn and the main chapel. The north medicine pavilion contains Thai traditional massage inscriptions with 32 drawings of massage positions on the walls while the one to the south has a collection of inscriptions on guardian angel that protects the newborn.[40]

 

“Phra Viharn Kod – This is the gallery which consists of four viharas, one on each corner outside the Phra Rabiang.[41][42]

Tamnak Wasukri – Also called the poet’s house, this is the former residence of Prince Patriarch Paramanujita Jinorasa, a Thai poet.[43] This building is in the living quarters of the monks in the southern compound and is open once a year on his birthday.”

“Tamnak Wasukri – Also called the poet’s house, this is the former residence of Prince Patriarch Paramanujita Jinorasa, a Thai poet.[43] This building is in the living quarters of the monks in the southern compound and is open once a year on his birthday.”

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Thai massage

The temple is considered the first public university of Thailand, teaching students in the fields of religion, science, and literature through murals and sculptures.[8] A school for traditional medicine and massage was established at the temple in 1955, and now offers four courses in Thai medicine: Thai pharmacy, Thai medical practice, Thai midwifery, and Thai massage.[47]

 

“This, the Wat Pho Thai Traditional Medical and Massage School, is the first school of Thai medicine approved by the Thai Ministry of Education, and one of the earliest massage schools. It remains the national headquarters and the center of education of traditional Thai medicine and massage to this day.”

“Courses on Thai massage are held in Wat Pho, and these may last a few weeks to a year.[19] Two pavilions at the eastern edge of the Wat Pho compound are used as classrooms for practising Thai traditional massage and herbal massage, and visitors can received massage treatment here for a fee.[48][49] Foreigners from 135 countries have studied Thai massage at Wat Po.[50]

There are many medical inscriptions and illustrations placed in various buildings around the temple complex, some of which serve as instructions for Thai massage therapists, particularly those in the north medical pavilion.[51]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Among these are 60 inscribed plaques, 30 each for the front and back of human body, showing pressure points used in traditional Thai massage. These therapeutic points and energy pathways, known as sen, are engraved on the human figures, with explanations given on the walls next to the plaques.[52] They are based on the principle of energy flow similar to that of Chinese acupuncture. The understanding so far is that the figures represent relationships between anatomical locations and effects produced by massage treatment at those locations, but full research on the diagrams has yet to be completed.[53]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 17

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Street Art in Pathum Thani and Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Pathum Thani is one of the central provinces (changwat) of Thailand. Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Ayutthaya, Saraburi, Nakhon Nayok, Chachoengsao, Bangkok, and Nonthaburi.

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The province is north of Bangkok and is part of the Bangkok metropolitan area. In many places the boundary between the two provinces is not noticeable as both sides of the boundary are equally urbanized. Pathum Thani town is the administrative seat, but Ban Rangsit, seat of Thanyaburi District, is the largest populated place in the province.[2]

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Pathum Thani is an old province, heavily populated by the Mon people, dotted with 186 temples and parks. The Dream World amusement park is here

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Academic institutes

National Science Museum, Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok University, Eastern Asia University, Pathumthani University, Rajamangala University of Technology, Rangsit University, Shinawatra University, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, and Thammasat University (Rangsit Center)”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

 Street Art in Pahtum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

 “Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Research bodies

Thailand Science Park, National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Thai Microelectronics Center (TMEC), Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research (TISTR), TOT Innovation Institute (TOT)”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Education and technology

“Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Industrial parks

Software Park Thailand (in Nonthaburi, southwest of Pathum Thani), Nava Nakorn Industrial Promotion Zone (1376 acres / 5.6 km²), Bangkadi Industrial Park (470 acres / 1.9 km²), Techno Thani (a “Technology City” administered by the Ministry of Science and Technology), and a number of industrial parks in neighboring Ayutthaya and Nonthaburi Provinces”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

“Pathum Thani is one of the central provinces (changwat) of Thailand. Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Ayutthaya, Saraburi, Nakhon Nayok, Chachoengsao, Bangkok, and Nonthaburi.

The province is north of Bangkok and is part of the Bangkok metropolitan area. In many places the boundary between the two provinces is not noticeable as both sides of the boundary are equally urbanized. Pathum Thani town is the administrative seat, but Ban Rangsit, seat of Thanyaburi District, is the largest populated place in the province.[2]

Pathum Thani is an old province, heavily populated by the Mon people, dotted with 186 temples and parks. The Dream World amusement park is here.

Geography

The province lies on the low alluvial flats of the Chao Phraya River that flows through the capital. Many canals (khlongs) cross the province and feed the rice paddies.

History

The city dates back to a settlement founded by Mon migrating from Mottama  in Myanmar around 1650. The original name was “Sam Khok”.[3]:230,369 In 1815 King Rama II visited the city and the citizens offered him many lotus flowers, which prompted the king to rename the city “Pathum Thani”, meaning “the lotus flower town”.[4]

Symbols

The provincial seal shows a pink lotus flower with two rice stalks bending over it, representing the fertility of the province. The provincial tree is the Indian coral tree (Erythrina variegata). The provincial flower is the lotus (Nymphaea lotus).

Administrative divisions

The province is divided into seven districts (amphoe). The districts are further subdivided into 60 communes (tambon) and 529 villages (muban).

  1. Mueang Pathum Thani
  2. Khlong Luang
  3. Thanyaburi
  4. Nong Suea
  1. Lat Lum Kaeo
  2. Lam Luk Ka
  3. Sam Khok

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Silpakorn UniversityMahawitthayalai Sinlapakon is a national university in Thailand. The university was founded in Bangkok in 1943 by Italian-born art professor Corrado Feroci, who took the Thai name Silpa Bhirasri when he became a Thai citizen. It began as a fine arts university and now includes many other faculties as well. In 2016, it has 25,210 students.[4]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

History: Silpakorn University was originally established as the School of Fine Arts under Thailand’s Fine Arts Department in 1933. The school offered the only painting and sculpture programs and waived tuition fees for government officials and students. Its creation owes much to the almost lifetime devotion of Professor Silpa Bhirasri, an Italian sculptor (formerly Corrado Feroci) who was commissioned during the reign of King Rama VI to work in the Fine Arts Department. He subsequently enlarged his classes to include greater members of the interested public before setting up the School of Fine Arts. The school gradually developed and was officially accorded a new status and named Silpakorn University on 12 October 1943.[2] Its inaugural faculty was the Faculty of Painting and Sculpture. In 1955, the Faculty of Thai Architecture was established, later named the Faculty of Architecture) and two more faculties were created, the Faculty of Archaeology and the Faculty of Decorative Arts.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

In 1966, Silpakorn University diversified the four faculties into sub-specializations to broaden its offerings, but the university’s Wang Tha Phra campus proved inadequate. A new campus, Sanam Chandra Palace, was established in Nakhon Pathom Province in the former residential compound of King Rama VI. The first two faculties based on this campus were the Faculty of Arts in 1968 and the Faculty of Education in 1970. Later, three more faculties were created: the Faculty of Science in 1972, the Faculty of Pharmacy in 1986, and the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology in 1992. In 1999, the Faculty of Music was created.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

 

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

“In 1997, Silpakorn extended its reach by establishing a new campus in Phetchaburi Province. The new campus was named “Phetchaburi Information Technology Campus”. In 2001 and 2002, the Faculty of Animal Sciences and Agricultural Technology and the Faculty of Management Science were established on the Phetchaburi Campus. In 2003, the Faculty of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was established, as well as Silpakorn University International College (SUIC). Its role is to provide an international curriculum in additional fields of study.

Ganesha, one of the Hindu deities symbolizing arts and crafts, is Silpakorn University’s emblem.[1] The “university tree” is the chan tree.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Silapakorn University Art Gallery: Hosin Mahawitthayalai Sinlapakon) is an art gallery and museum in Bangkok, Thailand. It is a building in Silpakorn University Wang Tha Phra Campus on Na Pralarn Road, directly north of the Grand Palace and south of Wat Mahathat Yuwaratrangsarit. It was created in 1994.[1]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Silpakorn University (also known as the University of Fine Arts) is a National university in Thailand. The university was founded in Bangkok in 1943[2] by Italian-born art professor Corrado Feroci, who took the Thai name Silpa Bhirasri when he became a Thai citizen. It began as a fine arts university and now includes many other faculties as well.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Museums and art galleries in Bangkok

Bang Khun Thien Museum

Bangkok Folk Museum

Bangkok Noi Museum

Bank of Thailand Museum

Children’s Discovery Museum

Museum of Counterfeit Goods

Golden Jubilee Museum of Agriculture

King Prajadhipok Museum

King Rama VI Museum

Museum of Imagery Technology

National Museum Bangkok

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Museums and art galleries in Bangkok

Plai Nern PalacePrasart MuseumPrincess Maha Chakri    Sirindhorn Anthropology CentreQueen Sirikit GalleryRoyal Barge National MuseumRoyal Elephant National Museum

Royal Thai Air Force Museum

Samphanthawong Museum

Siriraj Medical Museum

Thai Human Imagery Museum

Thai Labour Museum

Thai Philatelic Museum

Science Centre for Education

The Science Museum – Klong Luang

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Podstel Hostel Bangkok

is a brand new premium hostel “Poshtel”, that has over 200 beds to offer in over 5 different room types. Located in an upcoming district of Bangkok right by the intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek), the rest of Bangkok city is just at your door step. The hostel itself is within a part of a larger complex called The Bazaar Ratchadaphisek, which comprises of The Bazaar Hotel that accommodates up to 800 rooms, offices, municipal shops, restaurants, a 24 hour supermarket and convenience store, a nightly food street, a full facility gym with a pool, a Muay Thai boxing school, and daily entertainment cabaret and boxing shows at The Bazaar Theater. No doubt this makes The Bazaar a destination in itself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://podstelbangkok.com/

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Which Hindu gods are widely worshiped in Thailand? Why?

Nasa Saze, I am a scientist

Answered Jan 16 2016

Thailand adopt worshipping some Hindu gods and goddesses. I think it is true that Brahma is widely worshipped more than Vishnu and Shiva. Brahma is the god of creation that is why people worship him most. Vishnu is the god of protection might be worshiped in specific places. Shiva was mostly worshiped in the old time while Khmer Empire was ruling parts of Thailand, but he is the god of destruction who is not likely to be worshiped. Thais worship only some Hindu gods or goddesses who (they believe) can give their wishes come true. Some certain places may developed their belief to a specific god such as the worshipping of the Brahma at Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Many hotels in Thailand will have small shrines of Brahma or Vishnu in front of the hotels.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another god who is the son of Shiva, the god Ganesha, is also widely worshiped in many places in Thailand. Thais believe that Ganesha is the god of arts. Everyone who work in the artist field will have the tradition to held ceremonies to pray for this god.”
For more information please visit the following link:                                      https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Goddess of rivers and water, the goddess Ganges, is widely worshiped. Every year Thailand will have the Loy Krathong festival to thank the goddess Ganges. People will make krathong, a floating vessel made from any materials that can float on water with beautiful decorations with flowers and candles and the scent sticks, and then float in rivers, ponds, or reservoirs. This is one of the most famous festival of the year.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Goddess of the Earth, Phra Mae Thorani, is worshiped by everyone or at least some farmers. I am not sure that this goddess exist in Hindu or not, but I believe Thais adopt the idea that there is a holy spirit of the Earth from Hindu. When farmers will start new season of farming, they will pray for this goddess. There is no big statue or shrine of this goddess, but she is very well-known and everywhere. When Thais go to make merit at temples, they will pass the merit to their dead love ones. There will be a ceremony that the monks will chant a montra to pass the merit to spirits of the dead ones. During the chanting, people will pour water from a jar to a container. This is a symbolic ritual to pass the merit to the water. Then the water will be poured under trees or any ground in the temple. People will ask Phra Mae Thorani to pass the merit to the spirits.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

People pouring water to pass the merit

There is a goddess I am not sure she exists in Hindu or not. The goddess of farming, Phra Mae Posop, is widely worshiped by Thai farmers. During the rice farming season, farmers will held a ceremony (or more 2 or 3 ceremonies) to pray for this goddess to ask her for successful farming.
For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“A ceremony to worship goddess of farming
People in ancient time adopt the idea that their kings are avatars of Vishnu from ancient Khmer Empire. There are some traditions of expressing the king status as semi-divine in the royal ceremonies that are still practicing until now. People in rural area are still worshiping the king as a semi-divine. In modern Thailand, Thai people don’t worship the king like god, instead they think of the king and the royals as celebrities. Some express their respects to the royals as high as the most senior members of their families.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Thailand major religion is Buddhism and there are some minor religions such as Islam, Christian, Sikhism, and Hindu. Some Buddhist ceremonies also adapt Hindu traditions and that makes it the mixed religion tradition. There are some who really believe in these gods. Nowadays, many Thais might not believe that the gods really exist, but they still follow the old traditions to held many ceremonies during a year.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“The Deity (God) Brahma In the Hindu Religion

  • Hindus believe that Brahma is the creator of the world and everything in it. He was most respected in the early period.
  • At first, he was only an abstract, without forms, until later that the Brahmans created his appearance to make it easier for people to worship. Thus, he has become the god of four faces and four arms.
  • Brahma has a wife called Sarasvati and has a Hamsa as vehicle.
  • Brahma’s origin has been recorded differently. But in the recent scriptures such as Purana, it is believed that he is born out of Vishnu’s navel. Although Brahma is the creator of the World, he has not actually been much respected. There is not any denomination which respects him in particular; instead he is included in other denominations which respect the other two principal gods.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.thailandsworld.com/en/thai-people/hindu-deities-in-thailand/index.cfm

Religion in Thailand is varied. There is no official state religion in the Thai constitution, which guarantees religious freedom for all Thai citizens, though the king is required by law to be Theravada Buddhist.[1] The main religion practiced in Thailand is Buddhism, but there is a strong undercurrent of Hinduism with its distinct priestly class.[2] The large Thai Chinese population also practices Chinese folk religions, including Taoism. The Yiguandao (Thai: Anuttharatham) spread in Thailand in the 1970s and it has grown so much in recent decades to come into conflict with Buddhism; it is reported that each year 200,000 Thais convert to the religion.[3] Many other people, especially among the Isan ethnic group, practice Tai folk religions. A significant Muslim population, mostly constituted by Thai Malays, is present especially in the southern regions.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Thailand

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Podstel Hostel Bangkok

is a brand new premium hostel “Poshtel”, that has over 200 beds to offer in over 5 different room types. Located in an upcoming district of Bangkok right by the intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek), the rest of Bangkok city is just at your door step. The hostel itself is within a part of a larger complex called The Bazaar Ratchadaphisek, which comprises of The Bazaar Hotel that accommodates up to 800 rooms, offices, municipal shops, restaurants, a 24 hour supermarket and convenience store, a nightly food street, a full facility gym with a pool, a Muay Thai boxing school, and daily entertainment cabaret and boxing shows at The Bazaar Theater. No doubt this makes The Bazaar a destination in itself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://podstelbangkok.com/

Lat Phrao roads intersection of Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Lat Phrao Road or Thailand Route 366 is a major road in Bangkok, Thailand. Despite its name the road does not run through the nearby Lat Phrao District. It begins at Phahonyothin Road in Chatuchak District, passes through Huai Khwang and Wang Thonglang, and ends in Bang Kapi District. The road is serviced by two MRT stations: Phahon Yothin and Lat Phrao.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lat_Phrao_Road

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Ratchada is overwhelmingly modern but with a less built-up, more out of town feel than, say, Sukhumvit. Distinctive landmarks along Ratchadaphisek Road include the well-known Thailand Cultural Centre, local nightclubs and pubs, as well as department stores and value-for-money hotels. Located just to the north of the downtown metropolitan area, it runs parallel to Viphavadi Rangsit Road to the east, stretching northwards all the way from the end of Asok Road (Sukumvit Soi 21) to Lad Phrao Road. In recent years it’s gained something of a reputation for being an affordable nightlife spot – although this is more among locals than the expat or holiday crowd. It is extremely well-served by the MRT underground.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/ratchadapisek/#

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Ratchadapisek is situated to the north of metropolitan area. Ratchadapisek Road runs parallel to Viphavadi Rangsit Road from Lad Prao to Sukumvit’s Soi Asoke 21. Ratchadapisek is within the area of the Thai Cultural Center, several leading department stores, and a wide selection of entertainment venues. Transportation access into and out of Bangkok from here is easy and there are good connections to the eastern seaboard. From 6:00 PM onwards, along Silom Road are numerous street bazaars selling everything from cloths, to watches and souvenirs. To complete your entertainment options, there’s a good choice of pubs and restaurants and Patpong is just around the corner. The Chatuchak weekend market is one Bangkok’s most famous markets. It is popular with locals and visitors alike, looking for a bargain from everything such as discount clothes and souvenirs, to ornate Thai handcrafts.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/ratchadapisek/#

The intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek)

Ratchadaphisek is north of Sukhumvit and is a busy commercial and entertainment district. Accommodation on Ratchadaphisek Road has great access to restaurants, malls and nightclubs. Lots of students, young Bangkok office workers and expat teachers call this part of the city home.

The subway (MRT) follows Ratchadaphisek Road, making it safe and easy to connect between shops, restaurants and hotels. The two major cultural attractions in the area are Siam Niramit and Thailand Cultural Center. These are great venues for first-time visitors to learn about Thai traditions and art, and the presentation includes enough excitement and special effects to interest children.

Hotels in Ratchadaphisek are large and especially popular with Chinese and Japanese tourists. Prices are affordable in Ratchadaphisek, and since guests have access to the subway they can easily connect to the Grand Palace or the Sukhumvit area easily.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218 “Shopping centers including Lotus, Carrefour and Robinson are located next to the Cultural Center MRT station. The more affordable and more locally-flavored Jusco shopping center is also only a few steps from Thailand Cultural Center MRT. Esplanade is the most popular mall with younger people, featuring an ice-skating rink, cinema complex, mini skate park and several big-chain cafés and restaurants. Behind Esplanade is a dedicated nightclub zone with several large clubs that are busy every night of the week with Bangkok locals. Across the road are Ratchada Soi 4 and Soi 8 – both of which feature many large nightclubs, the most popular called Hollywood.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Ratchadaphisek covers a large area which is mostly residential and gives visitors to Bangkok a good idea about what life is like for locals. Since it’s also where many expats find affordable accommodation there are plenty of facilities geared towards foreigners, with markets (Ratchada Soi 14), the vintage weekend market (Huay Kwang MRT), Esplanade and Robinson shopping complex presenting plenty to do.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218

Go to the top