NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter stands on the Red Planet’s surface, Images from Mars by Perseverance Rover, common science, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, and History

NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter stands on the Red Planet’s surface, Images from Mars by Perseverance Rover, common science, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, and History

 NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter stands on the Red Planet’s surface.

The images show the flight zone of NASA’s Ingenuity Helicopter from the perspective of NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover and more.

Preparing for First Flight on Mars on This Week @NASA – March 26, 2021, NASA

See the Earth Mission NISAR Under Construction in JPL’s Clean Room, Mar 26, 2021,  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Mars in 4k: Images from Mars by Perseverance Rover, Mar 28, 2021,  common science

Mars 2020 and the Importance of Planetary Protection, Streamed live on Mar 23, 2021,  Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

NASA Previews First Flight of Mars Helicopter (Media Briefing), Streamed live on Mar 23, 2021,  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

The Universe: Human Life on Mars is Coming Soon (S2, E13) | Full Episode | History, Mar 22, 2021 

NASA Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Prepares for First Flight

NASA’s Mars Helicopter, Ingenuity (UHD Trailer), Apr 29, 2020,  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-to-host-briefing-to-preview-first-mars-helicopter-flights

In this illustration, NASA’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter stands on the Red Planet’s surface as NASA’s Perseverance rover (partially visible on the left) rolls away.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA will hold a virtual media briefing at 1:30 p.m. EDT (10:30 a.m. PDT) Tuesday, March 23, to discuss upcoming activities for the agency’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter. The teams operating Ingenuity and NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover have chosen the flight zone where the helicopter will attempt the first powered, controlled flights on another planet.

The briefing will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website and will livestream on multiple agency social media platforms, including the YouTube and Facebook channels for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

Briefing participants include:

  • Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters
  • Bobby Braun, director for planetary science, JPL
  • J. (Bob) Balaram, Ingenuity chief engineer, JPL
  • Håvard Grip, Ingenuity chief pilot, JPL
  • Farah Alibay, Perseverance integration lead for Ingenuity, JPL

To participate in the briefing by telephone, reporters must provide their name and affiliation by 11:30 a.m. EDT (8:30 a.m. PDT) Tuesday, March 23, to Rexana Vizza at rexana.v.vizza@jpl.nasa.gov.

Media and the public also may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #MarsHelicopter.

Ingenuity’s test flights are expected to begin no earlier than the first week of April. The exact timing of the first flight will remain fluid as engineers work out details on the timeline for deployments and vehicle positioning of Perseverance and Ingenuity. Photos showing some of the progress are available on Perseverance’s raw images website.

Perseverance – with Ingenuity attached to its belly – landed in Jezero Crater Feb. 18. Ingenuity is a technology demonstration with a limited test flight duration of up to 31 days (30 Mars days, or sols). The rover will deploy the helicopter and provide environmental monitoring and imaging support. It also hosts Ingenuity’s base station, enabling communication with mission controllers on Earth.

An Ingenuity press kit, with more information about the helicopter, is available at:

https://go.nasa.gov/ingenuity-press-kit

More information is also available on the Ingenuity website:

https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

-end-

Grey Hautaluoma / Alana Johnson
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-358-0668 / 202-358-1501
grey.hautaluoma-1@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

Jia-Rui Cook
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-354-5011
jccook@jpl.nasa.gov 

Last Updated: Mar 17, 2021

Editor: Sean Potter

Tags:  Jet Propulsion LaboratoryMarsMoon to MarsPerseverance Mars Rover

Rover Point of View of Ingenuity Flight Zone

This image shows the flight zone of NASA’s Ingenuity Helicopter from the perspective of NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover.

The Wright Brothers

Orville Wright makes the first powered, controlled flight on Earth as his brother Wilbur looks on in this image taken at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, on Dec. 17, 1903.

Perseverance Rover Drops its Debris Shield

The debris shield, a protective covering on the bottom of NASA’s Perseverance rover, was released on March 212021.

Perseverance on Mars Helicopter Above

This illustration depicts Mars Helicopter Ingenuity during a test flight on Mars.

Ingenuity Helicopter on Mars (Illustration)

An illustration of NASA’s Ingenuity Helicopter flying on Mars

M2020 parachute testing at Ames/NFAC 80×120 wind tunnel.
Run 03.
Requesters: Gregorio Villar, Chris Tanner.
Photographer: T. Wynne
Date: 02-JUN-2017
Photolab order: 070915-154126

NASA Needs Pi!

NASA uses pi every day!

Perseverance Hazcam First Drive

This image was captured while NASA’s Perseverance rover drove on Mars for the first time on March 4, 2021.

The Road Ahead for Perseverance

This image shows two possible routes (blue and purple) to the fan-shaped deposit of sediments known as a delta for NASA’s Perseverance rover, which landed at the spot marked with a white dot in Mars’ Jezero Crater.

Perseverance View of the Delta in Jezero Crater

From its landing site, “Octavia E. Butler Landing,” NASA’s Perseverance rover can see a remnant of a fan-shaped deposit of sediments known as a delta with its Mastcam-Z instrument

A Target for Perseverance’s SuperCam

Taken Feb. 22, 2021, this image from the Mastcam-Z instrument on NASA’s Perseverance rover shows the first target for analysis by the rover’s SuperCam instrument

Welcome to ‘Octavia E. Butler Landing’

NASA has named the landing site of the agency’s Perseverance rover “Octavia E. Butler Landing,” after the science fiction author Octavia E. Butler.

Flexing Perseverance’s Robotic Arm

This set of images shows parts of the robotic arm on NASA’s Perseverance rover flexing and turning during its first checkout after landing on Mars

Perseverance Is Roving on Mars

This image was taken during the first drive of NASA’s Perseverance rover on Mars on March 4, 2021

Mastcam-Z’s First 360-Degree Panorama

This is the first 360-degree panorama taken by Mastcam-Z, a zoomable pair of cameras aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover

Navcam View of Perseverance’s Rover Deck

The Navigation Cameras, or Navcams, aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover captured this view of the rover’s deck on Feb. 20, 2021

Perseverance Navcams 360-Degree Panorama

Panorama, taken on Feb. 20, 2021, by the Navigation Cameras, or Navcams, aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover

Mastcam-Z Looks at Its Calibration Target

Mastcam-Z, a pair of zoomable cameras aboard NASA’s Perseverance rover

Perseverance and Mars 2020 Spacecraft Components on the Surface

This first image of NASA’s Perseverance Rover on the surface of Mars from the High Resolution Imaging Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) shows the many parts of the Mars 2020 mission landing system that got the rover safely on the ground.

Perseverance’s Big Wheel

This high-resolution image shows one of the six wheels aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover, which landed on Feb. 18, 2021. The image was taken by one of Perseverance’s color Hazard Cameras (Hazcams).

Perseverance’s First Full-Color Look at Mars

This is the first high-resolution, color image to be sent back by the Hazard Cameras (Hazcams) on the underside of NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover after its landing on Feb. 18, 2021.

Perservence Gets Ready to Touch Down

Perseverance landed on Mars on Feb. 18, 2021.

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

https://nasasearch.nasa.gov/search?query=latest+images&affiliate=nasa&utf8=%E2%9C%93

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/main/index.html

https://www.nasa.gov/perseverance/videos

Preparing for First Flight on Mars on This Week @NASA – March 26, 2021

Mar 26, 2021  NASA

Preparing for first flight on Mars, making a splash with Orion, and the space station’s next crew prepares for launch … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_2…? Producer Credit: Andre Valentine Editor: Sonnet Apple Music: Universal Production Music/”Another Way of Winning”

See the Earth Mission NISAR Under Construction in JPL’s Clean Room

Mar 26, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

No bunny suit required! Come behind-the-scenes with NISAR mission experts to learn all about this joint NASA-ISRO satellite designed to spot potential natural hazards on our planet and how melting land ice will affect sea level rise. Speakers: Paul Rosen, project scientists, JPL Wendy Edelstein, instrument manager, JPL Note: Due to technical difficulties, there was a short gap in coverage at 14:40? in the feed of the original live stream on March 25, 2021. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mars in 4k: Images from Mars by Perseverance Rover

Mar 28, 2021  common science

See the stunning images of Mars captured by Perseverance Rover New images of Mars in 4k by Perseverance Rover Images of Mars in 4k by Perseverance Rover Mars Rocks images in 4k Images from Mars in 4k See what NASA’s Perseverance Rover Captures On Mars in absolutely stunning 4K. #4k? #perseverance? #NASA? ———————————————————————————————————— Hi this is common science, it is an educational channel. This channel is all about science topic related to biological science and physical science including: physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, astronomy, geology, geography, statistics, zoology, botany, #commonSCIENCE?

Mars 2020 and the Importance of Planetary Protection

Streamed live on Mar 23, 2021  Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

One exciting part of the Mars 2020 mission – which features the Perseverance rover that landed on Mars last month — is the collection of Mars rocks for possible return to Earth. In order to preserve the integrity of these samples, we have to make sure that no Earth germs hitched a ride to the Red Planet with the rover. Tune in March 23 at 8 pm ET as Moo Cooper, the Planetary Protection Lead Engineer for the Mars 2020 mission, shares a mission overview and the Planetary Protection actions taken by her team and why Planetary Protection is important. Register: https://s.si.edu/3qQkpry? The Exploring Space Lecture Series is made possible by the generous support of Aerojet Rocketdyne and United Launch Alliance.

NASA Previews First Flight of Mars Helicopter (Media Briefing)

Streamed live on Mar 23, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

The Ingenuity Mars helicopter, which arrived with the Perseverance rover, is a technology demonstration that will attempt the first-ever powered, controlled flight on another world. The teams operating Ingenuity and Perseverance have now chosen the flight zone where the helicopter will conduct its operations for up to 31 days (30 sols, or Mars days). Join NASA experts to discuss upcoming milestones and get answers to your questions. Speakers are expected to include: Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington Bobby Braun, director for planetary science, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Southern California J. (Bob) Balaram, Ingenuity chief engineer, JPL Håvard Grip, Ingenuity chief pilot, JPL Farah Alibay, Perseverance integration lead for Ingenuity, JPL Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Universe: Human Life on Mars is Coming Soon (S2, E13) | Full Episode | History

Mar 22, 2021  HISTORY

Space colonization is no longer the fodder of science fiction, it is becoming a reality. Examine the efforts underway to establish a human colony on Mars, including how they plan to grow food, in Season 2, Episode 13, “Colonizing Space.” #TheUniverse? Subscribe for more from The Universe and other great The HISTORY Channel shows: http://histv.co/SubscribeHistoryYT? Find out more about the show and watch full episodes on our site: http://www.history.com/shows/? Check out exclusive The HISTORY Channel content: History Newsletter – https://histv.co/newsletter? Website – https://histv.co/History? Facebook – https://histv.co/Facebook? Twitter – https://histv.co/Twitter? HISTORY® is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, premium documentaries, and scripted event programming

Map of Ingenuity Helicopter Flight Zone

This image shows where NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter team will attempt its test flights

This image shows where NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter team will attempt its test flights. Helicopter engineers added the locations for the rover landing site (also known as “Octavia E. Butler Landing”), the airfield (the area where the helicopter will take off and return), and the flight zone (the area within which it will fly) on an image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Experiment (HiRISE) camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Some small rainbow-like color distortions (which do not actually appear on the terrain of Mars) are seen in this image near the landing location because of the way pre- and post-landing color images were merged.

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter technology demonstration activity is supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, and the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory built and manages operations of Perseverance and Ingenuity for the agency. Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages JPL for NASA.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Last Updated: Mar 24, 2021

Editor: Tony Greicius

Tags:  Jet Propulsion LaboratoryPerseverance Mars Rover

Mar 23, 2021

RELEASE 21-033

NASA Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Prepares for First Flight

An illustration of NASA’s Ingenuity Helicopter flying on Mars

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA is targeting no earlier than April 8 for the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter to make the first attempt at powered, controlled flight of an aircraft on another planet. Before the 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) rotorcraft can attempt its first flight, however, both it and its team must meet a series of daunting milestones.

Ingenuity remains attached to the belly of NASA’s Perseverance rover, which touched down on Mars Feb. 18. On March 21, the rover deployed the guitar case-shaped graphite composite debris shield that protected Ingenuity during landing. The rover currently is in transit to the “airfield” where Ingenuity will attempt to fly. Once deployed, Ingenuity will have 30 Martian days, or sols, (31 Earth days) to conduct its test flight campaign.

“When NASA’s Sojourner rover landed on Mars in 1997, it proved that roving the Red Planet was possible and completely redefined our approach to how we explore Mars. Similarly, we want to learn about the potential Ingenuity has for the future of science research,” said Lori Glaze, director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters. “Aptly named, Ingenuity is a technology demonstration that aims to be the first powered flight on another world and, if successful, could further expand our horizons and broaden the scope of what is possible with Mars exploration.”

Flying in a controlled manner on Mars is far more difficult than flying on Earth. The Red Planet has significant gravity (about one-third that of Earth’s) but its atmosphere is just 1% as dense as Earth’s at the surface. During Martian daytime, the planet’s surface receives only about half the amount of solar energy that reaches Earth during its daytime, and nighttime temperatures can drop as low as minus 130 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 90 degrees Celsius), which can freeze and crack unprotected electrical components.

To fit within the available accommodations provided by the Perseverance rover, the Ingenuity helicopter must be small. To fly in the Mars environment, it must be lightweight. To survive the frigid Martian nights, it must have enough energy to power internal heaters. The system – from the performance of its rotors in rarified air to its solar panels, electrical heaters, and other components – has been tested and retested in the vacuum chambers and test labs of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

“Every step we have taken since this journey began six years ago has been uncharted territory in the history of aircraft,” said Bob Balaram, Mars Helicopter chief engineer at JPL. “And while getting deployed to the surface will be a big challenge, surviving that first night on Mars alone, without the rover protecting it and keeping it powered, will be an even bigger one.”

Deploying the Helicopter

Before Ingenuity takes its first flight on Mars, it must be squarely in the middle of its airfield – a 33-by-33-foot (10-by-10-meter) patch of Martian real estate chosen for its flatness and lack of obstructions. Once the helicopter and rover teams confirm that Perseverance is situated exactly where they want it to be inside the airfield, the elaborate process to deploy the helicopter on the surface of Mars begins.  

“As with everything with the helicopter, this type of deployment has never been done before,” said Farah Alibay, Mars Helicopter integration lead for the Perseverance rover. “Once we start the deployment there is no turning back. All activities are closely coordinated, irreversible, and dependent on each other. If there is even a hint that something isn’t going as expected, we may decide to hold off for a sol or more until we have a better idea what is going on.”

The helicopter deployment process will take about six sols (six days, four hours on Earth). On the first sol, the team on Earth will activate a bolt-breaking device, releasing a locking mechanism that helped hold the helicopter firmly against the rover’s belly during launch and Mars landing. The following sol, they will fire a cable-cutting pyrotechnic device, enabling the mechanized arm that holds Ingenuity to begin rotating the helicopter out of its horizontal position. This is also when the rotorcraft will extend two of its four landing legs.

During the third sol of the deployment sequence, a small electric motor will finish rotating Ingenuity until it latches, bringing the helicopter completely vertical. During the fourth sol, the final two landing legs will snap into position. On each of those four sols, the Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering (WATSON) imager will take confirmation shots of Ingenuity as it incrementally unfolds into its flight configuration. In its final position, the helicopter will hang suspended at about 5 inches (13 centimeters) over the Martian surface. At that point, only a single bolt and a couple dozen tiny electrical contacts will connect the helicopter to Perseverance. On the fifth sol of deployment, the team will use the final opportunity to utilize Perseverance as a power source and charge Ingenuity’s six battery cells.

“Once we cut the cord with Perseverance and drop those final five inches to the surface, we want to have our big friend drive away as quickly as possible so we can get the Sun’s rays on our solar panel and begin recharging our batteries,” said Balaram.

On the sixth and final scheduled sol of this deployment phase, the team will need to confirm three things: that Ingenuity’s four legs are firmly on the surface of Jezero Crater, that the rover did, indeed, drive about 16 feet (about 5 meters) away, and that both helicopter and rover are communicating via their onboard radios. This milestone also initiates the 30-sol clock during which time all preflight checks and flight tests must take place.

“Ingenuity is an experimental engineering flight test – we want to see if we can fly at Mars,” said MiMi Aung, project manager for Ingenuity Mars Helicopter at JPL. “There are no science instruments onboard and no goals to obtain scientific information. We are confident that all the engineering data we want to obtain both on the surface of Mars and aloft can be done within this 30-sol window.”

As with deployment, the helicopter and rover teams will approach the upcoming flight test methodically. If the team misses or has questions about an important preflight milestone, they may take one or more sols to better understand the issue. If the helicopter survives the first night of the sequence period on the surface of Mars, however, the team will spend the next several sols doing everything possible to ensure a successful flight, including wiggling the rotor blades and verifying the performance of the inertial measurement unit, as well as testing the entire rotor system during a spin-up to 2,537 rpm (while Ingenuity’s landing gear remain firmly on the surface).

NASA’s Mars Ingenuity helicopter arrived at the Red Planet Feb. 18, 2021. Its mission: to demonstrate the first powered flight on another world.

Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The First Flight Test on Mars

Once the team is ready to attempt the first flight, Perseverance will receive and relay to Ingenuity the final flight instructions from JPL mission controllers. Several factors will determine the precise time for the flight, including modeling of local wind patterns plus measurements taken by the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer (MEDA) aboard Perseverance. Ingenuity will run its rotors to 2,537 rpm and, if all final self-checks look good, lift off.  After climbing at a rate of about 3 feet per second (1 meter per second), the helicopter will hover at 10 feet (3 meters) above the surface for up to 30 seconds. Then, the Mars Helicopter will descend and touch back down on the Martian surface.

Several hours after the first flight has occurred, Perseverance will downlink Ingenuity’s first set of engineering data and, possibly, images and video from the rover’s Navigation Cameras and Mastcam-Z. From the data downlinked that first evening after the flight, the Mars Helicopter team expect to be able to determine if their first attempt to fly at Mars was a success.

On the following sol, all the remaining engineering data collected during the flight, as well as some low-resolution black-and-white imagery from the helicopter’s own Navigation Camera, could be downlinked to JPL. The third sol of this phase, the two images taken by the helicopter’s high-resolution color camera should arrive. The Mars Helicopter team will use all information available to determine when and how to move forward with their next test.

“Mars is hard,” said Aung. “Our plan is to work whatever the Red Planet throws at us the very same way we handled every challenge we’ve faced over the past six years – together, with tenacity and a lot of hard work, and a little Ingenuity.”

A Piece of History

While Ingenuity will attempt the first powered, controlled flight on another planet, the first powered, controlled flight on Earth took place Dec. 17, 1903, on the windswept dunes of Kill Devil Hill, near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Orville and Wilbur Wright covered 120 feet in 12 seconds during the first flight. The Wright brothers made four flights that day, each longer than the previous.

A small amount of the material that covered one of the wings of the Wright brothers’ aircraft, known as the Flyer, during the first flight is now aboard Ingenuity. An insulative tape was used to wrap the small swatch of fabric around a cable located underneath the helicopter’s solar panel. The Wrights used the same type of material – an unbleached muslin called “Pride of the West” – to cover their glider and aircraft wings beginning in 1901. The Apollo 11 crew flew a different piece of the material, along with a small splinter of wood from the Wright Flyer, to the Moon and back during their iconic mission in July 1969.

More About Ingenuity

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was built by JPL, which also manages the technology demonstration for NASA Headquarters. It is supported by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, and the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate. NASA’s Ames Research Center and Langley Research Center provided significant flight performance analysis and technical assistance.

At NASA Headquarters, Dave Lavery is the program executive for the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter. At JPL, MiMi Aung is the project manager and J. (Bob) Balaram is chief engineer.

Bring the excitement of Ingenuity into classrooms and homes through NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement toolkit. Educators, students, and families can follow along the mission by building a paper helicopter or coding an Ingenuity video game.

For more information about Ingenuity:

https://go.nasa.gov/ingenuity-press-kit

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter

More About Perseverance

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith (broken rock and dust).

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

nasa.gov/perseverance

and

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

For more images related to this release, go to:

https://go.nasa.gov/3tNe822

-end-

Alana Johnson / Grey Hautaluoma
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-672-4780 / 202-358-0668

alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov / grey.hautaluoma-1@nasa.gov

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Last Updated: Mar 24, 2021

Editor: Sean Potter

Tags:  Jet Propulsion LaboratoryMoon to MarsPerseverance Mars Rover

NASA’s Mars Helicopter, Ingenuity (UHD Trailer)

Apr 29, 2020  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA’s Mars Helicopter, Ingenuity, is set to arrive at the Red Planet on Feb. 18, 2021. Its mission: to demonstrate the first powered flight on another world. For more information, visit https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/heli…? Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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 Jacob Lawrence and his Artwork, Boston restores monument to Black Civil War troops, PBS News, and Wikipedia

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Mar 17, 2021  PBS NewsHour

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Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Biden continues to push for COVID relief and a minimum wage increase as a Cabinet nominee faces opposition in the Senate, global disparities and uneven distribution of COVID vaccines becomes more visible as the first shipment of doses arrives in Africa, and the pandemic highlights the discrimination African Americans encounter in the health system. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6? Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour? Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour? Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour? Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts? Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe?

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How the economic relief law narrows the equity gap for farmers of color

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The COVID relief and economic package is a massive bill that has a far-reaching impact in ways that many Americans don’t know about yet. One provision calls for debt relief for Black farmers, who have long been denied access to government funding. John Boyd, a fourth-generation farmer in Virginia and president of the National Black Farmers Association, joins Lisa Desjardins to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6? Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour? Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour? Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour? Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts? Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe?

Unraveling the mystery of a pioneering American painter’s missing work

Mar 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Imagine discovering that a painting on your wall is a long, lost masterpiece. In two recent cases, the story centers on Jacob Lawrence, a pioneering American modernist painter. Lydia Gordon, of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, is our guide, as part of our arts and culture series. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lawrence

Jacob Lawrence

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Jacob Lawrence
Jacob Lawrence in 1941
Born September 7, 1917

Atlantic City, New Jersey

Died June 9, 2000 (aged 82)

Seattle, Washington

Nationality American
Education Harlem Community Art Center
Known for Paintings portraying African-American life
Notable work Migration Series

Jacob Armstead Lawrence (September 7, 1917 – June 9, 2000) was an American painter known for his portrayal of African-American historical subjects and contemporary life. Lawrence referred to his style as “dynamic cubism“, although by his own account the primary influence was not so much French art as the shapes and colors of Harlem.[1] He brought the African-American experience to life using blacks and browns juxtaposed with vivid colors. He also taught and spent 16 years as a professor at the University of Washington.

Lawrence is among the best-known twentieth-century African-American painters, known for his modernist illustrations of everyday life as well as narratives of African-American history and historical figures. At the age of 23 he gained national recognition with his 60-panel The Migration Series, which depicted the Great Migration of African Americans from the rural South to the urban North. The series was purchased jointly by the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York. Lawrence’s works are in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Whitney MuseumMetropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn MuseumReynolda House Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Northwest Art. His 1947 painting The Builders hangs in the White House.

Early years[edit

Douglass argued against poor Negroes leaving the South

Jacob Lawrence was born September 7, 1917, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where his parents had migrated from the rural south. They divorced in 1924.[2] His mother put him and his two younger siblings into foster care in Philadelphia. When he was 13, he and his siblings moved to New York City, where he reconnected with his mother in Harlem. Lawrence was introduced to art shortly after that when their mother enrolled him in after-school classes at an arts and crafts settlement house in Harlem, called Utopia Children’s Center, in an effort to keep him busy. The young Lawrence often drew patterns with crayons. In the beginning, he copied the patterns of his mother’s carpets.

Lawrence teaching school children at the Abraham Lincoln School

After dropping out of school at 16, Lawrence worked in a laundromat and a printing plant. He continued with art, attending classes at the Harlem Art Workshop, taught by the noted African-American artist Charles Alston. Alston urged him to attend the Harlem Community Art Center, led by the sculptor Augusta Savage. Savage secured a scholarship to the American Artists School for Lawrence and a paid position with the Works Progress Administration, established during the Great Depression by the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Lawrence continued his studies as well, working with Alston and Henry Bannarn, another Harlem Renaissance artist, in the Alston-Bannarn workshop. He also studied at Harlem Art Workshop in New York in 1937. Harlem provided crucial training for the majority of Black artists in the United States. Lawrence was one of the first artists trained in and by the African-American community in Harlem.[3] Throughout his lengthy artistic career, Lawrence concentrated on exploring the history and struggles of African Americans.

The “hard, bright, brittle” aspects of Harlem during the Great Depression inspired Lawrence as much as the colors, shapes, and patterns inside the homes of its residents. “Even in my mother’s home,” Lawrence told historian Paul Karlstrom, “people of my mother’s generation would decorate their homes in all sorts of color… so you’d think in terms of Matisse.”[4] He used water-based media throughout his career. Lawrence started to gain some notice for his dramatic and lively portrayals of both contemporary scenes of African-American urban life as well as historical events, all of which he depicted in crisp shapes, bright, clear colors, dynamic patterns, and through revealing posture and gestures.[2]

At the very start of his career he developed the approach that made his reputation and remained his touchstone: creating series of paintings that told a story or, less often, depicted many aspects of a subject. His first were biographical accounts of key figures of the African diaspora. He was just 21 years old when his series of 41 paintings of the Haitian general Toussaint L’Ouverture, who led the revolution of the slaves that eventually gained independence, was shown in an exhibit of African-American artists at the Baltimore Museum of Art. This was followed by a series of paintings of the lives of Harriet Tubman (1938–39) and Frederick Douglass (1939–40).

His teacher Charles Alston assesses Lawrence’s work in an essay for an exhibition at the Harlem YMCA 1938:[5]

Having thus far miraculously escaped the imprint of academic ideas and current vogues in art,… he has followed a course of development dictated by his own inner motivations… Working in the very limited medium of flat tempera he achieved a richness and brilliance of color harmonies both remarkable and exciting… Lawrence symbolizes more than anyone I know, the vitality, the seriousness and promise of a new and socially conscious generation of Negro artists.

On July 24, 1941, Lawrence married the painter Gwendolyn Knight, also a student of Savage. She helped prepare the gesso panels for his paintings and contributed to the captions for the paintings in his multi-painting works.[6]

The Migration Series[edit]

Lawrence completed the 60-panel set of narrative paintings entitled Migration of the Negro or And the Migrants Kept Coming,[7] now called the The Migration Series, in 1940–41. The series portrayed the Great Migration, when hundreds of thousands of African Americans moved from the rural South to the urban North after World War I. Because he was working in tempera, which dries rapidly, he planned all the paintings in advance and then applied a single color wherever he was using it across all the scenes to maintain tonal consistency. Only then did he proceed to the next color. The series was exhibited at the Downtown Gallery in Greenwich Village, which made him the first African-American artist represented by a New York gallery. This brought him national recognition.[8] Selections from this series were featured in a 1941 issue of Fortune. The entire series was purchased jointly and divided by the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., which holds the odd-numbered paintings, and New York’s Museum of Modern Art, which holds the even-numbered. His early work involved general depictions of everyday life in Harlem and also a major series dedicated to African-American history (1940–1941).

Another biographical series of twenty-two panels devoted to the abolitionist John Brown followed in 1941-42. When these pairings became too fragile to display, Lawrence, working on commission, recreated the paintings as a portfolio of silkscreen prints in 1977.[9]

In 1943, Howard Devree, writing in The New York Times, thought Lawrence in his next series of thirty images had “even more successfully concentrated his attention on the many-sided life of his people in Harlem”. He called the set “an amazing social document” and wrote: [10]

Lawrence’s color is fittingly vivid for his interpretations. A strong semi-abstract approach aids him in arriving at his basic or archetypal statements. Confronting this work one feels as if vouchsafed an extraordinary elemental experience. Lawrence has grown in his use of rhythm as well as in sheer design and fluency.

World War II[edit]

In October 1943, during the Second World War, Lawrence was drafted into the United States Coast Guard and served as a public affairs specialist with the first racially integrated crew on the USCGC Sea Cloud, under Carlton Skinner.[11] He continued to paint and sketch while in the Coast Guard, documenting the experience of war around the world. He produced 48 paintings during this time, all of which have been lost. He achieved the rank of petty officer third class.

Lost works[edit]

In October and November 1944, MOMA exhibited of all 60 migration panels plus 8 of paintings Lawrence created aboard the Sea Cloud. He posed, still in his uniform, in front of a sign that read: Jacob Lawrence, The Migration Series and Works Created in the US Coast Guard”. The Coast Guard sent the eight paintings to exhibits around the United States. In the disorder and personnel changes that came with demobilization at the end of the war they went missing.

Post-war[edit]

In 1945, he was awarded a fellowship in the fine arts by the Guggenheim Foundation.[12] In 1946, Josef Albers recruited Lawrence to join the faculty of the summer art program at Black Mountain College.[13]

Returning to New York, Lawrence continued to paint but grew depressed; in 1949, he checked himself into Hillside Hospital in Queens, where he remained for eleven months. Painting there, he produced his Hospital Series, works that were uncharacteristic of him in their focus of his subjects’ emotional states as an inpatient.

Between 1954 and 1956 Lawrence produced a 30-panel series called “Struggle: From the History of the American People” that depicted historical scenes from 1775 to 1817. The series, originally planned to include sixty panels, includes references to current events like the 1954 Army-McCarthy hearings, and they sometimes explore relatively obscure or neglected aspects of American history, like a woman, Margaret Cochran Corbin, in combat or the wall built by unseen enslaved Blacks that protected the American forces at the Battle of New Orleans.[14] Rather than traditional titles, Lawrence labeled each panel with a quote, either to add an individual voice to his work or inject weighted vocabulary. Patrick Henry’s speech, famous for the phrase “Give me liberty or give me death”, he captioned with a different passage: “Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery.” A panel showing Blacks fighting against the British is captioned with the words of a man who sued for emancipation from slavery in 1773: “We have no property! We have no wives! No children! We have no city! No country!”[15] Three panels (Panels 14, 20 and 29) are lost, and three others were only located in 2017, 2020, and 2021.[16] The fraught politics of the mid-1950s prevented the series from finding a museum purchaser, and the panels had been sold to a private collector who re-sold them as individual works.[17]

The Brooklyn Museum of Art mounted a retrospective exhibition of his work in 1960.[18]

Publications[edit]

Lawrence illustrated several works for children. Harriet and the Promised Land appeared in 1968 and used the series of paintings that told the story of Harriet Tubman.[19] It was listed as one of the year’s best illustrated books by The New York Times and praised by the Boston Globe: “The author’s artistic talents, sensitivity and insight into the black experience have resulted in a book that actually creates, within the reader, a spiritual experience.” Two similar volumes based on his John Brown and Great Migration series followed.[20] Lawrence created illustrations for a selection of 18 of Aesop’s Fables for Windmill Press in 1970, and the University of Washington Press published the full set of 23 tales in 1998.[21]

Teaching and late works[edit]

Lawrence taught at several schools after his first stint teaching at Black Mountain College, including the New School for Social Research, the Art Students LeaguePratt Institute,[22][23] and the Skowhegan School.[24] He became a visiting artist at the University of Washington in 1970 and was professor of art there from 1971 to 1986.[18] He was graduate advisor there to lithographer and abstract painter James Claussen[25]

Shortly after moving to Washington state, Lawrence did a series of five paintings on the westward journey of African-American pioneer, George Washington Bush. These paintings are now in the collection of the State of Washington History Museum.[26]

He undertook several major commissions in this part of his career. In 1980, he completed Exploration, a 40-foot-long mural made of porcelain on steel, comprising a dozen panels devoted to academic endeavor. It was installed in Howard University’s Blackburn Center. The Washington Post described it as “enormously sophisticated yet wholly unpretentious ” and said:[27]

The colors are competely flat, but because the porcelain is layered, and because Lawrence here and there paints in strong black shawdows, his mural has the look of a rich relief. It is full of visual rhymes. The small scene of John Henry, the steel drivin’ man, in the final panel is echoed by an image of a sculptor in the art scene: He is hammering another spike, for quite different reasons, into a block of stone. This is not art that one tires of, for it is not the sort of work one can read at once.

Lawrence produced another series in 1983, eight screen prints called the Hiroshima Series. Commissioned to provide full-page illustrations for a new edition of a work of his choice, Lawrence chose John Hershey‘s Hiroshima (1946). He depicted in abstract visual language several survivors at the moment of the bombing in the midst of physical and emotional destruction.[7][28]

Lawrence’s painting Theater was commissioned by the University of Washington in 1985 and installed in the main lobby of the Meany Hall for the Performing Arts.[29]

Last years[edit]

The Whitney Museum of American Art produced an exhibition of Lawrence’s entire career in 1974, as did the Seattle Art Museum in 1986.[18]

In 1999, he and his wife established the Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation for the creation, presentation and study of American art, with a particular emphasis on work by African-American artists.[18] It represents their estates[30] and maintains a searchable archive of nearly a thousand images of their work.[31]

Lawrence continued to paint until a few weeks before his death from lung cancer on June 9, 2000, at the age of 82.[18] The New York Times described him as “one of America’s leading modern figurative painters” and “among the most impassioned visual chroniclers of the African-American experience.”[18] Shortly before his death he stated: “…for me, a painting should have three things: universality, clarity and strength. Clarity and strength so that it may be aesthetically good. Universality so that it may be understood by all men.”[32]

A retrospective exhibition of Lawrence’s work, planned before his death, opened at the Phillips Collection in May 2001 and travelled to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Detroit Institute of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.[33] The exhibit was meant to coincide with the publication of Jacob Lawrence: Paintings, Drawings, and Murals (1935-1999), A Catalogue Raisonne.[34] His last commissioned public work, the mosaic mural New York in Transit made of Murano glass was installed in October 2001 in the Times Square subway station in New York City.[35][36]

His wife, Gwendolyn Knight, survived him and died in 2005 at the age of 91.[37]

Recognition[edit]

The eighteen institutions that awarded Lawrence honorary degrees include Harvard University, Yale University, Howard University, Amherst College, and New York University.[18]

Legacy[edit]

  • The Seattle Art Museumoffers the Gwendolyn Knight and Jacob Lawrence Fellowship, a $10,000 award to “individuals whose original work reflects the Lawrences’ concern with artistic excellence, education, mentorship and scholarship within the cultural contexts and value systems that informed their work and the work of other artists of color.”[41]
  • The Jacob Lawrence Gallery at the University of Washington School of Art + Art History + Designoffers an annual Jacob Lawrence Legacy Residency.[42]

His work is in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including the British Museum,[43] the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum,[44] the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, the Phillips Collection, the Brooklyn Museum, the National Gallery of Art[45] and Reynolda House Museum of American Art, the Art Institute Chicago, the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Minnesota Museum of American Art, the Savannah College of Art and Design Museum, the Seattle Art Museum, the Birmingham Museum of Art,[46] the Indianapolis Museum of Art,[47] the University of Michigan Museum of Art,[48] the North Carolina Museum of Art,[49] the Princeton University Art Museum,[50] the Musei Vaticani,[51] the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering,[52] the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts,[53] the Saint Louis Art Museum,[54] the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts,[55] the Studio Museum in Harlem,[56] the Philadelphia Museum of Art,[57] the Portland Art Museum,[58] the Hudson River Museum,[59] and The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis.

In May 2007, the White House Historical Association purchased Lawrence’s The Builders (1947) at auction for $2.5 million. The painting has hung in the White House Green Room since 2009.[60][61]

See also[edit]

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Lawrence – Seattle

LawrenceKimmelman

LawrenceWilkerson

Jacob Lawrence, Panel 10. We crossed the River at McKonkey’s Ferry 9 miles above Trenton . . . the night was excessively severe . . . which the men bore without the least murmur . . . —Tench Tilghman, 27 December 1776, 1954. From Struggle Series, 1954–56
Egg tempera on hardboard
12 × 16 in. (30.5 × 40.6 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
© The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

LawrenceLetter from Home

LawrenceShadow

LawrenceCarnegie

 Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

LawrenceDreams

LawrenceBrownstones

Lawrence – Hirshhornsiedu

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Scan from color transparency

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Everett/Shutterstock (10305637a)
Coast Guardsman Jacob Lawrence, with his paintings at the Institute of Modern Art in Boston in 1945. During World War 2, Lawrence served with the first racially integrated crew on the USCGC Sea Cloud, under Carlton Skinner. He continued to paint and sketch while in the Coast Guard.
Historical Collection

Jacob Lawrence and his Artwork

Untitled, 12/11/03, 2:53 PM, 16C, 3450×4776 (600+0), 100%, AIA repro tone, 1/50 s, R58.9, G46.8, B59.3

Jacob Lawrence and his Artwork

Jacob Lawrence’s Artwork   Getty Images

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President Biden and Vice President Harris have responded swiftly to the massacre earlier this week, including restructuring tomorrow’s previously planned trip to Atlanta:

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Margaret Talev, Axios’ managing editor for politics, said the response reflects both Biden’s instincts and his engagement with the community during last year’s campaign.

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NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 18th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Mar 18, 2021  NBC News

What we know about the Atlanta shootings investigation, FBI releases new video of attacks on police officers at Capitol riot, and Covid cases rising in at least 13 states. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:14? Police Not Ruling Out Hate Crime In Spa Shooting Spree 02:50? Biden Orders Flags At Half-Staff In Honor Of Victims 02:55? Vigils Held Nationwide For Spa Shooting Victims 03:23? Shooting Investigator Promoted Racist T-Shirt On Facebook 03:34? Official Sparks Outrage By Saying Suspect Had ‘A Bad Day’ 03:55? Congress Holds Heated Hearing On Anti-Asian Hate 04:44? Congresswomen: Trump Put ‘Bullseye’ On Asian Americans 05:04? Fear Rises Among Asian Americans After Deadly Rampage 06:37? FBI Releases New Videos Of ‘Most Violent’ Capitol Rioters 08:15? New Covid Cases Rising In At Least 13 States 08:33? Highly Contagious Variants Found In All 50 States 08:46? Dr.Fauci & Senator Rand Paul Clash Over Masks 09:02? Biden: U.S. To Hit 100 Million Doses Goal Tomorrow 09:30? Sergeant Battling Covid Released From Hospital 09:48? New Severe Weather Threat After Tornado Outbreak 10:11? Migrant Teens Speak Out Minutes After Crossing Border 10:51? Border Agents Warn Of ‘Significant’ Migrant Surge 11:23? Migrant Teens Say Journey Not Motivated By Policy Shift 11:47? Migrant Camp Across The Border In Mexico Dismantled 12:17? Putin Fires Back After Biden Calls Him A Killer 12:41? Biden Administration Holds First Summit With China 14:14? Tips For Booking Vacations later In The Year 15:38? Deadly Counterfeit Pills Sold On Social Media » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBCwill? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 17th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Mar 17, 2021  NBC News

Dangerous storms and tornado outbreak hit the South, Atlanta shootings, disturbing surge in anti-Asian attacks leave communities on edge, and Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks out about school reopenings. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:01? Tornado Outbreak Causes Destruction In The South 2:58? 30 Millions Americans Under Risk From Severe Storm 4:04? SPA Shootings Suspect Charged With 8 Counts Of Murder 4:54? Police: Suspect Indicated He Has Sex Addiction 5:16? Police: Too Early To Tell If Shooting Racially Motivated 5:57? Suspects Gun Legally Purchased Before Deadly Spree 6:23? Asian American Communities On Edge As Attacks Rise 8:20? Migrants Desperate For Asylum Surging At Border 8:45? Biden Tells Migrants ‘Don’t Come’ To The Border 9:30? DHS Chief Grilled By Congress On Record Border Surge 9:55? Unaccompanied Migrant Teens Being Moved To Dallas 10:10? IRS Pushes Tax Filing Deadline Back To May 17 10:47? U.S. Still Reporting 50,000 COVID Cases A Day 11:20? Over A Quarter Of Adults Received At Least One Shot 11:41? Mississippi Struggles To Fill Vaccine Appointments 12:08? Older Children Could Receive COVID Vaccine By Fall 12:33? L.A. Schools Prepare To Reopen A Year After Shutdown 15:04? Education Secretary On Push To Reopen America’s Schools 15:47? Should Vaccinations Be Mandatory For Teachers? 16:26? Cardona: American Students Have ‘Impressive’ Resilience 16:59? Cardona: Fall ‘Will Look More Like’ Pre-COVID Era 17:52? California City Pays Tourists To Visit » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

‘I Shouted For Help, But Nobody Helped Me’: Asian Americans Are Under Attack

Mar 12, 2021  AJ+

There has been a significant surge in hate crimes against Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, according to New York City police data. We spoke to one victim, a Filipino American man named Noel, who describes waiting for a subway train in New York before being slashed across the face with a knife. He, like many in the AAPI community, is speaking out to take a stand against these attacks in the hope prevent further violence on Asian Americans. Subscribe for more videos: https://ajplus.co/subscribe? Sign up for subtext, our newsletter about the people and movements driving change in our society: https://ajplus.co/ekdv4? Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ajplus/? Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus?

Full Interview: Daniel Dae Kim On Anti-Asian Violence In The US | TODAY

Mar 18, 2021  TODAY

Actor Daniel Dae Kim gets choked up as he speaks with TODAY about the recent incidents of violence against Asian Americans, which have been on the rise since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. He calls on all Americans to use their voice in stopping anti-Asian hate crimes saying, “It’s not an Asian American issue, it’s a human issue.” » Watch TODAY All Day: http://www.youtube.com/today? » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY? » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY? About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY’s Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY? Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY? Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY? Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY? Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY? #DanielDaeKim? #AntiAsianViolence? #TODAY? Full Interview: Daniel Dae Kim On Anti-Asian Violence In The US | TODAY

Asian Entertainers Talk Activism Efforts & Giving Back | Around the Table | Entertainment Weekly

Mar 18, 2021  Entertainment Weekly

Daniel Dae Kim, George Takei, Olivia Munn, Dianne Doan, Hari Kondabolu, and Chloe Bennet sat down with EW on Sunday March, 14th 2021 to speak about their experiences as Asian artists and the rise in attacks against Asians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Subscribe to EW ?? http://bit.ly/EWSubscribe? #AroundTheTable? #DanielDaeKim? #GeorgeTakei? #OliviaMunn? #DianneDoan? #HariKondabolu? #ChloeBennet? #EntertainmentWeekly? EW News Flash brings you breaking news and exclusive stories from the world of entertainment. We’re always on the pulse with the latest updates in music, TV, movie and celebrity news, and full of behind-the-scenes coverage from A-List events and first looks at the newest TV and films trailers and teasers. From Marvel and Star Wars, to Game of Thrones and The Walking Dead, find out everything you need to know right here! See all your favorite celebs spill things you never knew. Scarlett Johansson reveals when the OG Marvel stars really believed the Avengers could work, the ‘Supernatural’ cast shares untold on-set secrets, and much more: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…? A Daryl and Carol ‘Walking Dead’ spinoff is coming? Carole Baskin joins ‘Dancing with the Stars’? Keep tabs on the buzziest Hollywood news all in one place: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…? Be the first to see our newest cover story and exclusive features. From the latest ‘Star Wars’ adventure to epic reunions for beloved shows like ‘The West Wing’: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…? CONNECT WITH Web: http://www.ew.com/? Twitter: http://bit.ly/Twitter_EW? Facebook: http://bit.ly/Facebook_EW? Instagram: http://bit.ly/Instagram_EW? Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snapchat_EW? Pinterest: http://bit.ly/Pinterest_EW? ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY is your pass to Hollywood’s most creative minds and most fascinating stars. With sharp insight and unparalleled access, we keep you plugged into pop culture. Asian Entertainers Talk Activism & Giving Back | Around the Table | Entertainment Weekly https://www.youtube.com/user/ew?

Atlanta Presser Sparks Outrage for ‘Really Bad Day’ Comments

Mar 19, 2021  NowThis News

Lawmakers and celebrities alike are calling out Capt. Jay Baker after he said the Atlanta-area shooter, who killed 8 people, just had ‘a really bad day.’ » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more stories on racial justice and U.S. politics, subscribe to NowThis News. #StopAAPIHate? #Atlanta? #RacialJustice? #Politics? #News? #NowThis?

Daniel Dae Kim Speaks to Congress About Anti-Asian Hate

Mar 18, 2021  NowThis News

‘We are 23 million strong. We are united. And we are waking up.’ — Daniel Dae Kim made these impassioned remarks before Congress during a hearing about anti-Asian hate in the U.S. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more stories on racial justice and U.S. politics, subscribe to NowThis News. #DanielDaeKim? #StopAAPIHate? #RacialJustice? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

Late Night Hosts Call Out Anti-Asian Hate After GA Shootings

Mar 18, 2021  NowThis News

‘If there’s anyone who’s racist, it’s a motherf*cker who kills 6 Asian women’ — Here’s how late night hosts reacted to the mass shootings in Georgia that left 8 dead, including 6 Asian women. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more stories on racial justice, subscribe to NowThis News. #TrevorNoah? #Colbert? #LateNight? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

Not Sorry: Chip Roy Invokes Lynchings At Anti-Asian Hate Hearing | The 11th Hour | MSNBC

Mar 19, 2021  MSNBC

Texas Republican Rep. Chip Roy said there will be no apologies after he seemed to glorify lynchings as a form of justice in a House hearing about anti-Asian racism. Kurt Bardella joins to discuss. Aired on 03/19/2021. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc? About The 11th Hour with Brian Williams: Brian Williams delivers the latest updates on evolving news stories and places the major political events of the day into context for viewers. Broadcast live from New York, Williams’ show convenes a dynamic panel of guests to offer a forward-thinking look at the critical stories that are expected to drive the conversation the following morning. Williams has also anchored MSNBC’s special coverage around key political events and major breaking news stories as they occur domestically and around the world. MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc? Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube? Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc? Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc? Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc? #KurtBardella? #ChipRoy? #MSNBC? Not Sorry: Chip Roy Invokes Lynchings At Anti-Asian Hate Hearing | The 11th Hour | MSNBC

No. 45’s Racist Rhetoric Led Directly To Hate Crimes Against The AAPI Community

Mar 18, 2021  The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

While all Americans have an obligation to protect one another and treat each other with respect, our former president bears a particular responsibility for inflaming and amplifying the hatred that is behind this spate of terrible crimes against Asian and Asian-American people in this country. #Colbert? #ALateShow? #Monologue? Subscribe To “The Late Show” Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/ColbertYouTube? For more content from “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”, click HERE: http://bit.ly/1AKISnR? Watch full episodes of “The Late Show” HERE: http://bit.ly/1Puei40? Like “The Late Show” on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1df139Y? Follow “The Late Show” on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1dMzZzG? Follow “The Late Show” on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1JlGgzw? Follow “The Late Show” on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/29wfREj? Follow “The Late Show” on Tumblr HERE: http://bit.ly/29DVvtR? Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS. Get the CBS app for iPhone & iPad! Click HERE: http://bit.ly/12rLxge? Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream live TV, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B? — The Late Show with Stephen Colbert is the premier late night talk show on CBS, airing at 11:35pm EST, streaming online via CBS All Access, and delivered to the International Space Station on a USB drive taped to a weather balloon. Every night, viewers can expect: Comedy, humor, funny moments, witty interviews, celebrities, famous people, movie stars, bits, humorous celebrities doing bits, funny celebs, big group photos of every star from Hollywood, even the reclusive ones, plus also jokes.

The Filibuster – If You Don’t Know, Now You Know | The Daily Social Distancing Show

Mar 18, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

The Senate filibuster is one of the biggest things standing in the way of anti-voter suppression laws, raising the minimum wage and immigration reform. What is this loophole, and how does it affect governing today? #DailyShow? #TrevorNoah? #Filibuster? Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh…? Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow? Watch full episodes of The Daily Show: http://www.paramountplus.com/?ftag=PP…?

Why We Should’ve Seen the Atlanta Shootings Coming | The Daily Social Distancing Show

Fundraiser   Mar 17, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Trevor unpacks the racist motivations behind the deadly shootings in Atlanta, which left eight people, including six Asian women, dead. #DailyShow? #TrevorNoah? #AtlantaShooting? Go to https://stopaapihate.org/actnow/? to help the Stop AAPI Hate coalition track, respond to and prevent acts of violence and discrimination against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh…?

The Answer Is Simple Yet Strangely Difficult: Don’t Hate Each Other

Mar 17, 2021  The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Amid a terrifying rise in anti-Asian violence in this country, and following the grim news that six Asian women were murdered in Atlanta last night, Stephen Colbert pleads with Americans to recognize our common humanity and remember that this nation of immigrants is meant to be a welcoming place for everyone. #Colbert? #ALateShow? #Monologue? Subscribe To “The Late Show” Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/ColbertYouTube? For more content from “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”, click HERE: http://bit.ly/1AKISnR? Watch full episodes of “The Late Show” HERE: http://bit.ly/1Puei40? Like “The Late Show” on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1df139Y? Follow “The Late Show” on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1dMzZzG? Follow “The Late Show” on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1JlGgzw? Follow “The Late Show” on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/29wfREj? Follow “The Late Show” on Tumblr HERE: http://bit.ly/29DVvtR? Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS. Get the CBS app for iPhone & iPad! Click HERE: http://bit.ly/12rLxge?

Karen Chee Addresses the Atlanta Shooting

Mar 19, 2021  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Late Night writer Karen Chee takes a moment to discuss the horrific shooting in Georgia that took the lives of six Asian-American women and the real motive behind it. Late Night with Seth Meyers. Stream now on Peacock: https://bit.ly/3erP2gX? Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth? Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se…? LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth? Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth? Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth? Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/? Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes.

Finally a President Who Does What He Says He’ll Do

Mar 18, 2021  Jimmy Kimmel Live

Deadly murder hornets are back, March Madness is underway, Barack Obama filled out his bracket, Gonzaga is still a fake university that doesn’t exist, President Biden’s promise of 100 million Americans being vaccinated in his first 100 days is ahead of schedule, Biden is planning to make Russia pay for their repeated election meddling, turns out Biden quotes his mother more than any President ever, a place called Louis Tussauds Waxworks had to remove its sculpture of Trump because people kept punching it in the face, the country continues to open up, help is on the way for that annoying person in your life who won’t stop talking about their Peloton, and This Week in Unnecessary Censorship. SUBSCRIBE to get the latest #Kimmel?: http://bit.ly/JKLSubscribe?

Ringo Starr Says “Peace And Love” Every Day And Still Believes In The Message

Mar 16, 2021    The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Ringo Starr makes his first visit to A Late Show and shares the reason he has kept the concepts of peace and love alive in his heart since the 1960s. Check out Ringo’s new EP, “Zoom In” and his new book, “Ringo Rocks: 30 Years Of The All Starrs.” #Colbert? #TheBeatles? #RingoStarr? Subscribe To “The Late Show” Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/ColbertYouTube? For more content from “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”, click HERE: http://bit.ly/1AKISnR? Watch full episodes of “The Late Show” HERE: http://bit.ly/1Puei40? Like “The Late Show” on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1df139Y? Follow “The Late Show” on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1dMzZzG? Follow “The Late Show” on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1JlGgzw? Follow “The Late Show” on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/29wfREj? Follow “The Late Show” on Tumblr HERE: http://bit.ly/29DVvtR? Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS. Get the CBS app for iPhone & iPad! Click HERE: http://bit.ly/12rLxge?

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PBS News, NBC News, Meet The Press, Brian Tyler Cohen, Glenn Kirschner, NBC News NOW, NowThis News, Late Night with Seth Meyers,  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, The Washington Post, and Colossal

PBS News, NBC News, Meet The Press, Brian Tyler Cohen, Glenn Kirschner, NBC News NOW, NowThis News, Late Night with Seth Meyers,  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, The Washington Post, and Colossal

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode March 13 &14, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 13rd &14th, 2021

 Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 14th, 2021

Chris Wallace calls out Republican TO HIS FACE for voting against OWN state’s relief, Mar 14, 2021  Brian Tyler Cohen

What Can We Do To Combat Politicians Who Work To Undermine Our Democracy? The Democracy Pledge, Mar 14, 2021, Glenn Kirschner

The Racism Virus: Anti-Asian Attacks Surge | NBC News NOW, Mar 10, 2021, NBC News

Top 5 Politics Stories: March 6-12, 2021, Premiered Mar 12, 2021,  NowThis News

Lauren Underwood on COVID-19 and Biden Admin | KnowThis, Premiered Jan 30, 2021,  NowThis News

Biden Signs COVID Relief Bill on One-Year Anniversary of the Pandemic: A Closer Look, Mar 11, 2021, Late Night with Seth Meyers

If You Don’t Know, Now You Know Everything: Environmental Round-Up |The Daily Social Distancing Show, Mar 13, 2021, The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

The Washington Post: Important developments in the pandemic.

Colossal: Dizzying Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe Billow and Writhe in the Wind

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode March 14, 2021

Mar 14, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 14, with COVID-19 relief checks on the way to many Americans and vaccination numbers on the rise, NewsHour Weekend dares to look forward to a post-pandemic future: newly-designed, safety-optimized office spaces, fewer zoom calls, and in our signature segment “Roads to Recovery,” how some hard-hit restaurants may have found a way to survive despite it all. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Live Show: March 13, 2021

Streamed live 40 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 13, more relief funds set to arrive as the U.S. marks one year of COVID-19 shutdowns, calls for justice on the anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s death, and in our signature segment, Exploring Hate: extremism in the ranks of the U.S. military and police. Hari Sreenivasa anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 14th, 2021

Mar 15, 2021  NBC News

17 million under storm warnings as severe weather plows through U.S., Biden hits the road as Americans receive Covid relief, and the White House deploys FEMA to border.

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 13th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Mar 13, 2021  NBC News

Winter blast threatens the Rocky Mountain states, Americans begin receiving Covid relief direct deposits, and U.S. surpasses 100 million Covid vaccinations.Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80? Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre…? Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8? Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF? Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4? Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 13th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 14th, 2021 | Meet The Press | NBC News

Mar 14, 2021 NBC News

Dr. Anthony Fauci shares when you can expect life to return to normal. Stacey Abrams and Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan (R-Ga.) discuss the fight to reshape democracy. Lanhee Chen, John Heilemann, Hallie Jackson and María Teresa Kumar join the Meet the Press roundtable » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC? Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC? Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC? Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC? Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 14th, 2021 | Meet The Press | NBC News

Chris Wallace calls out Republican TO HIS FACE for voting against OWN state’s relief

Mar 14, 2021  Brian Tyler Cohen

BREAKING: Fox News’ Chris Wallace just called out a Republican Senator to his face for voting against his OWN state’s relief. To call on businesses to STOP backing Republicans who support voter suppression bills, sign here ? odaction.com/btc-ga-corps Subscribe for more and follow me here: PODCAST: https://apple.co/36UvEHs? (or search “No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen” on your podcast app) TWITTER: https://twitter.com/briantylercohen? INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/briantylerc…? FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohen? PATREON:

https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohen? Please sign up for updates on my new projects below: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-up/? Sources: https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/new…?

What Can We Do To Combat Politicians Who Work To Undermine Our Democracy? The Democracy Pledge

Mar 14, 2021  Glenn Kirschner

American democracy was attacked on January 6. It survived but we are not out of the woods yet. There are still politicians who are working to undermine American democracy. We often ask ourselves what we can do to fight for democracy, how can we have an impact. That’s where The Democracy Pledge comes in. Voters’ voices are loud. But to corporate American, consumers’ voices are even louder. Here is a grassroots project designed to enable companies, corporations and businesses to take a stand in favor of a healthy democracy. Please visit us at www.thedpledge.com to help build a stronger democracy. Please follow us on Twitter @thedpledge

The Racism Virus: Anti-Asian Attacks Surge | NBC News NOW

Mar 10, 2021  NBC News

NBC News investigative and consumer correspondent Vicky Nguyen moderates this important special report focused on the concerning rise in anti-Asian violence during the pandemic and solutions to racism and xenophobia. Special guests include Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., basketball star Jeremy Lin, actors Olivia Munn and Brian Tee, ‘Survivor’ winner Yul Kwon, the Nobel Prize nominee and activist Amanda Nguyen, comedian Margaret Cho and more. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile? Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre…? Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC? Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC? Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC? Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC? #RacismVirus? #JeremyLin? #NBCNews? The Racism Virus: Anti-Asian Attacks Surge | NBC News NOW

Top 5 Politics Stories: March 6-12, 2021

Premiered Mar 12, 2021  NowThis News

WEEKLY TOP 5: One of Gov. Cuomo’s accusers spoke out on national television while the Dems stood up for workers’ rights and called out GOP hypocrisy again. Here’s what went down this week. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more U.S. politics, COVID-19 updates, and world news, subscribe to NowThis News. #COVID19? #Cuomo? #GOP? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

Lauren Underwood on COVID-19 and Biden Admin | KnowThis

Premiered Jan 30, 2021   NowThis News

Rep. Lauren Underwood, a registered nurse, became the youngest Black woman to serve in Congress in 2019. Zinhle Essamuah talks to her about COVID-19, Black maternal mortality, representation, and more. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? 0:00? Intro 0:27? Biden Admin and COVID-19 1:52? Vaccine Rollout 2:55? Sworn Into Congress 3:57? Black Maternal Mortality 7:40? New Opportunities in Congress Rep. Lauren Underwood (D-IL) became the youngest Black woman to serve in Congress when she was sworn in in 2019. We spoke to Lauren Underwood, who is also a registered nurse, about access to COVID-19 testing and vaccines, the Momnibus Act’s efforts to turn around maternal deaths, and the opportunities standing before Congress and the Biden admin. For more U.S. politics and world news, subscribe to NowThis News. #LaurenUnderwood? #COVID19? #MaternalHealth? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

Biden Signs COVID Relief Bill on One-Year Anniversary of the Pandemic: A Closer Look

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Mar 11, 2021   Late Night with Seth Meyers

Seth takes a closer look at President Biden signing his $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill on the one-year anniversary of the pandemic while Republicans try to both lie about the bill and claim credit for it. Late Night with Seth Meyers is supporting God’s Love We Deliver to help those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic. God’s Love We Deliver is a New York City-based organization that for over 30 years has provided personalized meals and nutrition counseling, free of charge, to those living with severe illnesses. With the help of 17,000 volunteers, God’s Love We Deliver provides over 2 million free meals each year to thousands of New York’s most vulnerable. Click the button on the above/below to donate or visit www.glwd.org. Late Night with Seth Meyers. Stream now on Peacock: https://bit.ly/3erP2gX? Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth? Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35?/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se…? LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth? Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth? Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth? Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/? Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. GET MORE NBC Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC? Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC? NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/? YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc? NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbc? Biden Signs COVID Relief Bill on One-Year Anniversary of the Pandemic: A Closer Look- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/nlPpV5h2LhI? Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenight…?

If You Don’t Know, Now You Know Everything: Environmental Round-Up |The Daily Social Distancing Show

Mar 13, 2021   The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Why are wildfires so bad in Australia and California? Is recycling actually good for the world? What’s wrong with the U.S. power grid? #DailyShow? #TrevorNoah? #IfYouDon?’tKnowNowYouKnow Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh…? Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow? Watch full episodes of The Daily Show: http://www.paramountplus.com/?ftag=PP…

The Washington Post: Important developments in the pandemic. 

By Ben Guarino
with Lindsey Bever
 Email

The latest

As vaccine doses become increasingly available in the U.S., hesitancy will become a major obstacle in getting shots into more arms. Those reluctant to get a vaccine represent a not-insignificant portion of the population. Almost 1 in 2 Republican men, and 47 percent of Donald Trump’s 2020 supporters, recently told NPR-PBS NewsHour-Marist pollsters they would choose to not get vaccinated against the coronavirus.

The nation’s top infectious-disease expert, Anthony S. Fauci, called those survey results “disturbing” on NBC News Sunday. He suggested the former president should use his popularity among Republicans to encourage vaccination.

But even a pro-vaccine ad starring Trump may not be as influential as it sounds. That’s one finding from a focus group of vaccine-hesitant Trump voters who said they would not be swayed by political appeals. If they are seeking information from conservative politicians, they should look elsewhere than Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) — who mistakenly believes having covid-19 is superior to the vaccine. It’s not. A previous infection is no reason to avoid getting the shot.

It’s no surprise that misinformation about vaccines thrives on social media. But a Facebook study of that problem, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post, contained some remarkable elements: For instance, half of all vaccine-hesitant content came from just 111 Facebook users.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is also conducting its own internal study of substandard information. A review of the agency’s pandemic recommendations posted in the Trump era, ordered by new CDC director Rochelle Walenskyfound some guidelines issued in summer 2020 that were “not primarily authored” by CDC staff. Parts of that guidance ignored the best scientific evidence. One set of recommendations, in August, discouraged people from getting tested if they didn’t show symptoms; facing widespread criticism, it was removed a month later.

Meanwhile on Monday, Germany became the largest European country to stop using the AstraZeneca vaccine over fears of blood clots. France and Italy also did so. Manufacturer AstraZeneca was adamant that its vaccine is not linked to an increased risk of clots.

Other important news

Vandals painted anti-Asian slurs on the windows of a ramen restaurant in Texas after its owner spoke out against the elimination of the state’s mask mandate.

Duke University is under a mandatory quarantine following the school’s worst one-week surge in cases, which a spokesman said was linked to fraternity parties.

Police fired pepper balls and pepper spray into a rowdy, unmasked crowd at Miami Beach. City officials are worried spring breakers pose infection risks.

Advocates for migrants object to ICE’s covid-19 protocols, which included dropping off asylum seekers who tested positive at a bus station, for releasing detainees.

Guide to the pandemic

Track confirmed cases, hospitalizations and deaths in the U.S. and the spread around the world.

U.S. vaccine distribution and delivery, tracked by state.

Guides: Stimulus checks | Finding vaccine appointments | Vaccines | Variants | Masks

Follow live updates about the pandemic from Post reporters across the globe.

Submit a question and we may answer it in a future story or newsletter.

 

  By Westyn Branch-Elliman, Polly van den Berg and Elissa Schechter-Perkins ?  Read more »
10 reasons for Australia’s covid-19 success story

Opinion ?  By Richard Glover ?  Read more »

Yo-Yo Ma played a surprise concert for a clinic during his post-vaccination waiting period  By Paulina Firozi ?  Read more 

Dizzying Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe Billow and Writhe in the Wind

Colossal: Dizzying Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe Billow and Writhe in the Wind

DECEMBER 7, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Washington-based artist Anthony Howe (previously) has mesmerized viewers for nearly a decade with towering kinetic sculptures that twist and turn with hypnotic motion. Weighing hundreds of pounds, the hefty artworks are activated with even the slightest breeze and resemble otherworldly organisms, four-legged creatures, and mechanisms as they coil in the wind. Howe documents his fabrication process for one of his works in a new video on his YouTube channel, where he shares a growing collection of sleek sculptures.

“Mums the Word,” 475 pounds, 206 x 96 x 60 inches

“In Cloud Light IV,” 830 pounds, 234 x 86 x 60 inches

Anthony Howe Fabricates a Kinetic Wind Sculpture

Dec 6, 2020  Anthony Howe

AAH Fabricates………..

Mums the Word , In Cloud Light IV

Nov 1, 2020  Anthony Howe

Two new public kinetic sculptures, Mums the Word, 206″H x 92″W x 60″D, 475lbs. In Cloud Light IV, 234″H x 86″W x 60″D, Base of 3/8″ 304 plate. 830lbs. Both spin in ultralight winds – Mums only spins when wind hits it from one side. ICL4 from both directions.

Torso

Aug 25, 2020  Anthony Howe

“TORSO” by Anthony Howe, stainless steel, 76″h x 90″l x 60″w, 290lbs. Kinetic wind sculpture if outdoors, motorized if indoors.

Go to the top

Biden outlines plan to vaccinate all American adults in first national address, PBS News, White House press secretary Jen Psaki holds news briefing, NBC Nightly News, Axios, and The New York Times

Biden outlines plan to vaccinate all American adults in first national address, PBS News, White House press secretary Jen Psaki holds news briefing, NBC Nightly News, Axios, and The New York Times

PBS News: Biden outlines plan to vaccinate all American adults in first national address

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 11 & 12. 2021

WATCH LIVE: White House press secretary Jen Psaki holds news briefing, Mar. 12.2021  PBS NewsHour

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 12th, 2021

Axios PM&AM: Vaccine nationalism

 The New York Times:  The Morning – Hope as a public-health tool, March 12, 2021, and COMING OF AGE – Teens on a Year That Changed Everything

WATCH: Biden outlines plan to vaccinate all American adults in first national address

Mar 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

President Biden spoke from the White House hours after signing the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill, laying out his administration’s plan to open vaccinations for all adults by May 1. Biden urged all Americans to get vaccinated and suggested that if the nation stays vigilant, there could be an opportunity to return to some level of normal by July 4 of this year. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 12. 2021

Mar 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the Biden administration teams up with key global allies to challenge China’s vaccine diplomacy dominance, Black Americans and women still face discrimination in skilled trades despite an increasingly diverse workforce, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart consider the historic COVID relief law, the immigration crisis and a year of life in the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Minneapolis settles suit with Floyd’s family https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcdQ4…? Biden moves up vaccine timeline, vows to expand global stock https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH_C-…? Black Americans, women face discrimination in skilled trades https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qiHa…? Brooks and Capehart on the historic COVID relief law  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rz_Z…? Record-breaking sale of digital art makes history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x9ws…? Remembering 5 Americans who lost their lives to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4GLS…? Unraveling the mystery of a pioneering painter’s work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mirgt…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour West live episode, Mar. 11, 2021

Streamed live on Mar 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

WATCH LIVE: White House press secretary Jen Psaki holds news briefing

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 12th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Mar 12, 2021  NBC News

Gov. Cuomo defiant as top lawmakers call for him to resign, Minneapolis reaches $27 million settlement with George Floyd’s family, and Netflix testing new measure to restrict password sharing. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:12? Top Senate & House Democrats Call On Cuomo To Resign 02:59? Governor Cuomo: ‘I’m Not Going To Resign’ 04:14? Seventh Women Accuses Cuomo Of Sexual Harrassment 04:29? Biden Silent On Harassment Allegations Against Cuomo 05:02? Historic $27 Million Settlement For George Floyd’s Family 06:59? Biden Promises All Adults Eligible For Vaccine By May 1 08:53? Countries Halt Astrazeneca Vaccine After Blood Clot Reports 09:42? Biden Takes Victory Lap On $1.9 Trillion Covid Rescue Plan 10:56? Republicans Say Trump Should Get Credit For Vaccines 11:25? Officials: First $1,400 Checks Going Out This Weekend 11:59? High School Announcer Caught On Mic Using Racist Slurs 13:34? Security Failures Led To Breach At Air Force One Base 14:49? Major Spring Snowstorm Bringing Up To 2 Feet 15:41? Black Americans Face Alarming Covid Vaccine Inequity 17:46? Netflix Testing Crackdown On Password Sharing 19:00? Southwest Reunites Boy With Lost Buzz Lightyear » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

Axios PM: Vaccine nationalism

    By Mike Allen ·Mar 12, 2021

Good afternoon: Today’s PM — edited by Justin Green — is 370 words, a 1.5-minute read.

?? Situational awareness: The U.S. has now administered over 101 million doses of the coronavirus vaccine — with almost 20% of the population having received one dose and over 10% of the population being fully vaccinated, Axios’ Ursula Perano reports.

1 big thing: Vaccine nationalism

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios
America first: That’s the message being sent by the White House when it comes to vaccines, writes Axios Capital correspondent Felix Salmon.

The big picture: Billions of people are waiting for access to a COVID-19 vaccine, but 30 million doses are sitting in Ohio, gathering dust.

· Press secretary Jen Psaki said yesterday that President Biden wants an extra 100 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine just in case.

·The president “wants to be overprepared and oversupplied.”

Between the lines: For the most part, it’s every country for itself, with poorer countries, including Brazil, generally much further back in the queue.

·  “We see many examples of vaccine nationalism and vaccine hoarding in wealthier countries,” said UN Secretary-General António Guterres in a statement yesterday.

·  “The global vaccination campaign represents the greatest moral test of our times.”

The bottom line: COVID-19 is a global pandemic that respects no national borders. But when it comes to access to the vaccine, the country you live in makes all the difference.

3. Catch up quick

 Data: Our World in Data; Chart: Axios Visuals

1.     Europe is seeing a new wave of COVID infections, which experts warn should be a “very serious warning” for North America. Go deeper.

2.    The Minneapolis City Council approved a $27 million settlement with the family of George Floyd.

3.    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo again refused to resign, as pressure mounts from state and congressional Democrats in the wake of a sixth sexual harassment allegation.

4.     Fauci’s “most difficult decision” in March 2020

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Bloomberg/Getty Images

 
Anthony Fauci said he faced a “most difficult decision” when it was determined that the spike in cases in New York in early March 2020 was coming from Europe, not China.

Why it matters: Fauci told Dan Primack on Axios Re:Cap about prodding the Trump administration to ban travel from Europe.

·  “To the president’s credit, he said, ‘Well, if we got to do it, if the docs think we need to do it, we’re just going to have to do it.'”

7. Biden uses “Quad” to counter China

Closing session of the Communist Party’s National People’s Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing yesterday. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden and his counterparts from India, Japan and Australia — collectively known as “the Quad” — will announce a plan today to increase vaccine supplies to countries in Asia, Axios’ Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian and Dave Lawler report.

·  Why it matters: Biden’s engagement shows a growing commitment to a group the U.S. sees as key to countering Chinese influence in the Indo-Pacific. Beijing has pledged to provide vaccines to countries around the world, putting the Biden administration on the back foot.

Keep reading.

The Morning: Hope as a public-health tool

The New York Times   March 12, 2021
By David Leonhardt

 

Good morning.  President Biden speaking from White House, reached for a little optimism.

A child attending online classes at a Y.M.C.A. in Los Angeles last month.Patrick T. Fallon/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

News from the speech:
  • Biden directed states to make all adult Americans eligible to receive a Covid vaccine by May 1.
  • He announced several new actions to speed up vaccinations, including the use of dentists, veterinarians, medical students and others to give the shots.
  • He condemned hate crimes against Asian-Americans, who he said have been “attacked, harassed, blamed and scapegoated” during the pandemic. “It’s wrong, it’s un-American, and it must stop.”
Go deeper: On his Times Opinion podcast, Ezra Klein talks with Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University about the tensions between pandemic optimism and pessimism. Ezra suggests that some politicians, especially in liberal parts of the country, are undermining their own pandemic response by being so negative: “They’re not giving people a way out of this they can hold on to.”
Follow-up: A Covid mystery
In response to Monday’s newsletter about the mystery of the relatively low Covid death tolls in Africa and Asia, several researchers wrote to me to add a potential explanation that had not been on my list: obesity.
Countries with higher obesity rates have suffered more Covid deaths on average, as you can see in this chart that my colleague Lalena Fisher and I put together:

By The New York Times | Sources: Health agencies and hospitals, C.I.A. World Factbook
Obesity can cause multiple health problems, including making it harder to breathe, as Dr. David L. Katz told me, and oxygen deprivation has been a common Covid symptom. A paper by Dr. Jennifer Lighter of New York University and other researchers found that obesity increased the risk of hospitalization among Covid patients.
It’s a particularly intriguing possibility because it could help explain why Africa and Asia have suffered fewer deaths than not only high-income countries but also Latin American countries. Latin Americans, like Europeans and U.S. residents, are heavier on average than Africans or Asians.

The Latest News

The Virus

An AstraZeneca vaccination in Madrid this week.Bernat Armangue/Associated Press

The European Union approved Johnson & Johnson’s Covid vaccine, the fourth to receive the bloc’s approval. Vaccination rates in most E.U. countries remain low. (This map tracks vaccinations around the world.)

·         The U.S. is sitting on tens of millions of AstraZeneca vaccine doses that the rest of the world needs.

China has agreed to provide coronavirus vaccines for participants who need them before this summer’s Tokyo Olympics.

Politics

President Biden addresses the nation from the White House.Doug Mills/The New York Times

The House passed two bills that would strengthen background checks for gun buyers. Republicans will probably block them in the Senate.

Other Big Stories·         Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office notified the Albany Police Department about a female aide’s claim that the governor had groped her. The police said the accusation might rise “to the level of a crime.”
·         And New York State lawmakers opened an impeachment investigation into Cuomo.

·         Georgetown University fired a law professor who made “abhorrent” remarks about Black students.

·         Mississippi will prohibit transgender women and girls from competing in women’s sports.

·         The Los Angeles Police Department severely mishandled the protests after George Floyd’s death, a report found.

·         A JPG file by the artist Beeple sold for $69 million in an auction, a sign of mania for “NFTs.” (We explained what those are in yesterday’s newsletter.)

The New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/08/learning/teens-pandemic-art.html?campaign_id=190&emc=edit_ufn_20210311&instance_id=27951&nl=updates-from-the-newsroom-&regi_id=105496626&segment_id=53227&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

Edelina Bagaporo

Camila Salinas

COMING OF AGE

Teens on a Year That Changed Everything

In words, images and video, teens across the United States show us how they have met life’s challenges in the midst of a pandemic.

March 7, 2021

What has it been like to be a teenager during the first year of a historic pandemic?  The New York Times, through its Learning Network, asked the question, and more than 5,500 responses poured in.

In words and images, audio and video, they reported that it was, in many ways, a generation-defining disaster. Being trapped inside — and missing the milestones that ordinarily mark coming of age in America — was lonely, disorienting, depressing and even suffocating.

But many also surprised themselves. They bonded with siblings, discovered nature, found small comforts in Zoom-school, played games, worked out, cooked, wrote, sang, danced, painted and made videos. And, perhaps most important at a time of life focused on figuring out who you are, they reinvented themselves.

But although so many coped admirably, this generation will be forever changed. As one 16-year-old put it, “Making history is way overrated.”

This week, a year after the World Health Organization declared Covid-19 a pandemic, we share their stories. In this special project, we chose a handful of entries to show what teenagers have lost — and what they have found. Below each image, you can find edited and condensed excerpts from their artists’ statements that can tell you more about the work.

No matter how old you are, as you read you might ask yourself a question, too: How has this year challenged and changed your generation?

— Katherine Schulten, editor, The Learning Network

1. A Generation Trapped in Its Bedroom

“For some, it was a time of reflection. For many, it was a dark period of isolation. For a generation, it was a defining collective experience.” — Parrish André, 18

WHIPPANY, N.J.

Sunnina Chen, 16

If you’re reading this, take five deep breaths.

Wasn’t that nice?

“Just breathe” became a mantra I told myself to get through the simple things. Taking the time to reflect, I realized why the Saran Wrap was suffocating me — I was the one who pulled it tight. Yes, it was placed there by my responsibilities and the uncertainty of our world, but I had the ability to let go. I let go of everything that wasn’t serving me, and took a deep breath.

CHICAGO

Stevia Ndoe, 18

Ever since I was a child, I looked forward to my 18th birthday. I thought I would suddenly gain years of knowledge and have the power to change the world. Little did I know how difficult the year of my retirement from childhood would be.

When murmurs of quarantining were becoming a reality, my family and I were stuck. My mom, an essential worker and single parent, worked all day while my younger siblings and I attended school. On top of trying to graduate from high school, I had to be a mother for a preschooler and a grade-schooler. My 18th birthday came and went, and I was still the same Stevia.

I look at the last few months and realize this is what growing up in a global crisis looks like for low-income families. Being in quarantine made me realize how much I have been robbed of my childhood and that I’ve been an “adult” for the majority of my life. My photo represents waking up daily with the stress of not knowing what life is going to throw at you, but going through the motions anyway. I took this photo one morning as my siblings were still sleeping four feet away from me. The light was coming through the window so beautifully, and it was one of the few moments of silence I had experienced since March.

BALTIMORE

Parrish André, 18

I drew this series in mid-April while sitting silently on many Zoom calls. In quarantine, my interactions with other people were all fit neatly into little rectangles on my screen.

Being young is about stretching and growing. We pull away from our parents, our homes, our schools, but as Covid-19 struck our communities we were reined in to all the situations that youth is about diverging from. For some, it was a time of reflection. For many, it was a dark period of isolation. For a generation, it was a defining collective experience.

EDUCATION BRIEFING: The pandemic is upending education. Get the latest news and tips.

Sign Up

FRISCO, TEXAS

Camila Salinas, 16

I wake up, go to school and sit at my desk. I do some work, the bell rings, I go to the next class. I do some work, the bell rings, I go to the next class. I get home, sit down, do my homework and catch up on a show. I go to sleep and I repeat.

Although my algebra class can range from having five to 30 students in a class, it feels as though there is only you. And for students learning from home, the situation is worse. They are literally by themselves.

SAN DIEGO

Paloma Ezzet, 16

For Paloma Ezzet in San Diego, “Common high school things, such as spending time with your friends and going to football games and dances, are near impossible to do.”Credit…Paloma Ezzet

Common high school things, such as spending time with your friends and going to football games and dances, are near impossible to do this year. Being in high school in 2020 is an experience like no other. It is gloomy, lonely and frustrating.

DALLAS

Ryan Daniel, 18

This piece, a picture I sketched of my little sister inside a box I created, depicts the entrapment and isolation felt by so many people during quarantine. This is the new normal for my generation. But we have grown together and are now capable of deeply connecting through shared experience.

MEMPHIS

Jayda Murray, 17

From a young age, I looked at the world from the lens of a dreamer. Flame-colored sunlight would dance through windows, and water would trickle below trees. I created scenes in my head until I found that a pen and paintbrush could do the same. I wanted to have those pictures and worlds to have substance in reality. That same inspiration drives my creative process as a teenager.

Before Covid-19 hit our American shores, I felt an increasing sense of dread. Two weeks later, my county issued a lockdown, and all my friends either found themselves at home or were recklessly disobeying the order. I had so many feelings. Fear, anxiety, sadness, loneliness. It was like they just took turns and looped from one to the next.

ELIZABETH, N.J.

Aishah Musa, 16

These are messages of a conversation I had with my sister on March 24, 2020. It was the first time I went with my parents to our grocery store, and I forgot to wear the mask before wearing the hijab, so I texted my sister to ask her how and she explained it. Remembering to wear the mask first is something that I still struggle with to this day.

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

Suhaylah Sirajul-Islam, 15

okay
What’s it like, being a teenager in quarantine?
it’s the same i guess.
except time passes more slowly.
and you’re not allowed to go outside.
it’s feeling exhausted from all the schoolwork.
and touch-starved because your friends aren’t there.
suddenly, the two-bedroom apartment you share with five family members,
finally begins to feel cramped.
it’s feeling terrified, because you share a room
with your covid-positive aunt, who refuses to see a doctor.
and you can hear your dad, coughing through the walls.
and your mom at 2 a.m., reciting qur’an and
rushing to make tea for the both of them.
she gets sick too.
and suddenly you’re failing classes because you can’t keep up with
helping your siblings, and classwork, and housework, and the sick adults at home.
things start to look up though.
the weather gets warmer.
and your family gets better.
being a teenager in quarantine
is radical acceptance.
things happened and things are happening
you’ll be okay.

Note: This is an excerpt from a longer poem. Read the full one here.

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Continue reading the main story

2. A Summer of Awakening

“The Black Lives Matter movement has encouraged me and an entire generation of young people to speak up.” — Christian Lee, 17

CHULA VISTA, CALIF.

Edelina Bagaporo, 17

This photo encompasses my own identity as an L.G.B.T.Q.+ Filipina-American woman. It highlights my role as an ally to the movements of social justice. No longer do I talk about boys or paint my nails, but start to recognize the part I can play in fighting for justice and how to tackle my implicit biases.

The Coronavirus Outbreak ›

March 12, 2021, 7:49 p.m. ET37 minutes ago

Is this helpful?

Although this was not the summer I was expecting, it truly has brought on tremendous personal growth, which I would not trade for anything.

LA HABRA, CALIF.

Christian Lee, 17

The Black Lives Matter movement has encouraged me and an entire generation of young people to speak up.

I photographed one of my best friends wearing the American flag because I thought it would be a simple but profound act of protest against racially motivated violence.

CARLSBAD, CALIF.

Madeline Mack, 16

When the news surfaced of the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, I was distraught and in need of support. My moms are always here for me, but there is something special and necessary about connecting with your peers. I needed a way forward and assumed others felt similarly, so I decided to create Mad’s Book Club. The club has gone beyond what I imagined. When uncertainty strikes, we need connection and community more than ever. Being a teenager is about finding the connection that powers you onward.

TENAFLY, N.J.

Rebecca Wong, 17

2020 didn’t ignite the waves of Asian racism. It was already there.

I’ve seen the Asian community strive to be “more American.” I saw my family disassociate themselves from the community. I purposefully never learned Cantonese in hopes of making myself “more American.” I thought was in my best interest. I erased my own culture willingly in hopes of fitting in — it’s always purposeful whitewashing, the strive to Americanize in hopes to be accepted.

But you’ll still see the person I tried to erase. I cannot wash my culture away; it will always stay. The racism will always stay. At least paint is washable.

HERMOSA BEACH, CALIF.

Maddox Chen, 15

This photograph was taken on Sunday, Nov. 8, on my iPhone propped up on my cramped white desk against the wall of my room/sanctuary in my house. Using my preferred medium of Lego bricks, I created a physical mock-up of my typical spot for the past eight months: glued to a screen, whether that is my phone, laptop or the TV.

Politics has dominated everything this year, from racial, social and economic inequities to the simple act of wearing a mask. One cannot refer to this time without mentioning the diametrical struggle between Donald Trump and Joe Biden.

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

Joyce Weng, 14

Teenagers took this year to think about what’s happening in the world. We have to stand up for ourselves and make a change, and we all came together to create the Black Lives Matter movement.

Some teenagers who didn’t go out there and protest helped from home. We signed petitions, gave donations and educated ourselves on topics we should have known about a long time ago.

EUREKA, CALIF.

Matthew Coyle, 15

I took this picture with my phone in my home in Humboldt County while wildfires raged nearby early in September. The air was toxic so you had to wear a mask when you went outside.

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Class Disrupted

Updated March 9, 2021

The latest on how the pandemic is reshaping education.

3. Creative Progress

“I was forced to be alone with myself, which led me to create art and poetry with deeper meaning than I had ever been able to create before.” — Hannah Blue, 17

SAN ANTONIO

Evelyn Cox, 17

I’ve welcomed the alone time.

The number of things that I have learned or relearned about myself has made this a time of discovery. A time where I get to put my needs first. Where I can feel comfortable in my own skin for the entirety of a day, every day, a week, for months on end.

The state of being home and surrounded by the people and things I love most hasn’t stopped the stress of school and college applications, or the feeling of helplessness when it comes to politics, or the full gravity of this deadly virus that flung us into this position. Being home has allowed me the time to recover and pick myself back up without the pressure of fitting in with my peers. It allowed me the space I need to grow.

WEST WINDSOR, N.J.

Marybel Elfar, 16

Who knows what my family dynamic will be in the next few years, but I know that I’ll miss what I have right now.

My sister is a senior, and I have no idea how I will survive when she goes to college next year. During quarantine, we would drive around our neighborhood blasting Kesha and screaming the lyrics horribly off key. My dad is taking a new position in his job, and my mom is returning to teaching. Neither of these things were able to happen before we were put on lockdown.

This picture was taken on a rainy day, when I felt inspired to take serious portraits of my family members, to match the mood outside and in the world. Despite my best efforts, nobody took me seriously, and I ended up with a series featuring my mom and dad goofing around and tickling each other.

FAIRFAX, VA.

Kenneth DeCrosta, 18

The Virginia High School League delayed all sports until they are safe. But in preparation for the start of a potential season, basketball players have been permitted to engage in physical training.

All workouts must take place outside. There is a strict set of guidelines that must be followed including online sign-ins, mandatory temperature checks, being masked at all times, sanitizing each player’s personal ball and maintaining at least six feet of distance.

Despite the restrictions, the majority of athletes from the Robinson Basketball team have participated. They have shown up faithfully for a season that may still be canceled.

JUNEAU, ALASKA

Thomas Kaufman, 17; Lance Algabre, 18; Andrew Garcia, 17

This song is inspired by the brutal couple of months that followed the first spike of Covid-19 in the United States. We felt ourselves become anxious, and depressed, and we wrote this song to try and spread some positivity to teenagers all over the world. We recorded different parts at our houses. We videoed some of the instruments live and some not. All of the videoed vocals are lip-synced in order to increase the workflow, creativity and fun. Aside from recording stuff, I created a fake Zoom, called Boom, to be the canvas, if you will, of the video.

LAYTON, UTAH

Haven Hutchison, 17

Teenagers wanted to have the best summer ever, and it was canceled in March.

A few days before this picture was taken, my friend texted me wanting to hang out but also be six feet apart.

My friends and I all decided on a day to drive to a parking lot. We just sat in a circle and talked for about four hours. It was one of the best nights of my quarantine.

All summer, my Instagram feed was filled with people throwing their own proms and finding fun ways to make this summer the best despite the pandemic. Finding a way to be happy in hard times is essential to making it through.

NEW YORK

Arianna Hellman, 16

How can anyone make a statement on beauty standards that has not been said a thousand times before? We all know that it should not matter what everyone else thinks. We all know that we should love ourselves. We also know that no matter how true these statements are, we don’t listen to them. This is especially true for teenagers who spend every night scrolling through our social media feeds until we fall asleep.

When New York gave the orders to stay at home, I was in the midst of multiple eating disorders that had started the previous year. The idea of quarantine terrified me. I would have to try even harder to hide my worsening health from my family. I didn’t want to get better.

As the days in quarantine blurred into weeks, all I was left with were my thoughts. I finally realized: “This is not what I want. I do not want this to become me.” I began to confront my feelings, put effort into counseling and find ways to express myself. The artwork that I created helped me to fully recover.

Each collage highlights a particular part of my body that made me feel insecure. I previously looked at myself as though in a clown mirror. My artwork transformed my self-doubt into beauty.

DALLAS

Hannah Blue, 17

I was angry at the world and I wanted to channel my feelings into something meaningful. I chose to design my own mini deck of tarot cards. The Hermit is the only one that is actually a real tarot card; I made the other three up. I am slightly grateful to the pandemic. I was forced to be alone with myself, with my thoughts and feelings, which led me to create art and poetry with deeper meaning than I had ever been able to create before.

REDMOND, WASH.

Chloe Kim, 14

When we first went into lockdown, it felt like an extension of spring break. We laughed about the toilet paper shortage of 2020. We believed Covid-19 would disappear soon.

I remember the first couple of weeks thinking this was my chance to become stronger during quarantine and get a glow-up. I did YouTube workouts and workouts our coaches posted; I did much self-care and focused on myself. But as time went on, online school started and the climbing season got canceled. I lost motivation and started falling into an unhealthy hole. My sleep schedule was nonexistent, and I rarely got off my bed, even for classes. I completely lost any desire to continue working out or do any self-care. I also stopped contacting my friends, which left me feeling so alone and weak. I felt like I was in this by myself, and no one could help me.

This signifies me finding my rhythm and becoming happier and finding a way to climb out of the hole and overcome my downward spiral.

To learn more about teaching with this collection, visit The Learning Network.

Here’s to 2021

Mar 8, 2021  The New York Times Learning Network

Here’s to 2021 Juneau, Alaska Thomas Kaufman, 17; Lance Algabre, 18; Andrew Garcia, 17 “This song is inspired by the brutal couple of months that followed the first spike of Covid-19 in the United States. We felt ourselves become anxious, and depressed, and we wrote this song to try and spread some positivity to teenagers all over the world. We recorded different parts at our houses. We videoed some of the instruments live and some not. All of the videoed vocals are lip-synced in order to increase the workflow, creativity and fun. Aside from recording stuff, I created a fake Zoom, called Boom, to be the canvas, if you will, of the video.” This video is one of the finalists of The Learning Network’s Coming of Age project: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/08/le…?

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Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS News, NBC News,  VOA News,  Reuters, NowThis News, Washington Post, FRONTLINE, and RT Documentary

Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS News, NBC News,  VOA News,  Reuters, NowThis News, Washington Post, FRONTLINE, and RT Documentary

PBS News: Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS NewsHour 

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 22, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – February 22nd, 2021

PBS News: National Cathedral rings bells in memory of 500k+ U.S. citizens lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21

VOA News: Biden Laments 500,000 Coronavirus Deaths in US, By Steve Herman

VOA News: Biden Tours Pfizer Vaccine Production Center, Updated February 19, 2021 09:33 PM

VOA News: Biden Announces Financial Support for Global COVID Vaccine Program

By Wayne Lee, Updated February 19, 2021 06:16 PM

Reuters: Biden to Debut at G-7 with Focus on Vaccines, Economy and China

By Reuters, February 19, 2021 08:52 AM

NowThis News: The Full Story of Trump and COVID-19 | NowThis, Oct 6, 2020

Washington Post: An inside look at Trump’s failed coronavirus response | America’s Pandemic, Premiered Oct 29, 2020 

PBS News: The Virus: What Went Wrong? (full film) | FRONTLINE, Jun 16, 2020 

RT Documentary:  COVID vs the USA. Why is America’s death toll so high? Aug 21, 2020 

WATCH LIVE: Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19

Streamed live 7 hours ago, 2.22.21  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 22, 2021

Feb 22, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the U.S. death toll from COVID-19 reaches 500,000 as experts warn safety measures may remain for longer than anticipated, major questions about energy infrastructure and emergency response remain in Texas following the winter storm, and we speak with Bill Gates about the ongoing pandemic response and the consequences of inaction in the global fight against climate change. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS  U.S. death toll from COVID-19 reaches 500,000 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqDXW…? News Wrap: WHO concerned about vaccines in poor nations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qltmV…? Texas faces a cascade of issues after winter storm  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meR9S…? Bill Gates on climate change and the pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMbb4…? How the women of the YPJ led the fight against ISIS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdME1…? Republicans who voted to convict Trump face political peril https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEaIC…? Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden’s relief package  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeEHp…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – February 22nd, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Feb 22, 2021  NBC News

President Biden observes moment of silence for 500,000 U.S. lives lost to Covid, Democrats push for vote on Biden’s $1.9 trillion Covid relief plan, and FAA orders inspections on Boeing 777s after engine failure. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:10? U.S. Surpasses Staggering 500,000 Covid Deaths 02:47? Officials: Millions Of Delayed Doses Arrive By Midweek 03:25? NYC Movie Theaters To Reopen At 25 Percent Capacity 04:19? Democrats Push For Vote On Biden’s $1.9 Trillion Plan 05:17? Over 100 Boeing 777s Grounded After Midair Emergency 07:41? Millions Desperate For Food And Clean Water In Texas 08:24? Texas Residents Outraged By Skyrocketing Energy Bills 08:50? Family Of 11-Year-Old Who Died Files $100 Million Lawsuit 09:30? New Inquiries Launched Into Texas Power Grid Failure 10:13? Confirmation Hearing For Biden’s A.G. Pick Merrick Garland 11:31? Supreme Court Deals Trump Major Defeat Over Taxes 11:56? Probe Finds Police Failures In Elijah McClain Death 13:38? Mother Speaks Out One Year After Ahmaud Arbery Killing 16:02? FDA Rule Forcing Vaccine Doses To Go To Waste? 18:33? New Images Show Perseverance Rover Landing On Mars 18:52? Cancer Survivor Joins First All-Civilian Space Mission » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

WATCH: National Cathedral rings bells in memory of 500k+ U.S. citizens lost to COVID-19

Streamed live 8 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

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https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/biden-laments-500000-coronavirus-deaths-us

Biden Laments 500,000 Coronavirus Deaths in US

By  Steve Herman

White House Bureau Chief

February 22, 2021 08:28 PM

President Joe Biden speaks about the 500,000 Americans that have died from COVID-19, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington.

WHITE HOUSE – As the nation marked 500,000 deaths because of COVID-19, U.S. President Joe Biden at twilight Monday walked to a White House South Portico decorated with black bunting and 500 candles.

Alongside the president were first lady Jill Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, who is known as the second gentleman. They stood silently as the Marine Corps band played the Christian hymn, “Amazing Grace.”

As the music concluded, Biden, a Catholic, made the sign of the cross.

A few minutes earlier at the Cross Hall on the first floor of the White House, Biden asked the nation to join in the moment of silence and, in a subdued tone, directed remarks to those who had lost loved ones to the virus.

“It seems unbelievable, but I promise you the day will come when the memory of the one you have lost brings a smile to your lips before a tear to your eye,” the president said. “We will get through this, I promise you.”

He also spoke of the cruelty of death amid the pandemic.

“So many of the rituals that help us cope, that help us honor those we loved, haven’t been available to us,” the president noted. “As a nation, we cannot and we must not let this go on.”

The president on Monday ordered U.S. flags on federal property lowered to half-staff for five days.

President Joe Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Doug Emhoff participate in a moment of silence during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Feb. 22, 2021.

The National Cathedral in Washington, meanwhile, tolled its bells 500 times to honor the lives lost to the coronavirus.

It was a year ago Tuesday that President Donald Trump declared to reporters on the White House South Lawn as he departed for India that “we have it very much under control,” adding “very interestingly, we’ve had no deaths.”

The first fatality from the virus in the United States had actually occurred more than two weeks before the president’s remarks, but it was not until April 2020 that authorities confirmed 57-year-old Patricia Dowd of San Jose, California, had died of COVID-19.

Amid the gloom of a half-million deaths and the emergence of variants of the virus, there are expressions of optimism from top U.S. government officials.

The seven-day average of deaths in the country is continuing to decline, according to Dr. Rochelle Wolensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A nationwide COVID-19 vaccination campaign is under way and about 13% of the population has received at least one dose, although winter weather in recent days has slowed the pace of immunization in some states.

Officials continue to plead for people to wear masks in public and maintain social distancing as the United States is “still seeing a lot of disease – 66,000 cases per day,” Wolensky said during a video briefing with reporters Monday.

The president’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, also cautioned “we are still at an unacceptably high baseline level,” preventing the resumption of normal society.

The United States has suffered the most deaths from the coronavirus and accounts for nearly 20% of total global deaths from the virus, although it is home to just 4% of the world’s population.

That is partly blamed on a lack of coherent federal response to the pandemic during the Trump administration. Trump, who left office January 20, had clashed with his own health experts and he primarily left it to the individual 50 states to figure out how to combat the virus.

Biden’s team “inherited a mess,” Florida’s emergency management director, Jared Moskowitz, told a state legislative committee last month.

In 2020, the virus shaved a full year off the average life expectancy in the United States, the biggest decline since World War II.

The loss of so many lives is “a horrific human toll of staggering proportions and incomprehensible sadness,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday in a statement, in which she called for swift action by Congress to approve the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan “to put an end to this pandemic and to stem the suffering felt by so many millions.”

The $1.9 trillion plan by the president is intended to increase the country’s recovery from the economic and health effects of the pandemic.

Some lawmakers have expressed concern about the proposed legislation’s total cost and what it covers.

“I’m prepared to hear ideas about how to make the American Rescue Plan better and cheaper,” Biden said in remarks delivered earlier Monday. “But we have to make clear who we’re helping and who it would hurt.”

Katherine Gypson contributed to this report.

https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/biden-tours-pfizer-vaccine-production-center

Biden Tours Pfizer Vaccine Production Center

By VOA News

Updated February 19, 2021 09:33 PM

President Joe Biden walks past freezers used to store Pfizer-BioNtech’s COVID-19 vaccine as he tours a Pfizer manufacturing site, Friday, Feb. 19, 2021, in Portage, Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

U.S. President Joe Biden toured a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine manufacturing plant Friday afternoon outside Kalamazoo, Michigan, where he touted his administration’s plans to distribute the vaccine to Americans, even as winter weather across the country caused delays.

“We’re now on track to have enough vaccine supply for all Americans by the end of July. That doesn’t mean it’ll be in all Americans’ arms, but enough vaccine will be available,” Biden said.

The president acknowledged that winter weather across much of the country is currently “slowing up the distribution,” but said his administration is on track to reach its goal of administering 100 million shots in its first 100 days.

White House officials said earlier Friday that the winter storms in the Midwest and South had delayed the delivery of 6 million vaccines, which is impacting every state. The delayed doses of both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines represents three days’ worth of shipments.

Even the president’s trip to see Pfizer’s largest plant was delayed a day because of a storm affecting Washington.

President Joe Biden speaks to the press after a tour of a Pfizer manufacturing site, Feb. 19, 2021, in Portage, Mich.

During his tour of the Pfizer plant, Biden walked through an area called the “freezer farm,” where vaccine doses are stored in ultra-cold conditions. Wearing two face masks, the president spoke with some of the plant’s workers. He was joined by Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla and White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeff Zients.

Speaking before Biden, Bourla said Pfizer would more than double vaccine production capacity in the coming weeks. Currently it averages 5 million doses per week. He said the increase was the result in part of improvements in the manufacturing processes at the plant.

In his remarks, the president touted the vaccine’s safety and encouraged everyone to get vaccinated.

“If there’s one message to cut through to everyone in this country, it’s this: The vaccines are safe,” he said.

Earlier Friday, Pfizer and its pharmaceutical partner BioNTech said a new study they conducted indicates their COVID-19 vaccine can remain effective when stored in standard freezers for up to two weeks.

The finding is a significant development since one of the initial drawbacks of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine was that it was required to be stored in ultra-low-temperature freezers not commonly found in standard clinics and pharmacies.

In a statement posted on Pfizer’s website Friday, the companies said they have submitted the new data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) demonstrating their vaccine is stable when stored at -25°C to -15°C, temperatures commonly found in pharmaceutical freezers and refrigerators.

Also Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that data collected in the first month of vaccinations in the United States have found no concerning new issues with either the Pfizer- BioNTech vaccine or the Moderna vaccine.

It said data collected from the administration of 13.8 million doses of vaccines between December 14, 2020, and January 13, 2021, showed 6,994 reports of adverse events after vaccination, with 90.8% of them classified as nonserious and 9.2% as serious.

Biden Announces Financial Support for Global COVID Vaccine Program

By Wayne Lee

Updated February 19, 2021 06:16 PM

Pfizer employees handle containers of vaccine as U.S. President Joe Biden tours a Pfizer manufacturing plant producing the coronavirus vaccine in Kalamazoo, Michigan, Feb. 19, 2021.

U.S. President Joe Biden announced Friday a $4 billion pledge to a global campaign to bolster the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines to poor countries.

At his first meeting as president with world leaders at the Munich Security Conference, Biden announced financial support for COVAX, a coalition tasked with distributing vaccines to low- and middle-income countries.

“Even as we fight to get out of the teeth of this pandemic, a resurgence of Ebola in Africa is a stark reminder that we must simultaneously work to finally finance health security, strengthen global health systems, and create early warning systems to prevent, detect and respond to future biological threats because they will keep coming,” Biden said at the virtual meeting.

President Joe Biden participates in a virtual event with the Munich Security Conference in the East Room of the White House, Feb. 19, 2021.

Biden pledged $2 billion that will fund the COVAX program through 2022. The pledge follows an initial $2 billion contribution that the U.S. Congress appropriated two months ago that should be released by the end of this month.

The COVAX program is jointly operated by the World Health Organization, an agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Former President Donald Trump withdrew from the WHO after accusing it of covering up China’s blunders in managing the virus at the start of the public health crisis.

“We have to work together to strengthen and reform the World Health Organization,” Biden said. “We need a U.N. system focused on biological threats that can move quickly to trigger action.”

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Biden used the financial commitment to encourage G-7 partners to fulfill their pledges to the COVAX program and make additional investments in international vaccine development and distribution.

Paris accord 

Also on Friday, the United States officially rejoined the Paris climate accord, the most comprehensive global effort to combat global warming. Biden warned of dire consequences if nations don’t do more to reduce carbon emissions.

“We can no longer delay or do the bare minimum to address climate change,” he said. “This is a global existential crisis. We will all suffer the consequences if we fail.”

Biden called on world leaders to “rapidly accelerate our commitments to aggressively curb our emissions and hold one another accountable for meeting our goals and increasing our ambitions.”

Biden previously said he would consider climate change when reviewing every major domestic and foreign policy decision his administration faces.

https://www.voanews.com/usa/biden-debut-g-7-focus-vaccines-economy-and-china

Biden to Debut at G-7 with Focus on Vaccines, Economy and China

By Reuters

February 19, 2021 08:52 AM

FILE – U.S. President Joe Biden hosts a meeting with labor leaders to discuss coronavirus response legislation and the president’s infrastructure plan in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington.

LONDON – U.S. President Joe Biden will attend his first meeting with Group of Seven leaders on Friday to discuss plans to defeat the coronavirus, reopen the battered world economy and counter challenges posed by China.

The COVID-19 pandemic has killed 2.4 million people, tipped the global economy into its worst peacetime slump since the Great Depression and upended normal life for billions.

Biden “will focus on the global response to the pandemic, including vaccine production, distribution of supplies” and efforts to fight emerging infections, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Thursday.

He “will also discuss the global economic recovery, including the importance of all industrial countries maintaining economic support for the recovery” and “the importance of updating global roles to tackle economic challenges such as those posed by China,” Psaki said.

The call with G7 leaders at 1400 GMT is a chance for Biden, a Democrat who took over as president from Republican Donald Trump on Jan. 20, to project a message of re-engagement with the world and with global institutions after four years of his predecessor’s “America First” policies.

Besides Biden, Italy’s new prime minister, Mario Draghi, will be a new face at the leaders’ virtual table, though he is famous for “doing whatever it takes” at the European Central Bank to save the euro during the European debt crisis.

Vaccine drive

Britain, which holds the rotating chair of the G7 and is trying to recast itself as a steward of the rules-based international system following Brexit, will ask members to help speed up the development of future vaccines to 100 days.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is keen to build ties with Biden, who did not support Brexit and who, as a presidential candidate, last year publicly warned Britain against endangering peace in Ireland.

Johnson has said he is interested in the idea of a global treaty on pandemics to ensure proper transparency after the COVID-19 outbreak which originated in China.

The Biden administration will pledge $4 billion to a coronavirus vaccination program for poorer countries in hopes of prying loose bigger donations from other governments, U.S. officials said on Thursday.

Britain, which has pledged 548 million pounds ($766 million) to the COVAX program co-led by the World Health Organization, will ask other G7 partners to give more.

China

China will also be on the agenda.

In his first major foreign policy speech as president, Biden cast China as the “most serious competitor” of the United States.

“We’ll confront China’s economic abuses; counter its aggressive, coercive action; to push back on China’s attack on human rights, intellectual property, and global governance,” Biden said on Feb. 4.

The United States will keep tariffs imposed on Chinese goods by the Trump administration in place for now, but will evaluate how to proceed after a thorough review, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said.

The G7 of the United States, Japan, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy and Canada has a combined gross domestic product of about $40 trillion – a little less than half of the global economy.

By  Reuters

The Full Story of Trump and COVID-19 | NowThis

Oct 6, 2020  NowThis News

THE FULL STORY OF TRUMP & COVID: More than 7 million Americans have suffered from COVID-19, including Pres. Trump. Emmy winner Jeffrey Wright narrates the documentary detailing how four years of Trump’s actions brought America to this moment (warning: distressing images). » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? Executive Producer – Nate Houghteling Directed by Nate Houghteling and Sarah Sherman Written by Sarah Sherman and Seamus McKiernan Edited by Pierce Wilson Produced with Portal A https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDOS…? For more U.S. politics, 2020 election news, and Trump news, subscribe to NowThis News. #Trump? #Politics? #COVID19? #News? #NowThis? #NowThisNews? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

An inside look at Trump’s failed coronavirus response | America’s Pandemic

Premiered Oct 29, 2020  Washington Post

This video is the final installment of a three-part documentary series by the Washington Post. Read more on The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3ovFoQx? Despite decades of warnings and preparation, President Trump has claimed that covid-19 “came out of nowhere.” He downplayed the coronavirus as it began to take hold in the U.S., disregarding the advice of experts and politicizing a health crisis. Through interviews with former Trump administration officials Mark Harvey and Olivia Troye, along with Washington Post reporters Dan Balz and Yasmeen Abutaleb, “Playing it down” explores why the White House was slow to respond to the pandemic, and the far-reaching consequences of its inaction. After months of mixed messages, contradictory policies, divisive rhetoric — and more than 220,000 deaths — the president continues to insist the virus will one day disappear. Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/? #WashingtonPost? #Documentary? #AmericasPandemic?

The Virus: What Went Wrong? (full film) | FRONTLINE

Jun 16, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

As COVID-19 spread across the globe, why was the U.S. caught so unprepared??An investigation of how America’s leaders failed to prepare and protect us — and who is accountable. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate? In this 90-minute FRONTLINE documentary special, award-winning journalists Marcela Gaviria and Martin Smith trace the coronavirus’s path across the globe and?identify a chain of fateful missteps — from Chinese authorities’ early silencing of dissent around the virus’s emergence in Wuhan, to the World Health Organization’s failure to more quickly sound the alarm, to Italian officials’ slow initial reaction. Then, “The Virus: What Went Wrong?” zeroes in on key moments in the Trump administration’s halting response — including warnings going back to January, the CDC’s inability to manufacture and mass-distribute a working COVID-19 test early on, and a string of missed opportunities to contain the virus before it was too late. #Coronavirus? #COVID19? #CoronavirusPandemic? Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp? Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs? Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline? Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

COVID vs the USA. Why is America’s death toll so high? | RT Documentary

Aug 21, 2020  RT Documentary

America’s covid-19 death toll is higher than anywhere else in the world. The richest country in the world is having trouble holding things together in the face of the COVID pandemic. To find out why, RT Documentary visits the #COVID? hotspots of New York City and Florida. There, ordinary people and analysts, homeless people and nurses talk about the underlying social conditions causing the chaos. If you want to support Janet Mendez, who struggles to pay an outrageous medical bill after COVID treatment go visit her go fund me page https://www.gofundme.com/f/5a8ms-covi…? 00:00? – Introduction 2:37? – New York’s protest movement amid the pandemic 5:44? – How to maintain social distance during protests 8:01? – Why was New York hit so badly by COVID-19? 12:22? – Overcrowded homeless shelters – a breeding ground for coronavirus 15:26? – Coronavirus crisis from a homeless man’s standpoint 16:51? – Mass-grave burials on Hart Island 19:14? – Diana Torres, a New York nurse 21:37? – Healthcare workers forced to wear trash bags 23:49? – Florida, America’s new COVID hotbed 25:00? – ‘Shame on you’, Ron DeSantis 28:21? – Masks – to wear or not to wear 29:48? – Flourishing funeral homes? 33:00? – Elmhurst, New York’s virus epicentre 37:27? – A $400,000 medical bill 43:35? – Inside Brownsville, New York’s most dangerous neighbourhood #RT? Documentary offers you in-depth #documentary? films on topics that will leave no one indifferent. It’s not just front-page stories and global events, but issues that extend beyond the headlines. Social and environmental issues, shocking traditions, intriguing personalities, history, sports and so much more – we have documentaries to suit every taste. RT Documentary’s film crews travel far and wide to bring you diverse and compelling #stories?. Discover the world with us! SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy? FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/? RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC? RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary? RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rt_document…? RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/?

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TED: Reduce, reuse, recycle, and 5 questions to ask about any climate change solution, from Bill Gates

TED: Reduce, reuse, recycle, and 5 questions to ask about any climate change solution, from Bill Gates

ANDREW DENT -To eliminate waste, we need to rediscover thrift

ANIRUDH SHARMA – Ink made of air pollution

DAN PHILLIPS – Creative houses from reclaimed stuff

MAJD MASHHARAWI – How I’m making bricks out of ashes and rubble in Gaza

KATRINA SPADE – When I die, recompose me

LISA DYSON – A forgotten Space Age technology could change how we grow food

ARVIND GUPTA – Turning trash into toys for learning

JAE RHIM LEE – My mushroom burial suit

TINA ARROWOOD – A circular economy for salt that keeps rivers clean

ANNA HERINGER – The warmth and wisdom of mud buildings

5 questions to ask about any climate change solution, from Bill Gates

https://www.ted.com/playlists/740/reduce_reuse_recycle?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_campaign=daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=playlist__2021-02-19playlist_button

Reduce, reuse, recycle

Discover the beauty in minimizing material goods, repurposing your most well-loved things and intentionally (and sustainably) lessening your carbon footprint.

There’s no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent — when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift — the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don’t have to purchase anything new — as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Andrew Dent · Material innovator

A leading expert on sustainable materials, Andrew Dent has played an important part in creating a new generation of more sustainable products.

TEDNYC | November 2017

What if we could capture pollution in the air around us and turn it into something useful? Inventor Anirudh Sharma shares how he created AIR-INK, a deep black ink that’s made from PM 2.5 pollution. See how he hacked together a clever way to capture these tiny particles — and make the world just a little bit cleaner in the process.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with BCG. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Anirudh Sharma · Engineer, inventor

Inventor Anirudh Sharma is the founder of Graviky Labs, an MIT Media Labs spinoff.

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FOLLOW

Follow AIR-INK on Instagram.

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JOIN

Support AIR-INK on Kickstarter.

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ABOUT TED INSTITUTE

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

TED@BCG Toronto | October 2018

In this funny and inspiring talk, Dan Phillips tours us through a dozen homes he’s built in Texas using recycled and reclaimed materials in wildly creative ways. Brilliant, low-tech design details will refresh your own drive to make more with less.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxHouston, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dan Phillips · Builder

Dan Phillips builds homes out of recycled and reclaimed materials in Huntsville, Texas.

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Join the movement to build homes with recycled and salvaged materials.

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ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxHouston | October 2010

Majd Mashharawi was walking through her war-torn neighborhood in Gaza when an idea flashed in her mind: What if she could take the rubble and transform it into building materials? See how she designed a brick made out of ashes that’s helping people rebuild their homes — and learn about her new project: bringing solar-powered energy to families living in darkness.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Majd Mashharawi · Engineer, entrepreneur

Majd Mashharawi leads a startup that makes bricks from recycled local materials — and employs women in the Gaza Strip.

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LEARN

Learn more about how Green Cake is helping to rebuild Gaza using a new type of eco-friendly brick.

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LEARN

Learn more about SunBox’s mission to bring electricity to Gaza.

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TEDWomen 2018 | November 2018

What if our bodies could help grow new life after we die, instead of being embalmed and buried or turned to ash? Join Katrina Spade as she discusses “recomposition” — a system that uses the natural decomposition process to turn our deceased into life-giving soil, honoring both the earth and the departed.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxOrcasIsland, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Katrina Spade · Inventor, designer, death care advocate

Katrina Spade created a system called “recomposition” that transforms human bodies into soil, so that we can return to the earth after we die.

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Sign up for updates.

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ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

We’re heading for a world population of 10 billion people — but what will we all eat? Lisa Dyson rediscovered an idea developed by NASA in the 1960s for deep-space travel, and it could be a key to reinventing how we grow food.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with BCG. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Lisa Dyson · Sustainability crusader

Lisa Dyson thinks a new class of crops might help us reinvent agriculture — and feed the world.

MORE RESOURCES

FURTHER READING

CONSUMERS

Purchase sustainably-sourced products. Everyday that you go to a store, you cast a vote with your purchasing choice. To establish a demand for more sustainably-sourced products, be conscious of the items you put in your cart.

More at www.kiverdi.com ?

FURTHER READING

BRANDS

Partner along the supply chain. It’s important for brands to partner with innovators and suppliers to create a more sustainable supply chain.

More at www.kiverdi.com ?

FURTHER READING

MANUFACTURERS

Collaborate with innovators. The role manufacturers play is where they devote R&D resources. Manufacturers can contribute to introducing sustainability into future product lines by collaborating with innovators to bring new solutions to market.

More at www.kiverdi.com ?

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At the INK Conference, Arvind Gupta shares simple yet stunning plans for turning trash into seriously entertaining, well-designed toys that kids can build themselves — while learning basic principles of science and design.

ABOUT THE CREATOR

Arvind Gupta · Toymaker

Science educator Arvind Gupta uses simple toys to teach.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

Science from Scrap

 

Arvind Gupta

Scholastic (2010)

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CONNECT

Connect with Arvind Gupta Toys to dub lesson videos in your language, and help bring fun science to children everywhere. Reach Gupta at arvindtoys at gmail dot com.

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ABOUT BEST OF THE WEB

Best of the Web, like the rest of TED.com, involves compelling people and ideas. But unlike TED Talks, these videos don’t come from TED or our partner conferences: they’re curated from around the internet, drawing on freely available videos from creators with an idea worth spreading.

INK Conference | December 2010

Here’s a powerful provocation from artist Jae Rhim Lee. Can we commit our bodies to a cleaner, greener Earth, even after death? Naturally — using a special burial suit seeded with pollution-gobbling mushrooms. Yes, this just might be the strangest TEDTalk you’ll ever see …

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Jae Rhim Lee · Designer, entrepreneur

TED Senior Fellow Jae Rhim Lee develops new rituals and objects around death to point us toward a more sustainable future, including a mushroom burial suit that converts our unused bodies efficiently into clean compost.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

During the winter of 2018-2019, one million tons of salt were applied to icy roads in the state of Pennsylvania alone. The salt from industrial uses like this often ends up in freshwater rivers, making their water undrinkable and contributing to a growing global crisis. How can we better protect these precious natural resources? Physical organic chemist Tina Arrowood shares a three-step plan to keep salt out of rivers — and create a circular salt economy that turns industrial byproducts into valuable resources.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with DuPont. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Tina Arrowood · Scientist, engineer

By combining science, circular thinking and disruptive innovation, Tina Arrowood helps envision a world in which fresh river water is not scarce, but well-managed.

TAKE ACTION

LEARN

Learn more about water management and how you can get involved by visiting the American Water Works Association.

Learn more ?

ABOUT TED INSTITUTE

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

TED@DuPont | September 2019

“There are a lot of resources given by nature for free — all we need is our sensitivity to see them and our creativity to use them,” says architect Anna Heringer. Heringer uses low-tech materials like mud and bamboo to create structures from China to Switzerland, Bangladesh and beyond. Visit an awe-inspiring school, an elegant office and cozy social spaces — all built from natural materials — in this delightful talk.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Anna Heringer · Architect

Anna Heringer’s sustainable designs lend breathtaking forms to easily-available local materials while developing the skills and consciousness of their builders.

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VISIT

Visit Anna Heringer’s homepage.

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5 questions to ask about any climate change solution, from Bill Gates

5 questions to ask about any climate change solution, from Bill Gates

Feb 17, 2021 / Bill Gates

SHARE THIS IDEA

July 26, 2017 – Nipton, CA- Contracted workers clean Heliostats at the Ivanpah Solar Project, owned by NRG Energy, Bright Source Energy,Bechtel and Google. Over 300,000 software-controlled mirrors track the sun in two dimensions and reflect the sunlight to boilers that sit atop three 459 foot tall power towers. The facility employs over 65 operations and maintenance workers and over 2,600 jobs during it’s 3 year construction period. (Photo by DENNIS SCHROEDER / NREL)

DENNIS SCHROEDER / NREL (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

There are two numbers you need to know about climate change. The first is 51 billion. The other is zero.

Fifty-one billion is how many tons of greenhouse gases the world typically adds to the atmosphere every year. Although the figure may go up or down a bit from year to year, it’s generally increasing and this is where we are today. (Note: 51 billion tons is based on the latest available data. Global emissions dropped a bit in 2020, because the COVID-19 pandemic slowed the economy so dramatically. But since we don’t know the exact figure for 2020, I will keep using 51 billion tons as the total.)

Zero is what we need to aim for. To stop the warming and avoid the worst effects of climate change — and these effects will be very bad — humans need to stop adding greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

When I started learning about climate change, I kept encountering facts that were hard to get my head around. For one thing, the numbers were so large. Another problem was that the data I was seeing often appeared devoid of context. One article said that an emissions-trading program in Europe had reduced the carbon footprint of the aviation sector there by 17 million tons per year. That sounds like a lot, but is it? But what percentage of the total does it represent? The article didn’t say, and that kind of omission was surprisingly common.

Eventually, I built a mental framework for the things I was learning. It gave me a sense of how much was a lot and how much was a little, and how expensive something might be. It helped me sort out the most promising ideas.

The framework of five questions that I came up with still comes in handy today, whether I’m hearing an energy investment pitch or talking with a friend. Now when you read an editorial proposing a climate fix or hear politicians touting their plans for climate change, this framework will help you cut through the clutter.

Question #1: How much of the 51 billion tons are we talking about?

Whenever I read something that mentions some amount of greenhouse gases, I do some quick math, converting it into a percentage of the annual total of 51 billion tons.

Consider the aviation example I mentioned above, the program that’s getting rid of 17 million tons a year. Divide it by 51 billion and turn it into a percentage, and that’s a reduction of about 0.03 percent of annual global emissions. Is that a meaningful contribution?

That depends on the answer to this question: Is the number likely to go up, or is it going to stay the same? If this program is starting at 17 million tons but has the potential to reduce emissions by much more, that’s one thing. If it’s going to stay forever at 17 million tons, that’s another.

At Breakthrough Energy Ventures, an investor-led fund that aims to build new, cutting-edge companies that will lead the world to net zero emissions, we fund only technologies that could remove at least 500 million tons a year if they’re successful and fully implemented. That’s roughly 1 percent of global emissions.

Technologies that will never exceed 1 percent shouldn’t compete for the limited resources we have for getting to zero. There may be other good reasons to pursue them, but significant emission reduction won’t be one of them.

Question #2: What’s your plan for cement?

If you’re talking about a comprehensive plan for tackling climate change, you need to consider everything that humans do to cause greenhouse gas emissions. Some things, like electricity and cars, get lots of attention, but they’re only the beginning.

Meanwhile, making steel and cement alone accounts for around 10 percent of all emissions. So the question “What’s your plan for cement?” is just a shorthand reminder that if you’re trying to come up with a comprehensive plan, you have to address the major sources of emissions.

Here’s a breakdown of all the human activities that produce greenhouse gases. Getting to zero means zeroing out every one of these categories:

  • Making things (cement, steel, plastic) 31%
  • Plugging in (electricity) 27%
  • Growing things (plants, animals) 19%
  • Getting around (planes, trucks, cargo ships) 16%
  • Keeping warm and cool (heating, cooling, refrigeration) 7%

You might be surprised that making electricity accounts for just over a quarter of all emissions. But even though electricity is only 27 percent of the problem, it could represent much more than 27 percent of the solution. With clean electricity, we could shift away from burning hydrocarbons (which emits carbon dioxide) for fuel. On its own, clean electricity won’t get us to zero, but it will be a key step.

Question #3: How much power are we talking about?

This question mostly comes up when thinking about electricity. You might read that a new power plant will produce 500 megawatts. Is that a lot? And what’s a megawatt, anyway?

A megawatt is a million watts, and a watt is a joule per second. For our purposes, just remember that a watt is a bit of energy per second. Think of it like this: If you were measuring the flow of water out of your kitchen faucet, you might count how many cups came out per second. Measuring power is similar, only you’re measuring the flow of energy instead of water. Watts are equivalent to “cups per second.”

A watt is pretty small. A small incandescent bulb might use 40; a hair dryer uses 1,500; a power plant might generate hundreds of millions of watts; and the largest power station in the world, the Three Gorges Dam in China, can produce 22 billion watts.

Because these numbers get big fast, it’s convenient to use some shorthand. A kilowatt is 1,000 watts, a megawatt is a million and a gigawatt is a billion. Here are rough comparisons that help me keep it all straight.

  • Small town: 1 megawatt
  • Mid-size city: 1 gigawatt
  • The United States: 1,000 gigawatts
  • The world: 5,000 gigawatts
  • Average American house: 1 kilowatt

Of course, there’s considerable variation throughout the day and throughout the year. New York City runs on upwards of 12 gigawatts, depending on the season; Tokyo, with a larger population than New York, needs something like 23 gigawatts on average but can demand more than 50 gigawatts at peak use during the summer.

Let’s say you want to power a mid-size city that requires a gigawatt. Could you simply build a one-gigawatt power station and be done? Not necessarily.

The answer depends on your power source, because some are more intermittent than others. A nuclear plant runs 24 hours a day and is shut down only for maintenance and refueling. But the effective capacity of plants powered by wind and solar panels might be 30 percent or less because the wind doesn’t always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine. You’ll need to supplement them to get one gigawatt reliably.

Question #4: How much space do you need?

Some power sources take up more room than others. This matters for the obvious reason that there is only so much land and water to go around. Space is far from the only consideration, but it’s an important one that we should be talking about.

Power density is the relevant number here. It tells you how much power you can get from different sources for a given amount of land (or water, if you’re putting wind turbines in the ocean). It’s measured in watts per square meter. Below are a few examples:

  • Fossil fuels:  500–10,000 watts per square meter
  • Nuclear: 500–1,000 watts per square meter
  • Solar: 5–20 watts per square meter
  • Hydropower (dams): 5–50 watts per square meter
  • Wind: 1–2 watts per square meter
  • Wood and other biomass: Less than 1 watt per square meter

The power density of solar is considerably higher than that of wind. If you want to use wind instead of solar, you’ll need far more land, all other things being equal. It doesn’t mean that wind is bad and solar is good; it just means they have different requirements that should be part of the conversation.

Question #5: How much is this going to cost?

The reason the world emits so much greenhouse gas is that as long as you ignore the long-term damage they do, our current energy technologies are the cheapest ones available. Moving our immense energy economy from “dirty,” carbon-emitting technologies to ones with zero emissions will cost something. How much? In some cases, we can price the difference directly. If we have a dirty source and a clean source of the same thing, then we can just compare the price.

Most zero-carbon solutions are more expensive than their fossil-fuel counterparts. In part, that’s because the prices of fossil fuels don’t reflect the environmental damage they inflict. These additional costs are what I call Green Premiums. There isn’t one single Green Premium;  there are many: some for electricity, others for various fuels, others for cement and so on. The size of the Green Premium depends on what you’re replacing and what you’re replacing it with.

Here’s an example of how Green Premiums work in practice.

The average retail price for a gallon of jet fuel in the US over the past few years is $2.22. Advanced biofuels for jets, to the extent they’re available, cost on average $5.35 per gallon. The Green Premium for zero-carbon fuel  is the difference between these two prices, which is $3.13. That’s a premium of more than 140 percent.

In rare cases, a Green Premium can be negative — that is, going green can be cheaper than sticking with fossil fuels. For instance, depending on where you live, you may be able to replace your natural gas furnace and air conditioner with an electric heat pump. In Oakland, California, doing this will save you 14 percent on your heating and cooling costs, while in Houston, Texas, the savings amount to 17 percent.

You might think that a technology with a negative Green Premium would already have been adopted around the world, but there is usually a lag between the introduction of a new technology and its being deployed — particularly for something like home furnaces, which we don’t replace often.

Once you’ve figured Green Premiums for the big zero-carbon options, you can start having serious conversations about trade-offs. Will we buy advanced biofuels that are twice as expensive as jet fuel? Will we buy green cement that costs twice as much as the conventional stuff?

I mean “we” in the global sense. You can imagine Green Premiums high enough that the US is willing and able to pay but India, China, Nigeria, and Mexico are not. We need the premiums to be so low that everyone will decarbonize.

Admittedly, Green Premiums are a moving target. What’s more important than the specific prices is knowing whether a given green technology is close to being as cheap as its fossil-fuel counterpart and, for the ones that aren’t close, thinking about how innovation might bring their prices down.

Green Premiums are a fantastic lens for making decisions. Looking at all the different premiums, we can decide which zero-carbon solutions we should deploy now and where we should pursue breakthroughs because the clean alternatives aren’t cheap enough.

There’s one last benefit to the Green Premium concept: It can act as a measurement system that shows us the progress we’re making toward stopping climate change. They give us a different insight from the raw number of emissions, which shows us how far we are from zero but don’t tell us how hard it will be to get there.

What would it cost to use the zero-carbon tools we have now? Which innovations will make the biggest impact on emissions? The Green Premiums answer these questions, measuring the cost of getting to zero, sector by sector, and highlighting where we need to innovate.

Excerpted with permission from the new book How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and The Breakthroughs We Need by Bill Gates. Published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC. Copyright © 2021 by Bill Gates.

Watch this TED-Ed lesson about the myth of the boiling frog here:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bill Gates is co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and founder of Breakthrough Energy. In 1975, Bill Gates founded Microsoft with Paul Allen and led the company to become the worldwide leader in business and personal software and services. In 2008, Bill transitioned to focus full-time on his foundation’s work to expand opportunity to the world’s most disadvantaged people. Along with co-chair Melinda Gates, he leads the foundation’s development of strategies and sets the overall direction of the organization. At Breakthrough Energy, he’s putting his experience as an innovator and problem-solver to work to address climate change by supporting the next generation of entrepreneurs, big thinkers, and clean technologies. Bill uses his experience partnering with global leaders across sectors to help drive the policy, market, and technological changes required for a clean energy transition. In 2010, Bill, Melinda, and Warren Buffett founded the Giving Pledge, an effort to encourage the wealthiest families and individuals to publicly commit more than half of their wealth to philanthropic causes and charitable organizations during their lifetime or in their will.

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