How Drawing Can Set You Free, Artists Shantell Martin & Laolu Senbanjo, TED, Room & Board, RefinedNG and Our Paths to Greatness

How Drawing Can Set You Free, Artists Shantell Martin & Laolu Senbanjo, TED, Room & Board, RefinedNG and Our Paths to Greatness

Culture Type

Known for Her Free-Form Line Drawings, Shantell Martin is Collaborating With the New York City Ballet – Culture Type 

Empire Entertainment

Empire – Shantell Martin’s “Charge Your Self” Exhibition

UTA Artist Space

Shantell Martin – UTA Artist Space

Booooooom

Influential Voices: An Interview with Artist Shantell Martin – BOOOOOOOM! – CREATE * INSPIRE * COMMUNITY * ART * DESIGN * MUSIC * FILM * PHOTO * PROJECTS

New Britain Museum of American Art

NEW/NOW: Shantell Martin | Live Drawing | NBMAA

Whitewall Magazine

Shantell Martin: Albright Knox, Max Mara, and “ ARE YOU YOU? ”

Shantell Martin

Shantell Martin — Work: Charge Yourself

California Home+Design

15 Minutes with Shantell Martin | California Home+Design

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Pin on Shantell Martin stuff

Medium

Shantell Martin. Shantell Martin’s work is a meditation… | by Depict | Moving Art | Medium

  Room & Board

Q&A with Artist Shantell Martin – Room & Board

Shantell Martin is a visual artist based in New York best known for her stream-of-consciousness drawings. Using her simple trademark—black ink and white surfaces—Shantell’s illustrations have transformed everything from walls, found objects, ceramics and sneakers into a visual narrative. Her hand-illustrated bedroom walls appeared on the cover of the New York Times home section in May 2012.

Q&A WITH ARTIST SHANTELL MARTIN

By Room & Board Team | June 23, 2015

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Shantell Martin is a visual artist based in New York best known for her stream-of-consciousness drawings. Using her simple trademark—black ink and white surfaces—Shantell’s illustrations have transformed everything from walls, found objects, ceramics and sneakers into a visual narrative. Her hand-illustrated bedroom walls appeared on the cover of the New York Times home section in May 2012.

Shantell is currently a visiting scholar at MIT Media Lab and an adjunct professor at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. In her spare time, she volunteers with schools and nonprofit organizations. Recently, Shantell teamed up with amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, to help raise awareness and find a cure for HIV/AIDS by designing a limited-edition beach towel. The towel’s bold design features one of her trademark black-and-white illustrations and the inscription, “Be Epic, Cure AIDS.”

Beach towel designed by Shantell Martin

Room & Board has long supported non-profits dedicated to strengthening home and family, as well as organizations that support those living with AIDS and institutions celebrating art and design. When amfAR asked us to donate a (black or white) furniture piece that would be adorned by Shantell and auctioned off for charity, we jumped at the opportunity.

Here are some behind-the-scenes photos of Shantell transforming our Lira leather lounge chair in her Tribeca studio.

This photo courtesy of Rachel Carr

Photo courtesy of Rachel Carr

Photo courtesy of Rachel Carr

The online auction, powered by Artsy, will also feature artworks by Robert Beck, William Eggleston, Steven Klein, Brett Lloyd, David McDermott and Peter McGough, Robert Rauschenberg, Cindy Sherman and Sam Taylor-Johnson. Bidding opened June 16 and closes June 30 at 12 p.m. ET on Artsy.

Shantell’s creation will be on view at the amfAR generationCURE Solstice Auction event tonight at The Hudson Hotel in New York City, where guests may place bids online for the chair along with the other art pieces via Artsy kiosks and mobile phones.

Q&A with Shantell Martin

We took the opportunity to connect with Shantell to learn more about her background, inspiration and drawing process.

Who is Shantell Martin?

Shantell Martin is an interesting character; each day she begins with a series of sneezing. She seems to cope very well at being both a very serious, practical person, while at the same time being a big kid. Never really showing the world when she is extremely excited or disappointed. Shantell loves to learn, to talk with people who know more than she does about pretty much any subject, she is hardworking and kind, sometimes she has more energy than she knows what to do with it and when given the chance will dance around a room to exert some of that extra energy. She is ambitious and loves the idea that we are always growing our capacity to be better kinder human BEings.

When I was six, I thought I would grow up to be a:

It was probably more like nine or ten when I started to think I could grow up to be something and for me that something was a runner or/and a cartoonist, not sure I understood the actual job roll of a cartoonist back then, but I did watch a lot of cartoons, which I thought was more than enough skill needed for the job.

When did you start drawing?

Not sure at what age I started drawing, but I remember being around seven years old when I realized it was a perfect way to escape, to control, to daydream.

Describe your drawing process.

Pretty much no matter what the scale or the surface is I start practically all my drawings with an initial line; I call this line the DNA this is the foundation, the structure, the thread that holds the drawing together. After I’ve drawn the DNA I look for clues in the lines like you would in a crossword puzzle. For example if there is a smooth line that looks like the side of a face I will draw a mouth then a nose and then eyes, if there is a part of the line that looks like land I will draw trees, then the sun and then birds and so on until I get this STOP feeling that tells me that the drawing is complete.

Where do you go for inspiration?

Sometimes I find it odd that we feel we need to go somewhere or do something to be inspired, yes there is definitely inspiration out there in the world, but there is also a lot of inspiration in there too. I like to wonder around my thoughts, my memories, I work on my daily life at being a more understanding, more compassionate, less reactful human being, I try to eat, drink and think well, I try my best at being a better version of me: all which is incredibly hard work, but all that work can help inspire you in your life, with your goals and in your career.

Take us inside your studio space.

You walk in and are hit by how light and bright the space is, you look up to see a large skylight above you, then down, you see a series of black and white objects, art pieces, wall drawings, airplanes, along side light pieces that say things like ARE YOU YOU and YOU ARE WHO. The space makes you feel relaxed and calm, you feel free, you begin to take a second closer look and discover another world, another level of drawings and stories.

Art should be:

A form of understanding, of questioning, of expression, it should be something that is inclusive.

How has your time spent in Japan influenced your art?

Living in Japan mostly influenced me in the sense that it gave me space to feel free, a space to discover more about me. I moved there right after school in 2003 and found myself in a place where for the first time no one knew me, there were no friends or family in sight, no one was projecting on me who they believed me to be and I was not living up to or filling in any roles that have already been carved for out for me. I really had a chance to discover, to learn, to forgive, to grow in Japan, which really fundamentally helped me as an individual.

What do you find most rewarding about your career?

If I were to describe my job, it might look a little like this: Travels around globe, draws on everything, meets amazing people, talks at conferences, teaches at renowned intuitions. Responsibilities: Be you, have fun, be professional, learn a lot, give a lot, don’t forget to love what you do.

Describe your design style.

Super minimal, strong bold lines and shapes.

What won’t we catch you without?

For over 10 years (maybe even longer), I had had a comb hidden in my hair and a pen in my pocket.

My perfect Saturday would include:

I’ve always loved Saturdays. I remember waking up super early as a kid to go watch cartons and eat cereal. Now I still wake up early, but will normally head to the studio early to knock out a bunch of work.

What do you collect?

Now not much, I’ve been working towards the opposite for many, many years. However, if you asked me what I ‘used’ to collect I could be here all day typing a long list of stuff.

What advice would you give struggling artists who believe they are following their calling?

Plan A has to be the same as plan B and C. When you see your friends go off and get good paying jobs, start to buy homes and cars and you’re sleeping on a couch, you have to trust that it will work. You have to also make sure that you not only have the talent you need, but also work on being organized, social, kind, professional. The days where an artist could just make art and be successful are all but gone, now it’s a whole package, a whole list of skill sets you need to require.

Photos by Roy Rochlin, and Rachel Carr 

For more information, please visit the following link: 

https://www.roomandboard.com/blog/2015/06/qa-artist-shantell-martin/

Who are you? To answer this question, artist Shantell Martin followed her pen. In this brilliantly visual talk featuring her signature freestyle line work — drawn across everything from the screens of Times Square to the bodies of New York City Ballet dancers — Martin shares how she found freedom and a new perspective through art. See how drawing can connect your hand to your heart and deepen your connection with the world.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Shantell Martin · Artist

Shantell Martin forges new connections between fine art, education, philosophy and technology to establish an environment that values artists as integral contributors to a healthy society.

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LEARN

Learn how to draw with Shantell Martin.

Learn more ?

TED2020  | May 2020

LAOLU SENBANJO

written by RefinedNG July 6, 2020

LAOLU SENBANJO

“Everything is my canvas” says Laolu Senbanjo also known as Laolu NYC, the Nigerian artist who is putting Yoruba and Nigeria on the Map one canvas at a time. Laolu is a visual artist, musician, a human rights lawyer, and activist. Born and bred in Ilorin, his roots are constantly present in his works from canvas to shoes, to walls and buildings, to clothing and even the body with his Sacred Art of the Ori. Laolu is a graduate of law from the University of Ilorin. 

As a visual artist, Laolu has collaborated with and designed several highly rated celebrities, brands, and products including Nike’s Air Max, Beyoncé’s album Lemonade, the Grammy Museum, Kenneth Cole, Nike, Equinox Fitness, Starbucks, Belvedere, Bvlgari, TED, the Smithsonian Institution and many more.  He has also partnered with Danielle Brooks, Angelique Kidjo, Kenneth Cole, Alicia Keys, Usher, and Lupita Nyongo, as well as features on several international newspapers such as NY Times, Vogue, BBC.

Read Also: DR. OLUROTIMI JOHN BADERO

Laolu Senbanjo created the Afromysterics genre, which means the mystery of the African thought pattern. According to him, every pattern is a storyline with a message in it. Laolu is all about spreading the gospel of his arts and patterns. He is super proud of his Yoruba roots and uses his visuals to demonstrate his journey and worldview.  

Laolu’s art integrates African themes and traditions; he is an advocate of “holding onto your culture and spreading its glory. Thus, he uses charcoal and distinct patterns to create complex, story-rich art designs that draw heavily on his Yoruba heritage and features ancient Nigerian symbols and patterns.

However, as a musician, Laolu draws his inspirations from Fela Kuti, Sade Adu, Bob Marley, and King Sunny Adé. His musical style is enshrined in the traditions of Afrobeat and High Life, mixed with Afro-Soul and Reggae. His music imbibes the Yoruba language and often translates Yoruba folks’ songs, proverbs, and oriki into English. 

Evidently, as an activist and human rights lawyer, Laolu uses art to convey his activism. Prior to converting fully to an artist, he worked as a human rights lawyer for five years, spending his final three years working at the National Human Rights Commission as a senior legal officer focusing on women and children’s rights.

Laolu Senbanjo is an inspiration and we are so proud. Keep rising Laolu. 

#AFROMYSTERICS#ARTS#CULTURE#LAOLUSENBANJO#LAWYERS#MCM#REFINEDNG#REFINEDPERSONALITY

For more information, please visit the following link:                                    https://refinedng.com/laolu-senbanjo/

Interview with Laolu Senbanjo

HOMEPAGE  NEWS  INTERVIEW WITH LAOLU SENBANJO

Laolu Senbanjo was the keynote speaker at the launch and fundraising gala of Our Paths to Greatness on Sunday, May 22, 2016 in Silver spring Civic Center, Silver Spring, Maryland. He inspired the attendees as he spoke about his journey and what kept him going.

Our team interviewed him about his many paths to greatness:

You’re many things – visual artist, musician, human rights lawyer, tell us, who is Laolu Senbanjo?

Laolu is a visual artist, musician, human rights lawyer and activist.  

You decided to move from the corporate/professional world into the arts. Why? What broke the camel’s back?  What made you make take that plunge?  Tell us about that journey.

The journey was a long arduous one.  I never wanted to be a lawyer.  It’s my father’s dream for me…and I did fulfill that dream.  But it was never my dream.  Most days in my office I would spend a significant part of my day drawing at my desk and I always couldn’t wait for the close of work to rush to my gallery to go and paint.  It got to a point eventually where I just couldn’t do it anymore.  It was too hard to share 24 hours with my day job.  So, I left my work as a human rights lawyer, traveled a bit to France, Germany and South Africa for some exhibitions and concerts.  Then I realized if I really was serious, I needed to leave Nigeria to truly explore myself and my Art.  That led me to Brooklyn and I actually flourished artistically, not financially at first but artistically I’ve truly grown and that really helped me.  

You wear many hats, how do you juggle it all? How do you prioritize?
Well, my team helps me a lot.  That is important, to surround yourself with brilliant people.  Also, I just have to prioritize what’s most important to me and to my brand.  

Who and/or what inspired you on your path?

Well, in Nigeria people like Ghariokwu Lemi, Nike Okundaye who are both Artists and thriving and staying true to their Art forms.  Also, I would say in the states, Lupita.  Lupita has really inspired me. Also, there are some individuals in Brooklyn who have inspired me and believed in me
since I set foot in America.  

What in your estimation is the single most important thing every individual needs to possess to succeed in life?

The ability to work hard and believe in yourself.  

What’s in the horizon for you?
A lot actually and it feels amazing to say this.  I have several exhibitions coming up, one on May 31st in Brooklyn.  Also, I am an Art Activist with Amnesty International where I get to merge my Artistic talents and my human rights background into one role.  Also, I have a new album in the works.

What haven’t you done yet that you would like to accomplish?
Do a US music tour.  Have an exhibition at the MoMA.  Get my art into the Louvre.  

What advice can you give the next generation that you wish someone had told you.
Never give up.  If you do work hard, network with people, and really push your dreams, you can accomplish them.  It may not be easy, or fast, but you can accomplish them.

How can people connect with you?

www.instagram.com/laolunyc
www.facebook.com/laolusenbanjo
www.laolu.nyc

Laolu arrived at the event unpretentious and down to earth. He spoke about his upbringing and how his Grandmother influenced his art. His African roots and how they have helped build a niche a him for his in the visual arts market. His journey was not an easy one. From struggling to keep a 9-5 job and then running to work on his art after work, to throwing art exhibitions in Abuja. People would ask him what exactly he was doing but he kept at it. His advice to the guests at the launch was to keep putting out their best work because you never know who is watching. In his case, Beyoncé, Nike and equinox where is work has either been featured or
commissioned. Africa and the world waits in anticipation for greater things from Laolu.

Be inspired to inspire.

For more information, please visit the following link:                    https://ourpathstogreatness.org/interview-with-laolu-senbanjo/

Laolu Senbanjo’s Artworks

Every artist has a name, and every artist has a story. Laolu Senbanjo’s story started in Nigeria, where he was surrounded by the culture and mythology of the Yoruba, and brought him to law school, to New York and eventually to work on Beyoncé’s “Lemonade.” He shares what he calls “The Sacred Art of the Ori,” art that uses skin as canvas and connects artist and muse through mind, body and soul.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Laolu Senbanjo · Artist, musician, lawyer, activist

Laolu Senbanjo’s motto is: “Everything is my canvas.”

TED2017 | April 2017

Comics creator Sam Hester is part of a growing movement within health care: graphic medicine. In short, literally drawing attention to a patient’s needs and goals with pictures to foster better and more accessible caretaking. Hester shares how illustrating small details of her mother’s medical story as she struggled with mysterious symptoms alongside her Parkinson’s and dementia led to more empathy, understanding, communication and peace of mind.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxYYC, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sam Hester · Graphic recorder

A leader in the emerging field of graphic recording, Sam Hester creates visual stories. Her work draws upon deep listening skills, a unique graphic style, a passion for community-building … and a lot of markers.

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LEARN

Learn more about the graphic medicine movement.

Learn more ?

ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxYYC | June 2021

Become a TED Member

Want to hear more great ideas like this one? Sign up for TED Membership to get exclusive access to captivating conversations, engaging events, and more!

Join Now

In an invitation to slow down and look at the world around you, graphic journalist Wendy MacNaughton illustrates how drawing can spark deeply human, authentic connections. Ready to try? Grab a pencil and join MacNaughton for this delightful talk. “Drawing is looking, and looking is loving,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Wendy MacNaughton · Illustrator, graphic journalist

An illustrator and graphic journalist with a background in social work, Wendy MacNaughton believes drawing is an essential tool to help everyone — young and old — slow down, look closely and connect with one another.

TAKE ACTION

LEARN

Learn more about Draw Together, Wendy MacNaughton’s immersive online art class for kids.

Learn more ?

VISIT

Explore Wendy MacNaughton’s website.

TEDMonterey | August 2021

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 16

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao  41, 28 and 27, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“Think of Bangkok as just a gray, concrete jungle? Head over to the historic Bang Rak neighborhood and maybe you’ll think again. Located around the famous Charoen Krung Road and close to the Royal Orchid Sheraton Hotel & Towers, the area has been given a colorful makeover with the BUKRUK Urban Arts Festival earlier this year. This 10-day event saw some of the world’s most talented street artists converge on the city, with numerous building blocks, old houses and walls around the area being transformed into vibrant masterpieces, creating a superb new attraction in Bangkok.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

  Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
“Those traveling to the hotel from the city can catch their first glimpse of the street art next to Saphan Taksin Bridge, the point of transit for many switching from the BTS to river ferry. Look out for the giant duck mural painted on a green background across a giant factory wall. Guests staying at the Royal Orchid Sheraton can use the complimentary boat service from the hotel’s pier to Saphan Taksin (and catch the street art on the way). From there, the BTS Skytrain is just a few steps away, providing quick and easy access to the rest of the city.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“The main collection of street art is best explored on foot; the closest to the Royal Orchid Sheraton can be found just footsteps away from the hotel on Charoen Krung Soi 28, 30 and 32. Start your journey on Soi 28, where you can check out a very Banksy-style mural by Daehyun Kim that appears to look into the side of a building. Hop over to the next alleyway and then onto Soi 32, which is actually where the majority of BUKRUK festival’s artwork can be found. Artists from across Asia and Europe including Bonus TMC, Phai, Lolay, Sabek and Alex Face have all delivered a splash of color, from a cartoon girl holding a rifle, to a mysterious furry creature holding a food basket over its shoulder.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“For those wanting to venture a little further afield, more street art from the same project can be found throughout the Bang Rak and surrounding Talad Noi area, which is packed full of charming shop houses, museums and shrines. Perhaps the most colorful example of the street art here is located north up river from the hotel on Song Wat Road: a bright pink mural covering the entire face of a building.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

Talad Noi also has other examples of older street art created by local artists over the years. The artwork takes on a distinct graffiti style, using physical objects on the street (such as windows, pipes and doors) to complete a more dynamic picture. For example, down the alleyway signposted as ‘Trok San Chao Rong Kueak’ – named of the Chinese temple found here –  you’ll find a traditional long boat painted along the length of a wall in bright red. There are also some cool cartoonish scenes from Thai family culture (including children looking through a window with a cute cat jumping up). A lot of these works are reminiscent to some of the iconic pieces found dotted around the colonial streets of Penang or even Phuket’s old town area.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Aside from the street art, the surrounding Talad Noi area is bursting full of galleries, great if you need a break from the heat on your walking tour. Doubling up as a backpackers’ hostel, Speedy Grandma is a cool space on Charoen Krung 28 showcasing local artists’ work in various forms, while MoST Gallery showcases cutting-edge exhibitions over three floors of an old renovated shop house.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Finally, after a long day’s walking tour of Bang Rak’s cool street art scene, it might be time for a refreshing drink. Guests, as well as outside visitors, are welcome at the Sheraton’s luxurious Lobby Lounge, which serves savory bites, sweets, cocktails and soft drinks throughout the day. If you’re arriving a little earlier, the comfortable lounge space serves up afternoon tea from 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m. daily.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“25 August 2017

Underground – and specifically street art – has emerged in Bangkok as a new and vibrant way for artists to share creativity that often contains social or humorous messages.

Alex Face is a prominent street artist whose signature is the ‘baby face’, which was inspired by his daughter as a new-born. Face uses the baby-face symbol as a way of communicating messages about the future.

“I want to represent humans’ next generation. I make them look worried – they worry about the future”, Face explains to Jason Lai.

Street art is moving from the underground to the mainstream in Bangkok, which has just hosted its first street art festival. But not everyone is convinced.

“There is still this image of coarse work, and art work done by uncommitted artists”, explains Fawalai Sirisomphol, an emerging street artist. “For me, I want to do my best so people will understand that street art is beautiful.”

Jason Lai is a musician and conductor with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra who is exploring the arts and culture of Thailand for this series on BBC World News.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170825-the-street-art-flourishing-in-bangkok

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Art lovers based in Thailand’s cultural stronghold of Bangkok have certainly noticed that there has been a surge of exhibitions featuring work of successful international street artists. Here are some of the best exhibits in Bangkok for viewing the work of street artists from around the world.

Those unfamiliar with street art might have gotten their first taste at the first international street art festival in Thailand, which takes place in Bangkok every year. BUKRUK, which translates to ‘invasion’, started as a collaboration between 11 Thai and 16 European street artists. The festival was organized by Toot Yung Gallery, Nemo Studio and BKK Arthouse with exhibition areas including the Bangkok Art and Cultural Center and walls around the city center.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Two well-known street artists attended the festival—Patcharapol Tangruen aka ALEX FACE and Danaiphat Lersputtitrakan aka BON. Both have already received international attention for their work, including a successful exhibit at the Frieze London Art Fair in 2013. In addition to showing in London, ALEX FACE has also presented his iconic three-eyed bunny ‘Mardi’ (said to be inspired by his daughter) in Korea and Taiwan.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“ALEX FACE actually studied architecture, but realized he could interact with the public more directly through graffiti. His pieces attempt to express frustration with local problems. Similarly, BON gives attention to a changing society and refers to social and cultural problems with his colorful characters. After his graduation in 2005 his reputation has grown and culminated in his first solo show at the Soy Sauce Factory in Bangkok’s Chinatown. He prepared for the exhibition for two years, creating canvases, installations, etchings and sculptures, transforming street art into work fit for a gallery.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another iconic symbol that can be found on walls in Bangkok is the bear of prominent Thai artist known as BONUS TMC. The artist also recently had his first solo exhibition, titled ‘Animal Planet’ at Goja Gallery. In the Phra Khanong area, an area of Bangkok that’s becoming more artsy by the day, visitors can easily spot BONUS’s work on the street and in galleries. In W District, the reopened Hof Art Space welcomes you with an exhibition showing pieces by Thai and international artists.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“As well as these three renowned Thai artists, there are also international tracks on the city walls. The three French artists that make up BIRDY KIDS have just brought their characteristic paintings in an exhibition at the Badmotel. Another graffiti artist, A.EM., made up of graphic designer Guillaume and print expert Gautier have spread their iconic bird design with several techniques such as graffiti, collage and serigraphy around the world.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another collaboration of street artists is the Japanese duo DOPPEL. Kohei Yamao aka BAKIBAKI, who is renowned for his traditional Japanese hemp patterns, joined forces with Kontaro OOyama aka MON in 2001. Together they have shown their murals in an exhibition and at least one of their street paintings in Bangkok as they’ve done previously in Japan and locations in Southeast Asia.

This a testament to the idea that street art can connect people with their surroundings, a notion that will continue to inspire galleries around the world.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Bangkok recently hosted their first Street Art Festival, inviting artists from around the world to join the best Thai talent to leave their colourful messages around town. Not everyone likes graffiti, but this is a popular art open to everyone and there is no doubt those artists are extremely talented. Unlike museums, street art is visible to everyone, everyday and are here to stay – as long as the old walls used as canvas are left standing. As construction claims more and more of Bangkok, this artwork will one day disappear, but for now it is here to enjoy. During our exploration of Bangkok, we have found several locations exhibiting these oversized painting. The best known set is next to Ratchatewi BTS Station, not far from MBK, and some other artworks are painted along the nearby canal. Another beautiful set is found at the Alliance Française on Sathorn Road.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Exhibition at Alliance Francaise on Sathorn The Street Art Exhibition of Thai artist Alex Face (Patcharapol Tangruen) and French Jace at Alliance Française on Sathorn Road is as discreet as it is unusual. The Alliance Française building has been on Sathorn for ages, since 1912 to be precise, but the Alliance Française (as well as the old French Embassy on the riverside) is due to move to a brand new building currently under construction near Lumpini park. All this explains why the exhibition is unusual and creative… an entire floor of the building has been emptied of all desks, filing cabinets and furniture, and every room has been offered to the two artists to express themselves. Indoor street art inside the abandoned floor of an official building with pieces of discarded desks left in dusty corners? It is beautiful and a bit eerie! Entry is free so you should rush to enjoy this before the Alliance Française moves to its new location and the building torn down. Opening Hours: Closed on Sunday Location: 29 Sathorn Road (next to Banyan Tree Hotel)”
For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Bukruk Festival on Phaya Thai Road Bukruk Street Festival (Bukruk meaning ‘Invasion’) united 16 European and 11 Thai artists for a month of frenzy wall art in the very middle of Bangkok. The most striking pieces are painted on a series of abandoned buildings located on Phaya Thai Road, below Ratchatewi BTS station, just a hundred meters from the famous MBK shopping mall. Here again famous Thai artist Alex Face strikes back, with his ‘rabbit falling from the roof’ and a giant mutated fly by Yuree Kensaku, a hairy one eye monster by Pharuephon Mukdasanit, known as Mamafaka, next to a psychedelic dog by Thai artist P7. More murals can be seen along the nearby Saen Saeb canal, in Siam Square or on Rama 6 Road, past the famous Jim Thompson house. The whole thing is extraordinary and proves that Bangkok too contributes to the comtemporary art scene.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise, the very successful interactive attraction which started in Pattaya, is now open at Esplanade Shopping Mall on Ratchada road. Also refered by locals as the Trickeye Museum or 3D Museum, Art in Paradise is great fun for couples, friends and families to spend a few hilarious hours, especially on rainy days. Esplanade Mall is located on the outskirts of Bangkok, but the MRT station is right in front of the mall. Located on the 4th floor of the rather quiet mall, the new 3D Art in Paradise is a shiny and spotless 2 storey gallery packed with superbly executed paintings in which visitors are invited to be part of dozens of scenes ranging from ‘stairway to hell’, ‘ride a flying carpet’ to the ‘Coronation of the Emperor’.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise: Distributed in several large rooms, the artwork done by the artists is really impressive and just admiring it is part of the pleasure of visiting. It’s a bit overwhelming at first to see so many intricate scenes in each room with people everywhere trying to find the best or the silliest pose, but soon the game captures you and you will find yourself trying to strike a pose on a surfboard or above a fictional abyss. To help the visitors, markers with arrows have been placed on the floor to indicate the best angle, and if you look in some hard to find corners, you’ll find photos taken by previous visitors that will help you understand which pose works best with each scene.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise: Walking around the rooms of Art in Paradise and finding the right pose takes 2 to 3 hours depending on how much fun you are having and how many friends are with you. There is no particular order to go around and take your photos, there are so many scenes to interact with you can go back and forth as you please, especially when someone monopolizes the scene you really want to be in. Trying to describe all the scene depicted in the gallery would spoil the fun, just know that they are different from the ones displayed in the Pattaya gallery.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

“Art in Paradise: Benefiting from their experience with previous museums, the Korean artists of Art in Paradise did an amazing job at maximising the space and rendering scenes using floor and walls, allowing you to literally step into a frame. On the downside, the protecting varnish used to coat the paintings is so glossy, it reflects everything, lights and people, partly spoiling the effect. For instance if you are walking a (virtual) rickety bridge above an abyss, you shouldn’t see your reflection into the abyss… but you do. Note also the you will need to deposit your shoes at the entrance and pick them up on the way back, tripods are also allowed in the gallery so everyone can be happily part of the frame!
Art in Paradise Bangkok Opening Hours: 10:00 – 22:00 (Ticket Booth closes at 21:00) Location: Esplanade Shopping Mall, 4th floor Address: Ratchadapisek Road, Din Daeng,Din Daeng, Bangkok, Thailand 10400 Tel: +66 2 660 9130 Price Range: 300 baht for adults, 200 for children”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

 “MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

 “Where to find street art in Bangkok

In Street Art, Thailand by Jaclynn SeahMarch 12, 2017

Bangkok is a gritty urban city, and while most visitors are happy to hang out in their myriad markets or shopping malls, many of its little alleyways hide some interesting street art which I had the pleasure of uncovering. I’ve been to Bangkok many times – its proximity to Singapore makes it one of the best weekend trip options – but all I’ve done is mostly shopping and eating – this was the first time I went hunting for street art in Bangkok and I found a surprising number of artworks.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theoccasionaltraveller.com/street-art-bangkok/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Spots to find Street Art in Bangkok

RATCHATEWI

This area is not far from Central World mall and easily accessed by BTS – the Ratchatewi station is closest although National Stadium BTS is also fairly near.

BANGRAK

Many of the works from the Bukruk Urban Art Festival 2016 which brought in many foreign street artists can be found here. This stretch is found along the Chao Phraya River between Saphan Taksin and Hua Lamphong BTS stations.

TALAT NOI / CHINATOWN

This area is near the Chinatown and quite a lot more industrial. You’ll find yourself walking by scrap metal shops but look out for interesting art in random alleys.

Chalerma park

Chalerma is a park and playground covered with murals and graffiti and popular among the hipster crowd for getting their OOTD shots. Make sure to check out the tiny lanes in the surrounding area – it’s a small bustling local community and you’ll see some works on the walls amidst people going about their daily lives.

Getting there: exit Ratchatewi BTS station in the direction of VIE hotel. This little park can be seen along the main Phaya Thai road – the entrance is on Si Sirut or Petchaburi 18 Allery just off Phaya Thai.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theoccasionaltraveller.com/street-art-bangkok/

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Peace Comes To Astoria, Street Art Queens, New York City, New York

 

Peace Comes To Astoria, Street Art

Murals and Surrounding Astoria Neighborhood

 Queens, New York City, New York

On Sunday, June 26, 2016

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Happy 4th of July everyone 🙂 🙂 🙂

John and I went to Astoria, Queens, NYC, New York on the previous Sunday, June 26, 2016 to view the latest murals.  We enjoyed walking about seeing murals on 30 Street, 12 Street and Welling Court by Astoria Boulevard.  I was very happy to see some artists produced Peace artwork.  We arrived about 2 P.M., the sun was very hot.  We cannot see the pictures on our equipment screens that well.  I tried my best to capture the murals that we viewed    We only viewed a small part of murals. We decided to return home and will come back again to view more murals in different areas. 

There were some people taking pictures of the murals.

 

I intended to walk across the street to view the murals on the other side of the road but I noticed the reflection of part of the mural with the peace sign artwork on the car window.  I realized that there is another mural on a wall inside of a gated property. 

I came back and tried to photograph the mural.  I could not capture the mural in full view because of the gate blocking it. 

Luckily my cheap camcorder is small enough to go through the space between the gate bars.  I tried my best to capture the whole image.  But I only got part of the mural.

I was glad I was able to at least capture the full peace sign.

Thanks to the artist who produced this peace mural.  I wish I could have gotten his or her full name.

These murals are on the opposite side of the street from the peace murals that I have shown above.

A group of tourists came to view the murals.  Thanks to all the artists who produced the artworks.  I love graffiti or street art because most of the artists wish to convey their thought and express them in a form of artwork in public for other people to view, to feel, and to think, no matter if you agree or disagree.  But the artists activate people’s brains to think.  Sometimes this may tickle the conscious of the viewer to absorb more information from the artwork.  Most graffiti or street art subjects are expressions of a present time which one can use as a chronicle of history in this specific time and place.  Eventually these artworks or murals will be gone if they are in the changing hands of property owners who want to demolish properties for other business ventures.

John pointed out to the lady photographer that the damaged car is a useful object to compose a photo looking through the mangled window to view the painted fire hydrant.

I will post John’s photographs in the next project.  It is interesting to see the difference in composition of individual photographers traveling  the same path.

This person seemed to be interested in taking photos of the remains of the crashed vehicle.  I felt sad to see the result of such a tragedy.  I hope the person or persons in the car survived.

This person is very smart; he used his bike to ride to more places to view murals.  He could travel longer distances, and be less tired compared to traveling by walking.

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