Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand Part 2

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

 I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand. 

 John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

 

Thai Mix Vegetables at Bangapi Mall, Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand has many kinds of vegetables for stir frying. We cook with Thai hot chili and coconut cream or in soup. We would have all kinds of vegetables in every meal in my family. I am longing to eat most of the food that I ate when I was in Thailand.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Thai_ingredients

 

Thai Fruits, Dragonfruit Hylocereus sp and The longan (lamyai) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand has many kinds of fruits in all seasons for fruit lovers to enjoy. I love all kinds of fruits and long to eat most of the fruits that I ate when I was in Thailand. I am here in Bangkok, Thailand for almost a month, but I have not eaten any of the Thai desserts yet. My desserts are all kinds of fruit.
Dragonfruit  Hylocereus sp, These fruits grow off the long arms of a cactus found in southern China and SE Asia.
“Towards the end of the rainy season, around September, the markets around the north are filled with piles of the oddly shaped dragon fruits. This relative new-comer is now a common sight in the markets and on the table when it is in season.” https://thailandforvisitors.com/general/food/fruit/
The longan (lamyai) or “dragon eyes” is so named because of the fruit’s resemblance to an eyeball when it is shelled (the black seed shows through the translucent flesh like a pupil/iris). The seed is small, round and hard and closely allied to the glamorous lychee. The fruit is edible, and is often used in East Asian soups, snacks, desserts, and sweet-and-sour foods, either fresh or dried, sometimes canned with syrup in supermarkets. The seeds of fresh longan can be boiled and eaten, with a distinctive nutty flavor.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Dragonfruit  Hylocereus sp photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Dragonfruit  Hylocereus sp, These fruits grow off the long arms of a cactus found in southern China and SE Asia.
“Towards the end of the rainy season, around September, the markets around the north are filled with piles of the oddly shaped dragon fruits. This relative new-comer is now a common sight in the markets and on the table when it is in season.” https://thailandforvisitors.com/general/food/fruit/
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Jackfruit  Artocarpus heterophyllus photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Jackfruit  Artocarpus heterophyllus
“If a Durian resembles a small bomb then the Jackfruit (kanoon) must be the Mother of them all. Weighing up to 80 pounds and a yard long, the Jackfruit is the largest tree borne fruit in the world. Broken open, the Jackfruit reveals dozens of large seeds covered with a sweet yellow sheath which has a taste similar to pineapple but milder and less juicy. It is said that the flavor of Juicy Fruit chewing gum comes from the Jackfruit.
The fruit is normally eaten raw but can also be dried and made into chips or cooked and added to curries.
A dye from the heartwood of the Jackfruit tree is used by forest monks to give their robes the traditional off-brown color.”
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Mango (Ma-muang) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
“Thailand and Hua Hin are well-known for Mango and sticky rice. The sweet mango and the coconut milk and sticky rice just can’t be beat as a dessert and is readily available in Hua Hin. The most well-known shop is across the street from the Hilton Hotel to the north. This shop normally has ripe mangoes throughout the year though they can get a little expensive during the off-season. There are also stalls in Chatchai Market and across the street on Phetkasem Rd. There are several cultivars of mango with some sweeter and some more sour. Some are eaten with a salt and chili dry dip. There is also a Three Season cultivar which produces year around.”
For more information please visit the followings:
https://www.frangipani.com/wordpress/thai-fruits/#.WXBZa2gpCW8

Thai Fruits, Rambutan (ngo) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Rambutan (ngo) In bright red with yellowish or greenish hair, the rambutan is beautiful in appearance. Its white flesh is firm, sweet, and juicy. The most widely grown species are the pink rambutan, the school rambutan and the che-mong. If you find that the meat does not come off the seed readily, you may use a knife to help. Season: May to June.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Custard Apple (noi-na) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Custard Apple (noi-na) Transplanted from Central America long ago. Easily broken with a squeeze. Eat the soft, white meat with the help of a spoon and leave out the seeds. Season: June to August.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Guava (farang) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
“Guava (farang) The Thai name means a White or a Westerner. The fruit derived its name because it originated from tropical America. It has become a popular fruit only after the new Vietnamese species was widely planted more than a decade ago. Eat the white, crisp flesh either alone or with the condiment provided free by the vendor. Don’t eat the core, which would cause constipation. Season: All year round.”
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5Thai Fruits, Durian photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
“Durian (thu-rian) A very special fruit. Reputed to be the king of all fruits, its strong smell sometimes turns people away before they have a chance to taste it. However, if one can overcome one’s initial dislike of its foul smell and give it a try, one is likely to love its rich, unique flavour.
Among the various species, the golden pillow (monthong) is most agreeable to the beginner.Other famous varieties include the long-stemmed (kanyao) and the gibbon (cha-ni). Season: May to June.”
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, Mangoateen (mahngkoot) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Mangosteen (mahngkoot) is often called the Queen of Fruits, due to its “cooling” properties, in contrast to the King of Fruits, Durian, with it’s “heatiness”. The fruiting seasons of the two coincide and they make a very nice combination. The husk or exocarp of the Mangosteen is a leathery purple shell which, when opened, reveals the soft, white fruit which is quite delicate and consists of 4-8 segments, the larger of which contain seeds. The fragrant, fleshy fruit is both sweet and tangy.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://cuesa.org/eat-seasonally/charts?gclid=CjwKCAjwqcHLBRAqEiwA-j4AyKG5Y6dycuMxzckA_7IVsZ1J-5

Thai Fruits, longan (lamyai photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
The longan (lamyai) or “dragon eyes” is so named because of the fruit’s resemblance to an eyeball when it is shelled (the black seed shows through the translucent flesh like a pupil/iris). The seed is small, round and hard and closely allied to the glamorous lychee. The fruit is edible, and is often used in East Asian soups, snacks, desserts, and sweet-and-sour foods, either fresh or dried, sometimes canned with syrup in supermarkets. The seeds of fresh longan can be boiled and eaten, with a distinctive nutty flavor.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://www.frangipani.com/wordpress/thai-fruits/#.WXBZa2gpCW8

Thai Fruits, Langsart (langsart) photographed at Bangapi, Bangkok, Thailand
Thailand has many kinds of fruits in all seasons for fruit lovers to enjoy. I love all kinds of fruits and long to eat most of the fruits that I ate when I was in Thailand. I am here in Bangkok, Thailand for almost a month, but I have not eaten any of the Thai deserts yet. My deserts are all kinds of fruit.
Langsart (langsart) are a sweet fruit with a pale brown skin with an inner stone which is quite bitter. Langsart grows on a tree of medium height. The leaf pattern consists of one large leaf with 5-7 small leaves. The fragrant yellow petals hang in pendulous spikes and start blooming in midsummer.The fruit hang in bunches of 8 to 20 pieces. The smooth outer skin is a dirty yellow color. Under the thin peel, which exudes a milky sap, are about five white or pinkish segments unequal in size. Most segments are sweet, but one or two contain a viable seed and are very bitter to the taste. Some people enjoy the contrast of flavors.
For more information please visit the followings:
https://www.frangipani.com/wordpress/thai-fruits/#.WXBZa2gpCW8

Thai Jasmin Garland and Malagold
Phuang malai  are a Thai form of floral garland. They are often given as offerings or kept for good luck.
Origins of phuang malai
There is no written evidence on who first created phuang malai. The first record of phuang malai was found during the reign of King Rama V or Phrabat Somdet Phra Paramintharamaha Chulalongkorn the Great.[1] There was a literary work written by the king called “Royal ceremony in 12 months”  which contained information about events and ceremonies in the Sukhothai Kingdom. In the 4th month ceremony, it was mentioned that fresh flower garlands were made by the king’s chief concubine “Tao Srijulalux” [2] Then, in the Rattanakosin Kingdom the phuang malai became an important ornamental object in every ceremony. Every girl in the palace was expected to acquire the skills of making phuang malai. Queen Sripatcharindra   devised a wide variety of intricate phuang malai patterns.[1]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phuang_malai

Thailand Bangkok Flower Market
Thailand Bangkok Flower Market Highlights As the biggest flower market in Bangkok, Bangkok Flower Market is the best place to go for all your floral needs. Flowers range from local species (jasmine, chrysanthemum, gerbera, orchids, lilies, roses) to imported species such as tulips, snapdragons, iris, lisianthus, delphinium and more. Props and accessories for flower arrangements are also plentiful, whether vases, flower pots, floral foam, ribbons, florist wire, twigs or all kinds of decorative leaves imaginable. Many vendors at Pak Klong Talad offer flower arranging services. Previously arranged bouquets, flower garlands, floral accessories for weddings or other special occasions are also available. Flower Market Opening Hours: 24 hours, more popular during nighttime Location: Chak Phet Road, the Memorial Bridge or Saphan Phut Chao Phraya pier How to get there: Taxi or Tuk Tuk

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/pak-klong-market.htm

Thailand Bangkok Flower Market
Thailand Bangkok Flower Market (Pak Klong Talad) is the biggest wholesale and retail fresh flower market in Bangkok. The market has all kinds of popular flowers and flora-related items, including roses, forget me nots, orchids, lilies and more. Most of them sold in packs of 50 or 100 flowers in each, and prices are amazingly cheap. Part of the Old City, Bangkok Flower market is located on Chak Phet Road near Saphan Phut or the Memorial Bridge. Shops and vendors are housed inside two to three-storey shop-houses on both sides of the main road. The market lies just south of Wat Pho (Temple of the Reclining Buddha) and has access to a river pier, so it makes for a great one-day trip when combined with other historical attractions in the Old City.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/pak-klong-market.htm

Mural at the Flower Market, Bangkok Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Thailand Bangkok Flower Market Open 24 hours, Pak Klong Talad is most lively after midnight. If you want to see the market in full action, though, the best time to go is pre-dawn or at 3:00-4:00. This is when the roadside , into a kaleidoscope of bright, blooming colours, as vendors receive floral goods from each flower-growing area in the country. Wholesalers bring in truckloads of freshly cut flowers, while traders and retailers come to buy their stock in bulk. It can be quite a chaotic scene, and vendors may be less patient when dealing with visitors. If you go during this period, it’s best to just observe and absorb the surrounding atmosphere. During the day, Bangkok Flower Market is relatively sleepy, although this is a good time for visitors to shop around. Prices are usually reasonably cheap, but during specific festivals such as Valentine’s, Mother’s Day, or graduation season, certain flowers will be three to four times more expensive (the same rule applies when you buy from any shop throughout the city). Bangkok Flower Market Highlights As the biggest flower market in Bangkok,

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/pak-klong-market.htm

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