PBS News, Africanews, Al Jazeera, ABC (Australia), CNA 24/7, Sky News, DW News, CTV News, Roylab Stats, CNN – Fareed Zakaria and The Washington Post

PBS News, Africanews, Al Jazeera, ABC (Australia), CNA 24/7, Sky News, DW News, CTV News, Roylab Stats, CNN – Fareed Zakaria and The Washington Post

PBS News: March 28 – 29, 2020

africanews Live,

Al Jazeera English – Live

ABC News (Australia) Live

 [CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries,

Sky News live

CTV News Channel: ongoing coverage and LIVE updates of the COVID-19 outbreak.

DW News Livestream – Latest news and breaking stories

TED Talks: Seth Berkley The quest for the coronavirus vaccine?, and  Seth Berkley The troubling reason  why vaccines are made too late if they re made at all

CNN:  CNN’s Fareed Zakaria gives his take on why the US has struggled to mount an effective response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Washington Post: Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic by Slack

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 29, 2020

•Mar 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 29, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, how renters are impacted by the pandemic, the complications of the virus for incarcerated people, and welcoming a bundle of joy in trying times. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 28, 2020

Mar 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 28, more than 600,000 people around the world are now infected with the coronavirus, the pandemic strains the health care safety net as people file for unemployment by the millions, and will the new federal stimulus package give a boost to the concept of universal basic income? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics 

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020   Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

Watch ABC News live

Started streaming on Mar 19, 2020  ABC News (Australia)

ABC News channel provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad. Including the latest coronavirus updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: http://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020  CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019   Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019   DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

https://www.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=64268

CTV News Channel LIVE | CP24.com

www.cp24.com › video (Canada)

Jun 7, 2016

CTV News Channel ongoing coverage and LIVE updates of the COVID-19 outbreak.

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

Novel coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases, recovered cases(COVID-19). I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the coronavirus spreading. For anyone that wants to know the numbers and progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. At first, I tried to show only official data from governments without any manipulation. But many people wanted to apply an up-to-date format of data to stream. I added a procedure to manually manipulate data with my computer. After seeing the inflicted countries numbers had sharply increased, I realized that I could no longer keep up with new information from 100 countries. So I made another procedure which enables moderators the ability to manipulate the numbers on screen remotely. Not only the moderators who willingly accepted the hard work, but also everyone that gave us reliable information were able to add streaming data. The role of this streaming is to show basic information to undertand situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites. References: 1. WORLDOMETER: https://www.worldometers.info/coronav… 2. BNO News: https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02… 3. JHU CSEE: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/ap… 4. 1point3acres (for USA/CAN):https://coronavirus.1point3acres.com/en 5. RiskLayer (DEU): http://www.risklayer-explorer.com/eve… 6. MorgenPost (DEU): https://interaktiv.morgenpost.de/coro… 7. DXY (CHN): https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneum… 8. J.A.G Japan (JPN): https://jagjapan.maps.arcgis.com/apps… 9. VG (NOR): https://www.vg.no/spesial/2020/corona… 10. Wiki – Brazil page (BRA): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_co… I majored in life science and joined bioinformatics laboratory for master degree. At that time I used python. Since I decided to change my career as dentist, I have been stopped programming for 15 years. Now, I start to learn more about python with googling. Because my job doesn’t allow mistakes, I won’t try something new works. Still I am wondering how can i start this live streaming. Sometimes python program doesn’t work as i intended. If I can devote all my free time to this live stream, I would give more accurate and faster information. But please understand that I can’t manipulate data all day. While I am working and sleeping, data gathering is done automatically. I live in South Korea. At the beginning of streaming, the number of confirmed cases were not so high in South Korea. After sudden appearing local transmission that can’t be trackable, the number has been dramatically increased. Please be warned that COVID-19 is highly contagious disease. Although the stream started off crude and basic, many people have supported me in improving and maintaining this. It is because of your support that I am encouraged to keep streaming. I especially appreciate all moderators for willingly accepting the role. They have given their precious time to making this live stream better – Max Mustermann, Stephanie Hughes, Random, Entrenched Trader, Droid Knight, Craft Fan, Fries, jlpowell73, The NCV, Josh Leathers,The Eldritch God, srpk khin, Hitz1001, Red Chiref, GildArt by Gilda, emmamec, lambi, AmberLeanne, DukeHeart, Green Rock Films, Charlie and amithist57. I hope this live stream can be a useful source of information for you. Please keep track of the numbers that impact you and let them inform the decisions you make when you have to make them. Please take care. Keeping good immunity is very important!!! Please sleep, eat and rest fully for resilience. Keep those affected by this unfortunate outbreak in your thoughts. Data1 – screen numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Data2 – Daily numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Eyes_of_Glory/ Heaven_and_Hell / Heaven_and_Hell_Part_2 / Hero_Down/ Into_the_Sky / Lonely_Troutman / Lonely_Troutman_II / Parzival / Mountain/The_Heartache Hero Down: http://incompetech.com/ from www.bensound.com from www.epidemicsound.com

Category  News & Politics

When will the coronavirus vaccine be ready? Epidemiologist Seth Berkley (head of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance) takes us inside the effort to create a vaccine for COVID-19. With clarity and urgency, he explains what makes it so challenging to develop, when we can expect it to be rolled out at scale and why we’ll need global collaboration to get it done. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 26, 2020)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Whitney Pennington Rodgers · TED Current Affairs Curator

Whitney Pennington Rodgers is an award-winning journalist and media professional.

MORE RESOURCES

TED Connects

TED Connects is a live, daily conversation series featuring experts whose ideas can help us reflect and work through this coronavirus pandemic with a sense of responsibility, compassion and wisdom.

More at TED.com ?

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LEARN

Learn more about Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and their work creating life-saving vaccines.

Learn more ?

82,801 views

TED Connects | March 2020

It seems like we wait for a disastrous disease outbreak before we get serious about making a vaccine for it. Seth Berkley lays out the market realities and unbalanced risks behind why we aren’t making vaccines for the world’s biggest diseases.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

TED2015 | March 2015

Fareed Zakaria: Trump’s claim turned out to be a cruel hoax

Mar 29, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria gives his take on why the US has struggled to mount an effective response to the coronavirus pandemic. ? #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

The Washington Post

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic. Presented by Slack

 
By Avi Selk
 Email
The Post’s coronavirus coverage linked in this newsletter is free to access from this email.
 
The latest The White House will decide this week whether to relax national social distancing guidelines against the advice of medical experts, even as the coronavirus death toll accelerates in the United States, with more than 2,200 fatalities among 130,000 confirmed infections. State officials reported nearly 450 deaths on Saturday alone. A 15-day plan advising most Americans to slow the virus’s spread by staying at home and avoiding groups of more than 10 people expires Monday. With the economy in tatters, Republican lawmakers and conservative economists have urged President Trump to roll the measures back. Doctors and public health officials warn any rollback could trigger new waves of disease and death. Even now, the virus is overwhelming hospitals, draining medical supply stockpiles and spreading undetected due to a shortage of tests. The United States could record 100,000 to 200,000 deaths and millions of infections, according to current but rapidly evolving projections, White House task force member Anthony S. Fauci said Sunday on CNN. His comments came as another prominent member of the task force, Deborah Birx, offered a similarly grim assessment: “No state, no metro area, will be spared.” Trump will review infection data before making a decision, Vice President Pence, who leads the coronavirus task force, said on Fox News this weekend. “While the president has said he’d like to open the country up in weeks not months,” Pence said, “ultimately, the president will make a decision that he believes is in the best interest of all of the American people.” Trump has whipsawed between contradictory plans in his comments, sowing confusion among state officials and the public. He said last week he would like to open things up to very large sections of our country” as soon as Easter. On Saturday, the president said he might quarantine New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut from the rest of the country by the end of the day, blindsiding governors in those states andcausing some people to flee New York City. Ultimately, he scrapped the idea hours later, via tweet. The president might lack the power to send the country back to work, even if he decides to try. Governors “will have the final say on when restaurants, stores and other gathering places in their states can reopen,” The Washington Post reported. Some governors have been coordinating with each other across party lines, creating an alternate power center to the White House. Meanwhile, the virus is spreading from coastal hotspots into the country’s interior. We report that “officials in Boston, Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, Milwaukee and Los Angeles are watching caseloads climb and taking extraordinary measures to prepare,” including turning the continent’s largest convention center into a makeshift hospital. Millions of Americans are on the move to less infected towns and cities, or even to the edge of wilderness — a mass migration that “might contain the seeds of a wholesale shift in where and how Americans live.” A Post analysis of more than a dozen large cities found a notable decline in crime since mass quarantines went into effect. Police officers, however, have been catching the virus in some of those same cities. Three officers in Houston, for example, tested positive after fighting a suspect with feverlike symptoms.  Other countries face their own forms of chaos. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi apologized “to my underprivileged brothers and sisters” after a lockdown of the country’s 1.3 billion residents and its train system forced tens of thousands of migrants to walk back to their villages — some for hundreds of miles. Thousands of American travelers have been stranded in the country.  In Europe, Spain and Italy still face daily death tolls in the hundreds despite lockdowns. Australia has told people not to go outside in groups of more than two as the infection proliferates in every corner of the world. Still, there is some good news. South Korea, with a viral tracking system far better than most countries, announced this weekend that its recoveries now outpace and outnumber infections. China’s infection rate appears to have stabilized after an ultra-strict quarantine program, though visitors from abroad are still spreading the disease, and some doubt the accuracy of the government’s reports. And a 101-year old man in Italy recovered from the virus, according to local authorities. Identified only as “Mr. P,” he was born during the 20th century’s greatest pandemic, in 1919. Content from Slack How to work from home while being your best self Working from home can feel isolating, but it doesn’t have to. We’ve compiled our top tips for connecting with coworkers.   Get more done with Slack, the channel-based messaging platform that helps you work better together.
 
Live updates Track deaths and confirmed cases in the United States at the county level. Follow the spread of the outbreak around the world with our updating map. Post reporters around the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day. Read live updates about the cases and impact in the D.C. area. How you can help people in needduring the outbreak. Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.
 
Your questions, answeredI read that you can self-test yourself by holding your breath for 10 seconds. If you can hold your breath for 10 seconds, then you don’t have respiratory problem and don’t have covid-19. Is this true? — Larry, California No, this is bad information that has been spreading over social media. “Most young patients with coronavirus will be able to hold their breaths for much longer than 10 seconds. And many elderly without the virus won’t be able to do it,” the University of Maryland’s chief of infectious diseases, Faheem Younus, tweeted last week. (Read that thread for other bogus coronavirus tips.) The early covid-19 symptoms to watch for are a fever, cough and shortness of breath, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  However, research suggests that even people with no apparent symptoms could have the disease and spread it to others. That’s why medical experts recommend behaving as if you have the virus: avoid contact with others as much as possible, wash your hands thoroughly and consult a medical professional if you show symptoms.
 
Today’s top reads Find more stories, analysis and op-eds about the outbreak on our coronavirus page, including: What to do if you don’t have money for rent or your mortgageA history of the Trump War on Media — the obsession not even coronavirus could stopThe toilet paper crisis Hawaii has never forgottenAs cases explode in Iran, U.S. sanctions hinder its access to drugs and medical equipment

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/coronavirus/?utm_campaign=wp_to_your_health&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_tyh&wpmk=1

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PBS News, Global National, CNN, DW News, ABC News, TED Talks, The New York Times, and Scientific American

PBS News: March 15 & 16, 2020, and Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

 Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

CNN: Fareed Zakaria – Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

DW News: Coronavirus update – Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders

ABC News: Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency – Four Corners – ABC News In-depth

TED Talks: Adam Kucharski How can we control the coronavirus pandemic?

The New York Times: We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L. By Chris Stanford

Scientific American: Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there By Jane Qiu, and WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 16, 2020

Mar 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the novel coronavirus pandemic dominates the U.S., as numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb and cities essentially shut down. Plus: The economic fallout from the outbreak, what epidemiologists mean by “flattening the curve,” the Biden-Sanders debate, Politics Monday, coronavirus threatens Lebanon with another crisis, coping through art and song and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 15, 2020

Mar 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 15, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, what you need to know about “social distancing,” how the coronavirus scare is shaping the political playing field, and what’s being done to stop Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

Mar 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the unique magnitude of the novel coronavirus pandemic, how President Trump is handling the crisis, what the government should do to reassure fearful Americans, and how the outbreak might affect the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race.

Category  News & Politics

Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

Mar 15, 2020  Global News

Canadian travellers are scrambling to return home amid the COVID-19 outbreak as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says nothing is ‘off the table” in combating the pandemic in Canada. Abigail Bimman reports on whether those plans could also involve border closures, and Jennifer Johnson reports on how U.S. health authorities are raising the possibility of more country-wide crackdowns. Heather Yourex-West reports on how many Canadian provinces are beginning to enforce tough measures by closing public spaces and schools. Robin Gill reports on a disastrous pipeline explosion in Nigeria and why the COVID-19 pandemic is halting Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial. Plus, Mike Le Couteur looks at why hundreds of millions of dollars allocated to support Canadian veterans has not been spent. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #Coronavirus #COVID19

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

Mar 15, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria discusses how President Trump is handling coronavirus and America’s well-being in comparison to other countries’ response to the global pandemic. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus update: Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders | DW News

Mar 15, 2020  DW News

Germany joins a growing list of EU countries to at least partially shut out its neighbors. Authorities here have decided to close borders with Switzerland and Austria. That’s according to German media reports. Added restrictions are also being imposed on the French-German boundary. Spain is in lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus Covid-19. Unprecedented lockdowns and border closures are coming into effect in many European countries, and the streets are empty throughout Europe, with Spain and France among the worst hit by the virus’ spread behind Italy. England is planning self-isolation measures for all people over 70, for up to four months. Austria’s Chancellor Sebstian Kurz says his government is banning gatherings of more than five people. Iran’s coronavirus death toll has leapt by 113 in one day to reach 724. And the Vatican says all Easter services will take place without worshipers in attendance. Pope Francis will hold Sunday blessings via TV and the internet. Meanwhile, the United States has tightened its ban on visitors from Europe. President Donald Trump says it will now include travelers from Britain and Ireland. In countries that are far away from coronavirus hotspots, like Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia, the response from authorities has ranged from tough to nonexistent.Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #dwNews

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency | Four Corners

Feb 24, 2020  ABC News In-depth

It’s likened to a scene from an apocalypse. Wuhan — a city more populous than London or New York — placed in ‘lockdown’ following the outbreak of the new and deadly coronavirus. In China, more than two thousand people have died, with tens of thousands more infected, and authorities are resorting to extreme measures to try to halt the contagion. In interviews filmed on smartphones, Chinese activists and Australians trapped in the lockdown explain what they are going through. Four Corners charts how the outbreak occurred and investigates whether a cover-up by Chinese authorities allowed the virus to spread. _________ Watch more Four Corners investigations here: https://bit.ly/2JbpMkf You can also like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abc4corners/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/4corners And sign up to our newsletter: https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/newsl… _____________

Category  News & Politics

As the threat of COVID-19 continues, infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski answers five key questions about the novel coronavirus, providing necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what might need to change about our social behavior to end the pandemic. (This video is excerpted from a 70-minute interview between Kucharski and head of TED Chris Anderson. Listen to the full interview at go.ted.com/adamkucharski.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Adam Kucharski · Infectious disease scientist

Adam Kucharski is working to understand how epidemics spread — and how they can be controlled.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread — and Why They Stop Hardcover

Adam Kucharski

Basic Books (2020)

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Monday, March 16, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L.
 

By Chris Stanford

Chelsea Market in Manhattan on Sunday. Restaurants and bars were ordered closed in several parts of the U.S.  Jose A. Alvarado Jr. for The New York Times
Americans are urged to ‘hunker down’
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that no gatherings of 50 people or more be held in the U.S. for the next two months, one of the federal government’s most sweeping efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
“For a while, life is not going to be the way it used to be in the United States,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Sunday. “We have to just accept that if we want to do what’s best for the American public.”
Here are the latest updates on the outbreak and maps of where the virus has spread.
In other developments:
? New York City’s public school system, the largest in the country, will be closed starting today. The city has also ordered a shutdown of tens of thousands of bars and restaurants, except for delivery and pickup services.
To ease a bottleneck in coronavirus testing, federal officials are setting up more drive-through centers and increasing commercial laboratories’ ability to process multiple samples at once.
? The Trump administration tried to persuade a German company that is developing a possible vaccine to move its work to the U.S., German officials said, raising fears in Berlin that any inoculation would be available first — and perhaps exclusively — in the U.S.
? Italy, the hardest-hit country outside China, reported a death toll of 1,809, a 25 percent increase over the day before. In a communal effort to lift the mood, Italians stuck in their homes have been breaking out in song. “It’s not like we’re maestros,” a woman in Rome said, but “it’s a moment of joy in this moment of anxiety.”
? As part of restrictions across Europe, Germany will close its borders with several neighbors.
? A Tennessee man who became a subject of national scorn after stockpiling more than 17,000 bottles of hand sanitizer donated the supplies. The state has begun a price-gouging investigation.
? Movie theaters had their worst weekend in two decades. Domestic ticket sales totaled $55.3 million, a 44 percent drop from the previous weekend.
What to know: Here’s how to practice social distancing and clean your phone. The Times is providing free access to much of our coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, like all of our newsletters, is free.
Another angle: On a special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. The story is a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” Listen here.
Fed cuts rates to near zero
The Federal Reserve on Sunday cut its benchmark interest rate by a full percentage point and said it would inject hundreds of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy, making an aggressive effort to address the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.
If the measures remind you of the 2008 global financial crisis, you’re not alone, our senior economics correspondent writes.
Global markets fell today. Here’s the latest.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the financial system’s response to the pandemic.
Related: Retailers, dairy farmers and meat producers say the U.S. food supply chain remains intact and has been ramping up to meet pandemic stockpiling.
Another angle: As the outbreak forces the cancellation of trips, nights out and large gatherings, economic damage is mounting. “Last week, I would have told you nothing had changed,” a California real estate agent said. “This week, it has all gone to hell.”  
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders bumped elbows rather than shaking hands before Sunday’s debate.  Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Democrats debate pandemic, and each other
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders called on Sunday for far more aggressive government action against the coronavirus and its economic effects, during their first one-on-one debate of the Democratic primary race.
The shadow of the pandemic loomed over the event, which was held without a live audience and with a six-foot distance between the candidates, following guidelines for social distancing.
Mr. Biden committed for the first time to selecting a female running mate, and Mr. Sanders said that “in all likelihood” he would do so as well. Here are six takeaways from the debate. We also fact-checked some of the candidates’ remarks.
Perspective: Writers from our Opinion section ranked the performances.
What’s next: Polls suggest that Mr. Biden is likely to win the four states with primaries on Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio. Georgia, which had been scheduled to vote March 24, postponed its primary for two months because of the coronavirus.
Go deeper: The Times Magazine looks at Mr. Sanders’s campaign. “Even as the two-man race has taken a more pugilistic turn while the economy reels and a pandemic sweeps the globe, Sanders has remained steadfast in his willingness to let the Democratic voters judge him by his democratic-socialist vision of what America should be. And so, it would seem, they have.”
Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. Shira Ovide wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

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How China’s “Bat Woman” Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

     By Jane Qiu on March 11, 2020 

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Shi Zhengli, known as China’s “bat woman” for her virus-hunting expeditions in bat caves, releases a fruit bat after taking blood and swab samples from it. Credit: Wuhan Institute of Virology

BEIJING—The mysterious patient samples arrived at Wuhan Institute of Virology at 7 P.M. on December 30, 2019. Moments later, Shi Zhengli’s cell phone rang. It was her boss, the institute’s director. The Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention had detected a novel coronavirus in two hospital patients with atypical pneumonia, and it wanted Shi’s renowned laboratory to investigate. If the finding was confirmed, the new pathogen could pose a serious public health threat—because it belonged to the same family of bat-borne viruses as the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that plagued 8,100 people and killed nearly 800 of them between 2002 and 2003. “Drop whatever you are doing and deal with it now,” she recalls the director saying.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-chinas-bat-woman-hunted-down-viruses-from-sars-to-the-new-coronavirus1/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=health&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-03-16_featured-this-week&spMailingID=64310566&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1841993808&spReportId=MTg0MTk5MzgwOAS2

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

     By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT on March 11, 2020

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

Coronavirus illustration. Credit: Dowell Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, acknowledging what has seemed clear for some time—the virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe.

Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the situation will worsen.

“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” said Tedros, as the director general is known.

As of Wednesday, 114 countries have reported that 118,000 have contracted Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, known as SARS-CoV2. In the United States, where for weeks state and local laboratories could not test for the virus, just over 1,000 cases have been diagnosed and 29 people have died. But authorities here warn continuing limits on testing mean the full scale of spread in this country is not yet known.

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Read more from this special report:

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

The virus causes mild respiratory infections in about 80% of those infected, though about half will have pneumonia. Another 15% develop severe illness and 5% need critical care.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/who-declares-the-coronavirus-outbreak-a-pandemic/

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PBS News-October 14-18, 2019, BBC-Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters, CNN, TEDx and More

PBS News:October 14-18.2019, How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut, What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability, How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

CNN: SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

PBS NewsHour full episode October 18, 2019

Oct 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the battleground in northeastern Syria appears to be quieting, as a Turkish operation there pauses to allow Kurdish fighters to leave. Also: Violence in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, more questions about Boeing’s handling of the 737 MAX, former Gov. John Kasich on overcoming political divisions, Shields and Brooks, the art of Native American women and a historic spacewalk. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 17, 2019

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, U.S. and Turkish officials agree that Turkey’s military offensive in northern Syria will pause. Plus: Another U.S. diplomat testifies on Capitol Hill as President Trump’s acting chief of staff disputes wrongdoing around U.S. aid to Ukraine, remembering Rep. Elijah Cummings, a possible Brexit deal, resolution of the General Motors strike and using big data creatively. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Turkish official denies Erdogan agreed to a ‘cease-fire’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOENn… How impeachment inquiry and Senate trial could unfold https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpY3k… News Wrap: New England lashed by powerful nor’easter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEtD-… Remembering lawmaker, civil rights advocate Elijah Cummings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKwv… The EU approved Johnson’s Brexit plan. Will Parliament? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63Ay9… What tentative GM deal says about American organized labor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtU4f… How customers’ big data is transforming creative commerce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cs7Cg…

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

A bipartisan group of senators announced a bill to impose additional sanctions on Turkey in the wake of the country’s invasion in Syria. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Chris Van Hollen, who introduced the bill, were joined by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, Richard Blumenthal and Jeanne Shaheen. The lawmakers expressed concern about President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria. “History will haunt us,” Blumenthal said. “We are going to be complicit in the ethnic cleansing that occurs as a result of this absolutely abhorrent action.” Later in the day, Vice President Mike Pence announced a 120-hour cease-fire between Turkey and the Kurds. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 16, 2019

Oct 16, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump defends his decision to remove U.S. troops from Syria as violence escalates, and the U.S. House votes overwhelmingly to condemn the move. Also: Critical moments in last night’s Democratic debate, a new frontier in the fight against Alzheimer’s, a chef reintroducing Native American culinary traditions and a Brief but Spectacular take on opioid addiction. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Syria and impeachment put Trump on defensive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Cj1v… News Wrap: GM and UAW reach tentative deal to end strike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orBra… Warren becomes debate target as moderates vie for breakout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RnD5… Can ultrasound be used to fight Alzheimer’s? https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/can… Traditional Native foods are the Sioux Chef’s key ingredient https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yxxd… What tackling the opioid crisis will require https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srrtH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 15, 2019

Oct 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, revelations that John Bolton raised alarms about Rudy Giuliani and the Ukraine affair add fuel to the impeachment inquiry. Also: A Syrian city as microcosm of the larger fight, a Texas officer is charged with murder, what to watch in the Democratic debate, defining the criteria for impeachment, the soaring cost of student housing, and Elizabeth Strout’s new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Testimony reveals officials raised concerns about Giuliani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQ8VS… News Wrap: Hundreds charged in Barcelona protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EyQL… Syria’s Manbij embodies consequences of Trump’s decision https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7O3m… What makes officers more likely to use deadly force? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL9wC… Van Hollen: Sanctions ‘next best’ way to influence Turkey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0_0P… The hot topics 2020 Democrats could debate tonight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DHYE… How the founders defined impeachment-worthy crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTVPZ… How soaring housing costs are straining college students https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PbOG… How fiction draws Elizabeth Strout home to Maine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od2Lw… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 14, 2019

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, how U.S. withdrawal from northern Syria is reshaping the region’s conflict. Plus: President Trump’s former top Russia adviser is deposed, analysis of the Syrian battleground, House Democrats who aren’t supporting the impeachment inquiry, Politics Monday, Ronan Farrow on revelations in his latest book, a Detroit museum’s hands-on experiences and a “NewsHour” announcement. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: As U.S. leaves Syria, Kurds join Assad to fight a NATO ally https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E5YM… Former Russia adviser Fiona Hill speaks to House committees https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLx7U… News Wrap: Texas police officer resigns over fatal shooting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdVwS… What Trump’s Syria withdrawal means for the Middle East https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bBPE… House Democrats in Trump districts face impeachment quandary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT9we… Amy Walter and Domenico Montanaro on impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ImL3… Ronan Farrow on the systemic coverup of sexual assault https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttgIt… At this Detroit art museum, engagement on community terms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFa2K… PBS launches “NewsHour West,” based in Phoenix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B5o9… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut

Oct 10, 2019 PBS NewsHour

November marks the 50th anniversary of public television’s “Sesame Street,” a cultural landmark widely praised for its approach to children’s programming. But beyond the songs and fun, “Sesame Street” does some serious work for those in need, providing special support and guidance for military families and addressing topics like autism and addiction. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Turkey continued its military assault into northern Syria on Thursday. Aid agencies warn that nearly half a million people near the border are at risk from the violence, which is drawing criticism from many U.S. officials. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to Sinam Mohamad, U.S. representative for the Syrian Democratic Council, and Soner Cagaptay of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

In a new book, Pulitzer winner James B. Stewart explores two controversial recent investigations by the FBI and the Justice Department: Probes into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server when she was secretary of state and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Stewart talks to William Brangham about how his research contradicts President Trump’s “deep state” narrative. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

4 hours ago  Turkey offensive in Syria

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Up to 300,000 people are said to have fled the violence in northern Syria

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says that Turkey will “crush the heads” of Kurdish fighters if they do not withdraw from a planned safe zone area in northern Syria.

Turkey agreed on Thursday to suspend an offensive for five days to allow the Kurds to retreat from the area.

But on Saturday both sides accused the other of violating the ceasefire.

Ankara views the Kurdish forces as terrorists and wants to create a “safe zone” buffer inside Syria.

Despite the temporary ceasefire, some sporadic violence has continued – particularly around the border town of Ras Al-Ain.

What did Erdogan say?

Speaking at a televised event in the central Turkish province of Kayseri on Saturday, President Erdogan said that if Kurdish fighters did not withdraw by Tuesday evening – as agreed in the ceasefire – “we will start where we left off and continue to crush the terrorists’ heads”.

The Turkish leader is due to hold talks next week with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin. On Saturday he said that if those talks did not produce a solution, Turkey would “implement its own plans”.

Turkey’s defence ministry earlier accused Kurdish forces of carrying out 14 “provocative” attacks in the last 36 hours, mostly in Ras Al-Ain, but insisted Turkish forces were fully abiding by the agreement.

However, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) accused Turkey of violating the ceasefire.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Turkish-backed Syrian rebels are still active along the border

They also accuse Turkish troops of failing to create a safe corridor for the evacuation of civilians and wounded people from the besieged town.

On Saturday the SDF urged US Vice-President Mike Pence, who helped to broker the temporary ceasefire, to pressure Turkey to allow the passage of civilians.

“Despite the constant communication with the American side and the promise made by them to solve this problem, there has not been any tangible progress in this regard,” the SDF said in a statement.

Turkish presidency spokesman Ibrahim Kalin said they wanted the US to put pressure on Kurdish forces to withdraw.

“We have told our American colleagues to use their leverage, their connections, to make sure that they leave without any incidents,” he told AFP news agency.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) said deliveries of humanitarian aid had been prevented from entering Ras Al-Ain.

The monitor group said on Friday that the civilian death toll from the Turkish operation had now risen to 86.

Between 160,000 and 300,000 people have reportedly fled their homes since the offensive started 10 days ago.

What prompted the offensive?

Turkish forces first launched their assault on 9 October, following an announcement US troops would withdraw from the Syria-Turkey border region.

Media captionThe BBC’s Martin Patience explains what’s behind the conflict

The Turkish plan is to clear Kurdish fighters from a buffer zone extending more than 30km (20 miles) into Syria. It would run for about 440km along the border, President Erdogan said on Friday, and be monitored from observation posts.

Turkey also plans to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees, currently on its territory, in the buffer zone but critics warned the move could trigger the ethnic cleansing of the local Kurdish population.

The goal was to push back a Kurdish militia group – the People’s Protection Units (YPG) – that Turkey views as a terrorist organisation.

Since the offensive was launched, President Donald Trump has been accused by some, including senior Republicans, of abandoning a US ally. The SDF – a group dominated by the YPG – fought alongside the US against the Islamic State (IS) group in Syria.

There has been growing international concern about possible war crimes committed by Turkey and its allied militias during the offensive.

Media captionMike Pence announces Turkish ceasefire in Syria

Amnesty International says it has gathered “damning evidence” of war crimes and other violations by their side and the United Nations has called on Turkey to investigate the allegations.

Unconfirmed reports have also emerged that Turkish-allied forces have used white phosphorus, a chemical weapon which causes bad burns, in Syria.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) said it was aware of the claims and was gathering evidence.

What is the latest with the ceasefire?

The pause in hostilities followed talks in the Turkish capital Ankara between Mr Erdogan and Mr Pence on Thursday.

President Trump celebrated news of the ceasefire and claimed the pause in hostilities would lead to “millions of lives” being saved. He remained optimistic in comments made on Friday, despite reports the ceasefire was failing to hold.

Media captionPresident Trump on Turkish and Kurdish forces: “Sometimes you have to let them fight a little bit”

SDF spokesman Mustafa Bali tweeted on Friday morning to allege that Turkey was breaking the ceasefire near Ras al-Ain.

“Despite the agreement to halt the fighting, air and artillery attacks continue to target the positions of fighters, civilian settlements and the hospital,” he wrote.

President Erdogan dismissed reports of continuing clashes on Friday as “misinformation” but international news media recorded explosions in Ras al-Ain during the morning.

The SOHR said Saturday that the SDF had not yet started to pull back from the border region.

Local Kurdish media are reporting that five civilians and 13 Kurdish fighters in Ras-al-Ain have been killed since the ceasefire began, but the BBC has not been able to independently confirm that.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

Oct 19, 2019  CNN

SE Cupp says President Donald Trump’s Syria policy is one of the only issues that has prompted swift criticism from the Republican party, and argues it may be the one issue that could put his presidency in danger.

Category  News & Politics

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

May 18, 2016  TEDx Talks

The Kurds are an ancient and noble people who are now the primary “boots on the ground” against ISIS in the Middle East. They are 35 million strong worldwide, the largest people group on earth without their own homeland. In this stirring talk, Stephen Mansfield tells the story of the Kurds and does so, surprisingly, through the lives of three women. Stephen Mansfield is a New York Times bestselling author who first rose to global attention with his groundbreaking book, The Faith of George W. Bush, a bestseller that Time magazine credited with helping to shape the 2004 U.S. presidential election. He has written celebrated biographies of Barak Obama, Booker T. Washington, George Whitefield, Winston Churchill, Pope Benedict XVI, and Abraham Lincoln, among others. Mansfield’s latest book, The Miracle of the Kurds, is a timely introduction to the Kurdish people that reached bookstores just as Kurdish troops began standing heroically against the evils of ISIS in the Middle East. The book has been named “Book of the Year” by Rudaw, the leading Kurdish news service. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Sep 21, 2013  TEDx Talks

Nicholas Glastonbury is a graduate of the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study. His studies focused on the intersections of human rights law, nationalism, anthropology, political science, theories of representation, feminist theory and queer theory. About New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study Creativity, flexibility and rigor characterize the academic program of the Gallatin School of Individualized Study. At Gallatin, students have the opportunity to combine the best of a small college experience with the best of a large research university. A Gallatin education is unique. The individualized structure of the program and its relationship to the rest of NYU are part of what makes the school so special. For more information visit gallatin.nyu.edu/ About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) video produced by Charles Q. Drexler vfx animation by Michael J. Green opening music by Gabriel S. Beam Hyphenate Media www.hyphenatemedia.com

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Oct 10, 2017  TEDx Talks

Levi Clancy shares his experience in Kurdistan, the homeland of multi-cultures and many religions, showing the co-existence and peace it has. Levi was born and grew up in 1990 in Los Angeles in the United States. When he was still a kid, he started taking college courses and when he was only 13 years old he transferred to the University of California! At 15, he was abandoned by his family and had to leave university, and started working in medical research as well as web development and graphic arts in order to support himself and make it month to month. At 18, he received a scholarship to return to university, and reconnected with his family. After finishing his baccalaureate in Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics (MIMG) with a minor in Mesopotamian history, he moved to Erbil. Levi has worked for University of California as a researcher in electron microscopy, oncology and flow cytometry. He has also worked in marketing for clients including the LA Lakers, NCAA, Verizon and AT&T. Currently, he works as a software developer and as a freelance journalist. Levi has been featured on CBS News and LA Times. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Feb 10, 2015  TEDx Talks

Imagine Iraq. Then imagine pop music. Dashni Morad is now in her tenth year as the leading successful singer of modern pop in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. From the little girl whom fled Saddam Hussein’s tyranny to the strong woman whom challenged the status quo, Dashni tells us her heartbreaking coming of age tale. Born in the city of Sulaimanya, raised in Netherlands, lost between two cultures and struggling between accomplishing dreams. Dashni Morad, a Kurdish/Dutch Pop singer and a TV personality who was known for her show on Kurdistan TV “Bi Control”, flee Kurdistan at the age of eleven to become a refugee in Netherlands due to the unstable political situation in Iraq and Kurdistan. Since moving to the Netherlands, Dashni, worked hard to accomplish being a musician and a TV presenter to entertain the Kurdish audience since it was much needed at the time in Kurdistan. Today, she is recognized as a national and international artist who broke through the impossible to give the gift of modern music to Kurdistan and presenting it outside of the Middle East region. Her songs presented messages such as women empowerment, peace, and the love for Kurdistan. She, however, didn’t stop at making music and TV presenting, she also founded a small non-profit under the name “Green Kids” supporting education to the kids of Kurdistan, as well as, raising funds for refugees and IDPs in Kurdistan, and also many group and student participation to clean the mountains of Kurdistan. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Jul 9, 2013  TEDx Talks

Tara comes from one of the oldest living civilizations and indigenous people in the world, which today is under constant oppression and war, her ultimate goal is to make sure the Kurdish people don’t forget themselves so the world never forgets the Kurdish people. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

Dec 18, 2015  TEDx Talks

Joakim Medim is a freelance journalist who, among other things, documented the military coup in Honduras, covered the political development in Central America, Hungary and Turkey and specialized in the refugee crisis and the socio-political response in Lebanon. Medin tells the stories that have been untold and fight for media where it has been oppressed. In 2014, when he was covering the humanitarian crisis in Syria, Medin was arrested by the Syrian government and was kept in isolation in a 3-by-6-foot cell. After heavy interrogation he was moved to Damascus for further questioning. It was only after the intervention of Syrian Kurdish officials that Medin and his translator were finally released. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

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Hundreds of Whales Dead after Mass Stranding in New Zealand

Thanks to the New Zealand people who are helping the stranded whales at Farewell Spit in Golden Bay, New Zealand

Hundreds of whales dead after mass stranding in New Zealand

By Ben Westcott, CNN

Updated 8:55 AM ET, Fri February 10, 2017

(CNN)Desperate efforts are underway to save dozens of pilot whales still alive after hundreds stranded themselves on a New Zealand beach, in the third largest mass stranding in the country’s history.

At least 250 whales were already dead of 400 found beached on Farewell Spit in Golden Bay on the tip of the South Island Friday, the Department of Conservation said in a statement.

Rescuers attempted to refloat more than 100 whales mid-morning, of which about 50 returned to sea.

However, another 80 to 90 whales who were freed re-stranded themselves in the same place just five hours later, Inwood said.

Thanks to the New Zealand people who are helping the stranded whales at Farewell Spit in Golden Bay in New Zealand

Hundreds of volunteers have come out to help the pilot whiles, pictured here at high tide.

Volunteers swoop on site

Hundreds of locals turned out to help keep the whales cool.

“There’s like two to three hundred car loads of people who have come to help, maybe three to four hundred people,” Department of Conservation Community Ranger Kath Inwood told CNN.

Cheree Phillips @Chazza1014

Just arrived at #farewellspit for sunrise to find whale stranding. Utterly, utterly heartbreaking. #stranding #whales #nz

12:51 PM – 9 Feb 2017

According to Inwood, the area regularly saw beached whales and many residents were already trained in keeping the animals comfortable and helping to refloat them.

“Lots of people will be there pretty quick and already have the knowledge and training to help effectively,” she said.

Work will stop overnight for the safety of volunteers, who could be in danger around the large, stressed animals.

More than 400 pilot whales stranded themselves on a New Zealand beach on the evening of Thursday February 9.

‘This is a huge one’

The whales were first spotted in the water late on Thursday night, by a department staffer, before being found on Farewell Spit on Friday morning.

“Normally (they) are between November and March and it’s not many years we don’t have one. (But) obviously this is a huge one compared to most years … mostly they’re in ones and twos,” she said.

The largest whale stranding in New Zealand took place in 1918, when 1,000 whales stranded themselves on Chatham Islands.

The second largest was in Auckland in 1985, when 450 ended up on a beach.

“You don’t usually get this many traveling at once, we have 180 once before but I think a lot of (answers as to why) are unknown really,” Inwood said. “There’s a lot of different theories.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.cnn.com/2017/02/09/asia/new-zealand-whales-stranding/?iid=ob_article_organicsidebar_expansion

Hundreds of Whales Are Dead Following a Horrific Mass Stranding in New Zealand

George Dvorsky     Today 9:15am

 Image: AP

In what’s considered the largest mass stranding in decades, over 400

pilot whales have beached themselves on a New Zealand shore. Hundreds of whales died overnight, and rescuers are now frantically working to save the dozens of remaining whales who are clinging to life.

According to New Zealand’s Department of Conservation (DOC), 416 pilot whales had beached themselves at Farewell Spit in Golden Bay, at the northern tip of the country’s south island. When the DOC arrived on the scene, around 250 to 300 whales had already perished, and by the time dawn broke this morning, more than 70 percent of the whales were dead. DOC staff and dozens of volunteers are now trying to save the remaining 80 to 90 whales.

 Image: AP

For those trying to help, the sight must be truly horrific. Images from the scene show the beach littered with the large black-bodied corpses. The ones still alive are surrounded by rescue workers who are desperately trying to keep them cool, wet and and calm.

“It is one of the saddest things I have seen, that many sentient creatures just wasted on the beach,” noted volunteer rescuer Peter Wiles in The Guardian. The DOC has made a plea to the local community to come and help, and to provide towels, buckets, and sheets. Some rescuers have been working in the cold, wet conditions for upwards of nine hours straight. The response was incredible, and the DOC says no more volunteers are needed at this time.

The next opportunity to save the remaining whales is scheduled for noon tomorrow (Saturday) when the tide comes in. Frustratingly, the remaining whales were “refloated” at high tide earlier today (at about 10:30 am local time), but 90 of them came back and re-beached themselves. As social mammals, they were likely trying to stay close to their pod—the majority of which are now lying dead on the beach.

“We are trying to swim the whales out to sea and guide them but they don’t really take directions, they go where they want to go,” said DOC team leader in The Guardian. “Unless they get a couple of strong leaders who decide to head out to sea, the remaining whales will try and keep with their pod on the beach.”

New Zealand has one of the highest rates of whale strandings in the world; about 300 whales and dolphins beach themselves on the nation’s shorelines each year. Golden Bay is particularly conducive to strandings because of its shallow topography, which makes it difficult for whales to swim out once they’ve entered.

On top of that, pilot whales are notorious for stranding themselves. Entire groups of these whales will beach themselves on account of their strong social bonds. It’s possible that the whales got stuck when an old, sick, or injured whale got stranded, and its pod-mates swam to its aid. The stranding may also have something to do with the pilot whales’ compromised ability to use echo-location in shallow, gently sloping waters. These whales, which are the largest of the oceanic dolphins, prefer steep areas such as continental shelf edges. Farewell Spit, with its shallow waters, is a death trap.

This stranding is now considered the third largest in New Zealand’s recorded history. In 1918, over a thousand whales beached themselves on the Chatham Islands, and in 1985, 450 stranded themselves at Great Barrier Island off the coast of Auckland. Two years ago, 200 whales were killed in a mass stranding at Farewell Spit.

[DOC, Guardian]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://gizmodo.com/hundreds-of-whales-are-dead-following-a-horrific-mass-s-1792213145

Hundreds of whales die in mass stranding on New Zealand beach

Urgent plea issued for locals to drop work and school commitments and head to the remote beach to save surviving whales

Volunteers try to save whales at New Zealand beach after mass stranding

Eleanor Ainge Roy in Dunedin

@EleanorAingeRoy

Thursday 9 February 2017 22.52 ESTFirst published on Thursday 9 February 2017 17.47 EST

Rescuers are trying to save dozens of whales after a mass stranding on a New Zealand beach thought to be the largest in decades.

The Department of Conservation (DOC) discovered 416 pilot whales had beached themselves overnight at Farewell Spit in Golden Bay at the top of the South Island, with more than 70% dying by the time dawn broke on Friday.

DOC staff and dozens of volunteers were on hand on Friday morning trying to save the remaining 100 whales.

Peter Wiles, who was one of the first volunteers to reach Farewell Spit, told Fairfax New Zealand that the white bellies of the whale corpses were lined up on the sand and floating in the shallows. “It is one of the saddest things I have seen, that many sentient creatures just wasted on the beach.”

As the morning wore on, an urgent plea was issued for locals to drop work and school commitments and head to the remote beach to save the whales, bringing towels, buckets and sheets to keep them cool, calm and wet.

Andrew Lamason, a team leader for the DOC Takaka area, said the stranding was the largest in living memory, and although he had “no clue” why the whales had beached themselves this time, Golden Bay was conducive to strandings because of its shallow bay, which made it difficult for whales to swim out once they’d entered.

At high tide, at 10.30am, the 100 remaining whales were successfully refloated, but early in the afternoon at low tide 90 of them re-beached themselves. DOC staff and up to 500 volunteers are now focused on keeping the surviving whales as healthy as possible until the next high tide at lunchtime tomorrow.

Lamason said it was common for whales involved in a mass stranding to re-beach themselves, because they were social animals and would stay in close proximity to their pod, the majority of which were now lying dead on the beach.

“We are trying to swim the whales out to sea and guide them but they don’t really take directions, they go where they want to go. Unless they get a couple of strong leaders who decide to head out to sea, the remaining whales will try and keep with their pod on the beach.”

Lamason said whale strandings, which were common in Golden Bay, were an emotionally exhausting event and anyone who wasn’t fit and strong and equipped to cope with the trauma were advised to stay away from the beach and not participate in the rescue effort.

“It is cold, it’s wet and some of us have been in and out of the water for nine hours now, we can only cope with robust volunteers, not ones that are going to break down, which happens quite often.” he said.

“We are in the farthest corner of the universe here but now volunteers have started turning up en masse and there are hundreds of people here and they have brought food and supplies so they are prepared to be here all day and all night if needed.”

View image on Twitter

Farewell Spit in New Zealand. (Image: NASA)

 Cape Farewell is a headland in New Zealand 400 pilot whales who have become stranded at Farewell Spit in Golden Bay.

5:24 PM – 9 Feb 2017

Tony @Tonylean

The beach was still littered with the bodies of the nearly 300 dead pilot whales which died overnight, but plans for disposing of their bodies naturally at sea were on hold while rescuers “concentrated on the living”, Lamason said.

The stranding at Farewell Spit makes it the third largest whale stranding in New Zealand’s recorded history.

In 1918, 1,000 whales beached themselves on the Chatham Islands, and in 1985 450 stranded at Great Barrier Island off the coast of Auckland.

According to Project Jonah, a whale rescue group, New Zealand has one of the highest rates of whale strandings in the world, and on average about 300 whales and dolphins beach themselves on Kiwi shores every year.

The reasons for whales strandings are still unclear, but it is thought a combination of factors contribute, with old, sick and injured whales being particularly vulnerable. Navigational errors among pods are also common, especially when chasing food or coming close to shore to avoid predators such as orcas.

Since 1840, more than 5,000 whales and dolphins have beached themselves on New Zealand shores according to DOC records.

Strandings occur year round, but usually involve only one or two animals. DOC respond to about 85 events a year, usually involving just a single animal.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/feb/10/hundreds-whales-die-mass-stranding-new-zealand-beach

JamesKeye 

Direct causal evidence for this particular beaching may not be discoverable, but human action has been changing ocean chemistry, adding mechanical pollutants and turning the whole ocean into an acoustic combination hall-of-mirrors and shooting range for some time. Even if these activities are not the proximate cause of beaching, we’ve no right to destroy the ecological systems arrived at by billions of years of biophysical process….much less the sanctity of life there.

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