PBS News, DW History Documentary, TED Talks, The New York Times, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Inspiration Grid

PBS News: February 28, 29 and March 1, 2020, New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank, and In the Age of AI (full film) – FRONTLINE,

DW History Documentary: Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology

TED Talks: Rebecca Knill How technology has changed what it’s like to be deaf?, and Sinead Burke Why design should include everyone

The New York Times: Morning Briefing – March 1, 2020

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 1, 2020

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 1, a look ahead to what’s at stake on Super Tuesday, new concerns over the coronavirus outbreak in Washington, the legacy of photographer Jim Marshall lives on through his iconic imagery, and climate change’s impact on a natural spectacle in California’s Yosemite National Park. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 29, 2020

Feb 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 29, President Trump addresses the first U.S. death from the novel coronavirus, South Carolina’s Democratic presidential primary takes center stage, the U.S. and the Taliban sign a peace agreement, and Venezuela’s second largest city of Maracaibo was once an oil-wealthy playground, now it’s a ghost town. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 28, 2020

Feb 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, global disruption from novel coronavirus increases, as governments and businesses shut down travel and large events. Plus: Renewed fighting between Syria and Turkey, the U.S. and the Taliban prepare to sign a provisional peace deal, South Carolina gets ready to go to the polls, Shields and Brooks analyze the week’s political news and a Dallas choir gives the homeless hope. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How U.S. government should react to virus’ economic impact https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t05u_… A pandemic expert questions speed of U.S. COVID-19 response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQoaL… News Wrap: Appeals court blocks ‘remain in Mexico’ policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NakPJ… As fighting escalates, Idlib’s humanitarian crisis worsens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynSu6… Afghans nurture hope for peace ahead of U.S.-Taliban deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjABT… How SC Democratic voters are weighing 2020 primary choice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brU3-… Shields and Brooks on SC stakes, Trump’s virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6Fz… How Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrKi-… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The fallout from the 2008 global financial crisis revealed that some of the world’s most powerful banks were involved in reckless financial dealings. Germany’s Deutsche Bank took a particularly aggressive approach — the consequences of which are still playing out now, more than a decade later. Paul Solman talks to The New York Times’ David Enrich, who has written a new book on the subject. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In the Age of AI (full film) | FRONTLINE

Dec 2, 2019  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

A documentary exploring how artificial intelligence is changing life as we know it — from jobs to privacy to a growing rivalry between the U.S. and China. FRONTLINE investigates the promise and perils of AI and automation, tracing a new industrial revolution that will reshape and disrupt our world, and allow the emergence of a surveillance society. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #ArtificialIntelligence #Automation #documentary Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category News & Politics

Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology | DW History Documentary

Oct 7, 2018  DW Documentary

Today modern archaeology often works with digital technology. Geophysics has allowed thousands of ancient sites to be located – a huge gain for science. The dig is no longer the be-all and end-all of archeology. We accompany some archeologists on their journey into the virtual past. Geophysics comprises a range of techniques with various geological and military functions. Geomagnetism is used to locate enemy submarines or potential reserves of oil or other minerals. Now, German and Irish archeologists have teamed up to use it to trace prehistoric grave systems. Researchers in western Germany are applying it to locate ancient procession and pilgrimage routes. Shipping archeologists in Bremerhaven are availing of digital technology to create virtual models of shipwrecks and, in Berlin, archeologists and game designers have also embarked on a joint project. As luck would have it, they scanned every millimeter of a temple in the Syrian city of Aleppo, not suspecting that, soon afterwards, the complex would be largely destroyed in the country’s civil war. Their virtual model is evidence that the study of the past can have uses for the present, just as technologies of the present can help us to study the past. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

“Complete silence is very addictive,” says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. “Technology has come so far,” Knill says. “Our mindset just needs to catch up.”

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with Wells Fargo. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rebecca Knill · Writer, business systems consultant manager

A writer and a part-time cyborg, Rebecca Knill embraces the humor in her bionic journey while balancing life as a deaf person with cochlear implants which enable her to hear.

TAKE ACTION  PARTICIPATE

Support Dogs for Better Lives to match assistance dogs with individuals who are Deaf or with hearing loss.

Sinéad Burke is acutely aware of details that are practically invisible to many of us. At 105 centimeters (or 3′ 5″) tall, the designed world — from the height of a lock to the range of available shoe sizes — often inhibits her ability to do things for herself. Here she tells us what it’s like to navigate the world as a little person and asks: “Who are we not designing for?”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sinéad Burke · Writer, educator

Sinéad Burke amplifies voices and instigates curious conversations.

MORE RESOURCES

As Me with Sinéad

Sinéad Burke   Lemonada Media ()

“Poorly designed public toilets aren’t just annoying, they’re dehumanizing”

Sinead Burke discusses the need for more accessible accommodations in public spaces with Quartz.

More at qz.com ?

TAKE ACTION  PARTICIPATE

Donate to Little People of Ireland.

TEDNYC | March 2017

The New York Times Morning Briefing March 1, 2020

Your Weekend Briefing
By Tom Wright-Piersanti and Stephen Reiss
Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.

Grant Hindsley for The New York Times

1. The first known death in the United States from the coronavirus was reported in Kirkland, Wash., near Seattle.
The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there was no evidence that the person had traveled recently or had contact with someone known to have the virus, adding to growing signs that the virus might be spreading in the United States. Above, EvergreenHealth Medical Center, where the patient had been treated.
The number of confirmed cases around the globe passed 85,000 on Saturday, according to a tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University, and more than 2,900 infected people have died. While the virus’s growth appeared to slow in China last week, it was accelerating elsewhere, with many new cases linked to an outbreak in Italy.
How prepared is the U.S. for an outbreak? It’s better positioned than most countries, according to experts, though there could be shortages of ventilators and protective equipment. The most important thing you can do: Wash your hands often.
Sign up for our new coronavirus newsletter, which will have the latest developments and expert advice about prevention and treatment. 2
Continue reading the main story
Maddie McGarvey for The New York Times
2. Joe Biden won the South Carolina primary with 49 percent of the vote,a victory that could provide his candidacy with a much-needed jolt after disappointing results in the earlier contests.
Bernie Sanders finished in a distant second with 20 percent, followed by Tom Steyer, who dropped out of the presidential race on Saturday night. Mr. Steyer, a billionaire hedge fund executive, had spent considerable resources in South Carolina, and had pinned the hopes of his campaign on the state.
Continue reading the main story
He said on Saturday night: “I said that if I didn’t see a path to winning, I would suspend my campaign. And I honestly don’t see a path.”
Pete Buttigieg finished in fourth, and Elizabeth Warren in fifth. See full results here.
South Carolina’s Democrats were the first predominantly black electorate to vote in the race. Many said they were eager to send a message to the Democratic Party: that their views on electability — which candidate is best suited to beat President Trump — would not be shaped by outcomes in overwhelmingly white states like Iowa and New Hampshire.
Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times
3. The U.S. signed a deal with the Taliban on Saturday that laid out a timetable for the final withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, setting the stage to end America’s longest war.
Continue reading the main story
“When historians look back at the moment,” David Sanger writes in an analysis of the news, “they may well conclude that Washington ended up much like other great powers that entered Afghanistan’s rugged mountains and punishing deserts: frustrated, immobilized, no longer willing to bear the huge costs.”
The agreement unlocks a difficult but crucial next step: negotiations between the Taliban and other Afghans, including the government, which the Taliban has refused to recognize. Here are four takeaways.
Aly Song/Reuters
4. Stock markets suffered their worst week since 2008, with the S&P 500 index falling 11.5 percent amid worries that the coronavirus outbreak could become a worldwide pandemic.
The Federal Reserve and other central bankers are poised to respond, suggesting they may cut interest rates as soon as next month. But their efforts may only go so far: Rates are historically low across advanced economies, and it’s doubtful a rate cut can do much to restart production lines hobbled by workers placed in quarantine.
“If a potential coronavirus downturn were a fire,” Neil Irwin writes in The Upshot, “the recession-fighters would be like a fire brigade low on supplies, fighting among themselves, and probably lacking the right chemicals to quench the flames anyway.”
Cengiz Yar for The New York Times
5. For migrants on the Mexican border, Friday was a day of hopes uplifted, and then quickly dashed.
A federal appeals court ruled that the so-called Remain in Mexico policy — which has forced asylum seekers to wait there for months while their cases are reviewed — was legally invalid, leading to cheers and hugs at the Good Samaritan shelter in Ciudad Juárez. But by the end of the day, nothing had changed, as the court stayed the ruling to allow the government time to appeal.
And in Turkey, thousands of migrants trying to reach Europe clashed with riot police on the Greek border on Saturday morning, signaling a new and potentially volatile phase in the migration crisis.
Jessica Pons for The New York Times
6. The country’s richest state doesn’t feel that way.
California’s unaffordability crisis — wide-scale homelessness, poverty and the stress of making ends meet — has emerged as a foundational issue as the state prepares to vote in the Super Tuesday primaries.
Nearly 150,000 homeless people sleep on sidewalks, in alleys, on vacant lots and in vehicles. “I pay the bills and I have nothing extra,” Mark Marquez, above, said.
Esme Gibson
7. In memoriam: Joseph Coulombe, the founder of Trader Joe’s, died Friday at age 89.
In the mid-1960s, when he started the grocery chain, he thought the rise in international travel could lead Americans to be more interested in exotic foods. Soon he was emphasizing organic foods, and had launched Trader Joe’s own label for numerous products, many of them at low prices.
In 2011, he told The Los Angeles Times that he envisioned the stores as being “for overeducated and underpaid people, for all the classical musicians, museum curators, journalists.”
Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times
8. Meet the “dirt spoons” of South Korea.
In Seoul, many of the urban poor live in semi-basements, a reality captured in the Oscar-winning film “Parasite.” Just like in the movie, the elevation of one’s home in the congested city? often reflects wealth and status.
“They keep going higher ?and higher, ?so they won’t have to smell the smell down below,” said a 63-year-old taxi driver. “Those living up there must look down on people like me like pigs.” For more information Please visit the following link: [Message clipped]  View entire message  

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

March 1, 1872
Establishment of Yellowstone as world’s first national park

Yellowstone National Park

NATIONAL PARK, UNITED STATES

WRITTEN BY:   Kenneth Pletcher

LAST UPDATED: Feb 26, 2020 See Article History

Behold Yellowstone's hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal species

Behold Yellowstone’s hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal speciesOverview of Yellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.See all videos for this article

Yellowstone National Park, the oldest, one of the largest, and probably the best-known national park in the United States. It is situated principally in northwestern Wyoming and partly in southern Montana and eastern Idaho and includes the greatest concentration of hydrothermal features in the world. The park was established by the U.S. Congress on March 1, 1872, as the country’s first national park. It is also generally considered to have been the first national park in the world, though some naturalists and others have argued that there is evidence that indicates that the creation of Yellowstone was predated by the creation of Bogd Khan Mountain National Park in Mongolia, which may date from as early as 1778. Yellowstone was designated a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage site in 1978. The park, which forms a squarelike rectangle with an irregular eastern side, is 63 miles (101 km) from north to south and 54 miles (87 km) from east to west at its widest point and covers an area of 3,472 square miles (8,992 square km). The John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway, an 80-mile (130-km) scenic roadway that was established in 1972, connects Yellowstone with Grand Teton National Park to the south. In addition, Yellowstone is surrounded by Gallatin (northwest and north), Custer (northeast), Shoshone (northeast and east), Bridger-Teton (southeast and south), and Caribou-Targhee (southwest) national forests. Headquarters are at Mammoth Hot Springs near the northern entrance to the park.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National ParkYellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States, designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1978.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Natural Environment: Geology

Yellowstone is situated in a region that has been volcanically and seismically active for tens of millions of years. Tectonic movement of the North American Plate has thinned Earth’s crust in the area, forming a hot spot (a place where a dome of magma, or molten rock, comes close to the surface). About 2.1 million years ago a subsurface magma dome that had been building up in the Yellowstone area blew up in one of the world’s most cataclysmic volcanic eruptions. Some 600 cubic miles (2,500 cubic km) of rock and ash were ejected, equivalent to about 6,000 times the amount of volcanic material that was released during the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980. (Observations made in the early 21st century indicated that this single eruption actually consisted of two events about 6,000 years apart: one very large and a second much smaller one. Subsequent massive eruptions occurred about 1,300,000 and 640,000 years ago—the last event (consisting in large part of lava flows) producing about two-fifths as much material as the first one.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

Each of those eruptions caused the magma dome that had built up to collapse as its contents were released, leaving an enormous caldera. The present-day Yellowstone Caldera, the product of the third eruption, is a roughly oval-shaped basin some 30 by 45 miles (50 by 70 km) that occupies the west-central portion of the national park and includes the northern two-thirds of Yellowstone Lake. Two resurgent magma domes—one just north of and the other just west of Yellowstone Lake—have been forming in the caldera, and the western dome underlie many of the park’s best-known hydrothermal features.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

00:4302:38

The Yellowstone region is also extremely active seismically. A network of faults associated with the region’s volcanic history underlies the park’s surface, and the region experiences hundreds of small earthquakes each year. The great majority of those quakes are of magnitude 2.0 or less and are not felt by people in the area, but occasionally a more powerful temblor will strike in the region and have effects in the park. One such event, a deadly quake that struck in 1959 in southern Montana just outside the northwestern corner of the park, affected a number of hydrothermal features in Yellowstone, including its iconic geyserOld Faithful.

Eagle Peak in the Absaroka Range, the highest point in Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.R Lake/U.S. National Park Service

Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Scenics of America/PhotoLink/Getty Images

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, north-central Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© magmarcz/Shutterstock.com

Morning Glory Pool hot spring, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park,

 northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

©Ferenc Cegled(/Shutterstock.com)

Yellowstone National Park: Castle Geyser

Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

©Kenneth Keifer/Fotolia

Travertine terraces at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© Jason Maehl/Shutterstock.com

Grove of aspen trees in autumn, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.S. Gniadik/U.S. National Park Service

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://www.britannica.com/place/Yellowstone-National-Park/Physical-features

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

ARTPHOTOGRAPHY

Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung                                             Published Sep 4, 2019        

Korean artist and photographer ChangKi Chung creates incredible, gravity-defying still life compositions of stacked fruits and vegetables.More art on the grid via Colossal

POSTED BY

IG Team       214

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://theinspirationgrid.com/balancing-act-still-life-photography-by-changki-chung/

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PBS News: November 18-21, 2019, WATCH: Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman’s full questioning of Amb. Marie Yovanovitch, What these young journalists wish they could tell Gwen Ifill, and Australia’s efforts to bring koalas back from the brink of extinction

CBS News: Day 2, Part 6: Five-minute rounds of questioning

TED Talks: Melanie Nezer The fundamental right to seek asylum#t-628392, Cady Coleman What it’s like to live on the international space station?, Benjamin Grant What it feels like to see earth from space , and  Yann Arthus  Bertrand Captures fragile earth in wide angle

Pocket Worthy: James ClearThe Weird Strategy Dr. Seuss Used to Create His Greatest Work  and Andrew MerleWhat to Eat to Live to 100

 Inspiration Grid: Illustration-Posted by IG Team 

PBS NewsHour full episode November 21, 2019,

Nov 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, another packed day of public hearings in the impeachment inquiry, including testimony from Dr. Fiona Hill and David Holmes. Plus: The impeachment inquiry in historical context, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is indicted, the fifth Democratic presidential debate, how two Nobel-winning economists are fighting poverty and high honors in the arts and humanities. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 20, 2019

Nov 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland shares explosive testimony during the fourth day of the impeachment inquiry’s public hearings. Plus: Counselor to President Trump Kellyanne Conway and Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., respond to Sondland’s claims and a preview of the Wednesday night debate among 2020 Democrats. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why Gordon Sondland’s public testimony was ‘extraordinary’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pk69… Conway says ‘there was no pressure applied’ to Ukraine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mR97m… What Rep. Steve Cohen thinks about evidence against Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sADQ… News Wrap: Israel likely to face unprecedented 3rd election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npnk0… Which 2020 Democrats will face new scrutiny in 5th debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRgJe… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Live Episode, Nov. 19, 2019

Streamed live 3 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 18, 2019

Nov 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.48M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, chaos in Hong Kong, as police lay siege to a university campus in which hundreds of protesters are trapped. Plus: A preview of the second week of public impeachment hearings, President Trump’s military pardons, the 2020 Democratic field expands, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, Winslow Homer’s love of the sea and distinguishing between migrant and refugee. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How Beijing might respond to escalating Hong Kong violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RYZm… News Wrap: Iran warns protesters unhappy with gas price hike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVNOz… What we can expect from this week’s impeachment witnesses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErKDD… Trump’s intervention in military legal cases sparks debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hijt… Obama warns 2020 Democrats not to be too ‘revolutionary’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3hzc… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Pete Buttigieg’s surge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9Jru… Winslow Homer’s long love affair with the sea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mCQu… Is the distinction between migrant and refugee meaningful? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlPIz… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

WATCH: Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman’s full questioning of Amb. Marie Yovanovitch

Nov 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Democratic counsel Daniel Goldman questioned Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, on Nov. 15, the second day of public hearings as part of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Goldman asked Yovanovitch for details about what led up to her ousting, which came after Trump’s personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, led a smear campaign against her. “When other countries, other actors in other countries, see that private interests, foreign interest can come together and get a U.S. ambassador removed, what is going to stop them from doing that in the future in other countries?” Yovanovitch testified. The impeachment probe centers around a July phone call in which Trump asked the president of Ukraine to investigate former vice president and 2020 presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. For more on who’s who in the Trump impeachment inquiry, read: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/politics… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Day 2, Part 6: Five-minute rounds of questioning

Nov 15, 2019  CBS News

The second day of public hearings in the House impeachment inquiry included five-minute rounds of questioning by Intelligence Committee members, which they could yield to colleagues. Watch this portion of former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch’s testimony. Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: https://youtube.com/cbsnews Watch CBSN live HERE: https://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7 Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/ Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: https://facebook.com/cbsnews Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: https://twitter.com/cbsnews Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: https://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: https://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! https://bit.ly/1OQA29B — CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.

Category   News & Politics

What these young journalists wish they could tell Gwen Ifill

Nov 14, 2019

PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

It has been three years since the NewsHour family lost dear friend and colleague Gwen Ifill. We think of her all the time, and her loss was felt acutely by young journalists in the NewsHour’s Student Reporting Labs. Four graduates of that program who went on to be Gwen Ifill fellows at their local PBS stations share the letters they wish they could have shared with Gwen. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Australia’s efforts to bring koalas back from the brink of extinction

Nov 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The population of Australia’s iconic koala has been rapidly declining in recent decades, and this year the Australian Koala Foundation declared the marsupials “functionally extinct.” But one Queensland zoo is using proven breeding strategies to protect the animals, and starting a live genome bank to tackle some of the biggest threats to koalas. Special correspondent Kirsty Johansen reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMidAtlantic, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Melanie Nezer · Refugee and immigrants rights attorney

Melanie Nezer is a national leader in efforts to inform and educate individuals, institutions, elected officials and communities about refugees and asylum seekers.

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TEDxMidAtlantic | March 2019

In this quick, fun talk, astronaut Cady Coleman welcomes us aboard the International Space Station, where she spent nearly six months doing experiments that expanded the frontiers of science. Hear what it’s like to fly to work, sleep without gravity and live life hurtling at 17,500 miles per hour around the Earth. “The space station is the place where mission and magic come together,” Coleman says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Cady Coleman · Astronaut

Cady Coleman draws from her time at NASA and her missions on the International Space Station to share insights about team building, leadership and innovation.

TED2019 | April 2019

What the astronauts felt when they saw Earth from space changed them forever. Author and artist Benjamin Grant aims to provoke this same feeling of overwhelming scale and beauty in each of us through a series of stunning satellite images that show the effects human beings are having on the planet. “If we can adopt a more expansive perspective, embrace the truth of what is going on and contemplate the long-term health of our planet, we will create a better, safer and smarter future for our one and only home,” Grant says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxSkoll, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Benjamin Grant · Artist, author

Through his mesmerizing satellite photographs, Benjamin Grant offers us a new way of seeing of our planet and ourselves.

More Resources

Overview: A New Perspective of Earth

Benjamin Grant

Amphoto Books (2016)

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxSkoll | April 2017

In this image-filled talk, Yann Arthus-Bertrand displays his three most recent projects on humanity and our habitat — stunning aerial photographs in his series “The Earth From Above,” personal interviews from around the globe featured in his web project “6 billion Others,” and his soon-to-be-released movie, “Home,” which documents human impact on the environment through breathtaking video.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yann Arthus-Bertrand · Photographer

With photography, Yann Arthus-Bertrand has captured the beauty of the Earth. Through video and film, his latest projects bind together ecology and humanism. For him, it’s all about living together.

TED2009 | February 2009

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-weird-strategy-dr-seuss-used-to-create-his-greatest-work

Pocket Worthy  Stories to fuel your mind.

The Weird Strategy Dr. Seuss Used to Create His Greatest Work

Setting limits for yourself — whether that involves the time you have to work out, the money you have to start a business, or the number of words you can use in a book — often delivers better results than “keeping your options open.”

James Clear

Theodor Geisel. Courtesy of Dr. Seuss Enterprises

In 1960, two men made a bet.

There was only $50 on the line, but millions of people would feel the impact of this little wager.

The first man, Bennett Cerf, was the founder of the publishing firm, Random House. The second man was named Theo Geisel, but you probably know him as Dr. Seuss. Cerf proposed the bet and challenged that Dr. Seuss would not be able to write an entertaining children’s book using only 50 different words.

Dr. Seuss took the bet and won. The result was a little book called Green Eggs and Ham. Since publication, Green Eggs and Ham has sold more than 200 million copies, making it the most popular of Seuss’s works and one of the best-selling children’s books in history.1

At first glance, you might think this was a lucky fluke. A talented author plays a fun game with 50 words and ends up producing a hit. But there is actually more to this story and the lessons in it can help us become more creative and stick to better habits over the long-run.

Here’s what we can learn from Dr. Seuss…

The Power of Constraints

What Dr. Seuss discovered through this little bet was the power of setting constraints.

Setting limits for yourself — whether that involves the time you have to work out, the money you have to start a business, or the number of words you can use in a book — often delivers better results than “keeping your options open.”

In fact, Dr. Seuss found that setting some limits to work within was so useful that he employed this strategy for other books as well. For example, The Cat in the Hat was written using only a first-grade vocabulary list.

In my experience, I’ve seen that constraints can also provide benefits in health, business, and life in general. I’ve noticed two reasons why this occurs.

1. Constraints inspire your creativity.

If you’re five foot five inches tall and you’re playing basketball, you figure out more creative ways to score than the six foot five inch guy.

If you have a one-year-old child that takes up almost every minute of your day, you figure out more creative ways to get some exercise.

If you’re a photographer and you show up to a shoot with just one lens, then you figure out more creative ways to capture the beauty of your subject than you would with all of your gear available.

Limitations drive you to figure out solutions. Your constraints inspire your creativity.

2. Constraints force you to get something done.

Time constraints have forced me to produce some of my best work. This is especially true with my writing. Every Monday and Thursday, I write a new article — even if it’s inconvenient.

This constraint has led me to produce some of my most popular work in unlikely places. When I was sitting in the passenger seat on a road trip through West Virginia, I wrote an article. When I was visiting family for the 4th of July, I wrote an article. When I spent all day flying in and out of airports, I wrote an article.

Without my schedule (the constraint), I would have pushed those articles to a different day. Or never got around to them at all. Constraints force you to get something done and don’t allow you to procrastinate. This is why I believe that professionals set a schedule for their production while amateurs wait until they feel motivated.

What constraints are you setting for yourself? What type of schedule do you have for your goals?

Related note: Sticking to your schedule doesn’t have to be grand or impressive. Just commit to a process you can sustain. And if you have to, reduce the scope.

Constraints are Not the Enemy

So often we spend time complaining about the things that are withheld from us.

  • “I don’t have enough time to work out.”
  • “I don’t have enough money to start a business.”
  • “I can’t eat this food on my diet.”

But constraints are not the enemy. Every artist has a limited set of tools to work with. Every athlete has a limited set of skills to train with. Every entrepreneur has a limited amount of resources to build with. Once you know your constraints, you can start figuring out how to work with them.

The Size of Your Canvas

Dr. Seuss was given 50 words. That was the size of his canvas. His job was to see what kind of picture he could paint with those words.

You and I are given similar constraints in our lives.

You only have 30 minutes to fit a workout into your day? So be it. That’s the size of your canvas. Your job is to see if you can make those 30 minutes a work of art.

You can only spare 15 minutes each day to write? That’s the size of your canvas. Your job is to make each paragraph a work of art.

You only have $100 to start your business? Great. That’s the size of your canvas. Your job is to make each sales call a work of art.

You can only eat whole foods on your diet? That’s the size of your canvas. Your job is to take those ingredients and make each meal a work of art.

There are a lot of authors who would complain about writing a book with only 50 words. But there was one author who decided to take the tools he had available and make a work of art instead.

We all have constraints in our lives. The limitations just determine the size of the canvas you have to work with. What you paint on it is up to you.

More from James Clear

This article was originally published on November 25, 2014, by James Clear, and is republished here with permission.

For more information please visit the following link: //getpocket.com/explore/item/the-weird-strategy-dr-seuss-used-to-create-his-greatest-work

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/what-to-eat-to-live-to-100

Pocket Worthy·  Stories to fuel your mind.

What to Eat to Live to 100

What we can learn from the eating and living habits of the world’s longest-lived people.

Andrew Merle

I aspire to live an incredibly long, happy, and healthy life.

That is why I recently read the The Blue Zones Solution, in which New York Times best-selling author Dan Buettner reveals the eating and living habits of the world’s longest-lived people.

For over a decade, Buettner (along with the National Geographic Society and a team of researchers) studied the 5 locations around the globe that have the highest concentrations of 100-year-olds, as well as exceptionally low rates of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and heart problems.

In the book, Buettner lays out the specifics for each of these “Blue Zones” locations, analyzes the trends, and then prescribes a plan for people looking achieve the same level of health and longevity.

The book is fantastic and I highly recommend it for anyone who is looking to live a longer, happier life. In case you are short on time, I have tried to summarize my main takeaways below.

Note: Most of the book focuses on food because, as Buettner says, “food may be the best starting point for anyone seeking to emulate the health, longevity, and well-being found in the world’s Blue Zones.” But a significant portion of the book is also devoted to other healthy lifestyle habits commonly found in Blue Zones locations, and I have included some of those key behaviors at the end of this post.

According to The Blue Zones Solution:

The best-of-the-best longevity foods are (Include at least 3 of these daily):

  • Beans (black beans, pinto beans, garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, lentils)
  • Greens (spinach, kale, chards, beet tops, fennel tops, collards)
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Nuts (almonds, peanuts, walnuts, sunflower seeds, Brazil nuts, cashews)
  • Olive Oil (green, extra-virgin is best)
  • Oats (slow-cook or Irish steel-cut are best)
  • Barley
  • Fruits (all kinds)
  • Green or Herbal teas
  • Turmeric (spice or tea)

The 4 best beverages are:

  • Water
  • Coffee
  • Green Tea
  • Red Wine (no more than 2 glasses daily)

Foods to Minimize include:

  • Meat (eat meat only 2 times per week or less; meat servings should be 2 oz. cooked or less; fine to eat up to 3 oz. of fish daily)
  • Dairy such as cheese, cream, and butter (limit as much as possible; Goat’s and Sheep’s milk products are ok)
  • Eggs (eat no more than 3 eggs per week)
  • Sugar (limit as much as possible?—?opt for honey and fruit instead)
  • Bread (OK to eat 100% whole wheat and true sourdough bread; look for sprouted grain bread, whole grain rye, or pumpernickel bread)

Foods to Avoid (other than a special treat):

  • Sugary beverages (sodas, boxed juices)
  • Salty snacks (chips, crackers)
  • Processed Meats (sausages, salami, bacon, lunch meats)
  • Packaged sweets (cookies, candy bars)

Food Guidelines to Live By:

  • 95% of your food should be plant-based
  • Eat your largest meal at breakfast, a mid-sized lunch, and small dinner
  • Stop eating when you’re 80% full
  • If you need to snack, make it a piece of fruit or handful of nuts
  • Cook most of your meals at home and eat with friends and family as much as possible

The top longevity foods eaten in each Blue Zone:

Ikaria, Greece:

  • Olive oil
  • Wild Greens
  • Potatoes
  • Legumes (garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, lentils)
  • Feta and Goat Cheese
  • Sourdough bread
  • Lemons
  • Honey
  • Herbal Tea
  • Coffee
  • Wine

Okinawa, Japan:

  • Tofu
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Brown Rice
  • Shiitake Mushrooms
  • Seaweeds
  • Garlic
  • Turmeric
  • Green Tea

Sardinia, Italy:

  • Olive oil
  • Beans
  • Goat’s Milk and Sheep’s Milk (including sharp pecorino cheese)
  • Flat Bread
  • Barley
  • Sourdough Bread
  • Fennel
  • Fava Beans and Chickpeas
  • Potatoes
  • Greens
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Zucchini
  • Cabbage
  • Lemons
  • Almonds
  • Wine

Loma Linda, California:

  • Avocados
  • Salmon
  • Nuts
  • Fruits
  • Beans
  • Water (7 glasses per day)
  • Oatmeal
  • Whole Wheat Bread
  • Soy Milk

Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica:

  • Corn Tortillas
  • Black Beans
  • Squash
  • Papayas
  • Yams
  • Bananas

Blue Zones lifestyle lessons to maximize happiness, health, and longevity:

  • Move daily (e.g. walking or other moderate-intensity activity).
  • Socialize more. Research shows that the happiest people socialize at least 8 hours per day, especially with parents and family.
  • Know what gets you up in the morning. Knowing your sense of purpose, or reason for living, has been shown to add up to 7 years of life expectancy.
  • Have faith. Attending faith-based services (it doesn’t matter what faith) 4 times per month has been shown to add 4–14 years to your life.
  • Committing to a life partner can add up to 3 years of life expectancy.
  • Aim to sleep 8 hours per night for maximum health and longevity.
  • Have sex. 80% of people in Ikaria ages 65–100 are still having sex, and sex has been shown to enhance longevity.

In summary, as noted in the book, “Eat well, stress less, move more, and love more.”

Here’s to a long, happy, healthy, and fulfilling life!

Andrew Merle writes about living well, including good habits for happiness, health, productivity, and success. Subscribe to his e-mail list at andrewmerle.com and follow him on Twitter.

This article was originally published on October 27, 2016, by Andrew Merle, and is republished here with permission.

For more information please visit the following link: getpocket.com/explore/item/what-to-eat-to-live-to-100

https://theinspirationgrid.com/category/illustration/

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