PBS News, TED Talks, Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy, Talltanic, Thisiscolossal, United Nations and Guardian News

PBS News: September24-28, 2019 and Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?,

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires,

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

TED Talks: Patrick Chappatte the power of cartoons, and A free world needs satire,  Kristie  Ebi How climate change could make our food less nutritious?

Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy:  AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

 Talltanic: 16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

The Secrets of Nature: The Black Mountain

Thisiscolossal: Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman, and The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

United Nations and  Guardian News: Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 28, 2019

•Sep 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour  

On this edition for Saturday, September 28, the latest on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, and low turnout as Afghans vote in the presidential election amid Taliban violence. Also, a look at the underlying issues of U.S.-China trade relations. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 27, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, new details emerge about President Trump’s controversial phone call with Ukraine’s president and how the White House tried to suppress it. Plus: A historic Chinese infrastructure campaign builds the country’s global influence, courting black voters in South Carolina, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and a new film on the tragic life of Judy Garland. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why House is moving so quickly on Trump impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrKMt… News Wrap: House votes to end Trump’s border emergency https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxCpK… How huge Belt and Road project is building Chinese influence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xl_kw… How South Carolina’s black voters feel about 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHxxr… Shields and Brooks on the politics of impeachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kPVN… How ‘Judy’ captures the triumph and tragedy of Judy Garland https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta2_U…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYzrHbS7Kd0

PBS NewsHour full episode September 26, 2019

Sep 26, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new details of the whistleblower complaint involving President Trump’s interactions with a foreign leader further roil Capitol Hill. Plus: Reaction to the allegations of presidential misconduct from Rep. Adam Schiff and Kellyanne Conway, legal and political analysis of the incident, the growing power of Chinese President Xi Jinping and a look at South Korean politics. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 25, 2019

Sep 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the White House releases a memo of the call between President Trump and the Ukranian president, now at the heart of the impeachment investigation. Also: the staggering damage of climate change on the world’s oceans, struggles to root out Taliban fighters in Afghanistan, plus a look at the power and prosperity of modern China. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What lawmakers learned from Trump’s Ukraine call memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k8vw… How DOJ is involved in the whistleblower complaint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf7ZT… Murphy: Trump’s call underscores need for House inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPWTv… How a president’s call to a foreign leader becomes a memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWxIR… News Wrap: Rouhani calls U.S. sanctions ‘economic terrorism’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7vPl… Future of ocean life is bleak if we don’t cut emissions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt22B… Afghan forces constantly fighting to root out Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mgin… POWER AND PROSPERITY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAiH5…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 24, 2019

Published on Sep 24, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s actions with Ukraine. Also: Trump’s address at the United Nations, what’s next in the Brexit saga, a survivor of sexual assault reclaims her voice, Ta-Nehisi Coates on his first novel and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Impeachment calls grow as Trump defends withholding aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0qRT… Spanberger: ‘So many troubling threads’ in Trump allegations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sc-4N… Harris: Releasing Trump call transcript ‘right thing to do’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XijaU… What spurred House Democrats to ramp up impeachment efforts? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ORqv… News Wrap: Tropical Storm Karen soaks U.S. Virgin Islands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzhLJ… Trump denounces globalism, calls out China on trade at UN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViU6E… UK court ruling leaves Johnson with fewer options on Brexit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-oEJ… How Chanel Miller took her story back https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpQUC… In Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new novel, memory is a superpower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuq6O… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

1.38M subscribers

Young leaders gathered on Saturday at the United Nations for the Youth Climate Summit, where they voiced concerns and offered solutions for a warming planet, a day after millions of young people participated in a global climate strike. Megan Thompson spoke with producer Maya Navon and associate producer Nina Joung, who covered the strike in New York City for WNET’s Peril and Promise initiative

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Fires have destroyed millions of acres of rainforest in the Amazon and in portions of Indonesia in recent months. This week, an international coalition of indigenous leaders met in New York during the United Nations climate summit to call attention to the destruction of their land, confront climate change and ask for increased protections for the environment. Megan Thompson reports.

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

•Published on Sep 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

In cities across the globe on Friday, protesters took to the streets to demand action on climate change. The demonstrations, easily the largest to focus on climate, represent a movement driven largely by young people — many of whom left school to join the walkout. William Brangham spoke to several participants about their mission to reduce fossil fuel emissions and how they plan to execute it. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In a series of witty punchlines, Patrick Chappatte makes a poignant case for the power of the humble cartoon. His projects in Lebanon, West Africa and Gaza show how, in the right hands, the pencil can illuminate serious issues and bring the most unlikely people together.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

Rising carbon levels in the atmosphere can make plants grow faster, but there’s another hidden consequence: they rob plants of the nutrients and vitamins we need to survive. In a talk about global food security, epidemiologist Kristie Ebi explores the potentially massive health consequences of this growing nutrition crisis — and explores the steps we can take to ensure all people have access to safe, healthy food.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kristie Ebi · Public health researcher

At the Center for Health and the Global Environment, Kristie Ebi studies and develops interventions to help at-risk populations deal with climate change.

AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

Jul 18, 2019  Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy

Documentary on Hummingbirds what everyone should know, how they live, feed with simple recipe that can bring 100’s to a garden, and what they need to survive their new city world. I now buy large bags of Pure White Cane granulated sugar so they can live and raised their chicks and know they can be supplement to many can stay strong to survive their tough environment. These are the smartest birds, I do believe, they know who feeds them, they know who is helping them. ENJOY my thoughts and Story. Mom Nest on my Window on hummingbird Feeder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mmCr… More on Hummingbirds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNEmj…

Category   Education

16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

Nov 4, 2016  Talltanic

Amazing and bizarre looking animals and creatures you need to know about from the strange scorpion fly to the endangered dhole. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9. The Raccoon Dog No, these dogs aren’t related to raccoons but they do happen to get their name for looking like a close relative of those little-masked bandits. Raccoon dogs are native to the Eastern region of Asia but are considered to be an invasive species ever since they were introduced into the local area. What’s interesting to note is that these dogs often climb trees, unlike most wild canids with the exception of the North American gray fox. The selling of their fur by retail companies has been the center of many scandals. 8. The Dhole The endangered canid can be found living in the regions of South, Central, and Southeast Asia. Here, they face the threat of habitat loss, persecution, and must compete against other animals such as tigers and leopards for food sources. They’re known to hunt in packs during the day and live in social packs that contain a hierarchy built on dominance. Unlike most domestic animals, the Dhole has been deemed as completely untameable due to their shy and vicious nature. 7. The Geoduck This is a geoduck but you probably recognize it as just an ordinary old clam. These saltwater clams are found throughout the west coast of North America and are edible. The most interesting thing about these animals is their very long siphons that can grow to be almost 3.5 inches long by themselves. Not only that, but this is the largest burrowing clam in the world that can live up to 140 years old, making it one of the longest-living creatures to ever exist. The oldest geoduck on record was recorded at being 168-years-old. 6. The Giant Isopod These nightmare inducing crustaceans dwell in the cold deep waters of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans. They closely resemble pillbugs, although, that’s not much of a surprise as they are related to them. They were first described back in 1879 which means that they’ve been known to the public for quite some time now. B. giganteus is capable of reaching between 7.5 to 14.2 inches! 5. A Deformed Chital Deer This might look like a strange new species of deer but no it’s just a regular deer. What makes it look peculiar are its tines. Normally, they’re supposed to form upwards but it isn’t uncommon to come across a deer with downward growing tines. The possible reason for this to occur is most likely due to injury. The deer possibly hit its antlers on a tree while they were growing and caused a blood vessel to either rupture or clot. Thus, the flow of blood gets disrupted and must find a new path to flow. 4. The Cassowary This flightless bird can be found living in the tropical forests of northeastern Australia and New Guinea. They live off a diet of mostly fruit, however, they’re considered to be omnivorous and will feed on smaller animals. Typically, the cassowary is a very shy animal but you do not want to get these birds angry. They’re able to inflict heavy damage by using their massive claws and can produce fatal injuries in humans and dogs. 3. The Lowland Streaked Tenrec This small mammal can be found living only on the island of Madagascar where its conservation status is currently classified as being Least Concerned. These little critters only grow to be around 7 ounces and come equipped with barbed quills on their body. This helps them defend against predators such as the fossa and the Malagasy mongoose. These are the only mammals that use stridulation to create sound, which is most commonly used by snakes and insects. 2. The Scorpion Fly These insects are known as Mecoptera and are referred to as scorpionflies because of their resemblance to a scorpion. The “stinger” that you see isn’t really the fly’s tail but rather only a trait that the males possess because it’s actually their enlarged genitalia. Scorpionflies are known to feed on dead organisms and live inside the bodies of dead humans, however, the body must be fresh in order to sustain the proper living conditions. 1. The Ant-Mimicking Treehopper You’re probably looking at this and wondering “what even is this thing?” Well, given the title of ant-mimicking treehopper you can pretty much guess that this isn’t actually a real ant. No, Cyphonia clavata here is specially designed by evolution to only appear as a ant, much like how other insects and spiders do. The black “ant” part of the treehopper is really just a bunch extension growths from its body. If you look closely you’ll see that the creature’s eye is is the circular shape located towards the brown area near its legs. The reason the “ant” is positioned backwards is because when ants are in defense mode they move backwards, so when the treehopper moves forwards that’s the illusion it creates.

Category   Pets & Animals

The Black Mountain – The Secrets of Nature

Feb 3, 2015  The Secrets of Nature

Subscribe to watch full natural history documentaries! A new documentary is uploaded every week. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesecretsof… Twitter: https://twitter.com/NatureUniversum When cloud banks swallow the rock and make valleys disappear, the sky draws menacingly close. Then, the sun tears away that curtain and jagged rocks appear, an iron cross gracing their peak. This is the eastern Alps most impressive summit and Austria’s highest peak – the Grossglockner, the ”Black Mountain”. Climbing three thousand seven hundred and ninety eight meters, Mount Grossglockner – the fateful summit of early mountaineers, towers above the Tauern massif like a sentinel over an Alpine paradise of nature. Ibex and chamois climb the rocks, Alpine flowers glow in the sun and golden eagles glide over the mountain peaks.

Category   Travel & Events

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017  Kate Sierzputowski

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4? (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84? x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50? x 75?, 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2016

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2017

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84? x 144?, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44? x 60?, 2015

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72? x 72?, 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2? (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90”, 2017

Enormous Panels of Patchworked Fabric Give Colorful Temporary Makeovers to Public Buildings

September 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Textile artist Amanda Browder collaborates with the communities she’s working in to built site-specific architectural interventions. Using hundreds of yards of donated fabric with bright colors and patterns, Browder and her volunteer teams stitch together enormous panels that resemble crazy quilts. The panels wrap around bell towers, sheath elevated walkways, and drape from gables and eaves to give passersby a new experience of familiar buildings. In a statement on her website, Browder describes her work:

A state of betweenness – ‘twixt soft sculpture /’tween orchestrated public object installation with a studio affinity for abstraction and minimalism”. I am in love with the transformative nature of materials, and how the combination of the familiar creates abstract relationships about place. This relational objectivity generates an open-ended narrative, ambiguous situations defined by the choice of materials and work ethic. Central to the psychedelic experience, I am drawn to reinventing Pop-Art colors by exploring shifts in scale and sculptural perceptions.

The Montana-born artist received a B.A. in studio arts as well as two master’s degrees in sculpture and installation art. Browder is now based in Brooklyn and frequently travels to create new work. She was recently awarded an opportunity with the prestigious ArtPrize organization in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The multi-part work, titled Kaleidoscopic, is currently on view at locations around Grand Rapids. Keep up with Browder’s projects on Instagram, and watch the video below for a time-lapse of a previous installation in Las Vegas and an interview with the artist.

Photo: Bryan Esler

Photo: Bryan Esler

The Hummingbird Whisperer

•Published on Dec 12, 2016 

The Hummingbird Whisperer

 Near the UCLA Court of Sciences, there is a wing-flapping, darting, squeaking colony of 200-plus birds that make their home around the campus office of the “hummingbird whisperer,” as Melanie Barboni is sometimes called. For the full story http://ucla.in/2hqzz4R

Category   Education

The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

September 4, 2017  Christopher Jobson

Photographer Melanie Barboni is an assistant researcher at UCLA’s Earth, Planetary and Space Science Program where she installed a hummingbird feeder outside her office window in hopes of seeing the elusive birds and maybe snapping a photo. Two years and several feeders later, she estimates there are over 200 birds that now stop by her window every day, over 50 of which she’s bestowed with names because she can recognize them on sight. Barboni was raised in Switzerland where hummingbirds are practically non-existent and she only read about them in books. She likens the view from her office at UCLA as a dream come true, a place that she’s referred to as The Hummingbird Whisperer. (via Laughing Squid)

 Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Sep 23, 2019  Guardian News

‘You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,’ climate activist Greta Thunberg has told world leaders at the 2019 UN climate action summit in New York. In an emotionally charged speech, she accused them of ignoring the science behind the climate crisis, saying: ‘We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth – how dare you!’ Subscribe to Guardian News on YouTube ? http://bit.ly/guardianwiressub The climate and the cross: the battle between evangelical Christians in the US ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsUlV… UN secretary general hails ‘turning point’ in climate crisis fight ? https://www.theguardian.com/world/201… Support the Guardian ? https://support.theguardian.com/contr… Today in Focus podcast ? https://www.theguardian.com/news/seri… The Guardian YouTube network: The Guardian ? http://www.youtube.com/theguardian Owen Jones talks ? http://bit.ly/subsowenjones Guardian Football ? http://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Sport ? http://bit.ly/GDNsport Guardian Culture ? http://is.gd/guardianculture

Category  News & Politics

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United Nation Climate Action Summit 2019, Guardian News, NBC News, PBS NewsHour, Al Jazeera English Live, CNA 24/7 LIVE News, africanews Live, FRANCE 24 English LIVE, Sky News live, DW News Livestream

United Nation Climate Action Summit 2019

 Guardian News, NBC News, PBS NewsHour

Al Jazeera English Live, [CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news

africanews Live, FRANCE 24 English LIVE

Sky News live, DW News Livestream

United Nation Climate Action Summit 2019

Greta Thunberg (Young Climate Activist) at the Opening of the Climate Action Summit 2019

23 Sep 2019 –  Greta Thunberg, Young Climate Activist, at the Opening of the Climate Action Summit 2019.

http://webtv.un.org/search/greta-thunberg-young-climate-activist-at-the-opening-of-the-climate-action-summit-2019/6088742229001/?term=&lan=english&page=5

Towards a Resilient Future – Climate Action Summit Formal Briefing (23 September 2019)

23 Sep 2019 – Climate Action Summit formal briefing by Dr. Mohammad Mahmoud Abubakar, Minister of Environment, Federal Republic of Nigeria; Mr. John Haley, CEO, Willis Towers Watson on Towards a Resilient Future.

http://webtv.un.org/search/towards-a-resilient-future-%E2%80%93-climate-action-summit-formal-briefing-23-september-2019/6088871562001/?term=&lan=english&page=1

Least Developed Countries – Climate Action Summit Formal Briefing (23 September 2019)

23 Sep 2019 –  Climate Action Summit formal briefing by Mr. Sonam P. Wangdi, Secretary of the National Environment Commission, Bhutan; Mr. Bintony Kutsaira, M.P., Minister of Natural Resources, Energy and Mining, Malawi; Dr. Akinwumi Adesina, President, African Development Bank; and Mr. Javier Manzanares, Deputy Executive Director, Green Climate Fund, on the situation in least developed countries.

http://webtv.un.org/search/least-developed-countries-%E2%80%93-climate-action-summit-formal-briefing-23-september-2019/6088751468001/?term=&lan=english&page=1

Small Island Developing States – Climate Action Summit Formal Briefing (23 September 2019)

23 Sep 2019 –  Climate Action Summit formal briefing by Mr. Wilfred P. Elrington, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Belize; Mr. Achim Steiner, Administrator, UN Development Programme; Mr. Francesco La Camera, Director-General, International Renewable Energy Agency on Small Island Developing States.

http://webtv.un.org/search/small-island-developing-states-%E2%80%93-climate-action-summit-formal-briefing-23-september-2019/6088852695001/?term=&lan=english&page=1

António Guterres (Secretary-General) at the Closing of Climate Action Summit 2019

23 Sep 2019 – Closing remarks by António Guterres, Secretary-General, at the Closing of Climate Action Summit 2019.

http://webtv.un.org/search/ant%C3%B3nio-guterres-secretary-general-at-the-closing-of-climate-action-summit-2019/6088865573001/?term=&lan=english&page=1

Monday, 23 September 2019

All indicated times are New York time (GMT-4) Email Subscription Full Live Schedule

07:30 am

Arrivals of delegations.

08:00 am

Universal Health Coverage in Least Developed Countries: A time for Accelerated Action.

Launch NDC Partnership’s Climate Action Enhancement Package.

Alliance for Rainforests.

Universal Health Coverage and Health Services for Displaced Populations.

08:30 am

Media Stakeout: United States Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar and Ministers representing four of the six key World Health Organization regions.

08:45 am

SDG Action Zone, High-Level Week, 23 September 2019.

09:00 am

High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (Opening and Plenary Segment) – General Assembly, 74th session.

Press Conferences (All day, starting at 9:00am and ending at 7:30pm).

10:00 am

(Part 1) Climate Action Summit 2019.

SDG4: Advancing quality education for all persons of African descent.

11:00 am

High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (Multi-stakeholder panel 1) – General Assembly, 74th session.

11:30 am

Global Call to Protect Religious Freedom.

12:40 pm

SDG Media Zone, High-Level Week, 23 September 2019.

01:00 pm

Financing UHC and Fiscal Policies – An Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) Report).

01:15 pm

Food Security and the achievement of SDGs in Africa: what role of South-South and triangular cooperation.

Towards healthier populations by investing in nutrition and Universal Health Coverage.

Private Sector Engagement in Innovative Solutions for Achieving the SDGs.

Supporting Member States to achieve the Non-communicable Diseases (NDC)-Related Sustainable Development Goals Targets.

01:30 pm

Primary Health Care towards Universal Health Coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals.

03:00 pm

(Part 2) Climate Action Summit 2019.

High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (Multi-stakeholder panel 2) – General Assembly, 74th session.

High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage (Continuation of the Plenary segment and Closing segment) – General Assembly, 74th session.

03:30 pm

How are we going to stop the war on children? (Co-Sponsored by the Governments of Belgium, Cote d’Ivoire, France, Germany, Indonesia, South Africa, the European Union and Save the Children.)

04:00 pm

70th Anniversary of the Geneva Conventions: “Investing in Humanity through Multilateralism”.

06:00 pm

Future of Work for Youth: Strategic Partnerships for Youth Employment.

24 Hour Live and pre-recorded Programming

22 Sep 2019 – The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming of United Nations meetings and events as well as with pre-recorded video features and documentaries on various global issues.

http://webtv.un.org/live/

Item:5 General Debate (Cont’d) – 28th Meeting, 42nd Regular Session Human Rights Council

23 Sep 2019 –  CONTINUED – General Debate Under Agenda Item 5: Human rights bodies and mechanisms
– 28th Plenary Meeting
42nd Regular Session of the Human Rights Council.

HRC extranet (information on daily updates, draft documentation, copies of oral statements etc.)

SPEAKERS
Africa Culture International (Human Rights), Mr. Lamine Diahko
Seek Human Rights Group, Ms. Eugenia Portioli
Himalayan Research and Cultural Foundation, Mr. Khalid Jenengir Sheikh
Health and Environment Program (HEP), Mr. Alakwa Magdi
Action for the Protection of Human Rights in Mauritania, Ms. Charlotte Kristine Morine
Association for the Protection of Women and Children’s Rights (APWCR), Ms. Ghulam Hassem
Palestinian Center for Development and Media Freedoms “MADA”, Mr. Mousa Rahimi
Article 19 – International Centre Against Censorship, Ms. Lisa Majundar
Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (Joint Statement), Ms. Rosanna Ocampo
Jeunesse Etudiante Tamoule, Mr. Vivekanandan Ramadoss
FIAN International, Mr. Ramón Muñoz
International Federation for Human Rights Leagues
Europe – Third World Centre
Universal Esperanto Association

… Show more »

http://webtv.un.org/live/watch/item5-general-debate-contd-28th-meeting-42nd-regular-session-human-rights-council/6088628979001/?term=

Feature Stories

https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/session42/Pages/42RegularSession.aspx

10,000 people a day must be freed to end slavery by 2030
In her latest report to the Human Rights Council, UN expert on contemporary forms of slavery, Urmila Bhoola, says that emerging global issues are putting more people of risk of being exploited or enslaved.
19 September 2019

“The world has never seen a threat to human rights of this scope”: High Commissioner’s update highlights climate threats
Michelle Bachelet’s wide-ranging update to the Human Rights Council outlines human rights gains and setbacks across the world, and urges greater partnership
9 September 2019  

http://webtv.un.org/topics-issues/global-issues/climate-change/watch/part-1-united-nations-youth-climate-summit-21-september-2019/6088351154001/?term=

Oral Update on the Human Rights Situation in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
At the Human Rights Council, High Commissioner Bachelet details continuing and serious human rights concerns in Venezuela
9 September 2019

01:54:54 English 21 Sep 2019

(Part 1) SDG Action Zone, United Nations Youth Climate Summit, 21 September 2019

21 Sep 2019 – The Youth Climate Summit will take place on Saturday, September 21 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, as part of a weekend of events leading up to the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit on Monday, September 23.
The Youth Climate Summit will feature a full-day of programming that brings together young activists, innovators, entrepreneurs, and change-makers who are committed to combating climate change at the pace and scale needed to meet the challenge. It will be action oriented, intergenerational, and inclusive, with equal representation of young leaders from all walks of life.
The UN Youth Climate Summit is a platform for youth leaders who are driving climate action to showcase their solutions at the United Nations, and to meaningfully engage with decision-makers on the defining issue of our time.
Programme:
Pre-opening
Opening Session with the UN Secretary-General: Young People at the Frontlines
Summer of Solutions: Young Entrepreneurs Pitch Competition
Youth Take the Mic!
Nature-based Solutions Led by Young People.
Nature-based Solutions: Reducing emissions, increasing sink capacity and enhancing resilience within and across forestry, agriculture, oceans and food systems, including through biodiversity conservation, leveraging supply chains and technology.

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Youth Climate Summit website

    03:23:10   English 21 Sep 2019

(Part 2) SDG Action Zone, United Nations Youth Climate Summit, 21 September 2019

(Part 2) SDG Action Zone, United Nations Youth Climate Summit, 21 September 2019

21 Sep 2019 –  Climate change is the defining problem of our generation. Without concerted efforts and concrete solutions from young people, we will not be able to address the crisis and risk, leaving the most vulnerable behind.

The SDG Action Zone will showcase solutions, commitments, and pledges made by young people to tackle the climate emergency. Participants will be able to interact with exhibits, network with climate activists and experts, present their solutions in an open mic format, and experience innovative ways to take climate action. The Youth Climate Compact, which emerged from thousands of youth pledging to take climate action at the 68th UN Civil Society Conference, will be featured.

The SDG Action Zone is organized by the Department of Global Communications Youth Representatives Steering Committee, with the support of the Youth Climate Team in the Executive Office of the Secretary-General.

3:30 -4 p.m.Open Mic: Climate Action and Solutions Participants will be encouraged to make pledges and commitments, as well as showcase solutions to fight climate change. 4 -4:30 p.m. The Power of Young Consumers This segment will look at the power of young consumers and their ability to shift economies towards more sustainable business practices and individual consumption patterns. Moderator Aishwarya Narasimhadevara, Medical Women’s International Association Speakers Madison Ross, Mercado Global Joel-Lehi Organista, League of United Latin American Citizens Daniel Chidubem Gbujie, Team54Project 4:30 -5:45 p.m.Climate Action Food Showcase: Kitchen Connection This platform will present chefs, both online and offline, who will showcase innovative climate-conscious recipes and the power that food has to combat climate change. (Brought to you with the support of the International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD), the UN Department of Global Communications (DGC) and New York University(NYU)) Participants Earlene Cruz, Director, Kitchen Connection Chef Nkem Odewunmi Chef Grace Ramirez Chef Hanan Rasheed5:45 -6 p.m. Closing Remarks Ali Mustafa, Glocha

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Spouses of CARICOM Leaders Action Network (SCLAN): Ensuring Access and Equity in Adolescents, Children and Women’s Health.

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Ministerial Meeting on the Launching of the Global Alliance for Subnational Development Banks (SDBs).

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Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

•Published on Sep 23, 2019

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‘You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,’ climate activist Greta Thunberg has told world leaders at the 2019 UN climate action summit in New York. In an emotionally charged speech, she accused them of ignoring the science behind the climate crisis, saying: ‘We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth – how dare you!’ Subscribe to Guardian News on YouTube ? http://bit.ly/guardianwiressub The climate and the cross: the battle between evangelical Christians in the US ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsUlV… UN secretary general hails ‘turning point’ in climate crisis fight ? https://www.theguardian.com/world/201… Support the Guardian ? https://support.theguardian.com/contr… Today in Focus podcast ? https://www.theguardian.com/news/seri… The Guardian YouTube network: The Guardian ? http://www.youtube.com/theguardian Owen Jones talks ? http://bit.ly/subsowenjones Guardian Football ? http://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Sport ? http://bit.ly/GDNsport Guardian Culture ? http://is.gd/guardianculture

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Category   News & Politics

Watch live: U.N. General Assembly 2019

Started streaming 3 hours ago

NBC News

Watch remarks from world leaders at the first day of high-level general debate at the United Nations. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC

Category   News & Politics

WATCH LIVE: World leaders address the 2019 United Nations General Assembly

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Category  News & Politics

Fiery calls to action at UN climate summit don’t win pledges from worst emitters

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PBS NewsHour full episode September 23, 2019

Published on Sep 23, 2019

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Category   News & Politics

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Category   News & Politics

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Category   News & Politics

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Started streaming on Aug 27, 2019

FRANCE 24 English

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Category   News & Politics

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Started streaming on Sep 17, 2019

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Category   News & Politics

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Category   News & Politics

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PBS News, DW Documentary, NatureNorth, 4 Ever Green, Biju Varkey, TED Talks, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: September16-22, 2019

DW Documentary: Coca-Cola’s plastic secrets

NatureNorth: From Egg to Frog in 7 Weeks!

4 Ever Green: 10 Most Beautiful Butterflies on Planet Earth

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TED Talks: Megan Phelps Roper I Grew up in the Westboro Baptist Church Here is Why I Left and Jonathan Haidt can a Divided America Heal

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PBS NewsHour Weekend live show September 22, 2019

•Streamed live 4 hours ago

PBS NewsHour   1.39M subscribers

On this edition for Sunday, September 22, President Trump hits the road as international issues take center stage, the General Motors strike enters its second week, and a look at what Peru is doing to reform a gold-mining industry that has decimated part of the Amazon rain forest. Megan Thompson anchors from New York.

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show September 21, 2019

Streamed live 4 hours ago

PBS NewsHour

1.38M subscribers

On this edition for Saturday, September 21, the U.S. says it will provide “defense support” to Saudi Arabia, young people take the lead on climate change at the Youth Climate Summit, and Peru’s government cracks down on gold mining in the Amazon. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 20, 2019

•Published on Sep 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, new details are being reported about a whistleblower complaint that might involve President Trump. Plus: Severe floods in southeastern Texas, the world’s largest climate change demonstrations, why Three Mile Island is closing, political analysis from Shields and Brooks and the movie premiere of the beloved “Downton Abbey.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 19, 2019

Published on Sep 19, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Rep. Adam Schiff weighs in on an “urgent” whistleblower complaint that’s causing a standoff between the White House and Congress. Plus: Fallout from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s blackface scandal, the Senate GOP’s gun policy ideas, rising costs of Guantanamo Bay, economic risks of a climate crisis, a Native voice in poetry and connecting through portraiture. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Iran threatens ‘all-out war’ if attacked by U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDXTf… Schiff says ‘we’re at risk’ over handling of whistleblower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJssW… For many Canadians, Trudeau blackface photos come as a shock https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NT4B… Public pressure on guns galvanizes Senate GOP, despite Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6s2A… Why cost of holding prisoners at Guantanamo Bay keeps rising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lDKI… Why extreme climate scenarios no longer seem so unlikely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu3Wo… Poet laureate Joy Harjo opens a Native ‘doorway of hope’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOArJ… Toyin Ojih Odutola on connecting through portraiture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N3XM…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 18, 2019

Published on Sep 18, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Fed cuts its benchmark interest rate for the second time in three months to keep the economy growing. Plus: Will attacks on Saudi oil sites prompt a U.S. military response, Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom on President Trump’s change to emissions rules, Maine lobsters suffer in warming waters, mining sand in Cambodia, teens on vaping dangers and a special retirement message. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Israel’s government in limbo after close election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1anGV… How U.S. economists have driven growth-oriented policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHaVb… What attacks on Saudi oil sites mean for the U.S. and Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DbIN… Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom on changes to auto emission rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Di5uj… How rising water temperatures could end Maine’s lobster boom https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iCrL… How sand mining is threatening Cambodia’s Mekong River https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tmyhe… How teens are reacting to news of vaping dangers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAFw9… A special retirement message for beloved teacher Mr. Moe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsIQA…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 17, 2019

•Published on Sep 17, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski testifies before the House Judiciary Committee — but doesn’t say much. Plus: What’s at stake in Israel’s second election of the year, Texas gun owners talk about universal background checks and red flag laws, how government detention can hurt children and remembering journalist and beloved NewsHour friend Cokie Roberts. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Taliban attacks kill at least 48 in Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOUR0… What Democrats and Republicans took from Lewandowski hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7E_4B… 2nd election, corruption charges place Netanyahu in jeopardy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OG6FJ… How Texas gun owners feel about these reform ideas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-afcR… How detention centers deepen migrant children’s trauma https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ7vE… Linda Wertheimer and Nina Totenberg remember Cokie Roberts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OF1Lb…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 16, 2019

Published on Sep 16, 2019

PBS NewsHour

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Category    News & Politics

Coca-Cola’s plastic secrets | DW Documentary

Published on Sep 19, 2019

DW Documentary

By 2050, there could be more plastic than fish in the sea. Ten tons of plastic are produced every second. Sooner or later, a tenth of that will end up in the oceans. Coca-Cola says it wants to do something about it – but does it really? In January 2018, Coca-Cola made an ambitious announcement: The brand, which sells 120 billion plastic bottles every year, promised a “world without waste” by 2030. But filmmaker Sandrine Rigaud was skeptical about this ostensibly noble resolution. In Tanzania, for example, far from the company’s American headquarters, a different picture emerges. Here everyone waits for red-and-white buses and walks by red-and-white walls, and the children play with red-and-white equipment in the playgrounds. The Coca-Cola logo is ubiquitous. But what is even more worrying is that history is repeating itself here. As it did 50 years ago in the United States, Coca-Cola has been continuously replacing glass bottles with plastic ones since 2013. Coca-Cola Vice President Michael Goltzman tries to play down the problem, saying it’s not the plastic bottles themselves that are the problem, but the lack of suitable infrastructure in Tanzania. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

From Egg to Frog in 7 Weeks!

•Published on Apr 13, 2014

NatureNorth

The development of Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) eggs to froglets in 49 days, just 7 weeks!

Category   Education

10 Most Beautiful Butterflies on Planet Earth

•Published on Jul 15, 2019

4 Ever Green

These cute and colorful creatures known as Butterflies are heart of our beautiful nature and it is very important that we keep these beautiful insects highlighted. These wonderful creatures have hundreds of species and names but I have listed only 10 of the most beautiful ones that are appealing to me. You can comment which one you like the most and why. Subscribe To Our Channel : http://bit.ly/4EverGreen More Videos About Colorful Animals You Won’t Believe Actually Exist: Beautiful Insects: https://youtu.be/7HYj798vyM8 Beautiful Fishes: https://youtu.be/YXPQmr-S9Uk Beautiful Frogs: https://youtu.be/9k1hNqP4vmw Beautiful Snakes: https://youtu.be/mnuxdYwtxm0 Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/4EGYT Twitter: https://twitter.com/4EverGreens Google+:https://plus.google.com/+fourevergreen For more videos and articles visit our website: https://www.4evergreen.org/ For Any Copyright Concerns, Contact Us at our email address. We will act upon your query immediately.

Category   Pets & Animals

Butchart Gardens

Published on Oct 23, 2017

Biju Varkey

The Butchart Gardens is a group of floral display gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada, located near Victoria on Vancouver Island. The gardens receive close to a million visitors each year. Gears Used Zhiyun Crane v2 https://zhiyun.us/collections/all Sony PXWX70 4K https://pro.sony.com/bbsc/ssr/micro-x… Nikon D800E Nikon AF-S 24-70mm f/2.8G ED www.onreviews.ca

Category   Travel & Events

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/22-000-days-without-drinking-water?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy:

·Stories to fuel your mind.

22,000 Days Without Drinking Water

Bolivia’s populist president has vowed to lift the fortunes of the rural poor. But high on the Andean plateau, one remote community still has no access to clean water—and one man has the awesome responsibility of ensuring his people are not parched.

Narratively | Michele Bertelli, Felix Lill, and Javier Sauras

Photos by Javier Sauras

It’s almost seven o’clock in the morning. The thermometer does not dare to peek above thirty degrees Fahrenheit but the sun bites every time it manages to find its way through the clouds of the high Andean plateau. Jacinto Sirpa, a peasant and member of the Aymara indigenous community, pulls down his camouflage hat over a woolen cap. Everything about him has the flavor of the Earth: chestnut coat, gray trousers, brown sneakers; a pair of beige gloves protects his copper hands while he ropes his old donkey, loaded with four large empty drums. Sirpa focuses his umber eyes, surrounded by wrinkles, on a distant barren slope and starts walking. He has to reach the slope, one hour walking from his home, to get some water. Just as he has done throughout his entire life. The same journey he has been repeating for sixty years now; 22,000 days without clean drinking water.

“I have never had drinking water,” says the farmer, shyly. “I have never drunk clean water.”

Jacinto Sirpa Condori is not one of a kind. Two million people don’t have drinking water piped into their houses in Bolivia and half of the population lacks basic sanitation. Sirpa lives in a rural community that is within the city of Viacha, two hours from La Paz, the capital. Despite living so close to the Presidential palace, Sirpa’s life is harsh. At 13,000 feet above sea level, even oxygen is a scarce resource.

***

The sun shines high in the sky, and Sirpa is back in his house of mud and straw. Using a colander, he filters the water he just brought from the pond and prepares coca tea. Sirpa knows better than anyone that the liquid he collects daily in the wetlands is not potable. His loneliness says so.

Jacinta Sirpa on his way to his only source of water – through a barren landscape, an hour away from home.

“These days my wife is sick, my children are sick; it seems that the land is also tired and no longer bears good fruits,” he says in a sad voice. Quiet, with simple and smooth movements, he pours the mate tea on the ground before taking a small mouthful. It is an offering to the Pachamama goddess so that she may look kindly upon him. “Hopefully, one day we will have water, and maybe we could irrigate and sow the fields. Do something.”

Sirpa believes in indigenous reciprocity towards Mother Earth, to whom he always gives something when there is something that he takes. However, these days he prefers to ask government institutions to address his problem of water scarcity rather than praying to the goddess. After leading the cattle to graze, the farmer uses one of the drums to wash himself. Then, he slithers into a red-and-black poncho, takes his ceremonial instruments and changes the camouflage hat out for a dark fedora. This year he has been appointed “Uma Mallku” of his community: overseer of the waters. In the Aymara society, Mallkus are rotating positions, their holder charged with ensuring the community has enough water. From a shack, he pulls out two large, rolled-up sheets, with documents and drawings, and gets back on track, crossing the infinite vastness of the “Altiplano.”

Sirpa speaking to the community. As the Uma Mallku, or Overseer of Water, he listens to the community’s concerns, writes down their suggestions and takes them to the local authority. Then, he will come back with answers from the officials.

“Governmental institutions don’t reach these places,” he says while strolling. In Central Coniri, the small rural community where he lives, they feel forgotten. Recently, several of the neighboring towns have inaugurated water wells and pipelines. According to a joint study carried out by UNICEF and the World Health Organization, twenty-four percent of the Bolivian population has gained access to improved water resources in the last fifteen years. Yet in rural areas, only fifty-seven percent of the population have pipelines installed and working in their plots. This ongoing shortage has drawn farmers towards the city like water emptying into a drain.

“Many have gone to the cities,” says Sirpa. “If there is no water, people cannot live.”

The Uma Mallku looks tired but he is relentless at heart. He will later gather his people to explain how the water works are progressing. Sirpa will listen to their concerns, write down their suggestions and take them to the local authority. Then, he will come back with the answers from officials. He is caught in a crossfire. His neighbors are angry because nobody is teaching them how to manage the water system that will soon be built. The city has promised him to send someone to give courses on technical issues, water pricing, sustainability and basic hygiene. Some of the elders will have to learn how to use a faucet and about the perks of washing their hands. Nothing has happened yet. In the belly of the “Altiplano,” time stands still.

As the Uma Mallku, Sirpa is entitled to wear a red and black poncho, ceremonial instruments, and a dark fedora. In the Aymara society, Mallkus are rotating positions that ensure the proper functioning of the community.

In 1990, less than half of the Bolivian population had water at home. Evo Morales, the current president of Bolivia, remembers well the days of thirst; he is, like Sirpa, a son of Aymara peasants and spent his early childhood in the high Andean plateau. He was born one kilometer away from a water well and his mother had to walk every day to bring water home. That may explain why one of his first acts after he came to power was the creation of a Ministry of Water. He also promoted a resolution at the UN, in 2010, that designated access to safe water and sanitation as an “essential to the full enjoyment of life and all human rights.”

GDP growth (6.8 percent in 2013), the Human Development Index, and the Gini Coefficient tell how Bolivia has progressed under Morales’ rule. However, in his eagerness to exert control, the president changed the head of the Ministry of Water—a precious political position—eight times in three terms. A minister with a technical background, José Antonio Zamora, stayed in office longer than anyone else (2012 – 2015). Although Bolivia has already reached the Millennium Development Goals, Zamora says that “much remains to be done,” especially in rural areas.

Since Evo Morales took office in 2005, water has been a main issue in Bolivia’s politics. Despite that, almost two million people still live without access to a reliable source of water. Here, Sirpa attends a meeting with leaders from other communities to speak about water scarcity.

“The president created the Agenda 2025, which sets specific targets for the elimination of extreme human poverty and coverage of basic services, including obviously water and sanitation,” Zamora explains. In 2025, Bolivia will turn 200 as an independent country and, to commemorate the Bicentennial, Morales’ government created a comprehensive development program. However, some of its points clash directly with Bolivia’s economic model, which is based in the exploitation of its natural resources.

Sirpa, the quiet Andean peasant, admires “el Evo,” as he calls him, but his life has not improved substantially in the nine years Morales has been leading the country. Two of the neighboring towns, Achica Arriba and Achica Baja, recently built new drinking water distribution systems with money given by NGOs and international development agencies. Now people from Central Coniri look at their nearby countrymen with envy. That’s why Sirpa keeps on walking through the wasteland, carrying blueprints and documents. He has to control, along with the members of his community, the advances on the well they are digging.

***

Jacinto Sirpa Condori sits on the ground, surrounded by his neighbors in the shade of a huge blue drill. Women lay down and open their multicolored blankets to prepare the feast. People from Central Coniri have gathered for an “apthapi,” an Aymara tradition of meeting and sharing. Everybody has brought a little something: there are boiled and freeze-dried potatoes, beans, yucca, fried fish, cheese, chili peppers and llama meat.

In the shadow of a drill, people from Central Coniri gather for an “apthapi,” an Aymara tradition of meeting and sharing. Everybody has brought something to share; beans, yucca, fried fish and even llama meat.

On the horizon glows the snow of the glaciers, topping 20,000 feet-high peaks. Sirpa pays attention to the people around him and patiently meets their demands. “We are drilling down to one hundred feet and there is water,” he announces, smiling. “There is water!”

Michele, Felix and Javier worked on “Bolivia’s Everyday Water War,” an interactive documentary that follows the struggle in the Andean country to improve water access and sanitation. Bolivia’s Everyday Water War is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation through the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Program, a media-funding project operated by the European Journalism Center). https://www.facebook.com/bewwdoc; Twitter @beww_en.

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This article was originally published on August 25, 2015, by Narratively, and is republished here with permission.

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Bring Back Handwriting: It’s Good for Your Brain

People are losing the brain benefits of writing by hand as the practice becomes less common

Markham Heid  Sep 12 · 4 min read

Illustration: Kieran Blakey

Not so long ago, putting pen to paper was a fundamental feature of daily life. Journaling and diary-keeping were commonplace, and people exchanged handwritten letters with friends, loved ones, and business associates.

While longhand communication is more time-consuming and onerous, there’s evidence that people may in some cases lose out when they abandon handwriting for keyboard-generated text.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings. Since the 1980s, studies have found that “the writing cure,” which normally involves writing about one’s feelings every day for 15 to 30 minutes, can lead to measurable physical and mental health benefits. These benefits include everything from lower stress and fewer depression symptoms to improved immune function. And there’s evidence that handwriting may better facilitate this form of therapy than typing.

A commonly cited 1999 study in the Journal of Traumatic Stress found that writing about a stressful life experience by hand, as opposed to typing about it, led to higher levels of self-disclosure and translated to greater therapeutic benefits. It’s possible that these findings may not hold up among people today, many of whom grew up with computers and are more accustomed to expressing themselves via typed text. But experts who study handwriting say there’s reason to believe something is lost when people abandon the pen for the keyboard.

Psychologists have long understood that personal, emotion-focused writing can help people recognize and come to terms with their feelings.

“When we write a letter of the alphabet, we form it component stroke by component stroke, and that process of production involves pathways in the brain that go near or through parts that manage emotion,” says Virginia Berninger, a professor emerita of education at the University of Washington. Hitting a fully formed letter on a keyboard is a very different sort of task — one that doesn’t involve these same brain pathways. “It’s possible that there’s not the same connection to the emotional part of the brain” when people type, as opposed to writing in longhand, Berninger says.

Writing by hand may also improve a person’s memory for new information. A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology found that brain regions associated with learning are more active when people completed a task by hand, as opposed to on a keyboard. The authors of that study say writing by hand may promote “deep encoding” of new information in ways that keyboard writing does not. And other researchers have argued that writing by hand promotes learning and cognitive development in ways keyboard writing can’t match.

The fact that handwriting is a slower process than typing may be another perk, at least in some contexts. A 2014 study in the journal Psychological Science found that students who took notes in longhand tested higher on measures of learning and comprehension than students who took notes on laptops.

“The primary advantage of longhand notes was that it slowed people down,” says Daniel Oppenheimer, co-author of the study and a professor of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. While the students who typed could take down what they heard word for word, “people who took longhand notes could not write fast enough to take verbatim notes — instead they were forced to rephrase the content in their own words,” Oppenheimer says. “To do that, people had to think deeply about the material and actually understand the arguments. This helped them learn the material better.”

Slowing down and writing by hand may come with other advantages. Oppenheimer says that because typing is fast, it tends to cause people to employ a less diverse group of words. Writing longhand allows people more time to come up with the most appropriate word, which may facilitate better self-expression. He says there’s also speculation that longhand note-taking can help people in certain situations form closer connections. One example: “A doctor who takes notes on a patient’s symptoms by longhand may build more rapport with patients than doctors who are typing into a computer,” he says. Also, a lot Berninger’s NIH-funded work found that learning to write first in print and then in cursive helps young people develop critical reading and thinking skills.

Finally, there’s a mountain of research that suggests online forms of communication are more toxic than offline dialogue. Most of the researchers who study online communication speculate that a lack of face-to-face interaction and a sense of invisibility are to blame for the nasty and brutish quality of many online interactions. But the impersonal nature of keyboard-generated text may also, in some small way, be contributing to the observed toxicity. When a person writes by hand, they have to invest more time and energy than they would with a keyboard. And handwriting, unlike typed text, is unique to each individual. This is why people usually value a handwritten note more highly than an email or text, Berninger says. If words weren’t quite so easy to produce, it’s possible that people would treat them — and maybe each other — with a little more care.

Elemental  Your life, sourced by science. A new Medium publication about health and wellness.

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·Physics Explains Why Time Passes Faster As You Age

Mind time cannot be measured on a watch.

Quartz | Ephrat Livni

Photo by Sergei Karpukhin.

Mind time and clock time are two totally different things. They flow at varying rates.

The chronological passage of the hours, days, and years on clocks and calendars is a steady, measurable phenomenon. Yet our perception of time shifts constantly, depending on the activities we’re engaged in, our age, and even how much rest we get. An upcoming paper in the journal European Review by Duke University mechanical engineering professor Adrian Bejan, explains the physics behind changing senses of time and reveals why the years seem to fly by the older we get.  (The paper, sent to Quartz by its author, has been peer-reviewed, edited, and has been approved for publication but a date has not yet been set.)

Bejan is obsessed with flow and, basically, believes physics principles can explain everything. He has written extensively about how the principles of flow in physics dictate and explain the movement of abstract concepts, like economics. Last year, he won the Franklin Institute’s Benjamin Franklin Medal for “his pioneering interdisciplinary contributions…and for constructal theory, which predicts natural design and its evolution in engineering, scientific, and social systems.”

In his latest paper, he examines the mechanics of the human mind and how these relate to our understanding of time, providing a physical explanation for our changing mental perception as we age.

The Mind’s Eye

According to Bejan—who reviewed previous studies in a range of fields on time, vision, cognition, and mental processing to reach his conclusion—time as we experience it represents perceived changes in mental stimuli. It’s related to what we see. As physical mental-image processing time and the rapidity of images we take in changes, so does our perception of time. And in some sense, each of us has our own “mind time” unrelated to the passing of hours, days, and years on clocks and calendars, which is affected by the amount of rest we get and other factors. Bejan is the first person to look at time’s passage through this particular lens, he tells Quartz, but his conclusions rest on findings by other scientists who have studied physical and mental process related to the passage of time.

These changes in stimuli give us a sense of time’s passage. He writes:

The present is different from the past because the mental viewing has changed, not because somebody’s clock rings. The “clock time” that unites all the live flow systems, animate and inanimate, is measurable. The day-night period lasts 24 hours on all watches, wall clocks and bell towers. Yet, physical time is not mind time. The time that you perceive is not the same as the time perceived by another.

Time is happening in the mind’s eye. It is related to the number of mental images the brain encounters and organizes and the state of our brains as we age. When we get older, the rate at which changes in mental images are perceived decreases because of several transforming physical features, including vision, brain complexity, and later in life, degradation of the pathways that transmit information. And this shift in image processing leads to the sense of time speeding up.

Clock time and mind time over a lifetime. From Adrian Bejan.

This effect is related to saccadic eye movement. Saccades are unconscious, jerk-like eye movements that occur a few times a second. In between saccades, your eyes fixate and the brain processes the visual information it has received. All of this happens unconsciously, without any effort on your part. In human infants, those fixation periods are shorter than in adults.

There’s an inversely proportional relationship between stimuli processing and the sense of time speeding by, Bejan says. So, when you are young and experiencing lots of new stimuli—everything is new—time actually seems to be passing more slowly. As you get older, the production of mental images slows, giving the sense that time passes more rapidly.

Fatigue also influences saccades, creating overlaps and pauses in these eye movements that lead to crossed signals. The tired brain can’t transfer the information effectively when it’s simultaneously trying to see and make sense of the visual information. It’s designed to do these things separately.

This is what leads to athletes’ poor performance when exhausted. Their processing powers get muddled and their sense of timing is off. They can’t see or respond rapidly to new situations.

Another factor in time’s perceived passage is how the brain develops. As the brain and body grow more complex and there are more neural connections, the pathways that information travels are increasingly complicated. They branch like a tree and this change in processing influences our experience of time, according to Bejan.

The brain’s complexity changes our sense of time. From Adrian Bejan.

Finally, brain degradation as we age influences perception. Studies of saccadic eye movements in elderly people show longer latency periods, for example. The time in which the brain processes the visual information gets longer, which makes it more difficult for the elderly to solve complex problems. They “see” more slowly but feel time passing faster, Bejan argues.

A Lifetime to Measure By

Bejan became interested in this topic more than a half century ago. As a young athlete on a prestigious Romanian basketball team, he noticed that time slowed down when he was rested and that this enabled him to perform better. Not only that, he could predict team performance in a game based on the time of day it was scheduled. He tells Quartz:

Early games, at 11 a.m., were poor, a killer; afternoon and evening games were much better. At 11 AM we were sleepwalking, never mind what each of us did during the night. It became so clear to me that I knew at the start of the season, when the schedule was announced, which games will be bad. Games away, after long trips and bad sleep were poor, home games were better, for the same reason. In addition, I had a great coach who preached constantly that the first duty of the player is to sleep regularly and well, and to live clean.

Now he’s experienced how “mind time” changes over the much longer span of his whole life. “During the past 20 years I noticed how my time is slipping away, faster and faster, and how I am complaining that I have less and less time,” he says. It’s a sentiment he hears echoed by many around him.

Still, he notes, we’re not entirely prisoners of time. The clocks will continue to tick strictly, days will go by on the calendar, and the years will seem to fly by ever faster. By following his basketball coach’s advice—sleeping well and living clean—Bejan says we can alter our perceptions. This, in some sense, slows down mind time.

This article was originally published on January 8, 2019, by Quartz, and is republished here with permission.

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What’s it like to grow up within a group of people who exult in demonizing … everyone else? Megan Phelps-Roper shares details of life inside America’s most controversial church and describes how conversations on Twitter were key to her decision to leave it. In this extraordinary talk, she shares her personal experience of extreme polarization, along with some sharp ways we can learn to successfully engage across ideological lines.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Megan Phelps-Roper · Writer, activist

A former member of Westboro Baptist Church, Megan Phelps-Roper is now a writer and educator on topics related to extremism, bullying and empathy in dialogue.

Take Action

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Be deliberate about cultivating empathy for “enemies.” Before getting into a conversation full of intense disagreement, you can lay the groundwork for success by making deliberate efforts to understand the perspective of groups with ideas you oppose. Whether Republicans or Democrats, city-dwellers or rural farmers, consider the groups you tend to write off. Who are they? Given their experiences, can you understand why they hold the positions they do? What ideas do you share? When you’re intentional about searching for understanding and common ground, you’ll be better at engaging people with opposing ideas on the merits — instead of the mental caricatures humans often form of one another.

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Practice engaging when the stakes are low. Remember that the strategies mentioned in this talk aren’t natural; they’re skills we have to learn and develop in ourselves. Disagreements are common, but the more intense the disagreement, the harder it is to remain calm enough to engage effectively. To practice, be on the lookout for low-stakes disagreements that appear in your life. Answering an angry tweet from a stranger requires less time and emotional energy than staying cool in a long conversation with a close friend about a divisive subject. Reaching out when the stakes are low strengthens our ability to engage when stress levels and potential costs are higher.

How can the US recover after the negative, partisan presidential election of 2016? Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt studies the morals that form the basis of our political choices. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, he describes the patterns of thinking and historical causes that have led to such sharp divisions in America — and provides a vision for how the country might move forward.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Jonathan Haidt · Social psychologist

Jonathan Haidt studies how — and why — we evolved to be moral and political creatures.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

More Resources

Further reading

To improve democracies

CivilPolitics.org educates groups and individuals who are trying to bridge moral divisions by connecting them with scientific research into the political domain.

More at civilpolitics.org ?

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To improve universities

HeterodoxAcademy.org is politically diverse group of social scientists, natural scientists, humanists, and other scholars who share a concern about a growing problem: the loss or lack of “viewpoint diversity.”

More at heterodoxacademy.org ?

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To improve business ethics

EthicalSystems.org makes the world’s best research available and accessible, for free, to anyone interested in improving the ethical culture and behavior of an organization.

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An Incredible Aerial Tour of Earth’s Surface from the International Space Station

January 9, 2019   Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based photographer and videographer Bruce W. Berry Jr. brings together images from the International Space Station (ISS) in his new time-lapse video, The World Below. Berry used public content from NASA to form the meditative short film that reads like a supersized version of today’s popular drone landscape videos. The World Below offers a glimpse at the vast scale of our planet, with portions of the ISS in-frame to provide additional perspective. The film compares richly textured, abstracted topography with dense networks of bright lights to showcase the powerful impact of humans on the planet.

All video and time-lapse sequences were taken by astronauts onboard the ISS. Berry then edited, color graded, denoised, and stabilized the footage to create the seamless quality of the final film. If you’re interested to learn the specifics of the clips’ locations, the filmmaker lists them out to the best of his knowledge in the video notes.

Berry created a similar video in 2013, but decided to create the newer version due to the wealth of content that has become available since his original take. The ISS makes 14.54 orbits around the Earth every day, providing ample opportunity for new views. You can see more of Berry’s photography portfolio on his website, and watch more videos on his Vimeo channel. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Swan Lake” (2014), all images © Natalie Lennard

Photographer Natalie Lennard, who works as Miss Aniela, creates lavish scenes centered around elegantly dressed models. While each image might seem, at first glance, like a straightforward luxury fashion shoot, further inspection reveals surreal details. A canary yellow tulle gown morphs into birds, and ocean water splashes out of a painting frame.

Miss Aniela’s fantastical scenes are created using a combination of on-site shoots with practical effects, along with extensive post-production and even bespoke C.G.I. (as for the 20,000 fish forming the dress worn by a deep sea diver model in “She Shoal”). The photographer explains that all images are shot on location with the model posed and lit in-frame. “Sometimes I do not know whether the image will be largely ‘raw’ and not require overt surrealism added,” Aniela shares, “until I go through the process to feel what is right for each piece.”

The U.K.-based artist has been working as a fine art photographer for 13 years, getting her start with self-portraits as a university student. In some works, she incorporates direct references to paintings from the art historical canon. Aniela has been working in her current style since 2011, and shares with Colossal that she has noticed a rising interest in her work from art collectors, as the lines between fine art and fashion are increasingly blurred.

You can explore more of Miss Aniela’s immersive worlds on Instagram, and go behind the scenes of production in her explanatory blog posts. Fine art prints are available via Saatchi Art.

“What He Bequeathed” (2016)

“She Shoal” (2019)

“Poster & Plumage” (2016)

“Enter the Golden Dragon” (2018)

“Thawed Fortress” (2015)

“Gilt” (2016)

“Scarlet Song” (2013)

“Away with the Canaries” (2013)

“Pokerface” (2015)

Ing’s Peace Project

Finished “Peace” artwork 3  

Salon Creative Lounge Event, presented by the International Women Artist’ salon,154 Stanton Street at Suffolk, New York City, NY, on March 31, 2012, organized by Heidi Russell.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by      Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 

Link to Peace Project Comes to Salon Creative Lounge NYC Page:

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PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 15, 2019

•Published on Sep 15, 2019

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On this edition for Sunday, September 15, a look ahead to this week’s election in Israel, the author and physicist Sean Carroll on the existence of parallel lives, and do the recent presidential debates show a growing rift between moderates and progressives in the Democratic Party? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

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On this edition for Saturday, September 14, the Bahamas brace as another tropical storm heads their way, the Trump administration announces federal changes to the Clean Water Act, and a legal rule that allows someone to be put away for murder even if they weren’t the one who committed it. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

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Although more Americans than ever are worried about climate change, less than 40 percent expect to make “major sacrifices” to tackle the problem. But according to Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager and climate activist, drastic action is exactly what’s needed to address the problem. William Brangham sits down with Thunberg to discuss galvanizing young people across the globe to the climate cause.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 12, 2019

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Thursday on the NewsHour, the leading 10 Democratic presidential candidates face off on the debate stage for the first time. Plus: Impeachment momentum in the House, CEOs of major U.S. companies pressure the Senate on gun legislation, ongoing conflict in Syria, why the Federal Election Commission’s operations are limited, the pinch of tariffs on the lobster industry and an oral history of 9/11. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

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Started streaming on Jan 14, 2019

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Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our news service: WhatsApp: https://cna.asia/whatsapp Telegram: https://t.me/cnalatest Follow CNA on the following platforms: https://www.cna.asia https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia https://t.me/cnalatest

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Turning toxic – The Bayer-Monsanto merger | DW Documentary

•Published on Sep 11, 2019

DW Documentary

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A year after Germany’s Bayer Group took over Monsanto, and it’s struggling to deal with the US seed giant’s controversial reputation. Now Bayer is also liable for Monsanto’s legal bills – which are starting to mount alarmingly. Roundup, a herbicide containing glyphosate sold worldwide by Monsanto has long been suspected of causing cancer. A California court has just awarded more than $2 billion in damages to a couple who had claimed that their use of the pesticide caused them to develop non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma . Bayer’s share price halved last year, and the consequences are already making themselves felt in the company itself: Around 12,000 jobs worldwide are to be cut in the next few years, a considerable proportion of them in Germany. CEO Werner Baumann, who pushed for the merger, is coming under increasing pressure. Voicing criticism, a majority of shareholders voted against absolving Baumann and other managers of their responsibility in the merger. Bayer is in the midst of its greatest crisis. The film traces the effects of the merger and investigates potential new health hazards emanating from glyphosate. How has Monsanto tried in the past to influence politicians, scientists and public opinion? Did the Americans actually play down or ignore the dangers? And does Bayer really distance itself from these practices? ——————————————————————– Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

Splash and Burn: An Artist-Led Initiative Raising Awareness About the Negative Effects of Palm Oil Production in South Asia

May 4, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Drone footage still of “Save Our Souls” by Ernest Zacharevic. All images provided by Splash and Burn.

Indonesia is the world’s largest exporter of palm oil, the harvesting of which has been shown to have extremely adverse effects on wildlife and natural resources, including deforestation, fires, and the displacement of people and animals. Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (previously) witnessed this devastation during his time spent photographing and traveling throughout the country, and decided to found the initiative Splash and Burn to spread public awareness about the resource’s inhumane production.

“A state of global environmental crisis is defining our generation,” Zacharevic tells Colossal. “As consumers, we are so disconnected from the source of our commodities that we do not recognize the impact of our daily choices. This project is an effort to bridge that gap.”

“Save Our Souls” (2018) by Ernest Zacharevic

The organization’s name comes from slash-and-burn, the cheap practice of burning land to clear the way for new plantations, a method that releases toxic smoke, and has been linked to more than 500,000 respiratory infections. For two years Zacharevic researched these issues effecting Indonesia’s population, meeting with NGOs, locals, and wildlife sites to educate himself on the organizations fighting against the practices and attempting to heal from their destruction.

After researching the area and its local organizations, like the Orangutan Information Centre, the Lithuanian artist invited several fellow creatives to respond to the native landscape and the palm oil crisis through art installations. Since February, international artists have created murals, sculptures, and other works throughout Sumatra. Pieces include an orangutan mural painted by VHILS, Isaac Cordal’s miniature hazmat suit installation, and Zacharevic’s plantation intervention in which he inserted the message SOS into the landscape’s trees.

Mural by Alexandre Farto aka VHILS, image credit: Ernest Zacharevic

“I wanted to communicate the magnitude of the problem to a wider audience, as well as provide creative outlook, hope, and inspiration to local communities and conservationists,” says Zacharevic in a press release about the work. “From the ground, you would not suspect anything more than just another palm oil plantation, the aerial view however reveals an SOS distress signal. ‘Save our Souls’ is a message communicated to those at a distance, a reminder of the connectedness we share with nature. As more of the forests are lost, we lose a little bit of ourselves in the process.”

So far Splash and Burn has worked with Anders Gjennestad aka Strøk, Axel Void, Bibichun, Gabriel Pitcher, Isaac Cordal, Mark Jenkins, and Pixel Pancho. The ongoing initiative is curated by Zacharevic and coordinated by Charlotte Pyatt. To follow upcoming installations or support the project’s efforts visit the Sumatran Orangutan Society website or Splash and Burn’s Instagram.

Work by Strøk aka Anders Gjennestad (2017), image credit: Anders Gjennestad

Work by Ernest Zacharevic (2017), photo credit: Ernest Zacharevic

Work by Isaac Cordal (2017), photo credit: Isaac Cordal

Work by Ernest Zacharevic , photo credit: Tan Wei Ming

REWILD: A Short Film by Splash and Burn and ESCIF Chronicles Rainforest Restoration Efforts in Sumatra

September 10, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

To draw attention to the ecological devastation wrought by palm oil farming in Southeast Asia, the Splash and Burn project (previously) creates and documents large and small-scale art activations. The initiative’s most recent endeavor, titled REWILD and executed with Spanish artist ESCIF, involved carving a rewind symbol into a palm oil plantation in Sumatra, Indonesia, and creating a short film documenting the effort. ESCIF explains, “the idea of going back, of rewinding, is an invitation to reconnect with ourselves; to recover awareness and respect for the earth, which is the ecosystem of which we are a part.”

The land art intervention took place on an acquired plantation within a new forest restoration site made possible by the Sumatran Orangutan Society. After clearing the palms, diverse vegetation has been re-planted. In a release about the project, Splash and Burn explains that the restoration site is located on the borders of the Leuser Ecosystem, one of the most biodiverse places on earth. Sumatra’s forests—and the wildlife populations within—have shrunk by 40% in the past two decades, replaced by palm oil, paper pulp, and rubber plantations. Though not commonly known in the U.S. as a cooking oil, palm oil is the most widely consumed oil on the planet, found in everything from chocolate and instant noodles to lipstick and laundry detergent.

You can watch the trailer of REWILD below. It features an abstract soundscape by Indonesian composer Nursalim Yadi Anugerah. If you are interested in contributing, head to moretrees.info, and follow Splash and Burn (comprised of Ernest Zacharevic and Charlotte Pyatt) on Instagram.

How blockchain technology could revolutionize the art market

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 11, 2019

The technology underpinning blockchain is a powerful decentralizing network architecture that could revolutionize many industries. Now, some artists are leveraging blockchain to help guarantee the authenticity of their work — and ensure that they get paid. Miles O’Brien reports on how digital documentation is putting power back into artists’ hands, even when no tangible object exists. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Naked Raku ~ The Full Monty

ArranEye  Published on Jan 11, 2017

Potter Simon Thorborn shows every step involved in this process. Simon has been perfecting his art on the Scottish Isle of Arran since 1986.

Category   Howto & Style

In spring 2019, more than 17,000 Europeans from 33 countries signed up to have a political argument with a complete stranger. They were part of “Europe Talks,” a project that organizes one-on-one conversations between people who disagree — sort of like a Tinder for politics. Editor Jochen Wegner shares the unexpected things that happened when people met up to talk — and shows how face-to-face discussions could get a divided world to rethink itself.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jochen Wegner · Journalist

Jochen Wegner edits Zeit Online, the website of German weekly “Die Zeit,” which prizes deep dives into cultural issues.

Todd William: A Brief Thought Experiment ~ The Island

What would you do to Survive?

If you found yourself on a deserted island, with no hope of being found, what might be your biggest priorities. If you chose to live, it would no doubt be water and food, followed by some sort of shelter.

Once you’ve established these, ensuring your safety and health would soon follow. And should those needs be met, you could then get to work on improving the quality of your life, for starters, making all the prior efforts as minimal as possible.

The less time you have to waste gathering food, repairing your shelter, or running from danger, the more time you have to spend doing whatever you would like to do.

Reality

But this is considerably different than ordinary life. For one, we have different objectives. We don’t merely eat food to live, we live to eat good foods. We don’t just care about shelter, we care about curb appeal

Our everyday needs are so easily met that almost all our focus and concerns are directed toward things that are not essential to life, they are just creature comforts. We are very fortunate to live in a time period when we can concern ourselves mostly with how we want to improve our lives, not with merely maintaining that life.

We have no reason to apologize for this. We don’t live on a deserted island, and improving our quality of life has value. That we’ve reached a point where most of our daily efforts are put towards creature comforts rather than necessities is a fine tribute to human ingenuity. Yet the implications of this are easily overlooked.

Jobs

Most jobs are about the icing on the cake. Once you move beyond things that involve food, water, housing, safety, and health, the necessity of any job begins to quickly fall into the that grey area where usefulness is purely subjective.

The point isn’t that these jobs aren’t worthwhile, its that we’re addicted to the icing, and we should be. Why not improve our lives. But this addiction keeps us blind to the possibilities. 

Technology

We’ve reached a point when we can realistically discus the possibility that technology may be able to replace most jobs. This is a scary notion. Yet maybe it shouldn’t be. 

If the use of technology permits us to produce all of life’s essentials with negligible manual effort, then all jobs would be related to icing. Any job losses related to technology would merely determine the amount of icing any of us would share.

There would no doubt be disparity, but in exchange, the notion of working to “get by” would be gone. Life would suddenly be merely a matter of how you decide to use your time – and that has more to do with imagination than circumstance.

This is a hard concept to fathom because we’re so accustomed to assessing the value of our lives by comparing what we possess relative to those around us.

But isn’t more appealing to judge the value of life by the amount of quality time we have as our disposal? That is the great equalizer. No matter how much power, wealth, or influence you have, you’re still getting the same 24 hours a day that we all get.

The Island

We don’t live on an isolated island, but we do live on an isolated planet. Maybe its not so different after all, we just need to get over our addiction.

Consider for a moment what it would mean if you no longer felt compelled to always have more . If food, water, shelter, health, and safety we’re all guaranteed to you, might you look at your job differently? Would you feel a bit more selective on how you use your time??

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.my-thought-spot.com/2017/01/a-brief-thought-experiment-island_12.html

Foods to Eat During Pregnancy for Intelligent Baby

Published on Dec 16, 2017

Mother and Baby Care

As an expectant mother, you need to ensure that your diet has all the nutrients and energy needed for your baby to develop properly. You also must ensure that your baby’s body is healthy as this will enable him or her to deal with the different developmental changes. What women eat during pregnancy affects the physical and mental development of their child. You can have some foods that will increase the brain power of your child. Not only during pregnancy, you must start eating these foods at the time when you decide to conceive. Have a look at some foods that you can eat during pregnancy to get intelligent baby.

Category   People & Blogs

Fetal development month by month: Stages of Baby Growth in the Womb

•Published on Jul 13, 2017

How Possible

66.8K subscribers

You’re pregnant. Congratulations! Are you curious how big your developing baby is, what your baby looks like as it grows inside you, and when you’ll feel it move? Take a peek inside the womb to see how a baby develops from month to month without any medical ultrasound or appointment with women’s health doctor. Month 1: (Weeks 4) 00:16 Month 2: (Weeks 8) 01:05 Month 3: (Weeks 12) 01:56 Month 4: (Weeks 16) 02:51 Month 5: (Weeks 20) 03:31 Month 6: (Weeks 24) 04:18 Month 7: (Weeks 28) 04:58 Month 8: (Weeks 32) 05:32 Month 9: (Weeks 36) 05:57 Visit these links for more videos related this! Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/howpossible Twitter: https://twitter.com/howpossiible Google plus: https://plus.google.com/1040794440430… Can this video is help? Please leave your answer in comment Thank you! for watching Fetal development month by month: Stages of Baby Growth in the Womb during pregnancy.

Category   People & Blogs

NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV

•Started streaming on Dec 28, 2018

NASA

Direct from America’s space program to YouTube, watch NASA TV live streaming here to get the latest from our exploration of the universe and learn how we discover our home planet. NASA TV airs a variety of regularly scheduled, pre-recorded educational and public relations programming 24 hours a day on its various channels. The network also provides an array of live programming, such as coverage of missions, events (spacewalks, media interviews, educational broadcasts), press conferences and rocket launches. In the United States, NASA Television’s Public and Media channels are MPEG-2 digital C-band signals carried by QPSK/DVB-S modulation on satellite AMC-3, transponder 15C, at 87 degrees west longitude. Downlink frequency is 4000 MHz, horizontal polarization, with a data rate of 38.86 Mhz, symbol rate of 28.1115 Ms/s, and ¾ FEC. A Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) compliant Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD) is needed for reception.

Category   Science & Technology

Will Space Tourism Take Off? – BBC Click

•Published on Sep 15, 2019

BBC Click

Click travels to Spaceport USA in New Mexico to speak to the team behind Virgin Galactic and learn more about their plans to put tourists into space. We also test out a new virtual reality experience and celebrate the 20th anniversary of the cubesat. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

Ing’s Garden:  Monarch Butterfly

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Sunday, September 8, 2019 at our backyard garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey

       Ing’s Garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey     Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Butterflies & Bees Backyard Garden Newark

naahblubiv

Published on Aug 21, 2012

In downtown Newark, New Jersey, surrounded by walls of brick and concrete buildings there is a small plot of land. This peaceful garden is cultivated to create a little heaven on earth for a simple person who loves nature. In this garden red, pink, orange, yellow, purple, and other colors of beautiful flowers contrast with varying shades of green creating a palette of color reminiscent of a Monet artwork. There is a little table and a few chairs for one or more company to relax in the evening with a gentle breeze bringing the fragrance of Jasmine and other flowers mesmerizing us with peace and tranquility in a moment of utopia on earth. Oh look, Monarch, swallowtail, and other butterflies are dancing around the flowers tasting the sweetness of nectar! A bee is hovering nearby cleverly drinking the nectar from a butterfly bush flower, for the first time teaching me how this is done. At the same time butterflies are using their long proboscis to pierce deep into the center of the flowers drinking up the nectar as though through a straw. For many moons and many summers, I have enjoyed my little plot of heaven on earth. Now it is a time for me to share this with others to help them calm down and enjoy nature before we leave this earth for good.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Category   Education

Music in this video  

Learn more   Listen ad-free with YouTube Premium

Song   String Quartet No. 1 in B-Flat Major, Op. 1 No. 1, Hob. III:1 “L

Artist   Caspar da Salo Quartet

Album    Haydn: Strings Quartets Nos. 1, 63 & 77

The life of Monarch Butterfly

•Published on Sep 12, 2015

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category   Pets & Animals

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Gandhi: Peace and Nonviolence for the World and Syria War

Gandhi: Peace and Nonviolence for the World

Sixteen years ago I wrote a book entitled “Remember Gandhi-The Man Of His Century” and the following is the beginning portion of my introduction:

“When I was young in Thailand, in early grade school we read a book about a man named Gandhi who was born in India.  He was married at age thirteen.  As a young man, Gandhi went to study in Britain and became a layer.  He went to work in South Africa where he experienced discrimination.  Because of this he devoted himself to fight for human equality.  The lessons learned in this fight were carried with him to India where he led his country to freedom from British colonial rule thereby creating an independent Indian country.

I was very impressed with Mr. Gandhi’s fight for human rights.  He helped his country gain independence from the British by nonviolent means without using weapons to achieve his goal.”                                                       

“NONVIOLENCE”, is a word that seems to have no meaning for a lot of countries around the world.  It hurts so much to see the pictures of starving children and adults in Syria.  What are you doing Syrian leaders?  Both sides of Syrian political divide, the government and the opposition use the same tactics trying to win over the other side by cut off the food supply to the villages of their opponents.  The pictures of these starving children and adult Syrians reminds me of pictures of Jewish people liberated from the concentration camps of Nazi Germany by American soldiers.   Why are you so cruel?  Do you all have hearts and feeling as decent human beings?   Please!!! Please!!!———A million times please, I beg you on of both sides.  Please stop fighting!!!  Do you know what happiness is? Please have a peace talks.  Both of your sides have destroyed so much.  Your country is in ruins.  Civilians work hard, only to have you buy weapons to kill them and ruin their livelihood.  Both of your sides are not good leaders for your country.  If you cannot make the country more prosperous and bring happiness to your citizens, what good is it to be leaders of your country?  Please do not let your greediness rule over humanity.  We all will be dead someday sooner or later, and history will record whatever you did.  But you do not die yet; you still have a chance to make things better than the past.  Please have peace talks and remember how Gandhi gained independence for his country by nonviolent means.  

I produced 40 artworks for the book.  The following pictures are four of my artworks of Gandhi that I used for the front and back covers of my book respectively.  Two more are from the inside of the book:

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 1       

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000 

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 2         

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 3                          

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000 

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 4                         

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 2000 

I also did more artworks on the subject of Gandhi in 2010 that is shown below.

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & His Words                         

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2010

Gandhi & Spinning Wheel Of Life         

Artwork by Ing-On  Vibulbhan-Watts 2010

Gandhi & Ing’s Poem, Peace Comes To You                   

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2010

I was very thankful and glad to find an article from the BBC News on, “Rare pictures of the last 10 years of Gandhi’s life”.  These are shown below:

Rare pictures of the last 10 years of Gandhi’s life

Soutik Biswas Delhi correspondent

Here’s an anxious-looking Mahatma Gandhi making a telephone call from his office in Sevagram village in the western state of Maharashtra in 1938.

India’s greatest leader had moved to a village called Segaon two years earlier. He had renamed it Sevagram or a village of service. He built an ashram, a commune which was home to “many a fateful decision which affected the destiny of India”. Gandhi had moved in with his wife, Kasturba, and some followers. There was also a steady stream of guests.

Kanu Gandhi, a callow young man in his 20s and a grand nephew of the Mahatma, was also there. Armed with a Rolleiflex camera, he was taking pictures of the leader.

He had wanted to become a doctor, but his parents had goaded him to join Gandhi’s personal staff doing clerical work, looking after accounts and writing letters at the ashram.

Kanu Gandhi had developed an interest in photography, but Gandhi had told him there was no money to buy him a camera.

The nephew did not relent. Finally, Gandhi asked businessman Ghanshyam Das Birla to gift 100 rupees ($1.49; £1.00) to Kanu so that he could buy the camera and a roll of film.

But the leader imposed three conditions on the photographer: he forbade him from using flash and asking him to pose; and made it clear that the ashram would not pay for his photography.

Kanu made do with a stipend from a Gandhi acolyte who liked his work. He also began selling his pictures to newspapers.

Over the years and until Gandhi’s assassination in 1948, Kanu Gandhi shot some 2,000 pictures of the greatest leader of the Indian Independence movement. For decades, his pictures remained in obscurity, once surfacing with a German researcher who began compiling and selling them.

Now, 92 of those rare pictures of Gandhi during the last decade of his life have been published in an exquisitely produced cloth-bound monograph by the Delhi-based Nazar Foundation, a non-profit trust founded by two of India’s most well-known photographers Prashant Panjiar and Dinesh Khanna.

This is possibly my most favourite image from the book. Here Gandhi is standing on a weighing scale at the Birla House in Bombay (what is now Mumbai) in 1945.

For a man who undertook more than a dozen fasts during the freedom movement as a part of his non-violent protests – to bring peace, demand Muslim rights or to shame rioting mobs – the picture is telling.

“This is a picture of a man keeping an eye on his weight, testing himself all the time. It tells you a lot about the man,” says leading photographer Sanjeev Saith who went through more than 1,000 images and helped curate the monograph.

Here, Gandhi is seen in front of his office hut at Sevagram ashram in 1940. A pillow covers his head as protection against the severe heat.

It is, at once, an intimate and remote image.

Which is one of the reasons, many say, that made Kanu Gandhi’s pictures of the Mahatma so special.

“Although he had incredible access to the icon, we are always struck at the way Kanu, perhaps because he was in awe of Gandhi always kept a respectful distance, and yet managed to convey a sense of intimacy and proximity,” says Panjiar.

“And because he kept a certain distance, Kanu intuitively found a more modern language of photography than what was prevalent in those times in India, framing many of his images with an interesting and unconventional use of the foreground, breaking many of the accepted rules of composition”.

Kanu Gandhi travelled far and wide with the leader.

Here’s his image of a van carrying Gandhi being pushed by Pathans and Congress workers over some rough terrain in the North West Frontier Provinces in October 1938.

This is a picture of Gandhi, and his wife Kasturba, in Abottabad in November, 1938.

Kanu Gandhi’s first-ever book of photographs chronicles the leader’s political and personal journey in his last decade in vivid detail. There are pictures of Gandhi in his many moods – brooding, joyous, pensive, grieving – and with his supporters.

Here Gandhi is being massaged by a relative and his elder sister Raliatbehn during a three-day fast in Gujarat’s Rajkot city in March 1939.

“These images may be old, but they are not old-fashioned. They are not straightforward, beautifully shot and carefully framed, neat pictures which were popular then,” says Panjiar.

“It possibly helped that Kanu was not a trained photographer because many of his images would have been rejected by his contemporaries on account of being blurred, slightly out of focus or double exposed. But these find pride of place, lovingly pasted by own hands in albums.”

Gandhi and his wife Kasturba are seen here at a wedding of a Christian man and an untouchable woman in Sevagram ashram, 1940.

Sanjeev Saith says the picture of a dying Kasturba Gandhi lying on a bed at the Aga Khan Palace in Pune in 1944 a few months before her death counts among his favourites. A broken shaft of light is streaming in through a window behind her.

“Here is this austere woman lying regally on this stately bed, she is about to die. This picture just shakes me up,” he says.

And then there is this historic 1938 picture of Gandhi in a convivial mood with freedom hero and radical nationalist Subhas Chandra Bose. In the background, Kasturba Gandhi is drawing her sari, and looking into the distance.

This was the high noon of Bose’s political life: he had been elected as president of the Congress party. Gandhi had overruled objections from independence hero Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, who had objected to Bose’s appointment.

The two leaders had shared a complex relationship and fell out later over differences.

“This is an amazing picture,” says Saith. “It contains two of India’s greatest heroes in one frame. Bose is young, cherubic, almost looking at Gandhi in admiration. Gandhi has his characteristic toothless grin. It is a nice, warm moment.”

Here’s Gandhi and Nobel Prize-winning poet Rabindranath Tagore in Shantiniketan, West Bengal, in February 1940, a study of two great men in meditation.

“Look at the bottom of the picture. It is an accidental double exposure [a technique which combined two different images into a single image]. It’s rather inventive. Kanu Gandhi knew it was a good picture, and he didn’t throw away the negative,” says Saith.

There’s a series of pictures of Gandhi collecting donations for a fund for the untouchables during a three-month long train journey that took him to Bengal, Assam and southern India in 1945-46.

In some he’s stretching his arm from a carriage for money; in others he’s surrounded by people and collecting the money in a slender basket.

“He’s an old man, but he looks agile. He’s almost begging for alms, and he’s serious about picking up every bit of money for a good cause. He understands money,” says Saith.

“I am a bania and there is no limit to my greed,” Gandhi once said, alluding to his Indian caste comprising mainly of moneylenders.

Being the only person who was allowed to take Gandhi’s photographs at any time, Kanu Gandhi was shooting every day.

Sometimes Gandhi intervened: one such moment was when Kasturba, lay dying in his lap at the Aga Khan Palace in Pune.

The nephew, however, was allowed to shoot this image of the leader, draped in a shawl, looking at Kasturba after she passed away in February 1944.

According to several accounts, Gandhi kept a vigil for hours, sitting by her side, praying.

“After sixty years of constant companionship,” he said later that night. “I cannot imagine life without her.”

Ironically, for a man who followed Gandhi like a shadow, Kanu Gandhi was away in Noakhali in east Bengal when his leader was killed in 1948.

“Gandhi’s death had a profound effect on Kanu and his wife, Abha’s life. For Kanu, photography was no longer as important as the need to convey his leader’s message,” says Panjiar.

Kanu Gandhi died after a heart attack while on a pilgrimage in northern India in February 1986.

Photographs by Kanu Gandhi/© Gita Mehta, heir of Abha and Kanu Gandhi.

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-35259671

The Following are some pictures, information and links on The Destruction of Syria.

KOBANE, Syria — A heap of dust is all that remains of the house where Alan Kurdi was born and raised, before war sent his family fleeing and he drowned on the short sea crossing between Turkey and Greece.

The image of the toddler’s lifeless body washed up on a Turkish beach turned him into an instant symbol of the suffering of Syrians so desperate to reach Europe that they are prepared to risk their lives making the dangerous journey.

His flattened home, destroyed in an American airstrike in the landmark battle for control of the Syrian town of Kobane last year, has not been so widely seen. It is just one of thousands of buildings leveled, among hundreds of thousands more that have been obliterated in Syria during the four-year-old war.

As the conflict drags into a fifth year with no end in sight, little heed is being paid to the enormity of the havoc being wreaked on the country. Some 2.1 million homes, half the country’s hospitals and more than 7,000 schools have been destroyed, according to the United Nations.

The cost of the damage so far is estimated at a staggering $270 billion — and rebuilding could run to more than $300 billion, according to Abdallah al-Dardari, a former Syrian government minister who heads the National Agenda for Syria program at the U.N.’s Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. That’s more than 10 times the amount spent by the United States on reconstruction in Iraq, with few discernible results.

   When a Turkish soldier picked up the body of Syrian toddler Alan Kurdi in September, it became an instant symbol of Syrian refugees’ suffering and desperation. Alan was the son of Abdullah Kurdi, a native of Kobane, who lost his wife and two sons when their dinghy sank off the coast of Turkey. | Graves hold the remains of Kurdi’s family members.

If or when the war ends, any government will find itself “ruling over a pile of rubble,” Dardari said. “I don’t know who will fund this.”

The immense human toll is a far more immediate and obvious concern. As many as 250,000 people are dead, 1 million have been wounded, 7.6 million are displaced within Syria and 4 million have fled across the borders, according to the U.N.

[As tragedies shock Europe, a bigger refugee crisis looms in the Middle East]

The numbers rise daily with each new airstrike and each new offensive launched, as Russian planes join Syrian and American ones in bombing the country and the various factions sustain their relentless attacks on one another with rockets, mortars and artillery.

So, too, does the damage, compounding the tragedy in small and unseen ways that also kill people or drive them to seek new lives elsewhere. The more buildings are flattened, the more homes, shops and businesses are lost, the greater the incentive to flee the country — and the less people will have to return to whenever the war finally ends.

“We’re allowing a level of destruction we will never have the means to address,” said Peter Harling of the International Crisis Group. “They’re wiping one city after another off the map.”

Kobane stands as a small reminder of how much is being lost.

 Abdullah Kurdi had fled to Turkey to work, but he chose to make the dangerous trip to Greece because he didn’t make enough money to live in Istanbul. His home was leveled in the battle for Kobane.

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/world/2015/11/13/kobane/

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.newsweek.com/2015/08/28/syria-war-bombing-aleppo-364035.html

Horror of the starving Syrians cut off from the world: People living in three towns under siege from Assad forces and rebels are forced to eat cats, dogs and grass as food supplies are unable to reach them

  • Madaya near Damascus has been under siege by Assad’s troops since July
  • Activists say desperate residents have resorted to eating domestic animals
  • Some have been killed by snipers or landmines while scavenging for food
  • Foua and Kfarya have been under attack from rebels for more than a year
  • Victims also forced to have surgery without anesthetic due to lack of drugs
  • See full news coverage on Syria at www.dailymail.co.uk/syria

By Simon Tomlinson for MailOnline

Published: 08:00 EST, 7 January 2016 | Updated: 06:33 EST, 8 January 2016

   For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3388505/Starving-survivors-trapped-Syrian-towns-siege-Assad-forces-rebels-forced-eat-cats-dogs-grass-food-supplies-cut-aid-groups-warn.html

  For more information please visit the following link:

http://qz.com/589222/horrifying-images-of-starving-syrians-are-bringing-the-war-back-into-focus/

For more information please visit the following link:

http://abcnews.go.com/International/besieged-madaya-syria-residents-describe-starvation-heartbreaking-conditions/story?id=36233172

Destruction: Parts of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo have been destroyed during the bitter civil war. The aftermath of a separate assault by the Syrian regime on the city is pictured

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2315102/Syrian-government-using-chemical-weapons-people-crosses-red-line-Britain-David-Cameron-warns.html

The Latest War in Syria, 2019

Syria war: Turkey warns Europe of new migrant wave

5 September 2019  BBC News: Europe migrant crisis

Turkey has warned it may reopen the route for Syrian refugees to enter Europe if it does not get more international support for creating a safe zone in northern Syria.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called for “logistical support” to establish a safe zone in Syria’s north-east.

“Either this happens, or we will be forced to open the gates,” he said.

Turkey is hosting more than 3.6 million Syrians who have fled the civil war. The US backs the “safe zone” plan.

But the plan is controversial, because Syrian Kurdish forces are wary of Turkey moving many Syrians into the north-east who are not originally from that area.

The ethnic Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), seen by Turkey as a terrorist group, do not want to make way for Turkish forces in that area.

The US military has backed the YPG against so-called Islamic State (IS) fighters, whose territory is now much diminished.

“Our goal is for at least one million of our Syrian brothers to return to the safe zone we will form along our 450km [280-mile] border,” Mr Erdogan said in a speech in Ankara.

“Give us logistical support and we can go and build housing at 30km depth in northern Syria.”

Exodus from Idlib

Turkey wants US forces to jointly patrol the safe zone, and Mr Erdogan said Turkey was “determined to set it up by the last week of September”.

Turkish officials also fear that heavy fighting in the north-western province of Idlib could push more refugees into Turkey.

Syrian government forces backed by Russian aircraft are pounding rebel and jihadist forces in Idlib. Turkey backs some of the rebel groups there.

For more information please visit the following links:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49599297?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cx1m7zg0w5zt/syria&link_location=live-reporting-story

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-49668689?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cx1m7zg0w5zt/syria&link_location=live-reporting-story

GoldenSwallowtailButterfly

naahblubiv  Published on Aug 24, 2013

To All Syrians from the Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Beautiful Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Summersaults in the sky

Drinking sweet nectar

For the beautiful wings to fly

The golden wings span out

Showing the black accented lines

A highlight for your beautiful wings

Two perfect tails you have

But a broken wing

Knowing how far you came from

Do you pass by Syria lately?

No! No one cultivates the gardens

They are busy fighting with each other

No trees, no plants

No flowers giving me the nectar to drink

They are running away

From their homes and their land

One million children are refugees now

What are you doing Syrian people?

Everybody stops fighting Please come!

Plant your trees for butterflies and bees

Show your children how nice butterflies can be

They help to fertilize your plants

Producing fruits for your children to enjoy

Syrian people you have a long culture

Your arts and your country are beautiful

Do not ruin your ancestors’ good reputation

Preserve your culture for your children to grow

Show your children your fruitful gardens

And the beautiful Golden Butterfly will visit you

The butterfly says,

You will see no tears

No fear on your children faces

But the sound of your children’s laughter

The joy of seeing my beautiful wings

Everybody stops using weapons Please come!

To enjoy your tasty food Your dance, your music, your arts

And your ancient civilization

We want to visit you

Show us how civilized Syrian Society can be

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, August 23, 2013, 9:45 pm

The Golden Swallowtail Butterfly was captured by me on Saturday, August 17, 2013 at our backyard garden in downtown Newark, New Jersey. I would like to dedicate this video to all the children in Syria.

Please visit www.ingpeceproject.com

 for more pictures and information

Category   Education

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PBS News, TED Talks, Chinese Traditional Crafts, francischeefilms, National Geographic, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal, Remembering-911

PBS News: September8 – 11, 2019 and New 9/11 documentary honors first responders who made the ultimate sacrifice

TED Talks: Asmeret Asefaw Berhe a climate change solution that’s right under our feet, and Joanne Chory, How supercharged plants could slow climate change.

XiaoXi Chinese: Traditional Crafts

francischeefilms: Cell Division Time lapse

National Geographic: Uranus 101

The Secrets of Nature: Bohemia – A Year in the Wetlands

Thisiscolossal: Children and Animals Commune Within Neglected Landscapes in New Paintings by Kevin Peterson

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: ingpeaceproject.com, Remembering-911

New 9/11 documentary honors first responders who made the ultimate sacrifice

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 11, 2019

On 9/11, as many tried to escape the wreckage and carnage in lower Manhattan, first responders rushed in. We remember that horrible day by taking a look at the sacrifice they made, courtesy of the documentary “Rescue, Recovery & Healing: The 9/11 Memorial Glade Dedication.” The piece was produced by New York’s WNET public media station.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 11, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Published on Sep 11, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, more than 20 states appear to have reached a comprehensive settlement with Purdue Pharma, manufacturer of OxyContin. Plus: Results of the N.C. special congressional election, a conversation with Mark Sanford, the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian, how the art world is using blockchain, reports of a U.S. mole in the Kremlin and remembering September 11th, 18 years later.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 10, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 10, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, National Security Advisor John Bolton steps down amid contradictory reports about what led to his departure. Plus: Assessing Bolton’s tenure in national security, gun control and other legislative priorities for Congress this fall, rodents that perform a critical safety function in Cambodia, the downfall of Harvey Weinstein and remembering photographer Robert Frank. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: The fundamental policy divisions between Bolton and Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhsHd… How Bolton’s departure might change Trump’s foreign policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Fnda… News Wrap: Pompeo denies reports of rescued Kremlin mole https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dfbw… Congressional Democrats vow to prioritize gun legislation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faLQo… Why Congress is likely to be even more divided this fall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEgIU… How giant African rats are finding land mines in Cambodia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okjod… How NYT reporters uncovered Weinstein’s empire of deceit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBL22… Photographer Robert Frank’s lens on American life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaPMt…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 9, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 9, 2019

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump cancels planned talks with the Taliban in the U.S., prompting questions about the outlook for peace in Afghanistan. Plus: The wreckage and turmoil left by Hurricane Dorian, the latest British political chaos over Brexit, Politics Monday, Margaret Atwood on her sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale,” remembering Marca Bristo and a tribute to fallen U.S. troops. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: North Korea says it’s open to new nuclear talks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j3sz… After canceled talks, what’s next for peace in Afghanistan? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gOf_r… Former Obama official blames U.S. for stalled Taliban talks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLCan… Residents of ruined Abaco and Grand Bahama flee in droves https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExoxQ… Brexit, Boris and bedlam: Britain ‘hobbled’ by stalemate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bmTR… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on N.C. special election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmiM9… Why this is the moment for a sequel to ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-TogG… How Marca Bristo changed Americans’ minds about disabilities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjYGj… Honor Roll for September 9, 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrT3Z… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 8, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 8, 2019

On this edition for Sunday, September 8, after President Trump’s tweet, what’s next for peace talks between the U.S. and Afghanistan? Also, the latest on the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian, and a look at how the norms of masculinity are negatively impacting men and boys. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

There’s two times more carbon in the earth’s soil than in all of its vegetation and the atmosphere — combined. Biogeochemist Asmeret Asefaw Berhe dives into the science of soil and shares how we could use its awesome carbon-trapping power to offset climate change. “[Soil] represents the difference between life and lifelessness in the earth system, and it can also help us combat climate change — if we can only stop treating it like dirt,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Asmeret Asefaw Berhe · Soil scientist

Asmeret Asefaw Berhe is a soil and global-change scientist and educator passionate about all things related to the science and beauty of soils.

Take Action

Learn more about how soils help sustain life.

Learn more ?

Learn how you can take action against climate change from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

TED2019 | April 2019

Plants are amazing machines — for millions of years, they’ve taken carbon dioxide out of the air and stored it underground, keeping a crucial check on the global climate. Plant geneticist Joanne Chory is working to amplify this special ability: with her colleagues at the Salk Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, she’s creating plants that can store more carbon, deeper underground, for hundreds of years. Learn more about how these supercharged plants could help slow climate change. (This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Joanne Chory · Plant geneticist

Recognized as one of the greatest scientific innovators of our time, Joanne Chory studies the genetic codes of plants. Her goal: to use plants to help fight climate change.

More Resources

A new model to inspire change at scale

The Audacious Project

Learn more about The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to fund ambitious ideas for social good.

More at AudaciousProject.org ?

Take Action

Learn more about Salk Institute’s plan to harness the power of plants to fight climate change.

Learn more ?

participate

Donate now to help Salk Institute turbocharge plants to make a dent in climate change.

TED2019 | April 2019

??????(Bamboo Steamer)?????????????(Yum Cha)?Dim Sum???XiaoXi?Chinese Traditional Crafts

Cell Division Time lapse

francischeefilms   Published on Mar 13, 2017

Time_lapse of cell division from second cleavage. The animal pole is clearly visible in the upper half of the image. A brief note about the image capture techniques: Hi I can say that it was done with a custom designed microscope based on the “infinity optical design” It is not available by any manufacturer. I built it. I used LEDs and relevant optics to light the egg. They too were custom designed by me. The whole microscope sits on anti-vibration table. I have to say that it doesn’t matter too much what microscope people use to perform this. There are countless other variables involved in performing this tricky shot, such as for example: the ambient temperature during shooting; the time at which the eggs were collected; the handling skills of the operator; the type of water used; lenses; quality of camera etc etc. Hope this helps. To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email licensing@storyful.com

Category   Education

Uranus 101 | National Geographic

National Geographic  Published on Feb 1, 2019

Uranus is a planet beyond convention. Find out why it boasts the coldest temperatures in the solar system, what phenomena caused the unique tilt of its axis, and the curious origin of the planet’s name. ? Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #Uranus #Educational About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more in “Planet Uranus, explained” https://on.natgeo.com/2FymTFI Uranus 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/m4NXbFOiOGk National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Category    Education

Bohemia – A Year in the Wetlands – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Feb 6, 2015

Subscribe to watch full natural history documentaries! A new documentary is uploaded every week. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesecretsof… Twitter: https://twitter.com/NatureUniversum In Bohemia, at the very heart of Europe, south of the Golden City of Prague and guarded by medieval castles, lies a hidden mosaic of lakes and gently flowing rivers, of misty forests and mysterious peat bogs.This important wetland, shaped both by nature and centuries of influence by man, is a magnet for huge flocks of birds and home to an amazing diversity of plant and animal life. In spring there is an explosion of life as the trees are weighed down with nests of cormorants, egrets, herons and storks. With the arrival of winter the landscape becomes silent and desolate. Otters are hunting fish under the ice of frozen lakes while White-tailed Eagles soar over gaps in the ice, targeting fish and birds. Since his early childhood wildlife cinematographer Jiri Petr has spent much of his time in this wildlife paradise. Together with him, we will explore this remarkable habitat and observe the changing faces of nature during the course of one year that inspired many artists and writers alike.

Category   Film & Animation

Children and Animals Commune Within Neglected Landscapes in New Paintings by Kevin Peterson

February 28, 2019   Kate Sierzputowski

For several years artist Kevin Peterson (previously) has created paintings that occupy the same fictionalized world. His imagined environments are occupied by children and animals— individuals band together as they navigate depleted urban environments. The works pair the innocence of its subjects against a broken and crumbling world, addressing the various journeys we each take through life.

Recently, Peterson has begun to paint just the animals in these scenes, rather than pairing them exclusively with children. “In my head, it’s the same world,” the Houston-based painter tells Colossal, “the animals and kids just haven’t met up yet. Maybe they’re searching for each other.” His solo exhibition Wild opens at Thinkspace Projects in Culver City, California on March 2, 2019 and continues through March 23, 2019. You can see more of his paintings on his website and Instagram. (via booooooom)

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: ingpeaceproject.com, Remembering-911

Remembering 9/11                                                 For All who perished

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PBS News: September 1-7, 2019 and Is France’s groundbreaking food-waste law working?

 United Nation: The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming

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BBC Click: E-Scooters, Debit Cards and Dementia

TED TAlKS: Kishore Mahbubani how the west can adapt to a rising asia?, and Hyeonseo Lee, my escape from North Korea

TED-ED: How do vitamins work? – Ginnie Trinh Nguyen

Thisiscolossal: Preview Artworks Available at Mother & Child Vol. II Fundraiser to Aid Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border, and Chart-Like Composite Photographs by Dan Marker-Moore Show the Progression of the 2019 Solar Eclipse   

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Free High-Quality Documentaries: The Pan-American Highway – From Peru to Tierra del Fuego

Real Wild: Valley of The Golden Baboons [Monkey Documentary]

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ artworks posted on Pinterest

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 7, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Sep 7, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, September 7, Hurricane Dorian leaves devastation and destruction in the Bahamas, the Carolina coast assesses damage as thousands remain without power, and Rwanda is seen as a model of success after the 1994 genocide, but at what cost? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 6, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 6, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian comes ashore in North Carolina as relief efforts in the Bahamas grapple with immense devastation. Plus: The health implications of detention and family separation for migrant children, warnings about the dangers of vaping, political analysis from Shields and Brooks and the Kennedy Center expands both its physical campus and its community approach. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 5, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 5, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian continues a path of destruction along the Carolina coast as relief efforts mobilize for the devastated islands of the Bahamas. Plus: Which DOD projects are losing money to fund border wall construction, Amazon species threatened by deforestation, mixing Mexican art and politics, migrating to save one’s family and a brief but spectacular take on tradition. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: After Dorian, what’s next for relief efforts in the Bahamas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqS80… How South Carolina’s coast is coping with Hurricane Dorian https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCJUU… What the U.S. East Coast can expect from Hurricane Dorian https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj0Tt… News Wrap: Taliban cause more deadly violence in Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyYl8… Trump’s ‘unprecedented’ use of DOD money for border wall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xcxz… In Brazil, deforestation threatens Amazon species’ survival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZ6pz… How Mexico’s Joaquin Segura translates politics into art https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zBXk… What this Filipino family proves about poverty and migration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeGcR… How gay male dancers are preserving a Cambodian tradition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aB2Jz…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 4, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 4, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the southeastern U.S. watches as a weakened but still potent Hurricane Dorian skirts the coast. Plus: Hurricane relief efforts in the Bahamas, confusion around the UK’s path to Brexit, Hong Kong drops its controversial extradition bill, Brazil’s Amazon burns, what Middle America voters are saying about politics and remembering the victims of the Odessa mass shooting.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 3, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 3, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian leaves unprecedented destruction in the Bahamas after lingering for days. Plus: How the southeastern U.S. is preparing for Hurricane Dorian, a conversation with acting DHS Sec. Kevin McAleenan, stemming Central American migration to the U.S., intensifying violence in Afghanistan, Texas copes with a mass shooting and the work of designer Alexander Girard. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 2, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 2, 2019

Monday on the NewsHour, the southeastern U.S. prepares for a possible hit from Hurricane Dorian. Plus: Hurricane Dorian slams the Bahamas, where rescuers have been unable to get to many of the stranded, a conversation with former Defense Sec. James Mattis, another mass shooting in Texas, Brexit drama in the UK, 2020 Democrats talk gun laws and Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Hurricane Dorian slams Bahamas; Florida awaits storm’s path https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXn6R… Scope of Hurricane Dorian’s damage in the Bahamas unknown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCdb8… News Wrap: At least 4 dead, 29 missing in Calif. boat fire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxslH… Amid peace talks, Taliban claims deadly explosion in Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmEF3… Why Mattis left Trump administration–but won’t criticize it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0-3X… Texas’ 2nd mass shooting in a month leaves state reeling https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcZHG… In Britain, Boris Johnson’s Brexit ‘hardball’ sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwMXk… 2020 Democrats add gun safety to Labor Day campaign agenda https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suV0x… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on 2020 labor vote, gun policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuZlJ…

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 1, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 1, 2019

On this edition for Sunday, September 1, Odessa, Texas, remains as an active crime scene, Hurricane Dorian intensifies and draws closer to the southeast coast, and Columbine cop advises on how to respond to mass shootings. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Is France’s groundbreaking food-waste law working?

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 31, 2019

A third of the world’s food goes to waste, but France is attempting to do something about it. Since 2016, large grocery stores in the country have been banned from throwing away unsold food that could be given away. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Christopher Livesay reports from Paris as part of our “Future of Food” series, which is supported in partnership with the Pulitzer Center. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

http://webtv.un.org/live/

24 Hour Live and pre-recorded Programming

6 Sep 2019 –  The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming of United Nations meetings and events as well as with pre-recorded video features and documentaries on various global issues.

Al Jazeera English | Live

Al Jazeera English  Started streaming on Jun 1, 2019

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category   News & Politics

E-Scooters, Debit Cards And Dementia BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on Aug 23, 2019

Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

As Asian economies and governments continue to gain power, the West needs to find ways to adapt to the new global order, says author and diplomat Kishore Mahbubani. In an insightful look at international politics, Mahbubani shares a three-part strategy that Western governments can use to recover power and improve relations with the rest of the world.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kishore Mahbubani · Author, diplomat, academic

Through his books, diplomatic work and research, Kishore Mahbubani reenvisions global power dynamics through the lens of rising Asian economies.

More Resources

Has the West Lost It?: A Provocation

Kishore Mahbubani

Penguin UK (2019)

Buy now ?

Take Action learn

Learn more about the end of Western domination of world history, and how we can open our minds to non-Western perspectives.

Learn more ?

TED2019 | April 2019

As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thought her country was “the best on the planet.” It wasn’t until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 14, to begin a life in hiding, as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope — and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Hyeonseo Lee · Activist

As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee thoght her country was the “best on the planet.” It wasn’t until the famine of the 90s that she began to wonder. She escaped the country at 17-years-old to begin a life in hiding as a refugee in China. Hers is a harrowing, personal tale of survival and hope — and a powerful reminder of those who face constant danger, even when the border is far behind.

More Resources

since the talk

Since the Talk: How Hyeonseo Lee found the man who saved her family

In 2013, Lee finally got the chance to say thank you to the stranger who helped her mother and brother flee North Korea. Read more.

More at blog.ted.com ?

bbc radio4

The business of saving lives

In a half-hour podcast from BBC Radio 4, get an inside look at the world of controversial South Korean brokers who help smuggle defectors out of North Korea.

More at www.bbc.co.uk ?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b012r7jv  Escape from North Korea  Crossing Continents

Lucy Williamson reports from Seoul on the dangerous trade of the people brokers, smuggling the desperate out of North Korea to the safety of the South.

https://www.ted.com/talks/yeonmi_park_how_i_escaped_north_korea_and_found_freedom?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=button__2019-08-30

“North Korea is unimaginable,” says human rights activist Yeonmi Park, who escaped the country at the age of 13. Sharing the harrowing story of her childhood, she reflects on the fragility of freedom — and shows how change can be achieved even in the world’s darkest places.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yeonmi Park · Human rights activist

North Korean defector Yeonmi Park is becoming a leading voice of oppressed people around the world.

More Resources

In Order to Live: A North Korean Girl’s Journey to Freedom

Yeonmi Park and Maryanne Vollers

Penguin Books (2016)

Buy now ?

Take Action

participate

Support Flash Drives For Freedom, a campaign to help bring outside information into North Korea.

How do vitamins work? – Ginnie Trinh Nguyen

TED-Ed   Published on Oct 6, 2014

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-s-the-… Vitamins are the building blocks that keep our bodies running; they help build muscle and bone, capture energy, heal wounds and more. But if our body doesn’t create vitamins, how do they get into our system? Ginnie Trinh Nguyen describes what vitamins are, how they get into our bodies — and why they are so crucial. Lesson by Ginnie Trinh Nguyen, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

Category   Education

Fundraiser To Aid Families Separated At The US Mexico Border

Preview Artworks Available at Mother & Child Vol. II Fundraiser to Aid Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border

July 8, 2019  Colossal

Valerie Lueth

It’s been a year since the trauma of separated families at the U.S.-Mexico border shocked people around the world. Tragically, this humanitarian crisis continues, as documented by journalists and photographers, as well the detained children themselves. Please join us in New York City on July 15, 2019 from 6-9pm for Mother & Child Vol. II, a fundraising gallery show. Colossal is partnering with Sugarlift and a slate of talented and generous artists from around the globe to support three vetted non-profits: Kids in Need of Defense, The Young Center, and The Florence Project provide direct aid and legal support to affected families.

Original artworks, prints, and photographs have been donated by over fifty artists including Valerie Lueth, Luján Pérez, Pat Perry, Maude White, Elicia Edijanto, Lauren Matsumoto, Michael Meadors and more. If you can’t make it to Manhattan, artworks are also available for purchase in the Mother & Child web shop, starting on July 15. RSVP for free here so we can send you a quick one-time reminder: bitly.com/motherandchild2019.

Luján Pérez

Jess X. Snow

Faith XLVII

Maude White

Sonni

Elicia Edijanto

Lauren Matsumoto

Pepe Salgado

Actias dubernardi

Adam Grochowalski   Published on Nov 28, 2016

Actias dubernardi, Chinese Luna Moth. The film shows details of the full development of this moth. I strongly recommend watching the movie on a TV screen 4K. Thank you, Adam Der Film zeigt Einzelheiten der vollständigen Entwicklung dieser Motte. Ich empfehle den Film auf einem 4K TV-Bildschirm beobachten. Danke, Adam

Category   Pets & Animals

The Pan-American Highway – From Peru to Tierra del Fuego

Free High-Quality Documentaries

Published on Jul 10, 2018

It measures roughly 35,000 kilometres. From Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. It runs across two continents and through more than a dozen countries; sometimes, as a gravel track, but also as an eight-lane motorway. It meanders through vast landscapes, as well as the confines of major cities. For many, it is the absolutely perfect route: The Pan-American Highway. It leads through forests and deserts, through jungles and across high mountain passes. To the right and left of the Pan-Americana, drug wars and civil wars are contended, Hollywood films produced and computer programmes developed. And just a few thousand kilometres further south, Red Indians still hunt with bows and arrows. For the very first time, a Norddeutscher Rundfunk TV-team travelled the entire route – in search of history and stories.

Category   Travel & Events

Valley of The Golden Baboons [Monkey Documentary] | Real Wild

Real Wild  Published on Dec 2, 2017

Marvel at this epic story, seen through the eyes of the king of the resident golden baboons in the Luangwa Valley, one of the last true wildernesses in Africa. It appears to be an idyllic setting, but below this tranquil scene, is a concentration of animal drama found nowhere else in Africa. Click here for more documentaries: http://bit.ly/2gSPaf6 For exclusive clips, follow us Facebook: facebook.com/wildthingschannel Any queries, please contact us at: owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com Content licensed by Sky Vision

Category   Pets & Animals

Chart-Like Composite Photographs by Dan Marker-Moore Show the Progression of the 2019 Solar Eclipse

August 12, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Los Angeles-based photographer Dan Marker-Moore (previously) flew south to document the solar eclipse that occurred in Chile on July 2, 2019. While many professional photographers also documented the event, most images capture the singular moment in one image. Marker-Moore decided to break out the progression in orderly chart-like designs. He shares with Colossal that he experimented with over one hundred different format variants before deciding on the final five. Each image contains between 26 and 425 photos of the sun. Read more about Marker-Moore’s trip and the equipment he used here, and find prints of his eclipse series in his online store. The photographer also shares new work on Instagram.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ artworks posted on Pinterest

On Friday, September 6, 2019 I jointed Pinterest and posted three of my artworks which are shown above.

I created “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996.

“I Have A Dream.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and, Vincent van Gogh and His Letters to his brother, I produced both artworks in 2010. 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, September 7, 2019

For more information please visit the following link:

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Newark Museum & Its Contribution to The Community, August 2019

Newark Museum & Its Contribution to The Community, August 2019

Newark Museum

Looking northwest at en:Newark Museum from western corner of Washington Park on a sunny midday. Jim.henderson – Own work
 
Wikimedia | © OpenStreetMap
Established 1909
Location 49 Washington St
Newark, NJ, USA
Director Linda C. Harrison[1]
Public transit access Washington Park Station (Newark Light Rail)
Website newarkmuseum.org
James Street Commons Historic District
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. Historic district
Contributing property
New Jersey Register of Historic Places
Newark Museum is located in Essex County,
New Jersey
Significant dates
Added to NRHP January 9, 1978
Designated NJRHP February 10, 1977

The Newark Museum, in Newark, Essex County, New Jersey, United States, is the state’s largest museum. It holds major collections of American art, decorative arts, contemporary art, and arts of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the ancient world.

Newark Museum  Google Arts & Culture

Coffin lid of Henet-Mer Artwork  Created: 1076 BC–946 BC

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Feral Benga, Senegalese Dancer  Artwork  Artist: Richmond Barthé  Created: 1935

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture  Female figure Artwork  Created: 1875–1925

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture  Brewing Vessel  Artwork  Created: 1900–1999

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Limestone statue of a votary  Artwork  Created: 451 BC–426 BC

 Its extensive collections of American art include works by Hiram Powers, Thomas Cole, John Singer Sargent, Albert Bierstadt, Frederick Church, Childe Hassam, Mary Cassatt, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Joseph Stella, Tony Smith and Frank Stella.

MEZZANINE  Artist: Norman Rockwell

Artist: Norman Rockwell

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

The Sheridan Theatre  Artwork  Artist: Edward Hopper  Created: 1937

Periods: Modern art, American Realism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Twilight, “Short Arbiter ‘Twixt Day and Night” (Sunset)

Artwork  Artist: Frederic Edwin Church  Created: 1850 

Periods: Hudson River School, Luminism

,

Newark Museum

Google Arts & Culture

Portrait of Willie Gee

Artwork  Artist: Robert Henri  Created: 1904

Periods: Modern art, Realism, Ashcan School, American Realism

Newark Museum

Google Arts & Culture

The Voice of the City of New York Interpreted: The White Way II

Artwork

Artist: Joseph Stella

Created: 1920–1922

Periods: Modern art, Futurism, American modernism

Newark Museum

Google Arts & Culture

Slave Rape Story Quilt

Artwork

Artist: Faith Ringgold

Created: 1985

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Mrs. Charles Thursby  Artwork  Artist: John Singer Sargent

Location: Private collection  Created: 1872–1898  Genre: Portrait

Periods: Impressionism, Realism, American Impressionism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

The Voice of the City of New York Interpreted: The Bridge (Brooklyn Bridge)

Artwork  Artist: Joseph Stella  Created: 1920–1922

Periods: Modern art, Futurism, American modernism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

The Voice of the City of New York Interpreted: The Port (The Harbor, The Battery)

Artwork  Artist: Joseph Stella  Created: 1920–1922

Periods: Modern art, Futurism, American modernism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

The Voice of the City of New York Interpreted: The White Way I

Artwork  Artist: Joseph Stella  Created: 1920–1922

Periods: Modern art, Futurism, American modernism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

The Voice of the City of New York Interpreted

Artwork Artist: Joseph Stella  Created: 1920–1922

Periods: Modern art, Futurism, American modernism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Mountain Landscape with Cows and Sheep

Artwork  Artist: Robert S. Duncanson  Created: 1866

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Near Andersonville  Artwork  Artist: Winslow Homer

Created: 1865–1866  Periods: Realism, American Realism

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Party Time: Re-imagine America

Artwork  Artist: Yinka Shonibare  Created: 2008–2009

Dr. Martine Luther King   Artist: Stephen Summerstein

The Newark Museum’s Tibetan galleries are considered among the best in the world. The collection was purchased from Christian missionaries in the early twentieth century. The Tibetan galleries have an in-situ Buddhist altar that the Dalai Lama has consecrated.

Buddha Statue

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Vishnu Mandala  Artwork  Created: 1700–1899

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Ardhanarishvara  Artwork  Created: 1755–1790

Asian Art Birds

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Swayambunath Stupa and Patrons Interior Book Cover Painting Probably for an Edition of the Swayambu Purana

Artwork  Created: 1600–1799

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Atisha (982-1054) Kadam Order Founder; beginning of Sarma (New) Orders

Artwork  Created: 1600–1799

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Krishna and Satyabhama Rescue Princesses from the Demon-King Narakasura Illustrated folio from a dispersed Bhagavat Purana

Artwork  Created: 1750–1800

In addition to its extensive art collections, the Newark Museum is dedicated to natural science. It includes the Dreyfuss Planetarium and the Victoria Hall of Science which highlights selections from the museum’s 70,000 specimen Natural Science Collection. The Alice Ransom Dreyfuss Memorial Garden, located behind the museum, houses numerous works of contemporary sculpture and is the setting for community programs, concerts and performances. The garden is also home to a 1784 old stone schoolhouse and the Newark Fire Museum.

 The museum was founded in 1909 by librarian and reformer John Cotton Dana. As the charter described it, the purpose was “to establish in the City of Newark, New Jersey, a museum for the reception and exhibition of articles of art, science, history and technology, and for the encouragement of the study of the arts and sciences.” The kernel of the museum was a collection of Japanese prints, silks, and porcelains assembled by a Newark harmacist.[4]

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

Ruan Xiaoqi, the Living King of Hell (Katsuenra Genshôshichi) from the series One Hundred and Eight Heroes of the Popular Suikoden All Told (Tsûzoku Suikoden gôketsu hyakuhachinin no hitori)

Artwork  Artist: Utagawa Kuniyoshi  Created: 1802–1830

Artist: Shen Zhen Lin

Originally located on the fourth floor of the Newark Public Library, the museum moved into its own purpose-built structure in the 1920s on Washington Park after a gift by Louis Bamberger. It was designed by Jarvis Hunt, who also designed Bamberger’s flagship Newark store.[5][6] Since then, the museum has expanded several times, to the south into the red brick former YMCA and to the north into the 1885 Ballantine House, by means of a four-year, $23 million renovation[7]. In 1990, the museum expanded to the west into an existing acquired building. At that time much of the museum, including the new addition, was redesigned by Michael Graves.

The museum had a mini-zoo with small animals for some twenty years, until August 2010.[8]

For the security of climate-sensitive artwork, the museum closed its front entrance to the public in 1997 to minimize the effects of temperature and humidity changes. However, in February 2018, after extensive renovation and the construction of a ramp for disabled access, the front doors were reopened.[9]

The museum is open from 12 to 5 pm from Wednesdays to Sundays and is free for Newark residents[10].

The Newark Black Film Festival is held every summer at the museum.

The Ballantine House

The Ballantine house is a preserved and restored house from the Victorian Era, designed by architect George Edward Harney. It was home to John Holme Ballantine, his wife, Jeannette, and their children, John, Robert, Alice, and Percy. Mr. Ballantine owned and ran a brewery in the Ironbound section of Newark. The house originally had twenty-seven rooms and three floors. In 1937, the Newark Museum bought the house and has since restored it to serve as galleries for the extensive decorative arts collections.

MakerSPACE at Newark Museum

The MakerSPACE at the Newark Museum is “an interactive area where visitors of all ages play, tinker and create as they make connections between the materials, processes and concepts of artwork and natural science objects in the Museum’s collections and their own creativity.” [11] John Cotton Dana, the founder of the museum, believed that “the worth of a museum is in its use.” [12] The museum has carried on this legacy of incorporation of the immediate community by opening a MakerSPACE. The museum even displays some of the artwork that is made in the space. The space includes many advanced tools, such as a laser cutter/engraver, 3D printers, a vinyl cutter, pottery wheels, sewing machines, relief and silk screen printing equipment, and various hand tools like saws, hammers, and screwdrivers. The MakerSPACE is open every Saturday 1-4PM for drop-in activities.

Reading session for children in the MakerSpace room

Testing, Science lesson for children in the MakerSpace room

Teacher, Ms. Garrido, Kai and Dr. Martine Luther King’s Portrait

Kai enjoyed playing with other children.

Kai was making his master artwork in “MakerSpace”

On Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Kai was very interested in playing with toy trains, at the “MakerSpace” room.

At the “MakerSpace” room.  Ms. Garrido introduced Kai to a group of people who were practicing a dance routine.

For more information please visit the following the links:

Newark Museum Google Arts & Culture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark_Museum

https://www.newarkmuseum.org/

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PBS News, CNA Breaking News, TED Talks, Bubble Vision, DW Documentary, DCODE by Discovery, Top-5 Top-10, Thisiscolossal, Clip’wreck & Ing’s Garden

PBS News: August 27-31, 2019 & August 23 – International pressure mounts for Brazil to counter raging Amazon fires, August 25 – Tracking the flow of opioids across America,  August28 – 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives in New York, [CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries, TED Talks: Britt Wray How climate change affects your mental health? & Melanie Nezer -The fundamental right to seek asylum, Bubble Vision: Reef Life of the Andaman (full marine biology documentary), DW Documentary: A journey into the world of our great-grandchildren,  DCODE by Discovery: Space Junk Around Earth, Top-5 Top-10: Top 10 most Horrifyingly Mysterious Lakes in the World,  Thisiscolossal: Earth’s Rotation Visualized in a Timelapse of the Milky Way Galaxy, Planetary Panoramas – 360 Degree Night-Sky Time-Lapse by Vincent Brady, Music by Brandon McCoy, Abstracted Dual Landscapes Created Using Cleverly Placed Mirrors & Repurposing the World’s Plastic Waste: An Interview With Assemblage Sculptor Thomas Deininger, Clip’wreck: Smart Animals Compilation & Ing’s Garden

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode August 31, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 31, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, August 31, Southeastern states prepare for Hurricane Dorian, threats to suspend Parliament before the Brexit deadline sparks backlash in the U.K., and what France is doing to curb food wastage. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode August 30, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 30, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian continues to strengthen, becoming a Category 3 storm as it approaches Florida. Plus: Colombia’s peace deal with the FARC may be coming apart, what New Jersey voters are telling their congressional representatives about impeachment, political analysis with Shields and Brooks, a sculpture that walks and a brief but spectacular take on incarcerated youth.

PBS NewsHour full episode August 29, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 29, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian appears poised to hit Florida. Plus: Kevin McAleenan’s trip to El Salvador to discuss migration, a conversation with Ken Cuccinelli about the Trump administration’s immigration philosophy, on the frontlines of war in Ukraine, what less regulation of methane means for the environment and whether greater public R&D investment can revitalize the economy. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ inspector says Comey mishandled Trump memos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8QZe… All of Florida should prepare for Dorian, officials say https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqaHA… U.S.,  El Salvador agree on 4 areas of immigration priority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmvfn… Cuccinelli defends CIS moves on citizenship, public charge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEXEX… Why this American is on the frontlines of Ukraine’s long war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix40T… Why oil and gas industry is divided over methane regulation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeP7f… Can public R&D investment revitalize a lagging economy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fn_VV…

PBS NewsHour full episode August 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 28, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Hurricane Dorian makes its way through the Caribbean, likely sparing Puerto Rico but taking aim at the mainland U.S. Plus: How Trump’s trade wars affect U.S. farming and retail, ongoing British political drama over Brexit, the field of 2020 Democrats shrinks before the September debate, health benefits of spending time outside and a Now Read This book club discussion. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Facebook to tighten rules around political ads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncoUL… Puerto Rico spared as Hurricane Dorian hits Virgin Islands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YjT2t… How U.S. farmers and retailers feel about Trump’s tariffs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynEvx… Why the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit may be rising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E27gL… Howard Dean on eligibility rules for 2020 Democratic debates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3uoB… Why doctors are increasingly prescribing nature https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fq0GY… Celeste Ng, Maxine Hong Kingston discuss ‘The Woman Warrior’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6pYu…

International pressure mounts for Brazil to counter raging Amazon fires

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 23, 2019

Large sections of the Amazon rainforest are engulfed in flames, their smoke turning Sao Paolo’s midday skyline to total darkness. Brazilian forest fires are common at this time of year but have spiked since 2018. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who has encouraged logging in the Amazon, admits the situation is “chaos” and is mustering the military for a response. William Brangham reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode August 27, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 27, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, a conversation with the former Republican congressman who says he’ll challenge President Trump for the party’s 2020 nomination. Plus: Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers tell their stories in court, the health risks of forest fires in the Amazon, how Jair Bolsonaro is changing Brazil, Puerto Rico braces for a tropical storm, Trump’s business interests in politics and school yoga. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Federal judge puts Missouri abortion law on hold https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N40n3… Joe Walsh on immigration policy, climate change and Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obmud… For Epstein victims, his death spurs both outrage and relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ren5U… Amid Amazon smoke, Brazilian children struggle to breathe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6r8d… What Bolsonaro’s presidency means for Brazil and the Amazon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMzBz… Still vulnerable from Maria, Puerto Rico braces for Dorian https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UmyKU… Could Trump really host the next G-7 at his own property? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ycj3J… Managing school stress by bringing yoga into the classroom https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RIKt…

WATCH LIVE: 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives in New York

PBS NewsHour   Streamed live on Aug 28, 2019

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Tracking the flow of opioids across America

PBS NewsHour   Published on Aug 25, 2019

The manufacturers and distributors of opioid prescription painkillers have supplied billions of pills throughout the U.S. An investigative series by The Washington Post looks at the opioid epidemic through the DEA’s newly public database that tracks every pain pill sold to pharmacies across the country. Steven Rich, The Post’s data editor, joins Hari Sreenivasan with more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

CNA   Started streaming on Jan 14, 2019

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our news service: WhatsApp: https://cna.asia/whatsapp Telegram: https://t.me/cnalatest Follow CNA on the following platforms: https://www.cna.asia https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia https://t.me/cnalatest

Category   News & Politics 

“For all that’s ever been said about climate change, we haven’t heard nearly enough about the psychological impacts of living in a warming world,” says science writer Britt Wray. In this quick talk, she explores how climate change is threatening our well-being — mental, social and spiritual — and offers a starting point for what we can do about it.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Britt Wray · Science storyteller, author, broadcaster

Britt Wray’s work is about life and what we make of it: past, present and future.

More Resources

Rise of the Necrofauna: The Science, Ethics, and Risks of De-Extinction

Britt Wray

Greystone Books (2019)

Take Action

participate

Participate in a workshop with Britt Wray around the emotional, psychological and spiritual challenges of living through the climate crisis.

Reef Life of the Andaman (full marine biology documentary),

Bubble Vision   Published on Nov 1, 2012

“Reef Life of the Andaman” is a documentary of the marine life of Thailand and Burma (Myanmar). It is available on DVD at https://www.amazon.com/shop/bubblevision Scuba diving more than 1000 times from the coral reefs and underwater pinnacles of Thailand’s Similan Islands, Phuket, Phi Phi Island and Hin Daeng, to Myanmar’s Mergui Archipelago and Burma Banks, I encountered everything from manta rays to seahorses, whale sharks to shipwrecks. The 116-minute film features descriptions of 213 different marine species including more than 100 tropical fish, along with sharks, rays, moray eels, crabs, lobsters, shrimps, sea slugs, cuttlefish, squid, octopus, turtles, sea snakes, starfish, sea cucumbers, corals, worms etc.. This marine biology documentary provides an overview of Indian Ocean aquatic life. Marine life & underwater subjects featured in the film: 0:00:00 – Introduction 0:01:42 – Underwater caves 0:02:18 – Corals and anemones ELASMOBRANCHS – SHARKS 0:03:37 – Carpet sharks (zebra sharks / leopard sharks and nurse sharks) 0:06:45 – Whale sharks 0:11:26 – Requiem sharks (grey reef sharks, silvertip sharks, whitetip reef sharks) RAYS 0:13:44 – Stingrays 0:17:05 – Eagle rays & devil rays / mobulas 0:18:48 – Manta rays REEF FISHES 0:21:24 – Moray eels 0:25:50 – Seahorse 0:27:12 – Cornetfish & trumpetfish 0:28:50 – Batfish (spadefish) 0:30:09 – Angelfish 0:31:34 – Butterflyfish 0:32:41 – Bannerfish 0:33:30 – Moorish idol 0:33:56 – Surgeonfish (tang) & unicornfish 0:34:42 – Bigeye 0:35:10 – Emperor Snapper 0:35:26 – Sweetlips 0:36:05 – Grouper (rockcod) 0:38:24 – Humphead wrasse 0:38:52 – Green humphead parrotfish 0:39:38 – Barracuda 0:40:37 – Trevally (jacks) 0:41:21 – Pufferfish 0:42:32 – Boxfish 0:44:28 – Porcupinefish 0:46:10 – Scrawled filefish 0:46:33 – Triggerfish CRUSTACEANS 0:48:23 – Spiny lobster 0:49:35 – Shrimps 0:50:39 – Red-legged swimming crab MOLLUSCS – GASTROPODS 0:51:13 – Cowries 0:52:46 – Sea slugs / nudibranchs BIVALVES 0:54:55 – Fluted giant clam 0:55:38 – Tuna Wreck – Similan Islands 0:56:00 – Schooling fish – Cardinalfish 0:56:56 – Hardyhead silversides 0:57:15 – Fusilier 0:57:45 – African pompano 0:57:49 – Striped eel catfish 0:58:02 – Schooling snapper 0:59:08 – Schooling barracuda 1:00:30 – Dogtooth tuna 1:00:45 – Bigeye trevally HIDING 1:01:15 – Pastel Tilefish 1:01:49 – Stingrays in sand 1:02:43 – Octopus ink CAMOUFLAGE – MIMICRY 1:03:03 – Straightstick pipefish 1:03:28 – Ornate ghost pipefish 1:04:19 – Giant frogfish 1:05:14 – Scorpionfish 1:06:42 – Stonefish 1:07:17 – King Cruiser shipwreck VENOMOUS SPINES 1:07:29 – Lionfish 1:09:25 – Crown-of-thorns starfish 1:10:00 – Sea urchin SYMBIOSIS 1:10:26 – Sea urchin cardinalfish 1:10:49 – Anemonefish / Clownfish / Sea anemones 1:13:53 – Porcelain anemone crab 1:14:39 – Tube anemone 1:15:13 – Rhizostome jellyfish 1:16:09 – Fishes feeding 1:16:16 – Streaked spinefoot 1:16:31 – Parrotfish 1:17:02 – Goatfish 1:17:10 – Bluefin trevally 1:17:29 – Smalltooth emperor 1:17:51 – Fringelip mullet REPTILES 1:20:26 – Banded sea krait (sea snake) 1:21:46 – Pacific Hawksbill turtle 1:23:26 – Green turtle SHRIMPS 1:25:05 – Harlequin shrimp 1:26:09 – Peacock mantis shrimp CLEANING 1:27:08 – Skunk cleaner shrimp 1:27:57 – Cleaner wrasse 1:29:07 – Rock cleaner shrimp 1:29:27 – False cleanerfish 1:30:07 – Remora / live sharksucker 1:31:38 – Cobia 1:32:47 – Rainbow runner POLYCHAETE WORMS 1:33:38 – Feather duster worm 1:33:43 – Hard tube coco worm 1:33:53 – Christmas tree worm 1:34:39 – Sea cucumber SEX 1:36:54 – Broadcast spawning 1:37:42 – Oyster 1:38:19 – Pharaoh cuttlefish mating 1:40:15 – Bigfin reef squid 1:40:36 – Day octopus fighting 1:43:25 – Rough-toothed dolphin 1:43:48 – Night diving 1:49:38 – Crabs at night 1:52:56 – Hermit crab 1:54:22 – Basket stars I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at: http://www.bubblevision.com I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here: http://www.facebook.com/bubblevision http://www.twitter.com/nicholashope MUSIC CREDITS: Prickly Shark, Black Corals, Jewel Squid by Erik Verkoyen Freefall Into The Blue, Buoyancy, Tai Long Wan, Andaman Resonance, Hidden Depths, Similan Sunrise, The Cool Of The Forest by Mark Ellison Blood Wine by Condor e (Velvet Night Album) Dream And You Will Fly by Menno Hoomans (http://twitter.com/mhoomans) Just Walk Away by Adam Fielding (http://adamfielding.com) Deep Blue, Starbeam by Toao (SOILSOUND Music Publishing LLC) (http://soilsound.com) Space Frigate by Smashed Toy (http://soundclick.com/smashedtoy) Deliberate Thought, Modern Vibes by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) Pattern Errors by Coded Bird’s Song (Edit) by Absorb Fish (http://soundcloud.com/absorb-fish) Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket (http://www.santanaphuket.com), to Rob Royle for a few of the clips, to Elfi and Uli Erfort and Daniel Bruehwiler for help with the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles.

Category   Pets & Animals   Source videos   View attributions

Refugee and immigrants’ rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMidAtlantic, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Melanie Nezer · Refugee and immigrants rights attorney

Melanie Nezer is a national leader in efforts to inform and educate individuals, institutions, elected officials and communities about refugees and asylum seekers.

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Donate to HIAS and help protect refugees.

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxMidAtlantic | March 2019

A journey into the world of our great-grandchildren | DW Documentary

DW Documentary   Published on Jun 1, 2019

What will the world look like in 2060? What role will climate change or the growing world population play? [Online until: July 7, 2019, Part 2 online: June 8, 2019] How does the drive for prosperity fit together with finite resources? John Webster writes a letter to his unborn great-granddaughter in film. “What will the world look like when my great-granddaughter is born?” Filmmaker John Webster has thought about this. He has named her Dorit, and she’ll probably live in the 2060s. He imagines her wearing little yellow rubber boots as she wanders along a shoreline that has by then completely changed out of all recognition. The film is a plea for a more responsible approach to nature for future generations. What kind of world will Dorit experience? What effect will climate change have had? John Webster takes the viewer on a both emotional and physical journey, from Finland through Russia to the Siberian coal mines, then on to the Marshall Islands in the Pacific and through the USA to New York. The world doesn’t actually offer Dorit much hope. By 2050, more than 2.5 billion more people will join the 6.6 billion people alive today: that will mean more than nine billion people are feeding off the land and releasing even more exhaust gases into the atmosphere. A growing percentage of humanity is pursuing prosperity without regard to natural limits. Every year we produce many billions of tons of CO2 and face a rapid succession of storms, droughts and floods,. Climate researchers warn that mankind must drastically reduce its CO2 emissions by 2050, otherwise the planet will no longer be able to support its inhabitants and will gradually shut down everything we base our lives on. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Visit our Spanish channel: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental Visit our Arabic channel: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category   Education

Space Junk Around Earth

DCODE by Discovery   Published on Aug 3, 2018

Space debris poses a threat to us on Earth, even causing damage to the International Space Station. DCODE how we can save the Earth and space, in this fascinating 2016 series – Space’s Deepest Secrets.

Category   Science & Technology

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3JemKZxIn0

Top 10 most Horrifyingly Mysterious Lakes in the World

Top-5 Top-10   Published on Sep 1, 2018

Thousands of lives lost, #mysterious inhabitants—poisonous #lakes are just about the most mystical and eerie bodies of water of our planet. Even placid lakes with crystal-clear water sometimes conceal deadly threats for those who decide plunge in for a swim or even set up camp on the shore. Hello everyone, and welcome to channel “Top 5, Top 10”. Get ready for the #top 10 most Horrifyingly Mysterious Lakes in the World. Subscribe to our channel – https://www.youtube.com/c/Top5Top10 All videos – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… For copyright matters please contact us at: moitelmtc@gmail.com Welcome to the channel “Top 5 Top 10” We create high quality #top10 and #top5 list based videos filled with mind blowing interesting and entertaining facts you are going to love and enjoy.

Category   Entertainment

Earth’s Rotation Visualized in a Timelapse of the Milky Way Galaxy – 4K

Aryeh Nirenberg   Published on Sep 10, 2017

Follow me on Instagram @art_only: http://instagram.com/art_only A timelapse of the Milky Way that was recorded using an equatorial tracking mount over a period of around 3 hours to show Earth’s rotation relative to the Milky Way. I used a Sony a7SII with the Canon 24-70mm f2.8 lens and recorded 1100 10″ exposures at a 12-second interval. All the frames were captured at F/2.8 and 16000iso. Music: Audiomachine – Wars of Faith

Category  Travel & Events

Earth’s Rotation Visualized in a Timelapse of the Milky Way Galaxy by Aryeh Nirenberg

August 20, 2019  Kate Sierzputowski

Although the Earth rotates below the sky, aerial time-lapse videos often have the perspective of a celestial scene rushing above the ground. In this brief video by Aryeh Nirenberg, the Milky Way becomes completely stationary, highlighting specifically the Earth’s rotation. Nirenberg recorded the time-lapse with a Sony a7SII with the Canon 24-70mm f2.8 lens while using an equatorial tracking mount over a period of three hours. You can see more of his starscapes on Instagram and Youtube. (via Kottke)

Planetary Panoramas – 360 Degree Night-Sky Time-Lapse by Vincent Brady, Music by Brandon McCoy

Vincent Brady   Published on Jun 17, 2014

Watch remastered version in 4k! https://youtu.be/sUsGBcWeiVQ A multiple camera, 360 degree, night-sky time-lapse (One of the first of its kind!) by photographer Vincent Brady and musician Brandon McCoy. Follow my Photography! https://www.facebook.com/VincentBradyhttps://google.com/+VincentBradyPhoto http://www.vincentbrady.com/ Get Brandon’s Music by Donation/Free Download! http://brandonmccoy1.bandcamp.com/ https://www.facebook.com/BrandonMcCoyhttps://www.youtube.com/BrandonMcCoyM… About Planetary Panoramas – While experimenting with different photography tricks and techniques back in 2012, I was shooting 360 degree panoramas in the daytime and long exposures of the stars streaking in the sky at night. It suddenly became clear that the potential to combine the two techniques could be a trip! Since the Earth is rotating at a steady 1,040 mph I created a custom rig of 4 cameras with fisheye lenses to capture the entire night-sky in motion. Thus the images show the stars rotating around the north star, rising in the east, setting in the west, as well as the effect of the southern pole. The 4 lenses are wide enough to capture the entire night sky and a 360 degree panorama of the scene on Earth. Each camera is doing nonstop long exposures, typically about 1 minute consecutively for the life of the camera battery. Usually about 3 hours. I then made a script to stitch all the thousands of these panoramas into this time-lapse. I created my rig in January of 2013 while in my final semester at Lansing Community College before receiving an associates degree in photography. Given it was winter in Michigan, I didn’t get to chase the notorious clear moonless night sky as much as I had hoped as the region has lots of cloud cover that time of year. Though I was ready on the rare night to go experiment. After graduating in May I had built up quite the urge to hit the road. My rig has taken me to firefly parties in Missouri, dark eerie nights at Devils Tower, through Logan Pass at Glacier National Park, up the mountains of British Columbia, and around the amazing arches and sandstone monuments in the Great American Southwest. Scenes as they appear 0:12 – Delicate Arch, Utah 0:27 – Double Arch, Utah (outside) 0:41 – Double Arch, Utah (inside) 0:57 – Landscape Arch, Utah 1:14 – Turret Arch, Utah 1:28 – Balanced Rock, Utah 1:42 – Logan Pass, Glacier National Park, MT 1:55 – Lake of the Ozarks, MO 2:08 – Kootenay Lake, British Columbia 2:19 – Valhalla, British Columbia 2:30 – Kootenay Lake, British Columbia 2:41 – Badlands, South Dakota 2:51 – Windows/Turret Arch – Utah (Lunar Eclipse) 3:00 – Garden of Eden – Utah 3:10 – Monument Valley – Utah 3:26 – Totem Poles, Monument Valley – Utah 3:39 – Sleepy Hollow, Michigan These are the images I created on the cold, dark, sleepless nights under awe-spiring skies. The music is composed and recorded by my very good friend, the acoustic fingerpicking guitar prodigy Brandon McCoy! Brandon who is also from the greater Lansing area in Mid-Michigan is quite the acoustic instrumentalist. The song chosen for this time-lapse is called ‘One Letter From Lady.’ I moved to Michigan when I was 15 and Brandon was the first friend I made. He was the cool kid playing Pink Floyd licks on a $2 guitar at the time. Soon, after he had spent his cold, dark, sleepless nights perfecting his craft, he started coming up with his very own instrumentals. Some of which are upbeat by mixing picking, slapping, and drumming on the guitar while other compositions of his are calm and soothing and can put you in a meditative trance if you just close your eyes. It has been a great experience watching each other grow as artist for over the past 10 years, and you better believe we will be collaborating on projects like this in the very near future. Speaking for the both of us, we are grateful that you checked this out this project. If you enjoyed it, don’t be selfish… Share it with your friends! Software used in the making: Magic Lantern: A firmware hack to use the intervelometer in camera. StarStax: Appropriately named software used to stack images of stars. PTGui: Used to manually stitch panoramas together. LR Time-Lapse: For smoothing out the time-lapse sequences via xmp files. Adobe Photoshop CC: For all the photoediting fun and to create time-lapse sequences. Adobe Premiere Pro: For slopping the whole video together. Prints and more information are on my site: http://www.vincentbrady.com/planetary… To use this video in a commercial player, advertising or in broadcasts, please email Viral Spiral: contact@viralspiralgroup.com

Category   Science & Technology

In San Jose, Costa Rica, Meet this Amazing Street Artist – “Salas” – May 29, 2013

Rob Freeman  Published on May 29, 2013

I was blown away that he was able to give me this neat painting in just 12 minutes. He should open a shop – he’d have tourists lined up out the door! Cool street art photos: http://bit.ly/1aBMIwc More street painting photos: http://bit.ly/15c03uF More street artist photos: http://bit.ly/13ZPISR Photos – Costa Rica: http://bit.ly/170z9t6 San Jose, Capital of Costa Rica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Jose… Costa Rica: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Costa_Rica . . .

Category   People & Blogs

Abstracted Dual Landscapes Created Using Cleverly Placed Mirrors &

August 23, 2018  Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Sebastian Magnani carefully positions round mirrors in outdoor settings to capture two landscapes at once: the ground below and the sky above. In the ongoing series Reflections, some compositions reflect connected imagery, like blossom-covered grass and a flowering tree. Others juxtapose man-made surfaces like asphalt with organic branches. By removing the usual context of landscape images, Magnani allows the viewer to focus on the textural qualities of the environment, and some images even veer into illusions, as with the cloudy night sky that appears like a full moon.  You can see more from the Swiss photographer, including portraits, on Instagram and Facebook. Magnani has also recently started offering prints of the Reflections series on Society6. (via Bored Panda)

Repurposing the World’s Plastic Waste: An Interview With Assemblage Sculptor Thomas Deininger

August 28, 2019  Kate Sierzputowski

Every year more than eight million tons of plastic are dumped into our oceans. This anxiety, coupled with fears of a dramatic decline in insect populations and a global climate crisis, fuel the assemblage-based works of Thomas Deininger (previously). In a new short film by gnarly bay, clips of Deininger in his studio are supercut with footage showing the many ways that plastic has laid damage to our world’s sea creatures and environment. It is these bits of mindlessly discarded plastic that the Bristol, Rhode Island-based artist uses to create his sculptural optical illusions—which are often of the exact same animals and insects that the plastic threatens. You can see more of Deininger’s three-dimensional works built from found objects on Instagram.

Clip’wreck: Smart Animals Compilation

Clip’wreck   Published on Nov 21, 2016

SMART ANIMALS COMPILATION ?? Feeling secure in your human intelligence? Watch these animals show off their brains by solving problems. Who’s really in charge? ?Visit the Clip’wreck Channel to see more awesome, funny, and amazing Compilation Videos! ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTep…) ? Buy Clip’wreck T-Shirt and other Merchandise at Teespring ( https://teespring.com/stores/clipwreck ) Music ?http://www.bensound.com ? http://www.purple-planet.com/home/458… ? http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b… *********************************************************** I am not the creator of this content. I am just a compiler of online content I find enjoyable. For any concerns about content ownership, please contact me at the address listed in my channel description. ***********************************************************

Category   Pets & Animals

Ing’s Garden: Pink Roses bloomed during July 2019.

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

For more information please visit the following link:

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