PBS News, TED Talks, Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy, Talltanic, Thisiscolossal, United Nations and Guardian News

PBS News: September24-28, 2019 and Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?,

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires,

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

TED Talks: Patrick Chappatte the power of cartoons, and A free world needs satire,  Kristie  Ebi How climate change could make our food less nutritious?

Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy:  AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

 Talltanic: 16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

The Secrets of Nature: The Black Mountain

Thisiscolossal: Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman, and The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

United Nations and  Guardian News: Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 28, 2019

•Sep 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour  

On this edition for Saturday, September 28, the latest on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, and low turnout as Afghans vote in the presidential election amid Taliban violence. Also, a look at the underlying issues of U.S.-China trade relations. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 27, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, new details emerge about President Trump’s controversial phone call with Ukraine’s president and how the White House tried to suppress it. Plus: A historic Chinese infrastructure campaign builds the country’s global influence, courting black voters in South Carolina, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and a new film on the tragic life of Judy Garland. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why House is moving so quickly on Trump impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrKMt… News Wrap: House votes to end Trump’s border emergency https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxCpK… How huge Belt and Road project is building Chinese influence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xl_kw… How South Carolina’s black voters feel about 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHxxr… Shields and Brooks on the politics of impeachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kPVN… How ‘Judy’ captures the triumph and tragedy of Judy Garland https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta2_U…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYzrHbS7Kd0

PBS NewsHour full episode September 26, 2019

Sep 26, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new details of the whistleblower complaint involving President Trump’s interactions with a foreign leader further roil Capitol Hill. Plus: Reaction to the allegations of presidential misconduct from Rep. Adam Schiff and Kellyanne Conway, legal and political analysis of the incident, the growing power of Chinese President Xi Jinping and a look at South Korean politics. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 25, 2019

Sep 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the White House releases a memo of the call between President Trump and the Ukranian president, now at the heart of the impeachment investigation. Also: the staggering damage of climate change on the world’s oceans, struggles to root out Taliban fighters in Afghanistan, plus a look at the power and prosperity of modern China. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What lawmakers learned from Trump’s Ukraine call memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k8vw… How DOJ is involved in the whistleblower complaint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf7ZT… Murphy: Trump’s call underscores need for House inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPWTv… How a president’s call to a foreign leader becomes a memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWxIR… News Wrap: Rouhani calls U.S. sanctions ‘economic terrorism’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7vPl… Future of ocean life is bleak if we don’t cut emissions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt22B… Afghan forces constantly fighting to root out Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mgin… POWER AND PROSPERITY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAiH5…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 24, 2019

Published on Sep 24, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s actions with Ukraine. Also: Trump’s address at the United Nations, what’s next in the Brexit saga, a survivor of sexual assault reclaims her voice, Ta-Nehisi Coates on his first novel and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Impeachment calls grow as Trump defends withholding aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0qRT… Spanberger: ‘So many troubling threads’ in Trump allegations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sc-4N… Harris: Releasing Trump call transcript ‘right thing to do’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XijaU… What spurred House Democrats to ramp up impeachment efforts? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ORqv… News Wrap: Tropical Storm Karen soaks U.S. Virgin Islands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzhLJ… Trump denounces globalism, calls out China on trade at UN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViU6E… UK court ruling leaves Johnson with fewer options on Brexit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-oEJ… How Chanel Miller took her story back https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpQUC… In Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new novel, memory is a superpower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuq6O… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

1.38M subscribers

Young leaders gathered on Saturday at the United Nations for the Youth Climate Summit, where they voiced concerns and offered solutions for a warming planet, a day after millions of young people participated in a global climate strike. Megan Thompson spoke with producer Maya Navon and associate producer Nina Joung, who covered the strike in New York City for WNET’s Peril and Promise initiative

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Fires have destroyed millions of acres of rainforest in the Amazon and in portions of Indonesia in recent months. This week, an international coalition of indigenous leaders met in New York during the United Nations climate summit to call attention to the destruction of their land, confront climate change and ask for increased protections for the environment. Megan Thompson reports.

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

•Published on Sep 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

In cities across the globe on Friday, protesters took to the streets to demand action on climate change. The demonstrations, easily the largest to focus on climate, represent a movement driven largely by young people — many of whom left school to join the walkout. William Brangham spoke to several participants about their mission to reduce fossil fuel emissions and how they plan to execute it. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In a series of witty punchlines, Patrick Chappatte makes a poignant case for the power of the humble cartoon. His projects in Lebanon, West Africa and Gaza show how, in the right hands, the pencil can illuminate serious issues and bring the most unlikely people together.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

Rising carbon levels in the atmosphere can make plants grow faster, but there’s another hidden consequence: they rob plants of the nutrients and vitamins we need to survive. In a talk about global food security, epidemiologist Kristie Ebi explores the potentially massive health consequences of this growing nutrition crisis — and explores the steps we can take to ensure all people have access to safe, healthy food.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kristie Ebi · Public health researcher

At the Center for Health and the Global Environment, Kristie Ebi studies and develops interventions to help at-risk populations deal with climate change.

AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

Jul 18, 2019  Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy

Documentary on Hummingbirds what everyone should know, how they live, feed with simple recipe that can bring 100’s to a garden, and what they need to survive their new city world. I now buy large bags of Pure White Cane granulated sugar so they can live and raised their chicks and know they can be supplement to many can stay strong to survive their tough environment. These are the smartest birds, I do believe, they know who feeds them, they know who is helping them. ENJOY my thoughts and Story. Mom Nest on my Window on hummingbird Feeder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mmCr… More on Hummingbirds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNEmj…

Category   Education

16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

Nov 4, 2016  Talltanic

Amazing and bizarre looking animals and creatures you need to know about from the strange scorpion fly to the endangered dhole. Subscribe to Talltanic https://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9. The Raccoon Dog No, these dogs aren’t related to raccoons but they do happen to get their name for looking like a close relative of those little-masked bandits. Raccoon dogs are native to the Eastern region of Asia but are considered to be an invasive species ever since they were introduced into the local area. What’s interesting to note is that these dogs often climb trees, unlike most wild canids with the exception of the North American gray fox. The selling of their fur by retail companies has been the center of many scandals. 8. The Dhole The endangered canid can be found living in the regions of South, Central, and Southeast Asia. Here, they face the threat of habitat loss, persecution, and must compete against other animals such as tigers and leopards for food sources. They’re known to hunt in packs during the day and live in social packs that contain a hierarchy built on dominance. Unlike most domestic animals, the Dhole has been deemed as completely untameable due to their shy and vicious nature. 7. The Geoduck This is a geoduck but you probably recognize it as just an ordinary old clam. These saltwater clams are found throughout the west coast of North America and are edible. The most interesting thing about these animals is their very long siphons that can grow to be almost 3.5 inches long by themselves. Not only that, but this is the largest burrowing clam in the world that can live up to 140 years old, making it one of the longest-living creatures to ever exist. The oldest geoduck on record was recorded at being 168-years-old. 6. The Giant Isopod These nightmare inducing crustaceans dwell in the cold deep waters of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans. They closely resemble pillbugs, although, that’s not much of a surprise as they are related to them. They were first described back in 1879 which means that they’ve been known to the public for quite some time now. B. giganteus is capable of reaching between 7.5 to 14.2 inches! 5. A Deformed Chital Deer This might look like a strange new species of deer but no it’s just a regular deer. What makes it look peculiar are its tines. Normally, they’re supposed to form upwards but it isn’t uncommon to come across a deer with downward growing tines. The possible reason for this to occur is most likely due to injury. The deer possibly hit its antlers on a tree while they were growing and caused a blood vessel to either rupture or clot. Thus, the flow of blood gets disrupted and must find a new path to flow. 4. The Cassowary This flightless bird can be found living in the tropical forests of northeastern Australia and New Guinea. They live off a diet of mostly fruit, however, they’re considered to be omnivorous and will feed on smaller animals. Typically, the cassowary is a very shy animal but you do not want to get these birds angry. They’re able to inflict heavy damage by using their massive claws and can produce fatal injuries in humans and dogs. 3. The Lowland Streaked Tenrec This small mammal can be found living only on the island of Madagascar where its conservation status is currently classified as being Least Concerned. These little critters only grow to be around 7 ounces and come equipped with barbed quills on their body. This helps them defend against predators such as the fossa and the Malagasy mongoose. These are the only mammals that use stridulation to create sound, which is most commonly used by snakes and insects. 2. The Scorpion Fly These insects are known as Mecoptera and are referred to as scorpionflies because of their resemblance to a scorpion. The “stinger” that you see isn’t really the fly’s tail but rather only a trait that the males possess because it’s actually their enlarged genitalia. Scorpionflies are known to feed on dead organisms and live inside the bodies of dead humans, however, the body must be fresh in order to sustain the proper living conditions. 1. The Ant-Mimicking Treehopper You’re probably looking at this and wondering “what even is this thing?” Well, given the title of ant-mimicking treehopper you can pretty much guess that this isn’t actually a real ant. No, Cyphonia clavata here is specially designed by evolution to only appear as a ant, much like how other insects and spiders do. The black “ant” part of the treehopper is really just a bunch extension growths from its body. If you look closely you’ll see that the creature’s eye is is the circular shape located towards the brown area near its legs. The reason the “ant” is positioned backwards is because when ants are in defense mode they move backwards, so when the treehopper moves forwards that’s the illusion it creates.

Category   Pets & Animals

The Black Mountain – The Secrets of Nature

Feb 3, 2015  The Secrets of Nature

Subscribe to watch full natural history documentaries! A new documentary is uploaded every week. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesecretsof… Twitter: https://twitter.com/NatureUniversum When cloud banks swallow the rock and make valleys disappear, the sky draws menacingly close. Then, the sun tears away that curtain and jagged rocks appear, an iron cross gracing their peak. This is the eastern Alps most impressive summit and Austria’s highest peak – the Grossglockner, the ”Black Mountain”. Climbing three thousand seven hundred and ninety eight meters, Mount Grossglockner – the fateful summit of early mountaineers, towers above the Tauern massif like a sentinel over an Alpine paradise of nature. Ibex and chamois climb the rocks, Alpine flowers glow in the sun and golden eagles glide over the mountain peaks.

Category   Travel & Events

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017  Kate Sierzputowski

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4? (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84? x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50? x 75?, 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2016

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2017

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84? x 144?, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44? x 60?, 2015

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72? x 72?, 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2? (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90”, 2017

Enormous Panels of Patchworked Fabric Give Colorful Temporary Makeovers to Public Buildings

September 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Textile artist Amanda Browder collaborates with the communities she’s working in to built site-specific architectural interventions. Using hundreds of yards of donated fabric with bright colors and patterns, Browder and her volunteer teams stitch together enormous panels that resemble crazy quilts. The panels wrap around bell towers, sheath elevated walkways, and drape from gables and eaves to give passersby a new experience of familiar buildings. In a statement on her website, Browder describes her work:

A state of betweenness – ‘twixt soft sculpture /’tween orchestrated public object installation with a studio affinity for abstraction and minimalism”. I am in love with the transformative nature of materials, and how the combination of the familiar creates abstract relationships about place. This relational objectivity generates an open-ended narrative, ambiguous situations defined by the choice of materials and work ethic. Central to the psychedelic experience, I am drawn to reinventing Pop-Art colors by exploring shifts in scale and sculptural perceptions.

The Montana-born artist received a B.A. in studio arts as well as two master’s degrees in sculpture and installation art. Browder is now based in Brooklyn and frequently travels to create new work. She was recently awarded an opportunity with the prestigious ArtPrize organization in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The multi-part work, titled Kaleidoscopic, is currently on view at locations around Grand Rapids. Keep up with Browder’s projects on Instagram, and watch the video below for a time-lapse of a previous installation in Las Vegas and an interview with the artist.

Photo: Bryan Esler

Photo: Bryan Esler

The Hummingbird Whisperer

•Published on Dec 12, 2016 

The Hummingbird Whisperer

 Near the UCLA Court of Sciences, there is a wing-flapping, darting, squeaking colony of 200-plus birds that make their home around the campus office of the “hummingbird whisperer,” as Melanie Barboni is sometimes called. For the full story https://ucla.in/2hqzz4R

Category   Education

The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

September 4, 2017  Christopher Jobson

Photographer Melanie Barboni is an assistant researcher at UCLA’s Earth, Planetary and Space Science Program where she installed a hummingbird feeder outside her office window in hopes of seeing the elusive birds and maybe snapping a photo. Two years and several feeders later, she estimates there are over 200 birds that now stop by her window every day, over 50 of which she’s bestowed with names because she can recognize them on sight. Barboni was raised in Switzerland where hummingbirds are practically non-existent and she only read about them in books. She likens the view from her office at UCLA as a dream come true, a place that she’s referred to as The Hummingbird Whisperer. (via Laughing Squid)

 Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Sep 23, 2019  Guardian News

‘You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,’ climate activist Greta Thunberg has told world leaders at the 2019 UN climate action summit in New York. In an emotionally charged speech, she accused them of ignoring the science behind the climate crisis, saying: ‘We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth – how dare you!’ Subscribe to Guardian News on YouTube ? https://bit.ly/guardianwiressub The climate and the cross: the battle between evangelical Christians in the US ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsUlV… UN secretary general hails ‘turning point’ in climate crisis fight ? https://www.theguardian.com/world/201… Support the Guardian ? https://support.theguardian.com/contr… Today in Focus podcast ? https://www.theguardian.com/news/seri… The Guardian YouTube network: The Guardian ? https://www.youtube.com/theguardian Owen Jones talks ? https://bit.ly/subsowenjones Guardian Football ? https://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Sport ? https://bit.ly/GDNsport Guardian Culture ? https://is.gd/guardianculture

Category  News & Politics

Go to the top