PBS News, Washington Week PBS, NBC News, Meet The Press, DW Documentary, TED, Axios, Reuters, BBC News, and VolcanoDiscovery : La Palma volcano eruption

PBS News, Washington Week PBS, NBC News, Meet The Press, DW Documentary, TED, Axios, Reuters, BBC News, and VolcanoDiscovery : La Palma volcano eruption

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 15 & 21, 2021

Culture Wars and Economic Challenges and The Politics of Blue Origin’s Space Launch | Washington Week | October 15, 2021, Washington Week PBS

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 14th, 15th &16th,  NBC News,

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 10th, & 17th, 2021, NBC News

Raising the Future: The Child Care Crisis, PBS NewsHour

What makes a child smart? | DW Documentary, Oct 15, 2021 

TED: Chris Bennett A close to home solution for accessible childcare and Khalil Ramadi Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease

Axios AM by Mike Allen, October 10, 2021 – 6. Snapchat generation steps up

ReutersLIVE: Lava still flowing one month after volcano erupted on La Palma Island, 10.21.2021

Canary Islands volcano forces further evacuations of La Palma residents – BBC News, Sep 22, 2021 

More destruction feared in La Palma as lava pours from new volcano vent | DW News, Oct 1, 2021 

La Palma volcano eruption 2 Oct 2021: lava fountains and lava flows, Oct 3, 2021  VolcanoDiscovery

PBS NewsHour live episode, Oct. 21, 2021

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 15, 2021

Oct 15, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, an FDA advisory panel authorizes another shot for some Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine recipients, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart analyze President Biden’s efforts to alleviate supply chain issues and navigate Republican pushback to vaccine mandates. Also, Questlove’s mission to bring archived footage of a 1969 concert series to audiences today. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Suicide attack in Afghanistan kills 47 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRcJI… FDA panel backs Johnson & Johnson booster shot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QIbi… International community looks to halt ransomware attacks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaFEe… Brooks and Capehart on supply-chain issues, vaccine pushback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjLVU… City honors man whose land was taken through eminent domain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16H3Z… Questlove film brings iconic 1969 concert back to life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTYsw… A Brief But Spectacular take on mental illness in jails https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ukKE… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Culture Wars and Economic Challenges | Washington Week | October 15, 2021

Streamed live on Oct 15, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel discussed former Trump aide Steve Bannon’s refusal to appear in front of the Jan. 6 committee, expanding political culture wars, and the nation’s economic challenges. Panel: Leigh Ann Caldwell of NBC News, Eugene Daniels of POLITICO, Jonathan Karl of ABC News, Stephanie Ruhle NBC News

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf4usX5ZyB8

The Politics of Blue Origin’s Space Launch | Washington Week | October 15, 2021

Streamed live on Oct 15, 2021  Washington Week PBS

This week, William Shatner, Star Trek’s Captain Kirk, blasted into space on a Blue Origin rocket. The panel discusses the rise of space tourism and the simultaneous growth of economic inequality. Panel: Leigh Ann Caldwell of NBC News, Eugene Daniels of POLITICO, Jonathan Karl of ABC News, Stephanie Ruhle NBC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Nightly News Full Broadcast (October 16th)

Oct 16, 2021  NBC News

Police departments battle Covid vaccine mandates, Covid booster shot confusion after FDA panel recommendation, and former President Bill Clinton still hospitalized.

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 15th

Oct 15, 2021  NBC News

FDA panel recommends Johnson & Johnson booster shot, Covid vaccine mandates fueling showdowns nationwide, and former President Bill Clinton hospitalized with infection. 00:00 Intro 01:25 – FDA panel recommends J&J booster shot 04:33 – Covid vaccine mandate showdowns 06:53 – Fmr. President Bill Clinton hospitalized 10:19 – Capitol Police officer indicted 11:07 – U.K. lawmaker killed in knife attack 13:04 – Hollywood workers threaten to strike 15:00 – Toymakers struggle with supply chain shortages 16:56 – Heating costs on the rise this winter 19:01 – China’s historic mission to new space station » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #NightlyNews #LesterHolt

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 14th

Oct 14, 2021  NBC News

FDA panel recommends Moderna booster for some Americans, thousands of John Deere workers go on strike, and Southlake teachers told to balance Holocaust books with “opposing” view. 00:00 Intro 02:11 Booster Shots 04:51 Nationwide Strikes 07:38 Alex Murdaugh Arrested 11:23 Michigan Water Emergency 13:22 Southlake Book Controversy 17:06 Early Black Friday 19:05 Inspiring America » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #BoosterShots #JohnDeere

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 17th, 2021

Oct 17, 2021  NBC News

Chuck talks with Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg on the supply chain crisis and Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ar.) on vaccine mandates. Kimberly Atkins Stohr, Garrett Haake, John Podhoretz and Amy Walter join the Meet the Press roundtable. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, The ReidOut, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYo… Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc #MeetThePress #ChuckTodd #NBCNews

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 10th, 2021

Oct 10, 2021  NBC News

Chuck talks with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and former White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham about the former president’s final weeks in office. He also sits down with Nick Clegg, Facebook’s VP of Global Affairs, on the reform needed on the platform. Yamiche Alcindor, Donna Edwards and David French join the Meet the Press roundtable. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

Raising the Future: The Child Care Crisis

Premiered 84 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour presents an in-depth look at how the lack of affordable, quality child care is affecting American families, which has plagued families in the U.S. for more than a century. Now the COVID-19 pandemic is transforming daily life for millions of working parents and pushing the nation’s childcare system to the brink of collapse. Out of that turmoil, a heated debate has emerged over what, if anything, can be done to better meet the needs of parents and preschool age children. In this hour-long documentary, the PBS NewsHour reveals how shifting societal values as well as decades of federal policy have shaped the U.S. child care system into what it is today. It explores the burden costly child care places on low and middle-income families, takes viewers to cities and states experimenting with new ways of providing childcare for working parents, and delves into the political battle brewing over the idea of federally funded, universal childcare. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What makes a child smart? | DW Documentary

Oct 15, 2021  DW Documentary

The first five years of a child’s life are crucial. If early childhood education is neglected, problems can arise that may never be overcome, leading to consequences for the individual and society as a whole. In the United States, there’s little public investment in early childhood education. Yet research shows that the support and education children receive in their first five years has a decisive influence on the course of their lives. A lack of early childhood education affects not only the child and the adult they become, but also the society in which they live. This documentary looks at the topic from several perspectives, including sociology, history, developmental psychology and neuroscience. But at its core are the personal stories of children and their love of learning, as well as families trying against all odds to give their kids a good start in life. It also spotlights preschool teachers – educators who are hardly recognized by society and whose salaries are barely above the poverty line, but whose work is essential. It’s a film that explores a dramatic problem using plenty of warmth and humor. #documentary #freedocumentary #education ______

Childcare needs a transformation — but rather than investing billions in new buildings and schools, what if we could unlock the potential of people already nearby? Entrepreneur Chris Bennett offers an innovative way to tackle the shortage of childcare worldwide and connect families to safe, affordable and high-quality options in their own communities.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Chris Bennett · Entrepreneur, education advocate

Chris Bennett is a Silicon Valley-based entrepreneur and early childhood education advocate who’s passionate about harnessing the internet for social good.

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TEDMonterey | August 2021

Could a small jolt of electricity to your gut help treat chronic diseases? Medical hacker and TED Fellow Khalil Ramadi is developing a new, noninvasive therapy that could treat diseases like diabetes, obesity, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s with an electronic pill. More targeted than a traditional pill and less invasive than surgery, these micro-devices contain electronics that deliver “bionudges” — bursts of electrical or chemical stimuli — to the gut, potentially helping control appetite, aid digestion, regulate hormones — and even stimulate happiness in the brain.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Khalil Ramadi · Medical hacker

Khalil Ramadi builds medical technologies that leverage the connection between the brain and the gut.

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TED Fellows: Shape Your Future

This groundbreaking selection of talks from the TED Fellows are snapshots of influential, new ideas from leading voices in medicine, human rights, conservation, astrophysics, education and beyond. Dive in to discover what (and who) is shaping your future.

More at ted.com/shapeyourfuture ?

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Learn more about healthcare hackathons as a tool to tackle healthcare problems.

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TED Fellows: Shape Your Future | May 2021

Axios AM by Mike Allen, October 10, 2021

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> 

6. Snapchat generation steps up

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios
In four days, nearly 2 million Snapchat users checked out a new “Run for Office” module aimed at encouraging young candidates, Axios’ Alexi McCammond reports.

·  Why it matters: The tech company — which claims to reach over 90% of the nation’s 18- to 34-year-olds — wants to expand the Snapchat generation” in local and state offices.

The top five issues Snapchatters say they care about: civil rights, education, the environment, health care and jobs.

·  A burst of interest came from six of the most populous states: Texas, Florida, Ohio, California, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

How it works: Snap is partnering with 10 candidate recruitment organizations, including ones that focus on helping young progressives, conservatives and immigrants to seek elected office.

·  In the opening days, more than 24,000 Snapchat users expressed interest in working with one of those organizations to explore running for local positions, including school board or city council.

·  Another 46,000 users nominated a friend to run.

LIVE: Lava still flowing one month after volcano erupted on La Palma Island

Started streaming 10 hours ago, 10.21.2021 Reuters

There is no immediate end in sight to the volcanic eruption that has caused chaos on the Spanish isle of La Palma since it began on September 19, 2021. #Live #Volcano #CumbreVieja #lava #LaPalma #Spain #News #Reuters Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe Reuters brings you the latest business, finance and breaking news video from around the globe. Our reputation for accuracy and impartiality is unparalleled. Get the latest news on: http://reuters.com/ Follow Reuters on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reuters Follow Reuters on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Reuters Follow Reuters on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/reuters/?hl=en

Canary Islands volcano forces further evacuations of La Palma residents – BBC News

Sep 22, 2021  BBC News

An erupting volcano on La Palma in the Spanish Canary Islands has forced authorities to evacuate hundreds of homes, as the lava gushes towards the sea. Local officials have warned the lava could trigger chemical reactions when it reaches the sea, causing explosions and the release of toxic gases. The BBC’s Dan Johnson reports on the latest stage of the evacuations from the ground in La Palma. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog #CanaryIslands #LaPalma #BBCNews

More destruction feared in La Palma as lava pours from new volcano vent | DW News

Oct 1, 2021  DW News

The erupting volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma has blown open new fissures, sending more lava streaking across the island. Authorities are monitoring air quality along the shoreline – where lava has reached the Atlantic ocean. The Spanish Government has committed to re-building the island, and is providing millions for those who lose houses and livelihoods. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwnews Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/dwdeutsch

La Palma volcano eruption 2 Oct 2021: lava fountains and lava flows

Oct 3, 2021  VolcanoDiscovery

As the eruption approaches two weeks of strong activity, there is no sign of it ending or fading soon. Powerful lava fountains continue from the main vent, and several lava flows are descending the slopes of El Paraiso. With the support of Civil Protection, the video was taken from near the vent area showing the activity as observed during the evening of 2 Oct 2021. Video copyright: Tom Pfeiffer / www.volcanodiscovery.com La Palma updates: https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/la-p…

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International Street Art: Bored Panda – Pierrot (Scaf), French Street Artist Paints 3D Creature Graffiti – Author Hidreley, Part 2

International Street Art: Bored Panda – Pierrot (Scaf), French Street Artist Paints 3D Creature Graffiti – Author Hidreley, Part 2

Bored Panda: French Street Artist Paints 3D Creature Graffiti and It’s Not For The Faint Of Heart (30 New Pics) Interview With Artist

Hidreley
Pro member

The streets of cities can be quite boring and dull. That’s why it’s fun to see them being brought to life by amazing and creative street artists. Not all people love graffiti, but it’s difficult to not like these unique and magnificent creations by Pierrot (Scaf).

The artist creates amazing 3D graffiti illusions and they look like they’re about to jump off the wall. If someone didn’t expect to see a dinosaur or a lion around the corner, they would be in for the scare of their life. Pierrot often takes before and after pictures of the places he transforms and it’s amazing to see the transition from a simple wall to a work of art.

Click here to see part one!

More info: Instagram | Facebook

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot started his own company where he paints his artwork for people. On his website, Pierrot writes: “Passionate about drawing, I founded my decoration company GrafoDeco. Addressing both individuals and professionals (public or private companies), event organizers, associations, or all those who are anxious to bring a touch of originality to their interior or exterior decorations. I paint all supports (walls, panels, canvases …) and of all sizes.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot didn’t study in any art schools or anything similar. He started like most street artists—on the streets. He learned everything he knows on his own or from other artists. In a previous interview, Pierrot mentioned that he was inspired by a school friend to start creating art.

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot doesn’t just do street art, he creates interactive optical illusions and they are very difficult to do. The level at which you have to understand perspective, light, and many other things is insane and requires a lot of experience. This shows perfectly that street art is not always just vandalism, it’s also an amazing and very technical art form.

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot tops off his amazing graffiti by coming up with fun ways to photograph it. He makes his art interactive so that people can take fun and unique photos with all kinds of creatures, characters, and even animals that don’t exist anymore. Pierrot himself dresses and poses with his work, which often is one of the reasons his work goes viral.

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

We got an interview from Pierrot and asked what the goal of his street art is: “My primary goal is to make people laugh. For people to have fun and escape by looking at my paintings. I have been drawing since I was little, my cousin drew a lot, and I started vandal graffiti in 2001 with a school friend.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

“The hardest part is not repeating myself over time. I always try to create something new. Sometimes animals come back in my paintings, but I’m usually trying to find something that best suits the wall. I need to paint without always doing the same; it’s quite difficult over time.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

We asked Pierrot what topics he chooses for his graffiti: “I don’t have a particular subject or theme in mind. I don’t convey a specific message through my art. I just try to keep it childish and fun.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

“My style is mostly 3D and quite cartoon-like. It depends on the moment. However, the main goal is to make people smile. So that the people who discover my paintings will have a moment of lightness in a world where everything goes so fast and crazy. I watch a lot of cartoons. My goal is also to get away from the problems of everyday life and dream.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot tells us how he chooses what to draw: “It also depends on the moment. I watch a movie or a cartoon and an idea comes to me. I also come up with ideas by looking at the wall I’m about to work on. The idea comes to me because the general shape of the wall is different (angles or wall superposition). I try to change the main subject of my art often. I don’t want to get stuck doing the same thing over and over again.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

“I started doing 3D designs 5 or 6 years ago, but I’ve been painting for 20 years. I still hope to paint even being old with a long white beard, young people will call me ‘the old fool of the village.'”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot shares what inspires him to keep on creating: “My friends and traveling motivate me to always be more detailed and complicated. I challenge myself constantly. I am never very happy with the final result of my paintings, so I always try to do better every time, when possible.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

We asked the artist if people ever get upset at his graffiti: “No, people mostly like it, or just don’t care. I live in a village in the northeast of France. People do not look too much at graffiti and are not always fond of art.”

Here is some advice from the artist for people who want to create art: “Always practice, don’t watch social networks and media, especially at the beginning. Paint, paint, and paint again. Especially for fun, not for the money or to be known. It’s a passion before it becomes a profession.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot tells us more about himself: “I paint almost every day. I live very simply. My pleasure above all is to paint, find abandoned places and later find ideas for paintings for them. I do a lot of sports, like breakdance. However, I do less and less because I am getting older, it starts hurting everywhere over time.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Pierrot has a message for our readers: “Keep your youthful soul alive, don’t be too serious and rigid in life. Remember when you were 10 years old and the world seemed like magic. This is my life philosophy and above all, be curious about everything.”

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

scaf_oner Report

Note: this post originally had 43 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

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Hidreley

Author, Pro member

Fascinated by music, movies and sitcoms, I’m passionate about social media and can’t live without the internet, especially for all the cute dog and cat pictures out there. I wish the day had about 40 hours to be able to do everything I want.

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International Street Art: Bored Panda – Pierrot (Scaf), French Artist Realistic Graffiti Art That Seems to Jump Off the Wall, Author – Hidreley, Part 1

International Street Art: Bored Panda – Pierrot (Scaf), French Artist Realistic Graffiti Art That Seems to Jump Off the Wall, Author – Hidreley, Part 1

Bored Panda: French Artist Realistic Graffiti Art That Seems To Jump Off The Wall (30 Pics), AUTHOR Hidreley, Part 1

Hidreley
Pro member

As lockdowns loosen, people start venturing out into the streets. We can once again appreciate fresh air, open spaces, and hopefully, some good graffiti on a wall rather than bad ones. I know for sure that there’s at least one person that tips the balance of good-and-bad graffiti to the better side. He goes by the street name of scaf, or scaf_oner, on Instagram. What’s more, he isn’t a mere vandal: “I love to paint in all of these abandoned places. Above all, I like abandoned houses, manors, castles and factories.” By doing so, he transforms them and adds extra value to them, rather than the opposite.

The French street artist’s trademark is his extremely detailed and realistic style. He portrays all sorts of animals like dinosaurs and snakes, skulls and bones, robots, and other cool stuff. By the time scaf is done, his work looks picture-perfect, as if he glued a print of a photo. Everything is there: details, shadows, highlights, gloss, and flair.

More info: Instagram | Facebook

#1scaf_oner Report

It makes one wonder where he acquired sick skills like that. One would assume that he went to art school, or something similar. It turns out his background is “the school of street,” as he jokingly said in his exclusive interview for Bored Panda. “I did not study art. I started 18 years ago in abandoned factories and the street. It was a school friend who transmitted this passion to me,” he told us.

#2scaf_oner Report

#3scaf_oner Report

But wait, there’s more depth to it than that. Literally. His other signature skill is his ability to draw from a perspective to create an in-depth optical illusion where the object seemingly pops out of the wall. I, for one, would die of a heart attack if I saw a dinosaur of his in an abandoned building. His 3D drawings are so lifelike, it makes one forget that dinosaurs went extinct millions of years ago.

#4scaf_oner Report

#5scaf_oner Report

The artist even kicks it up an extra notch by striking often-hilarious poses that complement and play along with his drawings, making it real Instalicious eye-candy. It enhances the whole experience even more: it’s one thing to take a picture of your work, and another to have fun while doing it. He even dresses up accordingly for them.

#6scaf_oner Report

#7scaf_oner Report

Apart from his insane skills, this too must be the reason why his 120k followers on Instagram aren’t just an optical illusion. If you like them, check out his other works on his social media pages above. And if you go for a walk along the streets, make sure you appreciate all of the good works of art that are out there for everyone to see for free.

#8scaf_oner Report

#9scaf_oner Report

The artist has also opened up about what his quarantine experience was like: “Quarantine hasn’t changed my daily life much when I’m in my little town in france. Apart from the many staggered trips, I continued to paint alone in my abandoned factories. And if not I worked some painting on canvas, and I drew a lot. I am in my artistic bubble every day.”

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Hidreley

Author, Pro member

Fascinated by music, movies and sitcoms, I’m passionate about social media and can’t live without the internet, especially for all the cute dog and cat pictures out there. I wish the day had about 40 hours to be able to do everything I want.

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NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory News – Month in Review – October 2021 

NASA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory News – Month in Review – October 2021 

JPL News – Month in Review

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory <jplnewsroom@jpl.nasa.gov>

Friday, October 1, 2021

MONTH IN REVIEW

What’s Up – October 2021
What are some skywatching highlights in October? See several groupings of the Moon, planets, and stars at sunrise and sunset. Then get to know two bright stars that take turns with Polaris as North Star over thousands of years. Plus, Oct. 16 is International Observe the Moon Night!
› Watch now

NASA’s Mars Fleet Lies Low With Sun Between Earth and Red Planet
The missions will continue collecting data about the Red Planet, though engineers back on Earth will stop sending commands to them until mid-October.
› Read the full story

  NASA’s Perseverance Rover Cameras Capture Mars Like Never Before
Scientists tap into an array of imagers aboard the six-wheeled explorer to get a big picture of the Red Planet.
› Read the full story

NASA’s InSight Finds Three Big Marsquakes, Thanks to Solar-Panel Dusting
The lander cleared enough dust from one solar panel to keep its seismometer on through the summer, allowing scientists to study the three biggest quakes they’ve seen on Mars.
› Read the full story

NASA Robots Compete in DARPA’s Subterranean Challenge Final
Led by NASA JPL, Team CoSTAR will participate in the SubT final this week to demonstrate multi-robot autonomy in a series of tests in extreme environments.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Delta-X Helps With Disaster Response in Wake of Hurricane Ida
Researchers flying a radar instrument over coastal wetlands in Louisiana helped with monitoring oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico.
› Read the full story

Solar Electric Propulsion Makes NASA’s Psyche Spacecraft Go
Futuristic electric thrusters emitting a cool blue glow will guide the Psyche spacecraft through deep space to a metal-rich asteroid.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Ingenuity Helicopter Captures a Mars Rock Feature in 3D
The rotorcraft captures nuances of rocky outcrop during aerial reconnaissance.
› Read the full story

Take a 3D Spin on Mars and Track NASA’s Perseverance Rover
Two interactive web experiences let you explore the Martian surface, as seen by cameras aboard the rover and orbiters flying overhead.
› Read the full story

Justin Simon Shepherds Perseverance Through First Phase of Martian Rock Sampling
The Johnson Space Center scientist was tasked with helping guide the way for mission’s first cored Mars rock sample.
› Read the full story

NASA Confirms Thousands of Massive, Ancient Volcanic Eruptions on Mars
Scientists found evidence that a region of northern Mars called Arabia Terra experienced thousands of “super eruptions,” the biggest volcanic eruptions known, over a 500-million-year period.
› Read the full story

Visionary Tech Concepts Could Pioneer the Future in Space
Dozens of concepts are being presented at this year’s NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts Symposium, including eight led by technologists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Perseverance Rover Collects Puzzle Pieces of Mars’ History
The rocks it has analyzed for sample collection are helping the team better understand a past marked by volcanic activity and water.
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Mars Perseverance Team Members to Be Recognized at Hispanic Heritage Awards
The three award recipients – Diana Trujillo, Christina Hernandez, and Clara O’Farrell – are engineers from the NASA rover team.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Perseverance Rover Collects First Mars Rock Sample
The rock core is now enclosed in an airtight titanium sample tube, and will be available for retrieval in the future.
› Read the full story

Planetary Radar Observes 1,000th Near-Earth Asteroid Since 1968
Seven days after this historic milestone, a massive antenna at NASA’s Deep Space Network Goldstone complex imaged another, far larger object.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Perseverance Rover Successfully Cores Its First Rock
Perseverance will obtain additional imagery of the sample tube before potentially completing the process of collecting its first scientifically-selected Mars sample.
› Read the full story

Improving Food Security Through Capacity Building
Millions of people suffer from food insecurity around the globe. With the help of Earth-observing satellites, the NASA-USAID SERVIR project is hoping to reduce that number.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Deep Space Network Looks to the Future
The DSN is being upgraded to communicate with more spacecraft than ever before and to accommodate evolving mission needs.
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NASA’s Perseverance Rover Cameras Capture Mars Like Never Before

Sep 23, 2021

Using its WATSON camera, NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover took this selfie over a rock nicknamed “Rochette,” on Sept.10, 2021, the 198th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Two holes can be seen where the rover used its robotic arm to drill rock core samples.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Full Image Details

Scientists tap into an array of imagers aboard the six-wheeled explorer to get a big picture of the Red Planet.

NASA’s Perseverance rover has been exploring Jezero Crater for more than 217 Earth days (211 Martian days, or sols), and the dusty rocks there are beginning to tell their story – about a volatile young Mars flowing with lava and water.

That story, stretching billions of years into the past, is unfolding thanks in large part to the seven powerful science cameras aboard Perseverance. Able to home in on small features from great distances, take in vast sweeps of Martian landscape, and magnify tiny rock granules, these specialized cameras also help the rover team determine which rock samples offer the best chance to learn whether microscopic life ever existed on the Red Planet.

Altogether, some 800 scientists and engineers around the world make up the larger Perseverance team. That includes smaller teams, from a few dozen to as many as 100, for each of the rover’s cameras and instruments. And the teams behind the cameras must coordinate each decision about what to image.

“The imaging cameras are a huge piece of everything,” said Vivian Sun, the co-lead for Perseverance’s first science campaign at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. “We use a lot of them every single day for science. They’re absolutely mission-critical.”

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-perseverance-rover-cameras-capture-mars-like-never-before?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211001-19

Mars Report: Update on NASA’s Perseverance Rover SHERLOC Instrument (September 23rd, 2021)

Sep 23, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has been hard at work using the SHERLOC (Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals) instrument to help determine the best rocks to sample and look for signs of ancient life. Mounted on the rover’s robotic arm, SHERLOC is the only instrument that can directly detect organics, which are building blocks for life. Because it characterizes the chemical composition of rocks, SHERLOC can also help scientists understand whether any of the rocks formed in an ancient habitable environment. SHERLOC features spectrometers, a laser, and cameras, including WATSON (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering). WATSON is a color camera that takes close-up images of rock grains and surface textures. This video provides an instrument update by Eva Scheller, one of the science team members from Caltech. For more information on Perseverance, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/perseverance. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Watch as Caltech’s Eva Scheller, a member of the Perseverance science team, provides a snapshot of the rover’s SHERLOC science instrument. Mounted on the rover’s robotic arm, SHERLOC features spectrometers, a laser, and cameras, including WATSON, which takes close-up images of rock grains and surface textures.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The storytelling began soon after Perseverance landed in February, and the stunning images have been stacking up as the multiple cameras conduct their scientific investigations. Here’s how they work, along with a sampling of what some have found so far:

The Big Picture

Perseverance’s two navigation cameras – among nine engineering cameras – support the rover’s autonomous driving capability. And at each stop, the rover first employs those two cameras to get the lay of the land with a 360-degree view.

Perseverance looks back with one of its navigation cameras toward its tracks on July 1, 2021 (the 130th sol, or Martian day, of its mission), after driving autonomously 358 feet (109 meters) – its longest autonomous drive to date. The image has been processed to enhance the contrast.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Full Image Details

“The navigation camera data is really useful to have those images to do a targeted science follow-up with higher-resolution instruments such as SuperCam and Mastcam-Z,” Sun said.

Perseverance’s six hazard avoidance cameras, or Hazcams, include two pairs in front (with only a single pair in use at any one time) to help avoid trouble spots and to place the rover’s robotic arm on targets; the two rear Hazcams provide images to help place the rover in the context of the broader landscape.

Mastcam-Z, a pair of “eyes” on the rover’s mast, is built for the big picture: panoramic color shots, including 3D images, with zoom capability. It can also capture high-definition video.

Perseverance Mars rover used its Mastcam-Z camera system to create this enhanced-color panorama, which scientists used to look for rock-sampling sites. The panorama is stitched together from 70 individual images taken on July 28, 2021, the 155th Martian day, or sol, of the mission.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Full Image Details

Jim Bell at Arizona State University leads the Mastcam-Z team, which has been working at high speed to produce images for the larger group. “Part of our job on this mission has been a sort of triage,” he said. “We can swing through vast swaths of real estate and do some quick assessment of geology, of color. That has been helping the team figure out where to target instruments.”

Color is key: Mastcam-Z images allow scientists to make links between features seen from orbit by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and what they see on the ground.

The instrument also functions as a low-resolution spectrometer, dividing the light it captures into 11 colors. Scientists can analyze the colors for clues about the composition of the material giving off the light, helping them decide which features to zoom in on with the mission’s true spectrometers.

For instance, there’s a well-known series of images from March 17. It shows a wide escarpment, aka the “Delta Scarp,” that is part of a fan-shaped river delta that formed in the crater long ago. After Mastcam-Z provided the broad view, the mission turned to SuperCam for a closer look.

The Long View

This image of an escarpment, or scarp – a long, steep slope – along the delta of Mars’ Jezero Crater was generated using data from the Perseverance rover’s Mastcam-Z instrument. The inset image at top is a close-up provided by the Remote Microscopic Imager, which is part of the SuperCam instrument.

Credit: RMI: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/CNRS/ASU/MSSSMastcam-Z: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS

Full Image Details

Scientists use SuperCam to study mineralogy and chemistry, and to seek evidence of ancient microbial life. Perched near Mastcam-Z on Perseverance’s mast, it includes the Remote Micro-Imager, or RMI, which can zoom in on features the size of a softball from more than a mile away.

Once Mastcam-Z provided images of the scarp, the SuperCam RMI homed in on a corner of it, providing close-ups that were later stitched together for a more revealing view.

To Roger Wiens, principal investigator for SuperCam at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, these images spoke volumes about Mars’ ancient past, when the atmosphere was thick enough, and warm enough, to allow water to flow on the surface.

“This is showing huge boulders,” he said. “That means there had to have been some huge flash flooding that occurred that washed boulders down the riverbed into this delta formation.”

The chock-a-block layers told him even more.

“These large boulders are partway down the delta formation,” Wiens said. “If the lakebed was full, you would find these at the very top. So the lake wasn’t full at the time the flash flood happened. Overall, it may be indicating an unstable climate. Perhaps we didn’t always have this very placid, calm, habitable place that we might have liked for raising some micro-organisms.”

In addition, scientists have picked up signs of igneous rock that formed from lava or magma on the crater floor during this early period. That could mean not only flowing water, but flowing lava, before, during, or after the time that the lake itself formed.

These clues are crucial to the mission’s search for signs of ancient Martian life and potentially habitable environments. To that end, the rover is taking samples of Martian rock and sediment that future missions could return to Earth for in-depth study.

The (Really) Close-up

Perseverance took this close-up of a rock target nicknamed “Foux” using its WATSON camera on July 11, 2021, the 139th Martian day, r sol, of the mission. The area within the camera is roughly 1.4 by 1 inches (3.5 centimeters by 2.6 centimeters).

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Full Image Details

A variety of Perseverance’s cameras assist in the selection of those samples, including WATSON (the Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering).

Located at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, WATSON provides extreme closeups of rock and sediment, zeroing in on the variety, size, shape, and color of tiny grains – as well as the “cement” between them – in those materials. Such information can lend insight into Mars’ history as well as the geological context of potential samples.

WATSON also helps engineers position the rover’s drill for extracting rock core samples and produces images of where the sample came from.

The imager partners with SHERLOC (Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals), which includes an Autofocus and Contextual Imager (ACI), the rover’s highest-resolution camera. SHERLOC uses an ultraviolet laser to identify certain minerals in rock and sediment, while PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry), also on the robotic arm, uses X-rays to determine the chemical composition. These cameras, working in concert with WATSON, have helped capture geologic data – including signs of that igneous rock on the crater floor – with a precision that has surprised scientists.

“We’re getting really cool spectra of materials formed in aqueous [watery] environments – for example sulfate and carbonate,” said Luther Beegle, SHERLOC’s principal investigator at JPL.

Engineers also use WATSON to check on the rover’s systems and undercarriage – and to take Perseverance selfies (here’s how).

Beegle says not just the strong performance of the imaging instruments, but their ability to endure the harsh environment on the Martian surface, gives him confidence in Perseverance’s chances for major discoveries.

“Once we get over closer to the delta, where there should be really good preservation potential for signs of life, we’ve got a really good chance of seeing something if it’s there,” he said.

More About the Mission

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

nasa.gov/perseverance

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Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

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Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

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karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

Written by Pat Brennan

2021-199

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-perseverance-rover-cameras-capture-mars-like-never-before?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211001-19

Mars Perseverance Team Members to Be Recognized at Hispanic Heritage Awards

Sep 08, 2021

From left to right: Diana Trujillo, Christina Hernandez, and Clara O’Farrell are engineers with NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover team.

Credit: Hispanic Heritage Foundation

The three award recipients – Diana Trujillo, Christina Hernandez, and Clara O’Farrell – are engineers from the NASA rover team.

Three Latina engineers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California are the 2021 recipients of STEM Awards from the Hispanic Heritage Foundation. They will be honored for their significant roles in the agency’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover mission during the 34th Hispanic Heritage Awards broadcast on PBS Oct. 8, joined by Carlos Santana, Ivy Queen, and others.

NASA JPL recipients are:

  • Christina Hernandez began her work at JPL in the Natural Space Environments group and as mission assurance manager on STABLE (Sub arcsecond Telescope and Balloon Experiment). Her Mars-related work began with impact assessment to keep Mars spacecraft safe during the Comet Siding Spring event. As a payload systems engineer for Perseverance, she has worked on three of its seven science instruments. Her work on the rover’s PIXL (short for Planetary Instrument for X-Ray Lithochemistry) will help scientists hunt for signs of ancient microbial life by taking super-close images of rock and soil textures and using its X-ray spectrometer to identify chemical elements within them.
  • Clara O’Farrell, who is originally from Argentina, moved to the U.S. on her 19th birthday to start college. She studied aerospace engineering at Princeton and completed a doctoral degree at Caltech with research on fluid dynamics of jellyfish swimming. After joining JPL in 2013, she began her work on parachutes, aerodynamics, and trajectory simulation for Mars entry, descent, and landing. Her accomplishments as a guidance and control engineer include certifying a supersonic parachute to land Perseverance via supersonic sounding rocket tests.
  • Diana Trujillo, an aerospace engineer, is currently Technical Group Supervisor for Sequence Planning and Execution and a Tactical Mission Lead for Perseverance. Born and raised in Colombia, Trujillo immigrated to the U.S. at the age of 17 to pursue her dream of working for NASA. While enrolled in English-as-a-second-language courses, she also worked full time to support her studies in community college and later the University of Florida and University of Maryland. Diana has held several roles for NASA and JPL, including Mars Curiosity Mission Lead, Deputy Project System Engineer, and Deputy Team Chief of Engineering Operations on Curiosity. Trujillo has also been active in sharing the excitement and opportunities of STEM with the public. She created and hosted #JuntosPerseveramos, NASA’s first-ever Spanish-language live broadcast of a major mission milestone (Perseverance landing on Mars), attracting millions of viewers worldwide.

“Congratulations to Christina, Clara, and Diana on receiving this prestigious STEM award,” said Dr. Jim Green, NASA’s chief scientist. “Each of them was integral to the planning, development, and successful landing of our Mars Perseverance rover. Our Mars Perseverance mission will advance NASA’s quest to explore past habitability of the Red Planet. Because of the hard work and dedication of our team, we can now look for past microbial life through the collection of core rock and soil samples and test technologies that will pave the way for future human exploration of Mars. Thank you to the Hispanic Heritage Foundation for their consideration and for this outstanding recognition of our extremely talented, diverse, and inspirational NASA workforce.”

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In the Hispanic Heritage Foundation’s news release, the organization’s president and CEO, Jose Antonio Tijerino, said, “As leaders in the STEM space, these inspirational Latinas demonstrate the great vision and value proposition our community presents America. These engineers also represent role models for aspiring Latinx engineers in expanding human knowledge and scientific discovery.”

The Hispanic Heritage Awards are produced by the Hispanic Heritage Foundation and were created by the White House in 1988 to commemorate the establishment of Hispanic Heritage Month in America. The awards are among the highest honors by Latinos for Latinos and are supported by 40 national Hispanic-serving institutions. The Foundation’s programs focus on education, workforce, and social impact through the lens of leadership.

More information at: https://www.hispanicheritage.org.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

News Media Contact

DC Agle / Andrew Good

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-9011 / 818-393-2433

agle@jpl.nasa.gov / andrew.c.good@jpl.nasa.gov

2021-188

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/mars-perseverance-team-members-to-be-recognized-at-hispanic-heritage-awards

Delta-X Oil Slick Radar Signal in Gulf of Mexico

Sep 20, 2021

An oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico following Hurricane Ida – a high-end Category 4 when it made landfall near Port Fourchon, Louisiana, on Aug. 29, 2021 – appears as a green trail in the inset false-color graphic provided by NASA’s Delta-X project, while the surrounding seawater appears orange. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) regularly monitors U.S. coastal waters for potential spills and noticed slicks that appeared just off the coast after the hurricane. They were able to use this information from Delta-X to corroborate other data they had about oil slicks in the area (satellite image in the second inset picture). The blue-green swath crossing from the Gulf of Mexico over the Louisiana coast denotes the flight path of the Delta-X radar instrument on Sept. 1, just before 11:30 a.m. CDT.

Charged with studying the Mississippi River Delta, Delta-X was gearing up to collect data on Louisiana’s coastal wetlands when Hurricane Ida barreled ashore in late August. The storm damaged buildings and infrastructure alike, resulting in power outages, flooding, and oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico.

Oil tends to smooth out the bumps on the ocean’s surface, which results in a distinct radar signal that the Delta-X mission was able to pick out of their data. Delta-X added flight paths to their planned schedule – with the support of NASA’s Applied Science Disaster Program – in order to collect information over the gulf in areas of interest to NOAA.

Delta-X is studying two wetlands – the Atchafalaya and Terrebonne Basins – by land, boat, and air to quantify water and sediment flow as well as vegetation growth. While the Atchafalaya Basin has been gaining land through sediment accumulation, Terrebonne Basin, which is right next to the Atchafalaya, has been rapidly losing land. The data collected by the project will be applied to models used to forecast which areas of the delta are likely to gain or lose land under various sea level rise, river flow, and watershed management scenarios.

The mission uses several instruments to collect its data. Affixed to the bottom of a Gulfstream-III airplane, one of those instruments, the all-weather Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), bounces radar signals off of Earth’s surface, forming a kind of image of a particular area. Repeated images of the same regions, captured at different times, enable researchers to detect changes in those areas, such as fluctuating water levels beneath the vegetation as the tides move in and out of these wetlands. In addition to radar measurements, teams from Caltech, Louisiana State University, Florida International University, and other collaborating institutions gather water and vegetation samples – among other data – by boat, other airborne sensors, and from instruments on the ground.

Funded by NASA’s Earth Venture Suborbital (EVS-3) program, Delta-X is managed by the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages JPL for NASA. Fall 2021 was Delta-X’s last scheduled field campaign, although the five-year mission will run through the end of 2023.

To learn more about the Delta-X mission, visit: https://deltax.jpl.nasa.gov

Hurricane Ida, August 27, 2021

Oct 07, 2021

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/hurricane-ida-august-27-2021

On August 27, 2021 Ida crossed over Cuba as a Category 1 Storm. 48 hours later the storm intensified to a Category 4 before making landfall on the coast of Louisiana. The storm was the second most destructive storm to ever make landfall on the Louisiana coast with sustained winds over 150 mph (240 km/h).

The rapid intensification process that the storm system underwent is not well understood. Satellite images such as this are helpful as scientists attempt to understand new weather patterns that are emerging with Global Climate Change.

Tasked with detecting plant water use and stress, ECOSTRESS’s primary mission is to measure the temperature of plants heating up as they run out of water. But it can also measure and track heat-related phenomena like wildfires, heat waves, and volcanoes. ECOSTRESS observations have a spatial resolution of about 77 by 77 yards (70 by 70 meters), which enables researchers to study surface-temperature conditions down to the size of a football field. Due to the space station’s unique orbit, the mission can acquire images of the same regions at different times of the day, as opposed to crossing over each area at the same time of day like satellites in other orbits do. This is advantageous when monitoring plant stress in the same area throughout the day, for example.

The ECOSTRESS mission launched to the space station on June 29, 2018. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages the mission for the Earth Science Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. ECOSTRESS is an Earth Venture Instrument mission; the program is managed by NASA’s Earth System Science Pathfinder program at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

More information about ECOSTRESS is available here: https://ecostress.jpl.nasa.gov/.

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/delta-x-oil-slick-radar-signal-in-gulf-of-mexico

July 2021 Heat Wave Surface Temperature

Jul 15, 2021

Click here for movie

Collecting temperature readings in the atmosphere and at the surface, NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard the agency’s Aqua satellite captured the progression of a slow-moving heat dome across the southwestern U.S. from July 1 to July 12, 2021. The animation of the AIRS data shows surface air temperature anomalies – values above or below long-term averages. The hottest areas, shown in pink, experienced surface air temperatures more than 10 degrees Fahrenheit (5.6 degrees Celsius) above average. Surface air temperature is something that people directly feel when they are outside.

AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth to provide a three-dimensional look at the planet’s weather and climate. Working in tandem, the two instruments make simultaneous observations down to Earth’s surface. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, three-dimensional map of atmospheric temperature and humidity, cloud amounts and heights, greenhouse gas concentrations, and many other atmospheric phenomena. Launched into Earth orbit in 2002, the AIRS and AMSU instruments fly aboard NASA’s Aqua spacecraft and are managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of Caltech.

More information about AIRS can be found at https://airs.jpl.nasa.gov.

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/july-2021-heat-wave-surface-temperature

ECOSTRESS Views 2021 Northern California Dixie Fire

Jul 29, 2021

Click here for animation

NASA’s ECOSTRESS captured data over Northern California’s Dixie Fire, which had ballooned to over 220,000 acres as of July 29, 2021. In the data visualization, the red areas show the hottest pixels – and fire movement – from July 15 to July 24. The most heavily affected areas are south of Lake Almanor in Plumas County.

Tasked with detecting plant water use and stress from the vantage point of the International Space Station, ECOSTRESS’s primary mission is to measure the temperature of plants heating up as they run out of water. But it can also measure and track heat-related phenomena like wildfires, heat waves, and volcanoes. ECOSTRESS observations have a spatial resolution of about 77 by 77 yards (70 by 70 meters), which enables researchers to study surface-temperature conditions down to the size of a football field. Due to the space station’s unique orbit, the mission can acquire images of the same regions at different times of the day, as opposed to crossing over each area at the same time of day like satellites in other orbits do. This is advantageous when monitoring plant stress in the same area throughout the day, for example.

The ECOSTRESS mission launched to the space station on June 29, 2018. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages the mission for the Earth Science Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. ECOSTRESS is an Earth Venture Instrument mission; the program is managed by NASA’s Earth System Science Pathfinder program at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

More information about ECOSTRESS is available here: https://ecostress.jpl.nasa.gov/.

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/ecostress-views-2021-northern-california-dixie-fire

ECOSTRESS Views 2021 Southern Oregon Bootleg Fire

Jul 29, 2021

Click here for animation

NASA’s ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) is aiding in the fight against fires in the Western U.S. As of July 27, 2021, the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon had ballooned to more than 410,000 acres, damaging hundreds of buildings and vehicles in its path.

ECOSTRESS measures surface temperature from the vantage point of the International Space Station. Researchers of the RADR-Fire team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been experimenting with ECOSTRESS data as part of a new tool now being implemented for first responders like the U.S. Forest Service.

In the visualization, ECOSTRESS is tracking the movement of the Bootleg Fire between July 7 and July and identifying its proximity to critical infrastructure — areas in red represent the hottest pixels ECOSTRESS detected. The extreme heat in those areas indicates the fire front, or where resources are most needed.

Tasked with detecting plant water use and stress, ECOSTRESS’s primary mission is to measure the temperature of plants heating up as they run out of water. But it can also measure and track heat-related phenomena like wildfires, heat waves, and volcanoes. ECOSTRESS observations have a spatial resolution of about 77 by 77 yards (70 by 70 meters), which enables researchers to study surface-temperature conditions down to the size of a football field. Due to the space station’s unique orbit, the mission can acquire images of the same regions at different times of the day, as opposed to crossing over each area at the same time of day like satellites in other orbits do. This is advantageous when monitoring plant stress in the same area throughout the day, for example.

The ECOSTRESS mission launched to the space station on June 29, 2018. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages the mission for the Earth Science Division in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. ECOSTRESS is an Earth Venture Instrument mission; the program is managed by NASA’s Earth System Science Pathfinder program at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

More information about ECOSTRESS is available here: https://ecostress.jpl.nasa.gov/.

For more information, please following the link:

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/ecostress-views-2021-southern-oregon-bootleg-fire

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PBS News, NBC News, NOVA PBS, National Geographic, and DW Documentary

PBS News, NBC News, NOVA PBS, National Geographic, and DW Documentary

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

NBC News: Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

National Geographic: COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

DW Documentary: Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives?, Can viruses be beneficial? and Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

Oct 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, employment numbers in the United States fall short of expectations as workers continue to leave their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Then, the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to news editors from Russia and the Philippines for their reporting in the face of political repression. And, David Brooks and Karen Tumulty consider the week in politics. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Biden to send Trump records to Jan. 6 committee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQdO7… Why so many U.S. workers quit their job during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNwfu… Why the Nobel Peace Prize was won by to 2 journalists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1pNx… Fiona Hill reflects on Trump presidency, opportunity in U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZhSE… Brooks and Tumulty on debt ceiling, Jan. 6 investigation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwWe6… Bill T. Jones’ new work explores collective American ‘we’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G9JR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

Oct 8, 2021  NBC News

U.S. added 194,000 jobs in September, unemployment rate down, two parents convicted in college admissions scandal trial, and combat medics unite after forming special connection a decade ago. 00:00 Intro 02:01 Major Jobs Setback 04:36 Mandate Battles 07:36 College Admissions Conviction 10:04 Biden – Trump Showdown 14:05 Travel Price Warning 18:28 Those Who Serve » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

 

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

BY SUKEE BENNETT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2021 NOVA NEXT

The winning image of the Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition shows a southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels. Image credit: Jason Kirk, Baylor College of Medicine

The winners of the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition, which aims to showcase “the beauty and complexity of life as seen through the light microscope,” were announced today.

This is the 47th year of the photo competition, which is open to anyone with an interest in microscopy—the use of microscopes to view samples and objects—and photography. This year the contest received almost 1,900 entries from 88 countries. A panel of five judges* evaluated the entries for originality, informational content, technical proficiency, and visual impact, Nikon reported. The results of the sister video competition, Small World In Motion, were announced last month.

Here are this year’s top 10 images:

A southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels photographed by Jason Kirk, a professional imager and core director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core. Kirk used a custom-made microscope system to take around 200 individual images of the leaf, which he stacked together to create this image, Nikon reports.

Trichomes, stomata, and vessels are all “essential to plant life,” Nikon writes. Trichomes, fine outgrowths that protect a plant from extreme weather and insects, are featured in white. “In purple, Jason highlights the stomata, small pores that regulate the flow of gases in a plant. Colored in cyan are the vessels that transport water throughout the leaf,” Nikon said in a statement.

  1. Networking neurons in microfluidic device

Image credit: Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen, Dementia Research Centre, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia

This image is of a microfluidic device, which contains 300,000 networking neurons divided into two isolated populations (left and right) bridged by axons (center). The isolated populations were each treated with a unique virus, Nikon reports. The image was taken at 40X magnification by Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen of Macquarie University’s Dementia Research Centre in New South Wales, Australia, using fluorescence imaging, which uses high-intensity illumination to excite fluorescent molecules in a sample. “When a molecule absorbs photons, electrons are excited to a higher energy level,” Nikon writes. “As electrons ‘relax’ back to the ground-state, vibrational energy is lost and, as a result, the emission spectrum is shifted to longer wavelengths.”

  1. Rear leg, claw and respiratory trachea of a louse

Image credit: Frank Reiser, Nassau Community College, New York

A rear leg, claw, and respiratory trachea of a louse, a wingless parasitic insect, at 5X magnification taken by Frank Reiser, a biologist at Nassau Community College in New York. Reiser used darkfield micrography, which “creates contrast in transparent unstained specimens” and “depends on controlling specimen illumination so that central light which normally passes through and around the specimen is blocked,” Nikon writes, and image stacking to produce this image.

  1. Embryonic rat neuron

Image credit: Paula Diaz, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

A sensory neuron from an embryonic rat taken by Paula Diaz, a physiologist at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in Santiago, Chile. Diaz took the image at 10X magnification and used fluorescence imaging to produce it.

  1. Housefly proboscis

Image credit: Oliver Dum, Medienbunker Produktion, Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany

A proboscis of a housefly (Musca domestica) taken by Oliver Dum of Medienbunker Produktion in Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany. Dum took the image at 40X magnification and assembled it using image stacking.

  1. Mouse brain vasculature

Image credit: Dr. Andrea Tedeschi, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University

3D vasculature of an adult mouse brain taken by Dr. Andrea Tedeschi of Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Tedeschi took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging, which involves scanning a specimen to create extremely thin (down to 250 nanometer thickness) computer-generated optical sections using visible light, to create it.

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  1. Tick head

Image credit: Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley, Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility

Head of a tick taken by Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley of Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility in Columbus, Ohio. Zhang and Stoodley took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging to produce it.

  1. Mouse intestine

Image credit: Dr. Amy Engevik, Medical University of South Carolina

Cross section of a mouse intestine taken at 10X magnification using fluorescence imaging by Dr. Amy Engevik of the Medical University of South Carolina’s Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology in Charleston, South Carolina.

  1. Water flea

Image credit: Jan van IJken, Jan van IJek Photography & Film, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

A water flea (Daphnia) carrying embryos and ciliated vase-shaped protozoans called peritrichs taken at 10X magnification using image stacking and darkfield microscopy by Jan van IJken of Jan van IJek Photography & Film in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

  1. Butterfly wing

Image credit: Sebastien Malo, Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France

Vein and scales on a Morpho didius butterfly wing taken at 20X magnification using image stacking and reflected light photography by Sebastien Malo of Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France.

*NOVA Science Editor Robin Kazmier was a judge in this year’s competition.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/nikon-small-world-photography-winners-2021-/

 

National Geographic

A medical student gives a woman a blood glucose test to check possible diabetes at a screening post in Alameda Dom Afonso Henriques during the COVID-19 pandemic on May 29, 2021 in Lisbon, Portugal.

PHOTOGRAPH BY HORACIO VILLALOBOS, CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

In addition to driving new cases of diabetes, the virus may be directly damaging the pancreas in ways that could lead to chronic inflammation and even cancer.

BYAMY MCKEEVER

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 8, 2021

Almost daily microbiologist Peter Jackson receives emails from people who recovered from COVID-19 only to discover that their health troubles have just begun.

Recently, a mother of two in her 30s wrote to the Stanford University professor to say that she now takes a slew of diabetes medications every day—even though she hadn’t been at risk for the disease before her coronavirus infection.

Experts have known since the beginning of the pandemic that having diabetes—a condition when the body doesn’t make enough insulin or use it well enough to counteract a rise in blood sugar—is a risk factor for more severe COVID-19 infections. But they have also long suspected that the inverse might be true as well. In May, Jackson published a study in the journal Cell Metabolism showing that SARS-CoV-2 infects cells in the pancreas that produce insulin and may even target and destroy them—suggesting that the virus may also cause diabetes. (Why scientists began investigating the link between COVID-19 and diabetes.)

“This is a real thing,” Jackson says of the complaints from newly diabetic people that have flooded his inbox. Although some experts argue that the condition is rare, Jackson says the data suggests that in 2020 as many as 100,000 people were diagnosed with an unexpected case of diabetes.

He is one of many scientists who worry there could be a new wave of diabetes patients who will have to monitor their blood sugar levels for the rest of their lives. But he and his colleagues are also concerned that the virus may be harming the pancreas in ways that may not be visible now but could one day have troubling implications for the organ itself and for the rest of the digestive system.

“This could be a pandemic in a pandemic,” says Paolo Fiorina, a professor of endocrinology at the University of Milan and lecturer at Harvard Medical School, who has also spearheaded investigations into the connection between COVID-19 and diabetes.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-many-ways-covid-19-seems-to-be-harming-the-pancreas?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=SpecialEdition_20211008::rid=B26F10713FF3E74BB579E77159591C7D

Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives? | DW Documentary

Oct 7, 2021  DW Documentary

What can animals’ emotions tell us about ourselves? This documentary takes us on a fascinating journey into the lives of the great apes. Did you know that chimpanzees wage war? Not only that, but they also show compassion, engage in cooperative behavior, and value fairness and reciprocity. Chimpanzees reconcile after fights, and comfort each other. Chimpanzee communities also have customs and traditions that vary from tribe to tribe. All this begs the question: are things like morality and culture solely human achievements? This documentary takes us into one of the last great wildernesses of West Africa – the mountainous jungles of Nigeria – and shows footage of chimpanzees in the wild. What is the significance of the mysterious stone piles left by chimpanzees near trees or in hollows? Are they a form of religion? How intelligent are our closest relatives in the animal kingdom? In what kinds of societies did our common ancestors live? And where does the phenomenon of xenophobia come from? #documentary #freedocumentary #chimpanzees ______

Can viruses be beneficial? | DW Documentary

Aug 7, 2021  DW Documentary

Viruses can be fatal, but some viruses can in fact be life-sustaining. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has killed large numbers of people during the current pandemic. But humans wouldn’t exist without viruses. How can they benefit us? Viruses aren’t living beings, yet they have had a great influence on evolution. Some viral elements have embedded themselves into the human genome and reproduce along with us – so-called endogenous retroviruses. One type of virus helps form the placenta, for example, while other viruses attack harmful bacteria. Viruses also maintain balance in marine ecosystems, curbing the growth of algae and attacking bacteria that are harmful to sea animals. Soon, viruses may even replace antibiotics in fish farming. Thousands of viruses have already been sequenced, including Ebola, Zika and bird flu. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world, with a mortality rate of up to 90%. But experts see greater danger in the less deadly diseases like Spanish flu and COVID-19: Because they spread much further, they kill more people overall. Viruses can also be used to create vaccines. In Rome, the shell of a virus found in gorilla feces has been used as a vector for the COVID-19 vaccine, turning a pathogen into a life-saving drug. __

Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis | DW Documentary

Oct 5, 2021  DW Documentary

Extreme weather is occurring more frequently worldwide. Rising sea levels and heavy rain are causing devastating floods. Most researchers agree that these are the consequences of climate change. But what can we do to protect ourselves? In July 2021, the Ahr Valley in western Germany was hit by a flash flood after heavy rainfall. Over 100 people were killed, thousands of homes were severely damaged. Experts are calling it the ‘flood of the century’. Yet extreme weather events such as the Ahr Valley floods have become more frequent in recent years – not only in Germany but worldwide. Mozambique has been hit by devastating cyclones for the third year running. In Bangladesh, the monsoon season has become heavier and more unpredictable due to climate change. More and more land has been flooded as a result. At the same time, heavy storms that cause flooding and rising sea levels threaten the south of the country. Experts estimate that 30 per cent of Bangladesh will be permanently flooded in a few years, making millions of people climate refugees. Wealthy countries such as Germany are now investing billions in the battle against the floods. The Netherlands have long pioneered in flood management, building powerful pumping stations, ever higher dikes and flood barriers. None of these options are available to poor countries. All they can do, along with improving early flood warning systems, is to resettle the people affected. The film ‘Global Climate Crisis – How to Tackle the floods?’ shows the unequal fight against the consequences of climate change with examples from Germany, the Netherlands, Bangladesh, and Mozambique. #documentary #flooding #climatechange #extremeweather ______

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Ing’s Street Art, My Little Red Shoes, Elephant Bath, In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace, and U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction Part 2

Ing’s Street Art, “My Little Red Shoes”, “Elephant Bath”, “In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”, and “U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction”

Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Part 2

 In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

 In the midst of trouble

Global warming

Causes the fires in California and elsewhere

 

The weather turns more violence

Hurricane Ida caused destruction in Haiti

Louisiana and other places in its path to the North East

 

Strong winds, rain and floods

Whole cities had to evacuate

Millions homeless caused by the nature

 

What causes nature to be violent?

Who causes Global warming?

 

Humans blame nature

Causing the destruction

 

No one can be blamed but ourselves

 

Let us start again

To care for Nature

for our lives now

And generations to come

  

Where can I Find Peace Street?

 

I got lost.

 

Where do you want to go?

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I can find my mother

Father and my family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I am happy

To see a peaceful Village

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children have a joyful time

With parents and family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children are not afraid

Or cry for food

And no place to stay

 

I want to go to Peace Street

where everyone is happy

No fighting

No disaster

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no weapons produced

And sold to kill each other

For profit and wealth

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no corrupt politicians

And greedy rich people who keep

Everything for themselves

Leaving non for the poor

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where people are kind

And helpful to one another

 

I want to go to Peace Street

To see beautiful nature

With no pollution

Clean oceans

With all the creatures

Living happily

 

Can you direct me to Peace Street?

I got lost

I am hungry

Where are my mother, father,

my husband, my daughter, my grandsons

and the others in my family?

I miss them

I am lonely

 

Please help to direct me to Peace Street

My life is short

I am lost

Where I can find Peace Street on Earth

I woke up this morning.  I felt sad, thinking about my family and other unfortunate people.  Biden had a policy to deport Haitian people who suffered in their country.  Most immigrants want to have an opportunity to work for survival of their families.  It is cruel to send people back to suffer and die while politicians try to find a way to gain credit for their future election to office.


Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, September 25, 2021

 

U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction

 

Low-income people have difficulty to survive

Even to have enough money to buy food

 To feed themselves and their children

 

A few days ago, a report from the news media stated that

700,000 people in the US died from COVID-19

 

The epidemic of the virus may cause some people not to get jobs

Especially families that have children

No money to pay rent

 

Thanks to an eviction moratorium policy

From Biden’s administration

 Landlords were prevented from evicting families

 

This policy to help the poor

Is just a drop of water to quench the thirst

Of dying families

 

Now! Six Republican Supreme Court Justice Appointees

Declared that landlords can evict poor families

That cannot pay rent

 

Millions of poor families

With children are going to be homeless

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic

Powerful people receive

Benefits and salary from the tax payers of the country

 

These people use their power to cause the poor

Who cannot get jobs because the COVID-19 epidemic

To suffer even more than they were facing before

 

“Where is the justice?”

I want to ask these six Justices of the Supreme Court  

If it makes you happy to see children and their parents suffer?

These poor families who have difficulty to feed children and themselves

Now have no home to stay

 

Where is your humanity?

Where is your empathy toward the poor?

Where is your kindness for the poor?

Where is your morality toward these citizens?

We, the citizens of the country

Especially the unfortunate poor and homeless

 Who has no voice

Ask the Six Republican Appointed Justices of the Supreme Court

The above questions

 

What were you thinking when you made your decision?

You represent the Supreme Court of the land

 Are happy now that you have

Paid back the favor to billionaires that appointed you

To the Throne of Justice?

 

It is sad to see these humans

These so-called Supreme Court Justices walk the earth

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

Where I can find Peace?

I could not control my tears for the evicted families

My heart is aching to hear such an order from this group of

United State Supreme Court Justices

 

Let me calm down

At least for my recording of the event

Let it be etched into history for future

Generations to learn

To cultivate the next generation

To be kind human beings

helping the unfortunate who

Suffer more than they

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

I will calm myself

Get back to my garden

And continue doing my artwork

 

At least my minuscule contributions

Brings happiness to the others

 

Hearing people pass my little garden

And artwork saying

“The flowers are beautiful”

And commenting

“You changed your artwork.

I like the children in your painting”

 

“The painting is called, My Little Red Shoes”

I respond

  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, October 2, 2021

 

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996. 

Daily Mail:

Supreme Court says letting the Biden administration keep the eviction moratorium in place could open the door to mandates for ‘free grocery delivery for the sick and vulnerable and free computers to let Americans work from home’

  • Conservatives on the Supreme Court said extending eviction moratoriums could lead to government mandates on ‘free grocery delivery and free computers’ 
  • ‘Could the CDC mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads from the six conservatives on the court
  • ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free Internet?’
  • The Supreme Court voted 6-3 to block the eviction moratorium, allowing landlord to kick out renters who haven’t paid rent in the midst of the pandemic
  • Argued that preventing landlords from evicting tenants who breach their leases strips them of their ‘right to exclude’  
  • The six conservative justices elected to end the eviction freeze from the CDC and the three liberals justices voting it should stay
  • Said the CDC overextended its authority in imposing the moratorium 

By KATELYN CARALLE, U.S. POLITICAL REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM  and AP

PUBLISHED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021 | UPDATED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021

Conservatives on the Supreme Court said that allowing the eviction moratorium to continue could set a precedent for government mandated ‘free grocery delivery’ and ‘free internet’ for people to work from home.

‘Preventing [landlords] from evicting tenants who breach their leases intrudes on one of the most fundamental elements of property ownership—the right to exclude,’ the majority opinion reads from the Thursday decision.

The court’s decision will allow for landlords to evict tenants who have not paid rent in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Questioned in the unsigned opinion from the six conservative justices was hypothetical situations for how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could overreach its authority in the future, as they claim it did so in extending the moratorium.

‘Could the CDC, for example, mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads. ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free high-speed Internet service to facilitate remote work?’

All this to say, the court feels that the CDC cannot decide for the sake of public health that other aspects of business can be impacted, like preventing landlords from collecting rent.

They also claim that congressional action is needed to extend the moratorium.

The Supreme Court elected to end the national eviction moratorium in a 6-3 vote on Thursday, claiming it would lead to a precedent of mandated ‘free grocery delivery for the sick’ or ‘free computers and internet’ to work from home

The decision again exhibited the power Republicans have with the court’s 6-3 conservative majority, which is now allowing evictions to resume across the U.S. as it blocks the Biden administration from continuing to enforce a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The vote was split by party line with conservatives John Roberts, Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett voting to end the eviction moratorium, and liberals Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan voting to keep it.

The justices said in an unsigned opinion Thursday that the CDC, which reimplemented the moratorium on August 3, lacked the authority to do so under federal law without explicit congressional authorization.

‘It would be one thing if Congress had specifically authorized the action that the CDC has taken,’ the court wrote. ‘But that has not happened. Instead, the CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination. It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts.’

Real estate groups in Georgia and Alabama had argued this point and told the high court that the moratorium caused property owners across the nation significant financial hardships, USA Today reports.

Property owners had to continue to pay expenses while not receiving payments from renters. They were also banned from evicting nightmare tenants, who were given free reign to make their neighbors’ lives a misery.

Court said the CDC did not have the power to extend the moratorium. Housing advocates protest on August 4 to allow the eviction moratorium to continue in New York

As of August 25, nearly 90 per cent of the federal funds meant to help landlords make up for the loss of funds had not been distributed, the U.S. Treasury Department said in a statement.

Roughly 3.5 million people in the United States said they faced eviction in the next two months, according to Census Bureau data from early August.

After the Thursday ruling, several progressive lawmakers pleaded with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to act with the ‘highest levels of urgency’ to combat evictions.

The lawmakers asked the leaders in a Friday letter to work to revive the national eviction moratorium after the Supreme Court ruled congressional action is needed.

‘Millions of people who are currently at risk for eviction, housing insecurity, or face becoming unhoused desperately look to their elected representatives to implement legislation that will put their health and safety first and save lives,’ the letter reads.

The effort was led by Representative Ayanna Pressley and signed on by more than 60 Democrats, including fellow ‘squad’ members Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Cori Bush.

Bush, who was once homeless before running for office, led protesters in sleeping outside the Capitol earlier this summer when the moratorium faced its end before the CDC expanded it.

The Supreme Court had originally allowed the eviction freeze to continue to July in a 5-4 vote, but Kavanaugh, who voted to keep it, indicated that he would vote against any further extension.

Roberts followed suit and voted against the moratorium with Kavanagh on Thursday.

In his dissenting opinion, Breyer asserted that the court should not end the moratorium on an expedited basis.

‘Applicants raise contested legal questions about an important federal statute on which the lower courts are split and on which this court has never actually spoken,’ Breyer wrote. ‘These questions call for considered decision making, informed by full briefing and argument. Their answers impact the health of millions.’

The national eviction freeze was set in place at the start of the pandemic and continued on until July, when the Supreme Court previously upheld it in a 5-4 vote

The Biden administration’s extension of the eviction moratorium was heralded by members the ‘the Squad,’ including U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who had celebrated the announcement earlier this month.

She and fellow Democratic congress woman Cori Bush had demonstrated outside the Capitol in protest of the moratorium’s original deadline at the start of August.

Bush was hailed as a key figure who pushed Biden and his administration to extend the deadline after five continuous days of protest, tweeting about her accomplishment.

‘Squad’ member Ilhan Omar also acknowledged Bush’s efforts in spearheading the moratorium extension, The Hill reported.

U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, a fellow democrat from California who sponsored a House bill to extend the eviction freeze, also thanked Biden ‘from the bottom of my heart and on behalf of millions of renters.

‘This extension of the moratorium is the lifeline that millions of families have been waiting for. From the very beginning of this pandemic, it was clear that eviction moratoriums not only kept people housed, but also saved lives,’ Waters said in a statement.

A group of Democratic lawmakers wrote a letter to Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer urging them to act congressionally to extend the moratorium after the Supreme Court said the CDC overreached 

This was the second high court loss for the administration this week at the hands of the court’s conservative majority.

On Tuesday, the court effectively allowed the reinstatement of a Trump-era policy forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their hearings.

The new administration had tried to end the Remain in Mexico program, as it is informally known.

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court voted the same way to strike down part of New York’s eviction moratorium.

In the same 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled against allowing COVID-19 hardships to stand as a reason to ban landlords from kicking out tenants. The state’s rules allowed renters to simply state they’d suffered financial hardship and avoid eviction without providing any evidence.

New Yorkers renting apartments will also now no longer be able to stay in homes they’ve stopped paying rent on by claiming that doing so would endanger their health.

The pause on evictions expires at the end of August, meaning people could start getting kicked out of their apartments by the end of this month.

Incoming Governor Kathy Hochul criticized Thursday’s ruling, saying that she and state lawmakers would work to try and reinforce the moratorium.

Both parts of the law that have been cut were enacted when COVID decimated many of New York’s biggest industries – including hospitality and travel – leaving people who worked in them fearful of being made homeless.

The state has since largely reopened, and its economy appears to be on the path to recovery.

Demonstrators protesting evictions are arrested by NYPD

Eviction moratorium finally set to expire 18 months after it was created amid COVID first wave

The national eviction moratorium was put in place last September by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide aid for those struggling from the economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020.

The moratorium was supposed to end in December, but Congress voted to extend it until January 2021.

The Biden administration then pushed the deadline further, once in January and then again in March.

Although the moratorium was set to expire at the end of July, the spread of the delta variant and summer spikes in COVID-19 cases continued to leave millions vulnerable.

Data showed that in July, roughly 3.6 million people would face evictions by September if the moratorium was halted, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision to allow the deadline to extend one final time until the end of July.

The pressure came as landlords and property owners grieved over the loss of income rent while the federal aid set aside for them trickled in at a snail’s pace.

Of the $47 billion in rental assistance that was supposed to go to help tenants pay off months of rent, only about 10% has been distributed as of Aug. 25.

Some states like New York have distributed almost nothing, while several have only approved a few million dollars.

After weeks of protests to extend the eviction moratorium were held at the Capitol, the Biden administration extended the deadline one more time into August.

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who voted to extend the deadline to July, had warned that he would switch his vote if the administration tried extending it again.

True to his word, Kavanaugh voted against the order on August 26, with Chief Justice John Roberts following suit.

The Supreme Court ultimately banned the eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision.

For more information, please view the following link:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9941319/Supreme-Court-says-extending-eviction-moratorium-open-door-free-grocery-delivery.html

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Supreme Court says extending eviction moratorium could open the door to ‘free grocery delivery’

In dissent, Justice Breyer wrote that “the public interest is not favored by the spread of disease or a court’s second-guessing of the C.D.C.’s judgment.”

The Biden administration and other moratorium proponents predicted that the decision would set off a wave of dire consequences.

“As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to Covid-19,” Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said in a statement.

The ruling also renewed pressure on congressional Democrats to try to extend the freeze over the opposition of Republicans.

“Tonight, the Supreme Court failed to protect the 11 million households across our country from violent eviction in the middle of a deadly global pandemic,” said Representative Cori Bush, a Missouri Democrat who slept on the steps of the Capitol this month to protest the expiration of the previous moratorium. “We already know who is going to bear the brunt of this disastrous decision: Black and brown communities, and especially Black women.”

But landlords, who have said the moratoriums saddled them with billions of dollars in debt, hailed the move.

“The government must move past failed policies and begin to seriously address the nation’s debt tsunami, which is crippling both renters and housing providers alike,” said Bob Pinnegar, the president of the National Apartment Association, a trade association representing large landlords.

It will most likely take a while for the backlog of eviction cases in many states to result in the displacement of renters. But tenant groups in the South, where fast-track evictions are common, are bracing for the worst.

In recent days, Mr. Biden’s team has been mapping out strategies to deal with the likely loss of the moratorium, with a plan to focus its efforts on a handful of states — including South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio — that have large backlogs of unpaid rent and few statewide protections for tenants.

The administration had at first concluded that a Supreme Court ruling in June had effectively forbidden it from imposing a new moratorium after an earlier one expired at the end of July. While the administration had prevailed in that ruling by a 5-to-4 vote, one member of the majority, Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh, wrote that he believed the moratorium to be unlawful and that he had cast his vote to temporarily sustain it only to allow an orderly transition. He would not support a further extension without “clear and specific congressional authorization (via new legislation),” he wrote.

Congress did not act. But after political pressure from Democrats, a surge in the pandemic and new consideration of the legal issues, the administration on Aug. 3 issued the moratorium that was the subject of the new ruling.

The administration’s legal maneuvering might have failed, but it bought some time for tenants threatened with eviction. In unusually candid remarks this month, President Biden said that was part of his calculus in deciding to proceed with the new moratorium, which was set to expire Oct. 3.

Congress declared a moratorium on evictions at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, but it lapsed in July 2020. The C.D.C. then issued a series of its own moratoriums, saying that they were justified by the need to address the pandemic and authorized by a 1944 law. People unable to pay rent, the agency said, should not be forced to crowd in with relatives or seek refuge in homeless shelters, spreading the virus.

The last moratorium — which was put in place by the C.D.C. in September and expired on July 31 after being extended several times by Congress and Mr. Biden — was effective at achieving its goal, reducing by about half the number of eviction cases that normally would have been filed since last fall, according to an analysis of filings by the Eviction Lab at Princeton University.

The challengers in the current case — landlords, real estate companies and trade associations led by the Alabama Association of Realtors — argued that the moratorium was not authorized by the law the agency relied on, the Public Health Service Act of 1944.

That law, the challengers wrote, was concerned with quarantines and inspections to stop the spread of disease and did not bestow on the agency “the unqualified power to take any measure imaginable to stop the spread of communicable disease — whether eviction moratoria, worship limits, nationwide lockdowns, school closures or vaccine mandates.”

What to Know About the Supreme Court Term

A blockbuster term begins. The Supreme Court, now dominated by six Republican appointees, returns to the bench to start a momentous term this fall in which it will consider eliminating the constitutional right to abortion and vastly expanding gun rights.

The big abortion case. The court seems poised to use a challenge to a Mississippi law that bars most abortions after 15 weeks to undermine and perhaps overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling could effectively end legal abortion access for those living in much of the South and Midwest.

A major decision on guns. The court will also consider the constitutionality of a longstanding New York law that imposes strict limits on carrying guns outside the home. The court has not issued a major Second Amendment ruling in more than a decade.

A test for Chief Justice Roberts. The highly charged docket will test the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who lost his position at the court’s ideological center with the arrival last fall of Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

A drop in public support. Chief Justice Roberts now leads a court increasingly associated with partisanship. Recent polls show the court is suffering a distinct drop in public support following a spate of unusual late-night summer rulings in politically charged cases.

The C.D.C. responded that the moratorium was authorized by the 1944 law. Evictions would accelerate the spread of the coronavirus, the agency said, by forcing people “to move, often into close quarters in new shared housing settings with friends or family, or congregate settings such as homeless shelters.”

The moratorium, the administration told the justices, was broadly similar to quarantine. “It would be strange to hold that the government may combat infection by prohibiting the tenant from leaving his home,” its brief said, “but not by prohibiting the landlord from throwing him out.”

The case was complicated by congressional action in December, when lawmakers briefly extended the C.D.C.’s moratorium through the end of January in an appropriations measure. When Congress took no further action, the agency again imposed moratoriums under the 1944 law.

In its Supreme Court brief, the government argued that it was significant that Congress had embraced the agency’s action, if only briefly.

The central legal question in the case was whether the agency was entitled to act on its own. In June, with the earlier moratorium about to expire, the court voted 5 to 4 in favor of the administration, allowing that measure to stand.

But that victory was distinctly provisional. Justice Kavanaugh, who voted with the majority, wrote that he had cast his vote reluctantly and had taken account of the then-impending expiration of the earlier moratorium.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exceeded its existing statutory authority by issuing a nationwide eviction moratorium,” Justice Kavanaugh wrote. “Because the C.D.C. plans to end the moratorium in only a few weeks, on July 31, and because those few weeks will allow for additional and more orderly distribution of the congressionally appropriated rental assistance funds, I vote at this time to deny the application” that had been filed by the challengers.

The other members of the court did not give reasons for their votes in the June ruling. But four of them — Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett — voted to lift the earlier moratorium. Taken together with Justice Kavanaugh’s statement, that distinctly suggested that a majority of the justices would not look favorably on another extension unless it came from Congress.

The Biden administration initially seemed to share that understanding, urging Congress to act and saying it did not have the unilateral power to impose a further moratorium through executive action. When Congress failed to enact legislation addressing the issue, the moratorium expired.

Under pressure from Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats and wary of the rise of the Delta variant, the administration reversed course a few days later.

The new moratorium was not identical to the earlier one, which had applied nationwide. It was instead tailored to counties where Covid-19 was strongest, a category that currently covers some 90 percent of counties in the United States.

Mr. Biden was frank in discussing his reasoning, saying the new measure faced long odds but would buy tenants some time.

“The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it’s not likely to pass constitutional muster,” he said on Aug. 3. “But there are several key scholars who think that it may — and it’s worth the effort.”

Many states and localities, including New York and California, have extended their own moratoriums, providing another layer of protection for some renters. In some places, judges, aware of the potential for large numbers of people to be put out on the street even as the pandemic intensifies again, have said they would slow-walk cases and make greater use of eviction diversion programs.

Evictions, the Pandemic and the Courts

As Democrats Seethed, White House Struggled to Contain Eviction Fallout

Aug. 7, 2021

The Biden administration issues a new eviction moratorium as the virus surges.

Aug. 3, 2021

Federal Judge Strikes Down Moratorium on Evicting Renters

May 5, 2021

Adam Liptak covers the Supreme Court and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments. A graduate of Yale Law School, he practiced law for 14 years before joining The Times in 2002. @adamliptak • Facebook

A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 27, 2021, Section A, Page 15 of the New York edition with the headline: Justices End Biden’s Eviction Moratorium, Leaving Thousands at Risk. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Boston, MA – August 12: Homes for All Massachusetts hosted a rally outside the State House in Boston on August 12, 2021 to voice support for a bill (H 1434 / S 891) up for a hearing later in the day that would temporarily pause evictions and foreclosures for 12 months following the end of the state of emergency. (Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Tenants rights groups block the north entrance to the Los Angeles County Superior Courthouse in protest of the coming mass evictions if Gov. Gavin Newsom does not replace the Judicial Council’s eviction moratorium Rule 1 and if AB 1436 is not passed on Friday, August 21, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

Tenants’ right advocates march down the Alameda to the offices of the California Apartment Association in San Jose, Calif., Thursday, April 6, 2017. They are protesting against no-cause evictions, which allows landlords to evict tenants in retaliation without giving a reason, displacing families and destabilizing communities. (Patrick Tehan/Bay Area News Group)U.S. Supreme Court on Eviction

On the eviction moratorium, the Supreme Court turns the law on its head | Opinion

Published: Oct. 04, 2021, 5:15 p.m.

Patrick Hill, an author and associate professor at Rutgers University, says that since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on an impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman, File)AP

By Star-Ledger Guest Columnist

By T. Patrick Hill

When the U.S. Supreme Court, on Aug. 26, ruled against President Biden’s extension of the moratorium on evictions, it sacrificed the safety and quite possibly the lives of hundreds of Americans to a legal ideology known as legal positivism or the understanding of law as justified simply because it is law, no matter its consequences.

In an eight-page unsigned decision, made with the concurrence of the six conservative justices and the dissent of the three liberal justices, the Court concluded that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which is responsible nationally for the public’s health, had exceeded its statutory authority by issuing the moratorium.

The statute, the Court correctly notes, is the 1944 Public Health Service Act which authorizes the Health and Human Services secretary (HHS) to “make and enforce such regulations as in his (sic) judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases … from one State or possession into any other State or possession.” Subsequently, this authority was placed in the hands of the CDC.

But from this point, the Court’s reading of the statute goes from bad to worse. Inexplicably, the statute appears to be suspect because, since enactment, it has rarely been used, and certainly not used to justify an eviction moratorium. Are we to conclude from this that the Court considers rarely invoked statutes as something less than law? But even when invoked, the statute has been confined, the Court insists, to measures like quarantining infected individuals, for example. But why should that logically justify the inference that an eviction moratorium exceeds the purposes of the statute?

And just because the statute has specifically included measures like fumigation, disinfection and pest extermination, that cannot be thought logically to mean it has specifically excluded other measures, such as an eviction moratorium. If the statute authorizes something as extreme as quarantining infected individuals in the interests of the public’s safety, why is it, as the Court puts it, a stretch to think an eviction moratorium would also be authorized?

Like any legislation, the statute may be thought to acknowledge that since we may not know, at any particular moment, everything there is to be known about controlling infectious disease, it is prudent to provide reasonably broadly for that inevitable moment when an infectious disease presents itself in radically unprecedented features.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more than 701,000 deaths in the U.S. so far. Yet, what is a major concern for the Court in its decision? The moratorium, it emphasizes, encroaches on “an area that is the particular domain of state law: the landlord-tenant relationship,” adding that earlier decisions of the Court have insisted on exceedingly clear language when congressional legislation might change the balance between state and federal power, in particular, governmental power over private property.

It is surely curious how, for the Court, the language of the 1944 statute is not sufficiently clear that it might be thought to include an eviction moratorium, but it is indeed sufficiently clear to exclude it. More curious is how, in the estimation of the Court, measures to control a raging pandemic, that is no respecter of state borders, are to play second fiddle to a narrow state-based interest.

Bottom of Form

The best that the Court can bring itself to acknowledge how indisputable the strong interest of the American public is in resisting the spreading threat of COVID-19, but not so strong as to justifiably override the private property interests that make up the landlord-tenant relationship. These are the calculations of justices, like Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, who believe so much in what they do but understand so little of what that is, and, as a consequence, bring down upon our heads a perfect storm of irrationality that undermines the very essence of law and its purpose in society.

There can be no clearer demonstration of this than the Court’s declaration, upon closing its argument, that “… our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully even in pursuit of desirable ends.” With what understanding of the law can it be said that to act, simply as one should, to protect human life from disease and even death is to act unlawfully? That can be only when the law is understood as a law unto itself, as self-justifying, and in no way accountable for its justification to ethics, from which all human law is ultimately derived.

Since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on this impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. Nevertheless, how mistaken to think that acting for the good of the public is to act unlawfully when actually it is to act ethically and must therefore be to act lawfully.

  1. Patrick Hill is an associate professor at Rutgers University and the author of the book, No Place for Ethics:Judicial Review, Legal Positivism and the Supreme Court of the United States.

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U.S. Supreme Court ends Biden’s Covid-19 eviction moratorium

Aug 27, 2021  Yahoo Finance

#EvictionMoratorium #moratoriumeviction #Biden Yahoo Finance’s Dani Romero reports on the U.S. Supreme Court blocking the Biden administration’s eviction moratorium. Watch the 2021 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting on YouTube: https://youtu.be/gx-OzwHpM9k Subscribe to Yahoo Finance: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb About Yahoo Finance: At Yahoo Finance, you get free stock quotes, up-to-date news, portfolio management resources, international market data, social interaction and mortgage rates that help you manage your financial life. Yahoo Finance Plus: With a subscription to Yahoo Finance Plus get the tools you need to invest with confidence. Discover new opportunities with expert research and investment ideas backed by technical and fundamental analysis. Optimize your trades with advanced portfolio insights, fundamental analysis, enhanced charting, and more. To learn more about Yahoo Finance Plus please visit: https://yhoo.it/33jXYBp Connect with Yahoo Finance: Get the latest news: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb Find Yahoo Finance on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2A9u5Zq Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2LMgloP Follow Yahoo Finance on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2LOpNYz Follow Cashay.com Follow Yahoo Finance Premium on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3hhcnmV

CDC Announces Targeted Eviction Moratorium After Protests

Aug 4, 2021  NBC News

The CDC has announced a new targeted eviction moratorium after the previous moratorium expired, leaving more than 10 million Americans at risk of losing their homes. NBC News’ Leigh Ann Caldwell explains how the new moratorium differs from the expired one and how Democrats were able to influence the CDC’s decision.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #Eviction #Housing #CDC

NJ eviction moratorium to end soon for some tenants

For the last 1 ½ years, renters across New Jersey have been able to keep a roof over their head regardless of nonpayment of rent, thanks to an eviction moratorium in the state. But a new law is ending that protection as of Aug. 31 for people who make more than 80% of their county’s area median income. For those who make less than 80% of the area median income, the moratorium will be extended through Dec. 31.

Tenants who make more than 80% of the area median income and who are still struggling to pay rent will have to certify under penalty of law that their failure to pay is related to COVID-19. If they can prove that, the moratorium will be extended for them.

While housing advocates say the measure will provide some relief, landlords say it continues to put the brunt of the financial weight on them.

What to know about the eviction moratorium as it nears expiration again

Aug 25, 2021  PBS NewsHour

The clock is ticking away again for those who could face eviction this fall. The CDC’s pandemic moratorium on evictions is set to expire in early October — or possibly even sooner. The Biden administration is pushing states, cities, and counties to tap into more federal aid, and get it to those who need it. But as John Yang reports, new data shows those efforts are moving much slower than needed. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Oct 4, 2021   PBSNewsHour

The “Pandora Papers,” written by a worldwide consortium of journalists, reveal how world leaders and the mega-rich can hide billions of dollars in secret offshore accounts, which investigators say drain money from government treasuries and can undermine national security. Nick Schifrin talks to Drew Sullivan, co-founder and editor of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, or OCCRP. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newsho

What are the Pandora Papers?

Oct 3, 2021  Washington Post

A massive trove of private financial records shared with The Washington Post exposes vast reaches of the secretive offshore system used to hide billions of dollars from tax authorities, creditors, criminal investigators and citizens around the world. Read more: https://wapo.st/3A0AVdi. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/ #WashingtonPost #PostDocs #PandoraPapers

The Pandora Papers: How the world of offshore finance is still flourishing | Four Corners

Oct 4, 2021  ABC News In-depth

In a major international investigation, Four Corners reveals the secrets of the Pandora Papers. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/abcnewsindepth For months, more than 600 journalists from around the world, including the ABC, the Washington Post and the BBC, have been working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists on this top-secret investigation. One of the biggest data leaks in history, the papers reveal how the wealthy and powerful are continuing to use offshore tax havens to hide their ownership of assets and stash their cash – despite attempts to rein the industry in.  _________

Political Divisions Threaten President Biden’s Agenda | Washington Week | October 1, 2021

Oct 1, 2021  Washington Week PBS

Democrats clashed over the size of President Biden’s infrastructure package, as Congress passed a bill to avoid a federal government shutdown before the deadline. The panel also discussed America’s continued division over COVID vaccines and mandates, plus a look into the testimony from military leaders on the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan. Panel: Laura Barrón-López of POLITICO, Natasha Bertrand of CNN, Garrett Haake of NBC News, Carl Hulse of The New York Times

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Ing’s Street Art “My Little Red Shoes”, “Elephant Bath” and “In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace” Part 1

 

Ing’s Street Art “My Little Red Shoes”, “Elephant Bath” and

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Part 1

 

Thanks to the sun for giving life to my plants, provided it is the optimum condition for my plants grow beautifully.  The colorful full flowers give a pleasant sight for the people who pass by.

I appreciate everyone who is helpful to others.  In this case I am very lucky and thankful to my husband, John Watts who helped me stretch the canvas and hang up my painting.

I produced the original painting, “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996. 

In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

Cultivating my gardens

To show their beauty

Green leaves of different shapes

Extend out to obtain the sun

 

I water them every day

In the extreme hot, hot sun

I spray water on the plants

 

The mist of water

Reaches over the leaves

And colorful variety of flowers

 

Yellow, red, pink, purple, Orange

In the green ocean of light

And dark green leaves

 

As I spent my time

With my plants in the gardens

Either in front of our shop

Or at the backyard garden

 

It is a utopian time

When I seek my Peace with Nature

 The plants in our backyard garden, 2021

I produced “Elephant Bath” in 1999.

In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

“This is very beautiful”

“And feels very peaceful”

A voice spoke from a man who walked by me

As I looked back

Seeing two eyes

Showing the only part of his face

Still visible beyond the mask

 

COVID –19 Is

“In the Midst of our Troubles”

 

With his focus on plants

He seeks Peace in the beauty of nature

 

 

In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

“Do you sell the flowers”

A pretty lady asked me

 

The flowers are for everyone who

Passes by to see something pleasant

 

The pretty lady smiles happily

Noticing the flowers

 

My wish has come true

We are seeking peace with nature

 

 

In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

“Is that your painting?”

A young man asked me

 

“Yes!  Are you an artist too?”

I asked

 

“I did some drawing, but not like this.”

He responded

 

“The plants are beautiful!”

The young man commented

 

I smile with happiness

Sharing with others

With my best ability

One human being to another

We are seeking peace with nature 

 


  

In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

The car door opens

Appear a woman with a child”

“Look!  Beautiful flowers.”

She points at the flowers

The child’s big eyes wild open

Smiles responding to his mommy

 

“See yellow flowers!”

I point at a group of marigold flowers

 

“How old is he?” I ask

 

“Two years old” She replies

 

“Our two grandsons come to stay with us twice a week”

“One is going to be six years old next month”

“One and a half years old,

The young one who is very busy bee”

 

“He is very busy bee too”

She responds to our conversation

 

Parents and grandparents understand

The lives around the little ones

 

Our grandsons give me joy

Seeing them healthy and playful

 

 Visualizing the young ones in my mind

As I lay down sleep at night

Smiling with peaceful sleep

Tomorrow my two little ones will be here

 

A Black yellow spotted swallowtail butterfly on very large pink flowers.

A Black light blue spotted swallowtail butterfly on a very large pink flower.

A golden swallowtail butterfly on an orange flower.

A monarch butterfly on very large yellow flowers.

A monarch butterfly on jade plant flowers.

A monarch butterfly on golden rods flowers.

A golden swallowtail butterfly on mixed colorful flowers and golden rods flowers.

 I miss doing my artwork.  I do not have a quiet time to be able to concentrate on composing the artwork.  This may be due to worry about the COVID-19 virus epidemic, especially during the last administration that caused about 500,000 (Five hundred thousand) people to die.  Almost every day there was some controversial news that came from the presidential twitter account, from the White house.  I had to listen to the news carefully in order to be aware of the circumstances. There was no peaceful time to contemplate doing my artwork.  But now that the Biden administration has far less controversy, I can begin to have some time to think and even feel affect of missing doing the artwork.

This year my Butterfly bush trees have more beautiful large purple and white flowers than in past years.  I saw more butterflies came to drink the nectar from the flowers.  Three weeks ago, I saw six monarch butterflies drinking the nectar from one of the butterfly bush trees and more on the other trees.  I could not get a good picture because they were very busy, flying here and there.  Not one of them stayed still long enough for me to capture the image.  In previous years, I was lucky to be able to capture photographs different types of butterflies.  I also found some of the older flower photographs that I like.  So, I combined the butterfly photographs with the flower photographs.  The result is the above pictures of different butterflies and flowers in our garden that I was enjoyed capturing in photographs, in previous years.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, October 1, 2021


 

Peace with Nature                    Happy 6th Birthday Kai

Grandpa John and I are very happy that

you read so well today.  Now, you can read for

Bodhi and your classmates.

Love,

Grandma Ing & Grandpa John

 

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20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 9, 10, 11 and 12, 2021

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world, Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour,

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

How 9/11 Changed American Life, Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

America After 9/11 (full documentary), Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9, 10 and 11th, 2021

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021 NBC News

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN, Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary, Sep 10, 2021 

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight, Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero, Sep 9, 2021 

The New York Times:  By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

AXIOS AM: By Mike Allen, Sep 12, 2021, 20 years ago this morning

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty,  In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

Press-Telegram: Never Forgotten, Southern California, remember Sept. 11, 2001, 20 Years Since 9/11, Sep 11, 2021, Enduring images of 9/11, By MICHELE CARDON  and PAUL BERSEBACH 

Encyclopedia Britannica: September 11 attacks 

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 12, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, September 12, President Joe Biden’s latest vaccine mandate fuels political division, the Taliban takes initial steps in forming their government, and a 9/11 survivor continues to fight for healthcare for other victims of the tragedy. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 11, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, September 11, the nation commemorates the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks as President Biden, Vice President Harris, and others including former presidents Obama, Clinton and Bush attend memorial events at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Jersey City, New Jersey. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour Full Episode, Sept. 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, how President Biden’s inoculation requirements for millions of Americans might be enforced in the workplace, a look at the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart discuss the anniversary of 9/11 and the politics of vaccinations. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: 19 Americans among group allowed to leave Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCjhV… What Biden’s vaccine mandates mean for companies, workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my263… How the 9/11 attacks changed America’s role in the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXYdL… Brooks and Capehart on 9/11 anniversary, Biden’s mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhi_c… Smithsonian Institution pieces together history of 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BYrJ… Educators reflect on the significance of teaching about 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35I1J… Teens facing off at U.S. Open create ‘fairy tale moment’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKjbj… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Sept. 9, 2021

Sep 9, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Taliban orders an end to all protests as they finally allow the departure of some 200 American citizens from Afghanistan. Then, we talk with Dr. Anthony Fauci about the difficult path ahead in navigating the pandemic. And, 9/11 first responders reflect on the trauma of that day and how it compares to the stresses of the current pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ sues Texas over 6-week abortion ban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmHQU… How Taliban rule triggered Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeuJp… Scattered thunderstorms complicate Louisiana’s recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXRRP… Why the ATF is often leaderless and how that affects it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFrUS… Dr. Fauci on vaccine mandates, reopening schools, boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-V5Q… NYC’s first responders reflect on trauma of 9/11, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRD1n… Robert Hogue reflects on surviving 9/11 Pentagon attack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTDvG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

This week PBS NewsHour has been marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by exploring how they have impacted the U.S. at home and abroad. Judy Woodruff leads our latest conversation on the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report

Premiered 5 hours ago, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

Two decades after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, PBS NewsHour explores how the world has changed since that day. This documentary compiles a series of special reports to help viewers understand how the attacks on the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon and Flight 93 have left a lasting mark on victim’s families, first responders, survivors and the nation as a whole. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How 9/11 Changed American Life | Washington Week | September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel continues the conversation, reflecting on the 20 year anniversary of 9/11. The panel also discussed how the attacks shifted American life, politics, and the impact the event had on Muslim Americans. Panel: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Asma Khalid of NPR, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Vivian Salama of The Wall Street Journal, Pierre Thomas of ABC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

America After 9/11 (full documentary) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

FRONTLINE traces the U.S. response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the devastating consequences that unfolded across four presidencies. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker and chronicler of U.S. politics Michael Kirk, this feature-length documentary draws on both new interviews and those from the dozens of documentaries Kirk and his award-winning team have made in the years since 9/11. “America After 9/11” offers an epic, two-hour re-examination of the decisions that changed the world and transformed America — from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol — and the ongoing challenges that legacy poses for the U.S. president and the country. #AmericaAfter911 #January6th For more reporting in connection with this investigation, visit FRONTLINE’s website: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/fi… Find FRONTLINE on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation; the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Park Foundation; and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen.

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 11th, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  NBC News

U.S. remembers the lives lost on 9/11, families of 9/11 victims honor their loved ones, and tribute paid to heroes of Flight 93. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11th

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 10th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden responds to Republican pushback over vaccine mandate, Los Angeles school district approves Covid vaccine mandate for eligible students, and how September 11 changed security in America. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:14 Biden On Vaccine Mandate Lawsuits 04:54 Back To School Battle 07:23 America Remembers: 9/11 15:38 Afghan Refugee Flights Halted » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11 #Biden

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden announces new vaccine mandates for millions of Americans, DOJ announces lawsuit over Texas abortion law, and 9/11 survivors and first responders ‘forgotten’ by health program, employees say. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:11 Biden’s Covid Strategy 8:44 DOJ Taking On Texas 10:25 American Evacuated From Afghanistan 12:57 9/11 Survivors: Broken Promises 17:19 Missing Airline Funds » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #VaccineMandates #Texas

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

Reflecting on 9/11 20 years after the attacks, GOP outraged over Biden vaccine mandates, Jan. 6 committee receives first set of documents.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #GOP #September11

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  NBC News

Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy breaks down Biden’s shift in Covid strategy. Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ark.) discusses the GOP response to vaccine and mask mandates. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) talks all things infrastructure. Doris Kearns Goodwin, Hallie Jackson, Kimberly Atkins Stohr and George Will join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #FullEpisode #MTP #Politics Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN

Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

President Biden visited all three sites where planes crashed on September 11, 2001 and cities held ceremonies to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. We followed all of these events and more starting with a CBS News Special Report anchored by Norah O’Donnell. #livenews #livestream CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary

Sep 10, 2021  DW Documentary

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 sent the world into a state of shock. Yet some had been loudly and publicly warning of the dangers posed by terrorism. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan Mujahideen commander, was among them. It’s September 9, 2001, two days before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan commander fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, is assassinated. Who ordered his murder? The same man who masterminded the attacks on the US two days later: Osama Bin Laden. For months, Massoud had tried to make his voice heard, warning about the global dangers posed by an ascendant Taliban in Afghanistan. But Europe and the United States weren’t listening. Why not? Would heeding his warnings have affected lucrative arms deals with Pakistan? Did economic interests take precedence over security? This little-known story is told firsthand by diplomats, political leaders and military officials. It sheds new light on the events leading up to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Above all, it’s the story of a man who could have changed the fate of the world if his warnings had been heeded sooner. #documentary #dwdocumentary #September11 #USA #WorldTradeCenter ______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: ? DW Documentary (English): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary ? DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental ? DW Documentary (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia ? DW Doku (German): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH1k… ? DW Documentary (Hindi): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC46c… For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Follow DW Documentary on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Follow DW Documental on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dwdocumental We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight

Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

Twenty years on from 9/11 and we reflect on the evolving nature of terrorism and how the attack changed the world through the transformation of US foreign policy, global security and geopolitics. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Twenty years ago, on 11 September 2001, Al-Qaeda began four coordinated terrorist attacks on the US, lasting one hour and seventeen minutes. The world watched as nineteen terrorists crashed four planes – two into the World Trade Centre, one into the Pentagon, the very symbol of American might, and the fourth into a field in Pennsylvania. To this day, Al-Qaeda’s attack 9/11 remains the deadliest terror attack in history. It was the audacity of the attack that was so shocking. The idea that in a little over an hour the United States of America – the leader of the free world – could be shown to be utterly vulnerable, not invincible. That terrible day arguably has impacted every American psyche to this day, the way America sees its place in the world and the way we see America. Newsnight’s David Grossman reports on how September 11th changed the world

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero

Sep 9, 2021  60 Minutes

60 Minutes went beneath ground zero, where an underground city had become a 16-acre burial ground and an exhausting and dangerous cleanup job was taking place. “60 Minutes” is the most successful television broadcast in history. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 and is still a hit, over 50 seasons later, regularly making Nielsen’s Top 10. Subscribe to the “60 Minutes” YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu Watch full episodes: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F Get more “60 Minutes” from “60 Minutes: Overtime”: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr Follow “60 Minutes” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry Like “60 Minutes” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao Follow “60 Minutes” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX Subscribe to our newsletter: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

The New York Times

By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

A second plane approaching the World Trade Center before hitting the South Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. Kelly Guenther for The New York Times

A missing legacy

The great crises in U.S. history have often inspired the country to great accomplishments.
The Civil War led to the emancipation of Black Americans and a sprawling program of domestic investment in railroads, colleges and more. World War II helped spark the creation of the modern middle class and cemented the so-called American Century. The Cold War caused its own investment boom, in the space program, computer technology and science education.

The attacks of Sept. 11 — which occurred on a sparkling late-summer morning 20 years ago tomorrow — had the potential to leave their own legacy of recovery. In sorrow and anger, Americans were more united in the weeks after the attacks than they had been in years. President George W. Bush’s approval rating exceeded 85 percent.

It isn’t hard to imagine how Bush might have responded to Sept. 11 with the kind of domestic mobilization of previous wars. He could have rallied the country to end its reliance on Middle Eastern oil, a reliance that both financed radical American enemies and kept the U.S. enmeshed in the region. While attacking Al Qaeda militarily, Bush also could have called for enormous investments in solar energy, wind energy, nuclear power and natural gas. It could have been transformative, for the economy, the climate and Bush’s historical standing.

Bush chose a different path, one that was ambitious in its own right: the “freedom agenda.” He hoped that his toppling of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Saddam Hussein in Iraq would inspire people around the world to rise up for democracy and defeat autocracy. For a brief period — the Arab Spring, starting in 2010 — his vision almost seemed to be playing out.

Today, though, we know it did not. Bush and his team bungled Iraq’s postwar reconstruction. In Afghanistan, the U.S. rejected a Taliban surrender offer, and the Taliban recovered to win the war. In Egypt and Syria, autocrats remain in power.

Some wars have left clear legacies of progress toward freedom — like the anti-colonization movement and the flowering of European democracy that followed World War II. The post-9/11 wars have not. If anything, the world has arguably become less democratic in recent years.

Twenty years after Sept. 11, the attacks seem likely to be remembered as a double tragedy. There were the tangible horrors: The attacks on that day killed almost 3,000 people, and the ensuing wars killed hundreds of thousands more. And there is the haunting question that lingers: Out of the trauma, did the country manage to create a better future?

A police officer covered in ash after the first building collapsed at the World Trade Center.Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Radical pessimism is a mistake,” David Ignatius argues in The Post. “These two decades witnessed many American blunders but also lessons learned.”

Twenty Years Gone”: The Atlantic’s Jennifer Senior on one family’s heartbreaking loss and struggle to move on.

“The fact that the United States itself went on to attack, and wreak even greater violence against innocent civilians around the world, was largely omitted from official narratives,” the novelist Laila Lalami writes for Times Opinion.

“The twin towers still stand because we saw them, moved in and out of their long shadows, were lucky enough to know them for a time.” Colson Whitehead wrote this essay shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Many people revisit it.

Michele Defazio on Sept. 11, holding up a poster of her missing husband, Jason Defazio, who worked in One World Trade Center.Krista Niles/The New York Times

From The Times
Dan Barry asks what it means to “never forget” given the inevitable fallibility of human memory.

Jennifer Steinhauer speaks to veterans of two wars that followed the attacks. “I am still fighting a little bit of that war, inside,” one said.

Elizabeth Dias reports that the deluge of anti-Muslim hate that followed the attacks has forged a new generation of Muslim Americans determined to define their place in the country.

The site of the World Trade Center “still feels like an alien zone,” Michael Kimmelman, The Times’s architecture critic, writes. But the rest of Lower Manhattan has bloomed.

The remains of more than 1,100 victims have never been identified. But New York City continues to search for DNA matches, Corey Kilgannon writes — a task the chief medical examiner called “a sacred obligation.”

AXIOS AM

by Mike Allen mike@axios.com   Sep 12, 2021

  1. 20 years ago this morning

An 18-page special section in today’s New York Times includes, in tiny black type, the names of all 2,977 victims at the three 9/11 attack sites.

  1. Top talker: Blazing SigAlerts

Photo: L.A. County Fire Air Operations via AP

A wildfire — the Route fire, “0% contained” — broke out yesterday in mountainous terrain near Castaic in L.A. County, prompting the CHP to close a stretch of the 5 Freeway in both directions. (L.A. Times)

7.  Salesforce offers to relocate workers with abortion concerns
After Texas’ anti-abortion law was upheld, Salesforce told employees via Slack that the company will help them relocate “if you have concerns about access to reproductive healthcare in your state,” CNBC reports.

·  The company didn’t take a stand on the Texas law, but said: “We recognize and respect that we all have deeply held and different perspectives. … [W]e stand with all of our women at Salesforce and everywhere.”

With Florida legislators planning to take up new abortion restrictions in January, Gov. Ron DeSantis is backing away from the Texas law’s bounty provision, BuzzFeed’s Kadia Goba reports.

·  DeSantis press secretary Christina Pushaw told BuzzFeed: “Gov. DeSantis doesn’t want to turn private citizens against each other.”

  1. The Boss: ” I remember you, my friend”

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen sang “I’ll See You in My Dreams” at the 9/11 Memorial, on the site of the Twin Towers:

I got your guitar here by the bed

All your favorite records and all the books that you read

And though my soul feels like it’s been split at the seams

I’ll see you in my dreams.

Watch it on YouTube.

  1. College games honor the lost

Photo: Ryan M. Kelly/Getty Images

Above, members of the U.Va. Cavaliers marching band — most not born on 9/11 — perform a memorial salute at halftime at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville.

  • College football teamsacross the country unveiled tributes, including special uniforms.

Photo: Joann Muller/Axios

  • Axios’ Joann Mullersent me this evening shot from the Big House at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.
  • Attendance: 108,345. Michigan says that’s “the 295th consecutive game with more than 100,000 fans at Michigan Stadium.”

More photos, videos 

  1. America on pause

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

An unfurled American flag greets the day at the Pentagon.

Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden greeted families and laid a wreath at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa.

  • This native, 17½ ton sandstone boulderwas placed in 2011 to show the edge of the impact site in an open field, next to a hemlock grove.

More photos from Shanksville … Read Biden’s remarks.

Photo: Brittainy Newman/AP

The “Tribute in Light” beams in Lower Manhattan consist of 88 xenon light bulbs, each 7,000 watts, positioned in two 48-foot squares on the roof of the Battery Parking Garage, south of the 9/11 Memorial.

  • They can be seenfor 60 miles.

More photos from Ground Zero.

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty

Remembrances of lives lost are plentiful as New York commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Lower Manhattan near Ground Zero. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden on Saturday were joined by former presidents, family members of victims and first responders at Ground Zero in New York City to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Driving the news: The ceremony at Ground Zero began with a moment of silence at 8:46am, when Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center, followed by a reading of the victims’ names who died in New York from the attack.

  • “Joe, we love and miss you more than you can ever imagine,” said Lisa Reina, who was eight months pregnant when her husband, Joseph Reina Jr., died on the deadly day, per the Washington Post.
  • “[While] 20 years feels like an eternity … it still feels like yesterday,” Reina said.
  • Bruce Springsteen also performed his song, “I’ll See You Ii My Dreams,” following the second moment of silence.
In photos:

Family members and loved ones of victims attend the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum on Sept. 11 in New York. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

NYPD and FDNY Memorial Ceremony at FDNY Engine 8, Ladder 2, Battalion 8 on Sept. 11 in New York City. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

A member of the FDNY visits the reflecting pool. Photo: Mike Segar-Pool/Getty Images

Katie Mascali is comforted by her fiance Andre Jabban as they stand near the name of her father, Joseph Mascali, at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Photo: Craig Ruttle/PoolAFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen performs during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden are joined by former presidents and others at the 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

People embrace during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Go deeper: Biden attends ceremony at Ground Zero on 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks

 AXIOS  Erin Doherty

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Biden attends wreath-laying ceremony at Pentagon

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Axios

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Harris, Bush preach unity at Flight 93 memorial, 20 years on from attacks

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during a 9/11 commemoration at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Kamala Harris joined former President George W. Bush at a ceremony on Saturday to honor the lives lost 20 years ago on United Airlines Flight 93.

Driving the news: The vice president and the 43rd president devoted much of their remarks to remembering the unity that brought Americans together after the 9/11 attacks.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.axios.com/photos-911-ceremony-ground-zero-new-york-ad1d4d5a-9fa8-40df-912f-9587ab94cf4e.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosam&stream=top

Never Forgotten | Southern California remembers

Sept. 11, 2001

Press-Telegram <email@newsletters.presstelegram.com>   Sep 11, 2021

20 Years Since 9/11
Twenty years ago, we were rocked when terrorists attacked the United States and killed nearly 3,000 people. In addition to so many innocent lives, we lost our vital belief that we were safe, just as Americans had with the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

In our local coverage of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, we examine how we have changed since 9/11 and how lessons we learned have surfaced again in a new crisis. Finally, we honor those who lost their lives, including the many heroes who ran toward danger to help when they were needed most.

Enduring images of 9/11

By MICHELE CARDON | mcardon@scng.com and PAUL BERSEBACH | pbersebach@scng.com | Orange County Register

PUBLISHED: September 7, 2021 at 3:37 p.m. | UPDATED: September 10, 2021 at 1:06 p.m.

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Sept, 11, 2001 began like any other Tuesday. School kids ate breakfast before heading to class, and parents prepared for their workday. Terrorism, especially on American soil, was the farthest thought from most people’s minds. But before many could walk out their front door, events were unfolding on the East Coast that would change America, and the world, forever.

At 8:46 a.m. EDT, a jetliner carrying thousands of gallons of fuel slammed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. What began with confusion as to what could have gone wrong quickly turned to the realization of a planned attack as a second plane hit the South Tower 17 minutes later.

Within two hours, two other planes had crashed into the Pentagon and in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And the twin towers fell. The attacks 20 years ago killed nearly 3,000 people, in the hijacked planes and on the ground, and injured thousands. The attacks forever changed the world.

A plane approaches New York’s World Trade Center moments before it struck the tower at left, as seen from downtown Brooklyn, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In an unprecedented show of terrorist horror, the 110 story towers collapsed in a shower of rubble and dust after 2 hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into them. (AP Photo/ William Kratzke)

The south tower begins to collapse as smoke billows from both towers of the World Trade Center, in New York.  (AP Photo/Jim Collins/FILE)

Two women embrace each other as they watch the World Trade Center burn following a terrorist attack on the twin skyscrapers in New York. (AP Photo/Ernesto Mora)

Chief of Staff Andy Card whispers into the ear of President George W. Bush to give him word of the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, during a visit to the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Fla. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Smoke billows from one of the towers of the World Trade Center and flames and debris explode from the second tower, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

People run from the collapse of one of the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo. (AP Photo/FILE/Suzanne Plunkett)

A person falls from the north tower of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File

A fiery blast rocks the World Trade Center after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

A man with a fire extinguisher walks through rubble after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on September 11, 2001, in New York. The man was shouting as he walked looking for victims who needed assistance. Both towers collapsed after being hit by hijacked passengers planes. (Photo by DOUG KANTER/AFP via Getty Images)

People flee lower Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, following a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)

A jet airliner heads into one of the World Trade Center towers for the second attack in New York.  (AP Photo/Carmen Taylor/File)

The south side of the Pentagon burns after it took a direct, devastating hit from an aircraft Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Tom Horan)

Emergency workers look at the crater created when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville, Pa., in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Julie McDermott, center, walks with other victims as they make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Pedestrians on Beekman St. flee the area of the collapsed World Trade Center in lower Manhattan following a terrorist attack on the New York landmark Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York, Sept. 11, 2001. In a horrific sequence of destruction, terrorists crashed two planes into the World Trade Center causing the twin 110-story towers to collapse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

A helicopter flies over the Pentagon in Washington as smoke billows over the building. The terrorist-hijacked airliner that slammed into the west side of the Pentagon killed 184 people. (AP Photo/Heesoon Yim, File)

With the skeleton of the World Trade Center twin towers in the background, New York City firefighters work amid debris on Cortlandt St. after the terrorist attacks of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

As rescue efforts continue in the rubble of the World Trade Center, President George W. Bush puts his arms around firefighter Bob Beckwith while standing in front of the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)

A woman looks at missing person posters of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 14, 2001. (AP Photo/Robert Spencer)

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Michele Cardon | Director of Photography

Orange County Register Director of Photography Michele Cardon has worked at The Register for more than 25 years. Her editing skills have been honored by the National Press Photographer Association, Society of News Design and Pictures of the Year. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Journalism. As a Register photo editor, Michele has covered events such as the World Series, Stanley Cup Finals, NBA Championship, Oscars, Emmys, Los Angeles riots, and the Laguna Beach firestorm.

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For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.presstelegram.com/2021/09/07/enduring-images-of-9-11/?utm_email=643944CEB487A5407435944139&g2i_eui=bogqR9ZyO1C5yUk5USoN618ndaZJqwBHiiYAAoY8WkA%3d&g2i_source=newsletter&utm_source=listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=https%3a%2f%2fwww.presstelegram.com%2f2021%2f09%2f07%2fenduring-images-of-9-11%2f&utm_campaign=lbpt-special-sept11 

September 11 attacks 

Encyclopedia Britannica

September 11 attacks, also called 9/11 attacks, series of airline hijackings and suicide attacks committed in 2001 by 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda against targets in the United States, the deadliest terrorist attacks on American soil in U.S. history. The attacks against New York City and Washington, D.C., caused extensive death and destruction and triggered an enormous U.S. effort to combat terrorism. Some 2,750 people were killed in New York, 184 at the Pentagon, and 40 in Pennsylvania (where one of the hijacked planes crashed after the passengers attempted to retake the plane); all 19 terrorists died (see Researcher’s Note: September 11 attacks). Police and fire departments in New York were especially hard-hit: hundreds had rushed to the scene of the attacks, and more than 400 police officers and firefighters were killed.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8JMajU52Us

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Remembering 9/11 and One World Trade Center, New York City, New York 

Remembering 9/11 and One World Trade Center, New York City, New York 

Memorial to World Trade Center 

John and I had planned for a while to take a trip to Swansea, Wales, UK to visit John’s older sister Phyllis.  Finally, we bought two tickets from Air India.  We were scheduled to leave Newark, NJ on September 10, 2001.  We always plan to stay more than three weeks’ vacation as we wanted to spend as much time with Phyllis as we can, since Mom, John’s mother passed away in summer 1994 and Phyllis was alone by herself.  So, we planned to stay with her until October 9, 2001, which was the day we returned home to Newark.  ————————————

“Do you know the World Trade Center collapsed?” 

The taxi man asked us while he took our luggage out from the trunk. 

“No!  It is impossible.  We just came from World Trade Center.”

We responded. 

“Two planes hit the twin towers.”

The taxi man gave us more information. 

After greeting Phyllis, we ran in the living room and turned on the TV and found out that there were no Twin Towers anymore.  We learned that the terrorists hijacked the airplanes and used planes as weapons to destroy the buildings and people on the plane and thousand more in the World Trade Center Towers.  We also learned about the disasters in Washington DC and Pennsylvania. ——————————————————

After we came back home to Newark, NJ from Swansea, the first thing I wanted was to visit the remains of WTC to join others who felt the sadness from the loss of so many people.  We also went to Jersey City by the peer at the bank of Hudson River opposite WTC to look at the empty spots where Twin Towers would have been. Our hearts ached and we were confused as to the cause of this destruction.  We liked to bring friends and family to view the NY skyline and watch the 4th of July fireworks by the Hudson River with the WTC in the background. 

I began doing the artwork relating to WTC, a few ceramic sculptures as a Memorial for the Twin Towers.  I kept my artwork to myself.  I showed them to only few people who were close to me.  I did not want to provoke negative feelings or bad memories in others.  I felt such sadness about this horrible event.  It is the same sadness for any horrible event such as Holocausts, the nuclear bombs in Japan, the killing field in Cambodia, in Rwanda and other places in the world.  We humans never learn to be civilized.  We seem so quickly to forget the horrible events that took place and then bad things happen again.  We kill each other directly and indirectly.  The indirect actions of corruption, greed and power hunger cause direct action to surface.  Innocent people will always end up suffering the effects.  Hopefully we will be wiser and able to learn from past events and improve our human race to be able to live with each other in peaceful coexistence. 

Twenty years have passed since the 9/11 events and I would like to share my artwork with others and express some of my thought on my Peace Project website. 

Many thanks to my daughter and son-in-law who subscribe the website for me and my husband who has the patients to correct my writing.  

The followings are the pictures of my sculptures I produced on March 16, 2002 I made especially as a memorial to the Twin Towers and the people who lost in these events:

The description of WTC memorial: 

Two towers stand erect, supported by two long panels.  Outside of two panels are animal designs in one side and the garden and plants on the other side.  The long path between the two towers inside panels is blank spaces which can be the area that the loved ones or any ones express their thought in writing.  And the corridor between two panels can be the place for children to play hide and seek. 

I made this small-scale Twin Towers sculpture as a replica for loved ones or any ones who comes to mourn, let go of sadness and to remember the loss.  I hope we can realize that we should enjoy and appreciate one and other while we are still alive.  

Memorial to World Trade Center 

Time to mourn

Time to cry

Wipe the sadness away

Time to remember

Time to live

Get up and go

Work awaits

I will go on

Remembering the past

With heavy heart

When you are apart 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, September 11, 2011, 5:57 AM 

Lost Hope  

Little girl feels 

Little girl hurts 

To feel the pain so young 

Her innocent lost

Even though it hasn’t begun 

We all lost our innocent and freedom 

Innocent of hoping working hard 

We will be better some day 

But freedom lost 

Sudden someone comes

And take the hope away 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, September 04, 2011, 9:45 PM

On Tuesday, September 11, 2001 a total of 343 firefighters died with thousands of innocent civilians in the World Trade Center and other locations. Their lives were taken away by fanatic, brainwashed believers of a distorted version of their own religion.  If the hijackers believe in humankind and nature, they would not kill themselves and others.  So, one should always learn to questions what one is told to believe. 

I salute all the brave firefighters and others who risk their lives saving others.  May peace be with the brave firefighters, all their families and the others. 

Respectfully yours, 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, August 8, 2003

 I wish it were!

Something that have wings

To save him

I love butterfly

Deep in my heart

I sent the butterfly

To catch him

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, September 15,2002

Order from the Top 

Sharp bayonet piercing on my back

As I am dying

Why do you kill me?

I don’t know you!

And you didn’t know me!

Oh! I forget

It’s an order from the top

If you didn’t kill me

I probably will kill you

Because I got order from the top also

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts Sunday, 8.28.2011, 6:27 PM

Mother liberty holds the twin towers

Close to her heart

Protecting World Trade Center

With her believe 

“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

Mother Liberty, do we still breathe free in this land of liberty?

Breathe free with fear for this event has come

Don’t shed your tears for this human race

The lesson learns might make us grow

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, August 30, 2011, 10:55 PM

What is the same and different between these two men?

One, they are both human beings

Two, they are both dead

Three, they are well known

Four, they both had a goal to be achieved

Five, one is nonviolent and other is violent

Six, one is spinning cotton on a wheel and other has a weapon

Seven, one is productive and other is destructive

Which do we prefer after we analyzing the lives of these two men?

History will record these two men’s actions when they were alive

I hope we can learn from these two people without vengeance and hatred

Let us teach our younger generations all over the world

To understand that we are all the same

If we harm others then we will harm ourselves in the end

 

Do not brainwash the youngsters!!!!!!!!!!! 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, 9.13.2011, 1 PM

Flowers from my little garden

Floating in the air

Let each beautiful one

Touching each soul

Seeing beautiful things

Rising to the sky

Just wait for a little while

I will be with you all

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, 9.13.2011, 1:20 PM

World Trade Center Remembered

 

World Trade Center falls

Becoming colorful Twin Towers

Teaching us

They are here

And they are gone 

Thinking how good

When they are standing there

As we take things for granted

Even with the love ones 

Or the cleaning workers

Or the others that faithfully

Do their jobs for everyone

World Trade Center

 Becomes colorful

In our mind

 I didn’t do anything

Why you hate me this much?

What did I do wrong?

Or did my fellow countrymen

Cause the trouble to the others

That I do not aware of?

 

These questions and thought

Become active

In my brain neurons

Start charging for reasons 

Thanks to the Twin Towers

You make us think

I miss you

 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts Saturday, August 27, 2011, 3:40 PM

For more information, please visit the following link:

 https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/

 

World Trade Center Under the Same Moon

 World Trade Center Under the Same Moon

 

The moon rises over the night sky

 

We sit and hold hand tight

Looking at the moon gets brighter

And the sky turns dark

By the Hudson River

 

Once we stood here

Watching the moon

Over the World Trade Center

Our hand firmly together

 

The same moon

But now the new one rise

Under the same sky

And the shiny moon

 

Let us hope

Peace will come to mankind

 

No fighting, no killing

 

Let build new World Trade Center

Under the same moon

 

As our hands tightly grip

Bond us with each other

And bond us all

 

Let Peace stand strong

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Wednesday, July 04, 2012, 1:55 A.M.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/world-trade-center-under-the-same-moon/

One World Trade Center 9.8.13 Part1

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

One World Trade Center 

Piecing through clouds

Up high in the sky

Tall and slender

With beauty and grace

 

People all over the world

Admiring they come

 One World Trade center

That is your name 

 

Trade without greed

Trade with fairness

Trade with love

Trade with integrity

That is what the new

World Trade Center should be

 Warm people hearts

With generosity and kindness

With these qualities

No one will want to take you down

 

Forget the past

Start the new

Let us all come together

With prosperity and peace for all  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, September 11, 2013, 10:33 pm

Link to One World Trade Center 9.8.13 Part 1 page

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-9-8-13-part1/

 

One World Trade Center Part 2

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

 Link to One World Trade Center Part 2 Page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-part-2/

 

One World Trade Center Part 3

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

Link to One World Trade Center Part 3 Page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-part-3/

One World Trade Center Part 4

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

Link to One World Trade Center Part 4 page: 

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-part-4/

 

One World Trade Center Part 5

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

Link to One World Trade Center Part 5  

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-part-5/

 

One World Trade Center Part 6

New York City, New York 

On Sunday, September 8th, 2013 

Link to One World Trade Center Part 6 Page:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/remembering-911/one-world-trade-center-part-6/

Photographs and artworks by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

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PBS News, NBC News, LastWeekTonight, Veritasium, Real Engineering, NASA, AXIOS, and Live Science

PBS News, NBC News, LastWeekTonight, Veritasium, Real Engineering, NASA, AXIOS, and Live Science

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 20, 2021

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – August 20th, 2021

Ransomware: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO), Aug 16, 2021  LastWeekTonight

The Genius of 3D Printed Rockets, Aug 12, 2021  Veritasium

The Plane That Will Change Travel Forever,Aug 2, 2021  Real Engineering

 Highlighting an Upcoming Earth-Observing Mission on This Week @NASA – August 20, 2021 NASA

Axios AM: By Mike Allan, Aug 20, 2021- Extreme heat becomes global health issue

Live Science: Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of power and more, Aug 19 & 20, 2021

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 20, 2021

Aug 20, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the Taliban targets Afghans who worked with the United States as their desperation to flee the country intensifies. Then, despite soaring levels of new COVID cases in Florida, school officials face backlash to face cover mandates. And, Jonathan Capehart and Michael Gerson break down President Biden’s handling of the Afghanistan crisis and the politics of mask mandates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Anxious Afghans rush airport gates in bid to flee country https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkUzA… News Wrap: FDA to grant full approval to Pfizer vaccine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBjlL… How the U.S. ignored corruption within the Afghan government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ4Y0… Examining Florida’s politicization of school mask mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doJkI… Gerson and Capehart on Afghanistan, school mask mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrrBu… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – August 20th, 2021

Aug 20, 2021  NBC News

President Biden pledges to evacuate all Americans trapped in Afghanistan, chaos outside Kabul airport with evacuations ongoing, and the battle over masks in schools intensifies across the South. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:10 Biden: We Will Get You Home 09:06 Masks In Schools Debate 12:18 Jeopardy Host Backlash 13:58 Heat Wave Deaths 16:36 Families Of The Fallen 19:14 Inspiring America: Big Steps After An Injury » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #Afghanistan #MaskMandates

Ransomware: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Aug 16, 2021  LastWeekTonight

John Oliver discusses ransomware attacks, why they’re on the rise, and what can be done about them. Connect with Last Week Tonight online… Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/lastweektonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: www.facebook.com/lastweektonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: www.twitter.com/lastweektonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: www.hbo.com/lastweektonight

The Genius of 3D Printed Rockets

Aug 12, 2021  Veritasium

3D printed rockets save on up front tooling, enable rapid iteration, decrease part count, and facilitate radically new designs. For your chance to win 2 seats on one of the first Virgin Galactic flights to Space and support a great cause, go to https://www.omaze.com/veritasium Thanks to Tim Ellis and everyone at Relativity Space for the tour! https://www.relativityspace.com/ https://youtube.com/c/RelativitySpace Special thanks to Scott Manley for the interview and advising on aerospace engineering. Check out his channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/szyzyg ?????????????????????????? References: Benson, T. (2021). Rocket Parts. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketParts Boen, B. (2009). Winter Wonder: Rocket Icicles. NASA. — https://ve42.co/EngineIcicles Hall, N. (2021). Rocket Thrust Equation. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketEqn Benson, T. (2021). Rocket Thrust. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketThrust Regenerative Cooling — https://ve42.co/RegenCooling How A Gold Bullet Almost Destroyed A Space Shuttle by Scott Manley — https://ve42.co/ManleyEngine ?????????????????????????? Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Burt Humburg, Blake Byers, Dumky, Mike Tung, Evgeny Skvortsov, Meekay, Ismail Öncü Usta, Paul Peijzel, Crated Comments, Anna, Mac Malkawi, Michael Schneider, Oleksii Leonov, Jim Osmun, Tyson McDowell, Ludovic Robillard, Jim buckmaster, fanime96, Juan Benet, Ruslan Khroma, Robert Blum, Richard Sundvall, Lee Redden, Vincent, Marinus Kuivenhoven, Alfred Wallace, Arjun Chakroborty, Joar Wandborg, Clayton Greenwell, Pindex, Michael Krugman, Cy ‘kkm’ K’Nelson, Sam Lutfi, Ron Neal ?????????????????????????? Written by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev, and Emily Zhang Animation by Mike Radjabov Filmed by Derek Muller, Raquel Nuno, Trenton Oliver, and Emily Zhang Edited by Trenton Oliver SFX by Shaun Clifford Additional video supplied by Getty Images & Pond5 Produced by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev, and Emily Zhang

The Plane That Will Change Travel Forever

Aug 2, 2021  Real Engineering

Get a free month of Nebula with any Real Engineering merch: https://store.nebula.app/collections/… New streaming platform: https://watchnebula.com/ Vlog channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMet… Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=282505… Facebook: http://facebook.com/realengineering1 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brianjamesm… Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEngineer… Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebrianmcmanus Discord: https://discord.gg/s8BhkmN Get your Real Engineering shirts at: https://standard.tv/collections/real-… Credits: Writer/Narrator: Brian McManus Editor: Dylan Hennessy (https://www.behance.net/dylanhennessy1) Animator: Mike Ridolfi (https://www.moboxgraphics.com/) Sound: Graham Haerther (https://haerther.net/) Thumbnail: Simon Buckmaster https://twitter.com/forgottentowel References: References: [1] https://theicct.org/sites/default/fil… [2] https://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2010/… [3] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [4] Page 19 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [5] https://www.statista.com/statistics/6…. [6] https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [7] https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Displ… [8] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [9] Page 81 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [10] https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [11] Page 20 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [12] Webinar by Mark Page a pioneer in the blended wing body design. https://youtu.be/x0vYuPmOPYE & https://www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/air… [13] https://www.businessinsider.com/boein… [14] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [15] Page 13 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [16] https://www.boeing.com/history/produc… [17] Page 22 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [18] Page 1 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 Select imagery/video supplied by Getty Images Thank you to AP Archive for access to their archival footage. Music by Epidemic Sound: http://epidemicsound.com/creator Thank you to my patreon supporters: Adam Flohr, Henning Basma, Hank Green, William Leu, Tristan Edwards, Ian Dundore, John & Becki Johnston. Nevin Spoljaric, Jason Clark, Thomas Barth, Johnny MacDonald, Stephen Foland, Alfred Holzheu, Abdulrahman Abdulaziz Binghaith, Brent Higgins, Dexter Appleberry, Alex Pavek, Marko Hirsch, Mikkel Johansen, Hibiyi Mori. Viktor Józsa, Ron Hochsprung

Highlighting an Upcoming Earth-Observing Mission on This Week @NASA – August 20, 2021

Aug 20, 2021   NASA

Highlighting an upcoming Earth-observing mission, the science on the next resupply mission to the space station, and testing a new material to help future spacecraft land on distant worlds … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-Highl… Producer: Andre Valentine Editor: Lacey Young Music: Universal Production Music

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Axios AM: Aug 20, 2021

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

Extreme heat becomes global health issue

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
Heat-related deaths around the world increased by 74% from 1980 to 2016, Axios’ Marisa Fernandez writes from a study published yesterday in The Lancet.

More than 356,000 people died from extreme heat-related causes in just nine countries in 2019, a death toll that’s expected to grow as temperatures increase worldwide.

  • 1.3 million deaths were related to cold — a 31% increase since 1990.

Heat stress can lead to stroke, organ and brain damage. A pair of studies out of the University of Washington found it also causes several types of heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

Live Science: Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of power and more, Aug 19 & 20, 2021

Created for ingpeaceproject@gmail.com |  Web Version
Top Science News
Milky Way has a 3,000-light-year-long splinter in its arm, and astronomers don’t know why

(NASA/JPL)

The Sagittarius arm of the Milky Way spirals out of our galaxy’s center, forming a swooping highway of gas that spans tens of thousands of light-years. This highway is dotted with the headlights of billions of stars, all seemingly moving along the same curvy track. But now, astronomers have found something unusual — a “break” in the arm, slashing perpendicularly through the spiral like a splinter poking through a piece of wood.

Spanning about 3,000 light-years, this stellar splinter makes up just a fraction of the Milky Way (which has a diameter of about 100,000 light-years). Still, the newfound break is the first major structure to be discovered disrupting the seemingly uniform flow of the galaxy’s Sagittarius arm, according to a study published online July 21 in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

History & Archaeology
Mass grave from Nazi atrocity discovered in Poland’s ‘Death Valley’

(D. Frymark; Antiquity Publications Ltd.)

Archaeologists in Poland have discovered a mass grave that the Nazis tried to destroy at the end of World War II, a new study finds.

The mass grave, filled with the remains of about 500 individuals, is linked to the horrific “Pomeranian Crime” that took place in Poland’s pre-war Pomerania province when the Nazis occupied the country in 1939. The Nazis killed up to 35,000 people in Pomerania at the beginning of the war, and they returned in 1945 to kill even more people, as well as to hide evidence of the prior massacres by exhuming and burning the bodies of victims.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Space Exploration
SpaceX Starlink satellites responsible for over half of close encounters in orbit, scientist says

(SpaceX)

Operators of satellite constellations are constantly forced to move their satellites because of encounters with other spacecraft and pieces of space junk. And, thanks to SpaceX’s Starlink satellites, the number of such dangerous approaches will continue to grow, according to estimates based on available data.

SpaceX’s Starlink satellites alone are involved in about 1,600 close encounters between two spacecraft every week, that’s about 50 % of all such incidents, according to Hugh Lewis, the head of the Astronautics Research Group at the University of Southampton, U.K. These encounters include situations when two spacecraft pass within a distance of 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) from each other.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Chinese satellite got whacked by hunk of Russian rocket in March

(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Yunhai 1-02’s wounds are not self-inflicted.

In March, the U.S. Space Force’s 18th Space Control Squadron (18SPCS) reported the breakup of Yunhai 1-02, a Chinese military satellite that launched in September 2019. It was unclear at the time whether the spacecraft had suffered some sort of failure — an explosion in its propulsion system, perhaps — or if it had collided with something in orbit.

We now know that the latter explanation is correct, thanks to some sleuthing by astrophysicist and satellite tracker Jonathan McDowell, who’s based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Chinese astronomers eye Tibetan Plateau site for observatory project

(NASA JSC)

Chinese astronomers hope to establish a major observatory program on the roof of the world, the Tibetan Plateau, with new research arguing for pristine observing conditions nestled in the uplands.

The analysis focuses on a study site near Lenghu Town in Qinghai Province at an altitude of more than 2.5 miles (4.2 kilometers) and some 1,900 miles (3,000 km) west of Beijing. In the paper, the scientists argue that three years of monitoring shows conditions on par with those at some of the most renowned scientific outposts on Earth.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Math & Physics
Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of energy

(Damien Jemison/NIF)

Scientists used an unconventional method of creating nuclear fusion to yield a record-breaking burst of energy of more than 10 quadrillion watts, by firing intense beams of light from the world’s largest lasers at a tiny pellet of hydrogen.

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Northern California said they had focused 192 giant lasers at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) onto a pea-size pellet, resulting in the release of 1.3 megajoules of energy in 100 trillionths of a second — roughly 10% of the energy of the sunlight that hits Earth every moment, and about 70% of the energy that the pellet had absorbed from the lasers. The scientists hope one day to reach the break-even or “ignition” point of the pellet, where it gives off 100% or more energy than it absorbs.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Physicists give weird new phase of matter an extra dimension

(IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch)

Physicists have created the first ever two-dimensional supersolid — a bizarre phase of matter that behaves like both a solid and a frictionless liquid at the same time.

Supersolids are materials whose atoms are arranged into a regular, repeating, crystal structure, yet are also able to flow forever without ever losing any kinetic energy. Despite their freakish properties, which appear to violate many of the known laws of physics, physicists have long predicted them theoretically — they first appeared as a suggestion in the work of the physicist Eugene Gross as early as 1957.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Curious Creatures
World’s most elusive giant squid could be monogamous, female corpse hints

(Miyazu Energy Aquarium)

A female of the world’s largest squid — sometimes called the “kraken” after the mythological sea monster — that was caught off the coast of Japan apparently had just one amorous encounter in her lifetime.

The female had sperm packets from just one male giant squid embedded in her body, which surprised researchers. Because giant squid are solitary creatures that probably run across potential mates only occasionally, scientists expected that females would opportunistically collect and store sperm from multiple males over time.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Your Brain
Lab-made mini brains grow their own sets of ‘eyes’

(Elke Gabriel)

Scientists recently grew mini brains with their own sets of “eyes,” according to a new study.

Organoids are miniature versions of organs that scientists can grow in the lab from stem cells, or cells that can mature into any type of cell in the body. Previously, scientists have developed tiny beating hearts and tear ducts that could cry like humans do. Scientists have even grown mini brains that produce brain waves like those of preterm babies.

Now, a group of scientists has grown mini brains that have something their real counterparts do not: a set of eye-like structures called “optic cups” that give rise to the retina — the tissue that sits in the back of the eye and contains light-sensing cells, according to a statement.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Daily Quiz

 

POLL QUESTION:

What material is a modern penny mostly made of?

(Learn the answer here)

Zinc

 

Copper

 

Bronze
Tin
LIMATE CHANGE
Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ is fighting an invisible battle against the inner Earth, new study finds

(NASA)

West Antarctica is one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth. For evidence, you need look no further than Thwaites Glacier — also known as the “Doomsday Glacier.”

Since the 1980s, Thwaites has lost an estimated 595 billion tons (540 billion metric tons) of ice, single-handedly contributing 4% to the annual global sea-level rise during that time, Live Science previously reported. The glacier’s rate of ice loss has accelerated substantially in the past three decades, partially due to hidden rivers of comparatively warm seawater slicing across the glacier’s underbelly, as well as unmitigated climate change warming the air and the ocean.

Now, new research suggests that the warming ocean and atmosphere aren’t the only factors pushing Thwaites to the brink; the heat of the Earth itself may also be giving West Antarctica’s glaciers a disproportionately nasty kick.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/20)

Why this weekend’s Blue Moon is extra rare (and how to see it)

(Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)

The saying “once in a blue moon” is especially pertinent this week: This Sunday (Aug. 22), the full Sturgeon Moon is expected to impress skygazers, particularly because of its “blue” designation.

Typically, the term “Blue Moon” refers to the second full moon within the same month. The last one rose on Oct. 31, 2020, when an eerie Blue Moon lit up the night sky on Halloween. But there’s a lesser-known definition, dating to 1528, which applies to the third full moon in a season with four full moons, according to NASA.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/20)

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