Happy New Year 2020 Around the World – Part 2 – Daily Mail

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Say hello to 2020! Europe brings in the New Year following huge fireworks displays across the rest of the world

  • People around the world are ringing in the New Year and a new decade as 2019 comes to an end at midnight
  • Auckland and Sydney became the first major cities to kick off the celebrations with huge firework displays
  • They were joined by Seoul, Tokyo and Pyongyang, before Hong Kong marked the New Year amid protests  
  • South East Asia welcomed the new year next with epic firework displays from Singapore and Thailand  
  • The celebrations then drove westward, with western European countries now setting the skies alight 
  • The UK, Brazil and America are among the countries still waiting to put on a big show for 2020 

By Ryan Fahey and Sophie Tanno and Chris Pleasance for MailOnline and Afp

Published: 05:32 EST, 31 December 2019 | Updated: 19:49 EST, 31 December 2019

Billions of people around the world are celebrating the start of a new year and a new decade after the clock struck midnight across the globe. 

Sydney and Auckland became the first major world cities to let rip with huge firework displays, after a handful of remote Pacific island near the international date line had already flipped the calendar to 2020.

Organisers in Sydney decided to go ahead with their show despite calls for it to be cancelled amid wildfires that have brought swathes of devastation across the country, killing at least 12 and destroying dozens of homes. 

There were also fraught scenes in Hong Kong as the state marked the start of the New Year amid pro-democracy protests, as Beijing and Singapore celebrated at the same time. 

It comes ahead of Brazil and America who are still set to put on a big show when their times come. Hawaii will be one of the last to mark the end of 2019.  

Fireworks illuminate the night sky behind July 15 Martyrs' Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky behind July 15 Martyrs’ Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

Fireworks go off and illuminate the night sky over people at the Uludag ski resort within the new year celebrations in Bursa, Turkey on January 1, 2020

Fireworks go off and illuminate the night sky over people at the Uludag ski resort within the new year celebrations in Bursa, Turkey on January 1, 2020

People celebrate the turn of the year in front of the Ortakoy mosque and 15 July Martyrs Bridge near the Bosphorus during new year's celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, 01 January, 2020

People celebrate the turn of the year in front of the Ortakoy mosque and 15 July Martyrs Bridge near the Bosphorus during new year’s celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, 01 January, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky in front of Ortakoy Mosque and July 15 Martyrs' Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky in front of Ortakoy Mosque and July 15 Martyrs’ Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

This evening's celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, as fireworks explode over the July 15 Martyrs' Bridge

This evening’s celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, as fireworks explode over the July 15 Martyrs’ Bridge

Fireworks illuminate the night sky in front of Ortakoy Mosque and July 15 Martyrs' Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky in front of Ortakoy Mosque and July 15 Martyrs’ Bridge within the new year celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey on January 01, 2020

People celebrate the turn of the year in front of the Ortakoy mosque and 15 July Martyrs Bridge near the Bosphorus during new year's celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, 01 January, 2020

People celebrate the turn of the year in front of the Ortakoy mosque and 15 July Martyrs Bridge near the Bosphorus during new year’s celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, 01 January, 2020

Fireworks explode in the sky over the Ortakoy Mosque by the July 15 Martyrs' Bridge during the New Year's celebrations, in Istanbul on January 1, 2020

Fireworks explode in the sky over the Ortakoy Mosque by the July 15 Martyrs’ Bridge during the New Year’s celebrations, in Istanbul on January 1, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky over fairy chimneys, the famous volcanic rock formations at the historical region of Cappadocia, during the new year celebrations in Nevsehir, Turkey on January 01, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the night sky over fairy chimneys, the famous volcanic rock formations at the historical region of Cappadocia, during the new year celebrations in Nevsehir, Turkey on January 01, 2020

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Fireworks light up the sky as part of new year celebrations in Baku, Azerbaijan on January 1, 2020

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Fireworks illuminate the sky around Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, during New Year’s 2020 celebrations in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 01 January 2020

Video – Burj Khalifa lights up Dubai as the UAE sees in the New Year

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7839809/People-globe-begin-celebrating-New-Years-Eve-2019.html#v-6552631572881192126

Fireworks go off at the Burj Khalifa on New Year's Eve 2019 on January 1, 2019 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Fireworks go off at the Burj Khalifa on New Year’s Eve 2019 on January 1, 2019 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Fireworks illuminate the sky around Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, during New Year's 2020 celebrations in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 01 January, 2020

Fireworks illuminate the sky around Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, during New Year’s 2020 celebrations in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 01 January, 2020 

The Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, is prepared for the fireworks of New Year 2020 celebrations in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

The Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, is prepared for the fireworks of New Year 2020 celebrations in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

People gather near to Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, prior to the fireworks of New Year's eve 2020 in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

People gather near to Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, prior to the fireworks of New Year’s Eve 2020 in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

People gather near to Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, prior to the fireworks of New Year's eve 2020 in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

 People gather near to Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world, prior to the fireworks of New Year’s Eve 2020 in the Gulf emirate of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, 31 December 2019

Fireworks explode out of the Burj Khalifa as Dubai welcomes in the 2020 new year

Fireworks explode out of the Burj Khalifa as Dubai welcomes in the 2020 new year

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi, Pakistan 

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

People watch fireworks as part of the New Year celebrations in Rawalpindi on January 1, 2020

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Fireworks are seen over the Gateway of India monument on New Year’s Day in Mumbai, India, January 1, 2020

New Year's Eve fireworks erupt over Mumbai's iconic Gateway of India on January 1, 2020

New Year’s Eve fireworks erupt over Mumbai’s iconic Gateway of India on January 1, 2020

People release balloons as they celebrate the New Year's countdown event in a road in Ahmedabad, India, January 1, 2020

People release balloons as they celebrate the New Year’s countdown event in a road in Ahmedabad, India, January 1, 2020

People gather around a vendor blowing bubbles during celebrations to welcome the New Year in a road in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2019

People gather around a vendor blowing bubbles during celebrations to welcome the New Year in a road in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2019

People wearing masks blow horns during celebrations to welcome the New Year in a road in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2019

People wearing masks blow horns during celebrations to welcome the New Year in a road in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2019

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year's eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year’s Eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

A policeman jumps over a railing to manage a crowd of revelers who assembled to celebrate on New Year's eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

A policeman jumps over a railing to manage a crowd of revelers who assembled to celebrate on New Year’s Eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019 

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year's eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year’s Eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year's eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

Revelers get together to celebrate on New Year’s Eve in Bangalore, India, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019

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Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year’s celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year's celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year’s celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year's celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year’s celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year's celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Sri Lankans watch fireworks during new year’s celebrations in Colombo, on January 1, 2020

Nepalese people make a human flag of Nepal and light candles to welcome 2020 in Swayambhunath New Year Celebrations, Kathmandu, Nepal on 31 December, 2020

Nepalese people make a human flag of Nepal and light candles to welcome 2020 in Swayambhunath New Year Celebrations, Kathmandu, Nepal on 31 December, 2020

Fireworks explode after midnight over Garuda Wisnu Kencana cultural park as part of New Year celebrations in Bali, Indonesia

Fireworks explode after midnight over Garuda Wisnu Kencana cultural park as part of New Year celebrations in Bali, Indonesia

Fireworks explode after midnight over Garuda Wisnu Kencana cultural park part of New Year celebrations in Bali, Indonesia

Fireworks explode after midnight over Garuda Wisnu Kencana cultural park part of New Year celebrations in Bali, Indonesia

People wearing rain coats gather at Bundaran Hotel Indonesia roundabout as they attend New Year's Eve celebrations in Jakarta

People wearing rain coats gather at Bundaran Hotel Indonesia roundabout as they attend New Year’s Eve celebrations in Jakarta

A woman takes selfie pictures next to 2020 decoration during New Year's Eve celebrations in Jakarta, Indonesia on December 31

A woman takes selfie pictures next to 2020 decoration during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Jakarta, Indonesia on December 31

A couple takes pictures as National Monument (Monas) is illuminated by video mapping during New Year's Eve celebrations in Jakarta

A couple takes pictures as National Monument (Monas) is illuminated by video mapping during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Jakarta

A woman uses a phone as National Monument (Monas) is illuminated by video mapping during New Year's Eve celebrations in Jakarta

A woman uses a phone as National Monument (Monas) is illuminated by video mapping during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Jakarta

Video – Hello 2020!  Bangkok brings in New Year with major fireworks display

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7839809/People-globe-begin-celebrating-New-Years-Eve-2019.html#v-8346679917147472756

Revellers take a selfie while arriving for a New Year countdown party outside a shopping mall in downtown Bangkok on December 31

Revellers take a selfie while arriving for a New Year countdown party outside a shopping mall in downtown Bangkok on December 31

Revellers take a selfie while arriving for a New Year countdown party outside a shopping mall in downtown Bangkok on December 31

Revellers take a selfie while arriving for a New Year countdown party outside a shopping mall in downtown Bangkok on December 31

Fireworks explode for the 'Amazing Thailand Countdown 2020' at Icon Siam during the New Year's celebrations on January 1, 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand

Fireworks explode for the ‘Amazing Thailand Countdown 2020’ at Icon Siam during the New Year’s celebrations on January 1, 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand

Fireworks explode over Chao Phraya River during the New Year's celebrations in Bangkok, Thailand

Fireworks explode over Chao Phraya River during the New Year’s celebrations in Bangkok, Thailand

Fireworks explode over Chao Phraya River in Bangkok in a dazzling display to ring in 2020

Fireworks explode over Chao Phraya River in Bangkok in a dazzling display to ring in 2020 

Fireworks explode for the 'Amazing Thailand Countdown 2020' at Icon Siam during the New Year's celebrations on January 1, 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand

Fireworks explode for the ‘Amazing Thailand Countdown 2020’ at Icon Siam during the New Year’s celebrations on January 1, 2020 in Bangkok, Thailand

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There Is No Honor In Honor Killing

There Is No Honor In Honor Killing

BBC News reported:

According to the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP), at least 109 people were killed for “honour” during just four months, between January and April this year.

Human rights monitors say the incidence of such killings is on the rise. The HRCP reported 1,100 honour killing incidents in 2015, 1,105 in 2014 and 869 in 2013.”

On Sunday, June 19, 2016, I posted a project’s named, “Peace with Nature”, which utilized my photos from our backyard garden, downtown Newark, New Jersey, during the month of May and June, 2016.  I also stated, “Let Nature Heal Us”, which is a tribute to sadness of the killings in the United State of America.  It was A Father’s Day, so I also wished my husband, son-in-law, his father and all fathers, “A Happy Father’s Day”.  At the end of the project I wrote a poem’s name “MY GOOD FATHER, HAPPY FATHER’S DAY”, which I wrote about fathers who killed their daughter in the name of Honor Killing. 

This morning I planned to post one of my finished artwork projects from a high school in Newark on Google+.  Before I checked my website I visited BBC News website I found the article that just posted one hour ago Qandeel Baloch: Pakistan social media celebrity ‘killed by brother’  (Sat 7.16.2016)” Pakistani social media celebrity Qandeel Baloch has been killed by her brother in an apparent ‘honour killing’ in the province of Punjab, police say.———–

I am sorry that I have to post this kind of inhumane behavior on my website.  I felt responsible to let more people know and help to raise awareness of this kind of believe in the twenty first century that still exists.  Only two days ago on Friday, July 17, 2016 Dr. Neena M. Shah, physician and her mother, Mrs. Bharti M. Shah and our long time friend Joanne Leone visited us.  I talked to Dr. Shah and her mother who came from India about Honor Killing in India, Pakistan and other countries. 

There will be no peace in the world if there is still this kind of believe.  It is inhumane; all humans have to be educated to understand that any form of abuse from one human to another is unacceptable for civilized society.

MY GOOD FATHER, HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

 I miss my father

Who passed away twenty years ago

I miss him everyday

Especially the day that

The world honor fatherhood

 

I wrote a letter telling my parents

I found my true love

We love each other

We decided to marry

My parents were joyous

 

Father and mother gave you life

They are happy to see you find love

And build a new family

They are joyful with your happiness 

 

Daddy I miss you!!!

I love you dearly!!!

Please do not kill me!!!

My husband is a good man!!!

He loves me!!!

And I love him!!!

We are going to have another life!!!

We will have grandchild for you!!!

Daddy!!!

Please do not kill me!!!

 

Please good father

You are a good human being

You created life

Your daughter has become

An individual person

You do not own this life you created

You nurtured her

And you watched her grow

To become a good human being

 

Please abolish Honor Killing!!!

You gave life but do not destroy it

The world is not flat

The world is a sphere

Some of what we believed before is good

And some is bad

 

Honor Killing is revenge

Revenge is war

Revenge is killing

Revenge is unhappiness

 

Please seek Peace

Make peace not war

 

Honor Killing is inhumane

Please do not do it

Abolish Honor Killing Good Father

 

“Please do not kill me Daddy!!!”

“I love you!!!”

“Have A Happy And Peaceful Father’s Day Daddy”

 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, June 18, 2016, 11: 19 am

The following are some of the articles BBC News reported on the subject of Honor Killing:

Qandeel Baloch: Pakistan social media celebrity ‘killed by brother’

The link is: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36814258

  • 1 hour ago
  • From the section Asia

Media caption Qandeel Baloch had a reputation for being Pakistan’s first social media celebrity

Pakistani social media celebrity Qandeel Baloch has been killed by her brother in an apparent ‘honour killing’ in the province of Punjab, police say.

Ms Baloch, 26, recently caused controversy by posting controversial pictures of herself on social media, including one alongside a Muslim cleric.

Police say she was strangled to death.

Cases of women being killed for ‘dishonouring’ their family are commonplace in Pakistan.

Qandeel Baloch became a household name for posting bold, sometimes raunchy, photographs, video and comments.

Parents detained

Ms Baloch’s parents told The Express Tribune that she was strangled to death on Friday night following an argument with her brother.

They said her body was not discovered until Saturday morning. Her parents have been taken into custody, the Tribune reported.

Ms Baloch had gone to Punjab from Karachi because of the threat to her security, police say.

Image caption Ms Baloch was admired by liberals but reviled by conservatives Image caption Ms Baloch appeared alongside a Muslim cleric in images uploaded onto social media

Image caption In a recent interview she was bitterly critical of Pakistan’s patriarchal society

“[Her] brothers had asked her to quit modelling,” family sources quoted by the Tribune said.

Sources quoted by the newspaper said that Wasim was upset about her uploading controversial pictures online and had threatened her about it.

Police said he had not been arrested and was on the run.

‘No woman is safe’

Ms Baloch’s murder was condemned by filmmaker Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, whose documentary A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness won an Oscar earlier this year.

“I really feel that no woman is safe in this country, until we start making examples of people, until we start sending men who kill women to jail, unless we literally say there will be no more killing and those who dare will spend the rest of their lives behind bars,” she told the AFP news agency.


Why some say death is ‘good news’, by BBC World Service South Asia editor Jill McGivering

Qandeel Baloch used social media to find fame and the reactions there showed the feelings she inspired, from admiration to disgust.

Some called her death “good news” and even praised her suspected killer. Others said it was wrong to condone her murder, even if she was flawed. Some showed outright support.

Qandeel Baloch has been dubbed Pakistan’s Kim Kardashian. There are comparisons: the provocative selfies, the pursuit of celebrity, the controversial rise to notoriety.

But in Pakistan, women, especially poor ones, still lack basic rights, from schooling to choosing a husband and violence against them is rife. The country struggles with sexuality and especially with “immodest” women.

The fact that many of Qandeel’s videos went viral suggests a titillating fascination with confident female sexuality – along with fear of its power and of her assertion of independence. However she lived her life, tweeted one, it was her life.


Ms Baloch rose to fame in Pakistan in 2014 when a video of her pouting at the camera and asking “How em looking?” went viral.

In a recent interview she was bitterly critical of Pakistan’s patriarchal society and described herself as a leading exponent of girl power.

While many younger people saw her as a cultural icon and hailed her liberal views, she was also subjected to frequent misogynist abuse online.

Her request for better security was ignored by the government, Dawn reported, despite pleas made three weeks ago to the interior minister and other senior officials.

Hundreds of women are murdered every year in Pakistan in so-called honour killing cases.

Pakistan honour killings on the rise, report reveals

1 April 2016

 From the section Asia

Activists of The Pakistan People’s Party hold placards at rally to mark International Women’s Day in Karachi on March 8, 2016Image copyright AFP

More women in Pakistan are demanding an end to gender-related violence

Nearly 1,100 women were killed in Pakistan last year by relatives who believed they had dishonoured their families, the country’s independent Human Rights Commission says.

In its annual report the commission said 900 more women suffered sexual violence and nearly 800 took, or tried to take, their own lives.

In 2014 about 1,000 women died in honour-related attacks and 869 in 2013.

Correspondents say a large number of such crimes go unreported in Pakistan.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has said there is no place in Islam for killing in the name of family honour.

“The predominant causes of these killings in 2015 were domestic disputes, alleged illicit relations and exercising the right of choice in marriage,” the report said.

Most of the 1,096 victims were shot, the report said, but attacks with acid were also common.

Protest against killing of Farzana Parveen, 2014Image copyright AFP

The 2014 killing of Farzana Parveen by her relatives in Punjab triggered protests

Among the cases highlighted in the report are a man who shot dead his two sisters in Sargodha, Punjab, because he believed they had “bad character” and three teenage girls killed by their male cousin for “dishonouring” their family in Pakpattan, Punjab.

The report said that 88 men were also the victims of honour killings last year.

In February, Punjab, the country’s largest province, passed a landmark law criminalising all forms of violence against women.

However, more than 30 religious groups, including all the mainstream Islamic political parties, have threatened to launch protests if the law is not repealed.

Religious groups have equated women’s rights campaigns with promotion of obscenity. They say the new Punjab law will increase the divorce rate and destroy the country’s traditional family system.

Among the most infamous cases of honour killing in Pakistan was the stoning to death of Farzana Parveen in 2014 outside the High Court in Lahore. She had married against her family’s wishes.

Her father, brother, cousin and former fiance were all found guilty of murder. Another brother received a 10-year jail sentence.

The issue of honour killings in Pakistan inspired a documentary film, A Girl in the River – The Price of Forgiveness, which won its creator, Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy, an Oscar at this year’s Academy Awards.

In her acceptance speech, she said it was after seeing the film that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had vowed to change the law on honour killings.

Pakistan: Woman who rejected marriage offer burnt to death

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36425946

  • 1 June 2016
  • From the section Asia

Image caption Maria Sadaqat’s body was taken to her village for her funeral on Wednesday

A Pakistani woman who was set on fire for refusing a marriage proposal has died of her injuries.

Maria Sadaqat, a young schoolteacher, was attacked in her home by a group of men on Sunday and died in hospital in Islamabad on Wednesday.

Her family say she had turned down a marriage proposal from the son of the owner of a school she had taught at.

Campaigners say attacks on women who refuse marriage proposals are common in Pakistan.

Maria Sadaqat suffered burns all over her body and took three days to die

Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif launched an immediate investigation into the killing, which will report in two days.

Maria’s father has said the school owner was one of the men who attacked his daughter. Police told the BBC that the men beat her and doused her in petrol before setting her alight near the hill resort of Murree, not far from the capital.

She suffered serious burns on nearly all of her body. Local media report that she had 85% burns.

Ms Sadaqat’s maternal aunt, Aasia, told the BBC the trouble started when the school’s owner asked for her niece to marry his son.

She said: “She was teaching at their school. They sent in the proposal six months ago but the guy was already married and had a daughter. They wanted her to run the school after marrying the son of the owner of the school.

“Her father refused the proposal and they took the revenge by doing this.”


Panic and anger in Murree: The BBC’s Iram Abbasi reports

“They have taken away my universe, why was she brutally murdered? How can they not feel any compassion?” Maria’s mother told me, while waiting for her daughter’s body.

We were outside a local hospital in Murree. It is a resort town with a 69% literacy rate which, even though high for a rural area, can still not combat the menace of violence against women.

Life here is strictly dictated by religious norms.

After this incident, the sleepy hill town is engulfed with panic and anger. The elders are trying to influence the victim’s father to stay quiet as this is a matter of his honour.

One of the elders whispered in his ear “your daughter is gone and they are going to malign her and your family’s honour the more you highlight it in the media.”

The family is being pressured by fellow villagers to settle the case out of court.


‘Light beatings’

Image copyright AFP Image caption Activists demanded an end to gender-related violence on International Women’s Day in March

Nearly 1,100 women were killed by relatives in Pakistan last year in so-called honour-killings, the country’s independent Human Rights Commission says.

Violence against women by those outside the family is also common in Pakistan and is often connected to a perceived slight, as may have occurred in Maria Sadaqat’s case.

Police said earlier this year that village elders had ordered the murder of a teenage girl because she helped a friend to elope.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif said in April: “The predominant causes of these killings in 2015 were domestic disputes, alleged illicit relations and exercising the right of choice in marriage.”

Campaigners say most “honour killings” are not reported.

The BBC’s M Ilyas Khan in Islamabad says that in many cases, including those reported to the police, relatives hoping to keep the family name out of the news prefer to make out-of-court settlements and therefore there are no convictions.

Under Islamic laws introduced in the 1980s the victim’s family can pardon the perpetrator in return for money or other considerations.

In February, Punjab province, where the attack on Miss Sadaqat happened, passed a landmark law criminalising all forms of violence against women.

However, more than 30 religious groups, including all the mainstream Islamic political parties, threatened to launch protests if the law was not repealed.

The Council of Islamic Ideology proposed making it legal for husbands to “lightly beat” their wives. It came under fire as a result.

Religious groups have equated women’s rights campaigns with promotion of obscenity. They say the new Punjab law will increase the divorce rate and destroy the country’s traditional family system.

Pakistan: Mother ‘burnt her daughter to death’ over marriage

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36212080

  • 8 June 2016
  • From the section Asia

Zeenat RafiqPic her marriage certificate, wed Hassan Khan last week

Police in the Pakistani city of Lahore have arrested a woman suspected of murdering her daughter for marrying without family consent.

Police say the body of Zeenat Rafiq shows signs of torture. She was doused with fuel and set alight.

Her mother Parveen is accused of luring her back from her in-laws.

It is the third such case in a month in Pakistan, where attacks on women who go against conservative rules on love and marriage are common.

Last week a young school teacher, Maria Sadaqat, was set on fire in Murree near Islamabad for refusing a marriage proposal. She died of her injuries.

Image caption Maria Sadaqat suffered burns all over her body and died three days later

A month earlier village elders near Abbottabad ordered the murder of a teenage girl who was burnt to death because she helped a friend to elope, police said.

Zeenat Rafiq, who was 18, had been burnt and there were signs of torture and strangulation, police told BBC Urdu. A post mortem examination may establish if she was still alive when she was set on fire.

Police Superintendent Ibadat Nisar said officers were looking for her brother who is “on the run”. Her mother was found in the house with the body.

“Her mother has confessed to the crime but we find it hard to believe that a 50-year-old woman committed this act all by herself with no help from the family members,” he said.

Neighbours contacted authorities after hearing screaming, but Ms Rafiq was already dead by the time police arrived, BBC reporter Saba Eitizaz says.

Image caption Hassan Khan said his wife’s family had “lured her back”, promising a wedding reception

Ms Rafiq and her husband, Hassan Khan, married a week ago through the courts after eloping. They went to live with his family.

“When she told her parents about us, they beat her so severely she was bleeding from her mouth and nose,” Mr Khan told BBC Urdu.

“Her family lured her back, promising reconciliation and a proper wedding reception. She was afraid, she said ‘they are not going to spare me’. She didn’t want to go but my family convinced her. How were we to know they would kill her like this?”

Attitudes ‘unchanged’

Nearly 1,100 women were killed by relatives in Pakistan last year in so-called honour-killings, the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) says. Many more cases go unreported.

Violence against women by those outside the family is also common.

Najam U Din, a joint director of the HRCP, said that societal attitudes had not changed in line with greater education and freedom for young women.

“So when women become more assertive, more reluctant to be content with submissive survival within the family – for example when they insist on studying further, or when they want to take independent decisions about themselves – then the society does not allow it.”

Image copyright AFP Image caption Activists demanded an end to gender-related violence on International Women’s Day in March

Protests over new law

Punjab province, where the two latest attacks happened, passed a landmark law in February criminalising all forms of violence against women.

However, more than 30 religious groups, including all the mainstream Islamic political parties, threatened to launch protests if the law was not repealed.

The Council of Islamic Ideology, which advises the government, then proposed making it legal for husbands to “lightly beat” their wives. It was criticised as a result.

Religious groups have equated women’s rights campaigns with promotion of obscenity. They say the new Punjab law will increase the divorce rate and destroy the country’s traditional family system.

Pakistan ‘honour’ killing: Why clerics call may fall on deaf ears

By M Ilyas Khan

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-36542285

BBC News, Islamabad

15 June 2016

From the section Asia

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Protest against killing of Farzana Parveen, 2014Image copyright AFP

Image caption

The 2014 killing of Farzana Parveen by her relatives in Punjab triggered protests

The Council of Islamic Ideology (CII) in Pakistan has declared that killing in the name of family honour is un-Islamic and against the law. The group, which advises the government on religious aspects of law and society, issued its statement after a recent spate of killings shocked many in Pakistan and around the world. Will anyone listen?

What did the clerics say?

The Council of Islamic Ideology – which came under fire last month for suggesting husbands should be allowed to lightly beat their wives – said it had declared such killings to be un-Islamic in 1999, and made clear it was restating its position following a spate of killings in recent weeks.

Council of Islamic Ideology chairman Maulana Muhammad Khan Sherani speaks to journalists in Islamabad on 26 May 2016Image copyright FAROOQ NAEEM/GETTY

Image caption

Council of Islamic Ideology chairman Maulana Muhammad Khan Sherani speaks to journalists in Islamabad

A working group formed to look into the matter has recommended that while “adultery, obscenity and immodesty are grave sins and Islam prescribes harsh punishments for them, it does not allow an individual to act in an extra-judicial manner”.

The CII said it was up to the courts to declare an individual guilty or innocent.

Its statement says that anyone guilty of such killing should be tried under a range of existing laws that cover different categories of murder. These laws, it says, are in conformity with Islamic teachings and therefore no new legislation is required.

Why now?

There have been at least four cases in the past month in which a woman was killed in a marital dispute. It is alleged the murders were carried out by family members or relatives of a rejected suitor, either on their own or following the verdict of local elders.

Last week a young woman, Zeenat Rafiq, was allegedly burnt to death in Lahore by her mother for marrying without family consent, triggering widespread anger.

Hassan Khan shows the picture of his wife Zeenat Rafiq, who was burned alive, allegedly by her mother, on a mobile phone at his home in Lahore, Pakistan Wednesday, June 8, 2016.Image copyright AP

Hassan Khan said his wife Zeenat Rafiq’s family had “lured her back”, promising a wedding reception

A week earlier school teacher Maria Sadaqat was set on fire in Murree near Islamabad for refusing a marriage proposal. She died of her injuries.

And last month a teenager was burnt to death near Abbottabad on the orders of village elders because she helped a female friend to elope, police said.

On Sunday, ahead of the CII statement, a group of Pakistani clerics issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, declaring honour killing to be against the teaching of Islam.

How bad is Pakistan’s honour killing problem?

According to the independent Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP), at least 109 people were killed for “honour” during just four months, between January and April this year.

Human rights monitors say the incidence of such killings is on the rise. The HRCP reported 1,100 honour killing incidents in 2015, 1,105 in 2014 and 869 in 2013.

Increased media coverage may be one reason but changing lifestyles amid continuing social conservatism are also a major factor.

For example, women’s education and their exposure to changing lifestyles and fashion in the media have been growing. Mobile phones and the internet have also empowered many women.

But social norms continue to prevent them from practising this newfound liberation.

Who carries out honour killings?

In the overwhelming majority of cases, the killers are often close relatives – a brother, father, cousin, even a mother, or a maternal or paternal uncle.

Rukhsana and her husband Mohammad,

Rukhsana Bibi eloped with Mohammad Yunus – he was killed while she survived

Most killings take place after the woman concerned is accused of having a pre-marital or extra-marital affair, marries a man of her choice despite her family’s opposition, or refuses a marriage proposal brought by her family.

What are the legal obstacles to prosecutions?

Since honour killings are largely a family affair, most cases go unreported – so police rarely make arrests.

Even in the reported cases the families involved often reach an out-of-court settlement and the alleged killers walk free.

Under a 1980s law the next-of-kin of the victim have the right to pardon the person accused of killing them.

Attempts to introduce stricter laws have often been abandoned following opposition from religious lobbyists.

A law passed by the Punjab parliament in February which criminalised all forms of violence against women has still not been enacted after the CII said it violated Islamic teachings.

Are there cultural reasons too?

There is the sanction of society. Honour killing is a function of culture, and so it cuts across religions.

One example is the recent murder of a Christian teenage girl in Sialkot. The police said that Anum Masih wanted to marry a Christian neighbour but her family was opposed to the proposal.

On Sunday morning, her 23-year-old brother, Saqib Masih, smashed her head with a log, police said.

In an article published in Dawn newspaper, Lahore-based intellectual Mushtaq Soofi explained the phenomenon by linking it to the origin of private property and the concomitant evolution of modern family in societies that have not progressed beyond feudal ethics.

“Once consigned to the household, a woman was gradually reduced to a piece of property,” he wrote. “And property if left unguarded is taken by someone else.”

This, he said, was also “the secret of endogamous marriage”.

Women also needed to be “monitored and controlled” because of their reproductive power.

“She is considered a machine that makes men,” Mushtaq Soofi added. “If she goes off with a man not accepted by her family, she in fact creates the male competitors who would challenge the family muscle.”

Pakistani filmmaker on Oscar hopes

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35634604

23 February 2016 Last updated at 00:21 GMT

When Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy won an Oscar for her film Saving Face in 2012 she became the first Pakistani to triumph at Hollywood’s biggest awards ceremony.

The documentary maker is nominated again this year for A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiving, which addresses the issue of honour killings in Pakistan.

Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy explained to BBC News what drives her to make the films she does.

Thanks to BBC News organization reported this news to the world population.

 For more information please visit BBC News as the following links:

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Pakistan elders ‘ordered girl’s killing’ in Abbottabad

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Pakistan: Mother ‘burnt her daughter to death’ over marriage

8 June 2016

Four sentenced to death for Pakistan ‘honour killing’

19 November 2014

Pakistani women shot in ‘honour killings’

27 June 2013

Pakistan acid attack parents ‘feared dishonour’

5 November 2012

Pakistan sectarian bus attack in Kohistan kills 18

28 February 2012

Video Murders treated as honour killing

28 November 2011

Peace with Nature

https://ingpeaceproject.com/2016/06/19/peace-with-nature/

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