Black Lives  Matter, PBS News, USA TODAY, CNN, MSNBC, The Young Turks, DW News, Brian Tyler Cohen,  ET Canada,  The Daily Show, The New York Times, TED Talks and Wikipedia

PBS News:  July 2 -5, 2020, #WashWeekPBS Full Episode: President Trump’s Declaration of Grievance, Washington Week,  The #WashWeekPBS Bookshelf: “Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump”,  Why a ‘feverish’ Arctic will affect everyone on the globe, Opioids, Inc. (full film) | FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE PBS | Official, and Name Your Favorite Firework!

USA TODAY: John Bolton on his new book “The Room Where it Happened” – FULL INTERVIEW

CNN: US setting records as Covid-19 cases soar, Trump disregards public health warnings for speech at Mt. Rushmore, Stelter: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech won’t make sense to most people, GOP governor: The numbers are glaring warning signs,

 MSNBC: Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1, ‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden, Speaker Pelosi: ‘The President Himself Is A Hoax’ | Stephanie Ruhle, Cal Perry On The Scene In South Dakota Prior To The Arrival Of President Trump | All In, Epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch on the Risks Americans Face with Reopening | All In, Elijah McClain’s ‘Greatest Crime Was Walking Home While Being Black’ | Stephanie Ruhle, and From Breonna Taylor To Elijah McClain, Rev. Al Sharpton Clues In On Cases Of Police Brutality

 The Young Turks: District Attorney: No Injuries To Elijah McClain

 DW News: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore 4th of July speech: Protesters want to ‘wipe out our history’

 Brian Tyler Cohen:  Top Trump official goes OFF THE DEEP END on national TV over COVID outbreak

 CBS News: Photos show officers reenacting chokehold on Elijah McClain

 ET Canada: Celebs React To ‘Justice For Elijah McClain’

 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Jordan Klepper vs. Trump Supporters

 The New York Times: Our Weekend Briefing, July 4, 2020 bRemy Tumin and David Scull

TED Talks: Katherine Eban A dose of realit about generic drugs and Rebecca Onie What if our health care system kept us healthy

Wikipedia: The History of America’s Independence Day

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 5, 2020

Jul 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, July 5, Fourth of July weekend sees a spike in COVID-19 cases, Jeff Greenfield on President Trump’s campaign strategy, opioid overdose is a hidden epidemic during the pandemic, and, ‘superspreaders:’ what they are and how they’re worsening the spread of COVID, according to scientists researching the disease. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 4, 2020

Jul 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, July 4, Americans celebrate the holiday weekend amid a surge in COVID-19 cases and Black Lives Matter protests, criticism against Chicago police’s holiday weekend security plan, and an Israeli-Palestinian orchestra celebrates 20 years of intercultural harmony. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, July 3, 2020

Fundraiser

Jul 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. tops 50,000 new coronavirus infections for the second consecutive day as the Fourth of July weekend approaches. Plus: Hong Kong reels from China’s free speech crackdown, advertisers pressure Facebook to further regulate its content, a potential new name for the Washington, D.C., football team, Brooks and Capehart, a COVID-19 children’s book and in memoriam. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Khashoggi trial in absentia begins in Istanbul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjwAA… Cities struggle to keep residents compliant as virus surges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2lUq… Why this pro-democracy Hong Kong activist fled his home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6te5G… Will advertiser boycott force Facebook to change policy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuS1e… A tipping point for Washington, D.C., football team’s name https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fe1U… David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart on coronavirus failures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQe9T… A book that teaches children ‘Why We Stay Home’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGBDL… In memory of 5 more U.S. victims of the coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqTol… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

PBS NewsHour full episode, July 2, 2020

Fundraiser

Jul 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the U.S. sees a record 50,000 new COVID-19 cases in a day as infections rise in 40 states. Plus: Nurturing the U.S. economy without fueling the pandemic, Hong Kong’s crackdown continues, President Trump’s rhetoric on race, a new twist in the Jeffrey Epstein sex abuse saga, a family textile business adapts to change and a Brief But Spectacular take on empowering community. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: U.S. sees record 50,000 new virus cases in a day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNXJ7… Paul Romer on halting the pandemic to save the U.S. economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB6uW… What China’s Hong Kong crackdown says about Xi Jinping https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bTIH… Is Trump’s strategy of stoking racial tensions succeeding? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldUIj… How voters view Trump’s handling of racial unrest, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuc8M… Ghislaine Maxwell’s arrest yields new twist in Epstein saga https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cj3Qu… How the pandemic is reshaping American manufacturing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCVm0… A Chicago electrical worker on empowering her community https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA2kF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

John Bolton on his new book “The Room Where it Happened” – FULL INTERVIEW | USA TODAY

Premiered Jun 26, 2020

USA TODAY

John Bolton, the former national security adviser to President Donald Trump, talks with USA TODAY’s Washington Bureau chief Susan Page about his new book, “The Room Where It Happened.” RELATED: Watch Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma https://youtu.be/WcBTkokxAmc Bolton has gained national attention for his criticism of Donald Trump after spending nearly a year and half as the president’s top adviser on national security. Bolton continues his criticism and recounts for USA TODAY some instances in which he questioned Trump’s acumen, intelligence and dedication to issues of national security. Susan Page asks Bolton about the impeachment efforts led by House Democratic Party leadership, to which Bolton responds that he would have convicted Trump on Ukraine. But Bolton is not interested in supporting Joe Biden, or any other Democratic candidates in 2020. He plans to write-in a conservative of his own choosing. » Subscribe to USA TODAY: http://bit.ly/1xa3XAh » Watch more on this and other topics from USA TODAY: https://bit.ly/2VfvRjw » USA TODAY delivers current local and national news, sports, entertainment, finance, technology, and more through award-winning journalism, photos, videos and VR. #johnbolton #theroomwhereithappened #usatoday

#WashWeekPBS Full Episode: President Trump’s Declaration of Grievance

Jul 3, 2020  Washington Week

President Trump is speaking Friday night at Mount Rushmore, ahead of Independence Day.

The visit captures this president at this moment: turning to symbols from the past and rallying his base as his campaign faces mounting challenges. The panel also discussed reporting from multiple news organizations that Russia offered bounties to the Taliban to kill American and coalition troops in Afghanistan. Panel: Ayesha Rascoe of NPR, Weijia Jiang of CBS News, Peter Baker of The New York Times and Jonathan Swan of AXIOS

The #WashWeekPBS Bookshelf: “Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump”

Jul 3, 2020

Washington Week

On the Washington Week Extra, presidential historian Kate Andersen Brower discusses her newest book Team of Five: The President’s Club in the Age of Trump.

US setting records as Covid-19 cases soar

Jul 5, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Phil Mattingly looks into the latest numbers of the coronavirus pandemic as case counts continue to rise throughout the nation. #CNN #News

Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1 | MSNBC

Jul 2, 2020  MSNBC

Watch the top news stories and highlights from The Rachel Maddow Show, airing weeknights at 9 p.m. on MSNBC. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news and in-depth analysis of the headlines, as well as informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1 | MSNBC

Trump disregards public health warnings for speech at Mt. Rushmore

Jul 3, 2020  CNN

President Donald Trump will soon speak at Mt. Rushmore where masks are optional, and the crowd will not be social distancing. #CNN #News

Why a ‘feverish’ Arctic will affect everyone on the globe

Jun 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A historic heat wave is occurring in the Arctic, already the fastest-warming place on Earth due to the increasing accumulation of greenhouse gases. Dr. Merritt Turetsky, director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado Boulder, has studied the Arctic for decades. She joins William Brangham to discuss causes and consequences of the Arctic’s rising temperatures. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

Opioids, Inc. (full film) | FRONTLINE

Jun 18, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Pushing opioids. Bribing doctors. Making millions. FRONTLINE and the Financial Times investigate how Insys Therapeutics profited from a fentanyl-based painkiller up to 100 times stronger than morphine — and how some Wall Street investors looked the other way. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate “Opioids, Inc.” tells the inside story of how Insys profited from Subsys, a fast-acting fentanyl-based spray that’s been linked to hundreds of deaths. Tactics included targeting high-prescribing doctors and nurse practitioners known as “whales,” misleading insurers, and holding contests for the sales team: the higher the prescription doses they got doctors to write, the larger the cash prize — despite the dangers to patients. But as the documentary traces in unprecedented detail, the scheme fell apart: With federal prosecutors using anti-racketeering laws designed to fight organized crime, Insys became the first pharmaceutical company to have its CEOsentenced to prison timein federal courtin connection with the opioid crisis. #Opioids #OpioidCrisis #WallStreet Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp

‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden

Jul 4, 2020  MSNBC

Kristopher Purcell, a member of 43 Alumni for Biden, explains why hundreds of Republican ex-staffers under George W. Bush are coming together to endorse Joe Biden and says, “Donald Trump is a threat to our nation.”» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYo… Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc ‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden

Stelter: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech won’t make sense to most people

Jul 4, 2020  CNN

President Donald Trump used the backdrop of Mount Rushmore the night before the Fourth of July to deliver a speech to his base. CNN’s Brian Stelter examines the message of his speech. #CNN #News

GOP governor: The numbers are glaring warning signs

Jul 4, 2020  CNN

Experts are urging caution as Americans gather to celebrate the 4th of July. CNN’s Polo Sandoval reports. #CNN #News

Trump’s Mt. Rushmore 4th of July speech: Protesters want to ‘wipe out our history’

Jul 4, 2020  DW News

US President Donald Trump has kicked off Independence Day celebrations at an event in South Dakota. Fireworks lit up the sky over the Mount Rushmore monument which, in a controversial move, Trump chose as the venue for this year’s festivities. In a divisive speech, he criticized recent protests against racial injustice as “a merciless campaign to wipe out our history.” Trump made little reference to the coronavirus pandemic, though his speech came on a day the US saw another record rise in cases, with more than 57,000 new infections. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Trump #MountRushmore

Cal Perry On The Scene In South Dakota Prior To The Arrival Of President Trump | All In | MSNBC

Jul 3, 2020  MSNBC

MSNBC Correspondent Cal Perry is on the ground in South Dakota amidst protests for President Trump’s visit to mark the Fourth of July. Aired on 7/3/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube

Epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch on the Risks Americans Face with Reopening | All In | MSNBC

Jul 3, 2020   MSNBC

As coronavirus cases continue to grow across the country, Harvard epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch discusses the risks of reopening and trajectory of the spread. Aired on 7/3/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

Top Trump official goes OFF THE DEEP END on national TV over COVID outbreak

Jul 3, 2020  Brian Tyler Cohen

BREAKING: A top Trump official just went off the deep end on national TV over the COVID outbreak. Demand White House officials stop wasting time defending Trump’s lies, sign here ? http://odaction.com/btcwhlies Subscribe for more and follow me here: PODCAST: https://apple.co/36UvEHs (or search for “No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen” on your preferred podcast platform) TWITTER: https://twitter.com/briantylercohen INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/briantylerc… FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohen PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohen Please sign up for updates on my new projects below: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-up/ Sources: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-persp… https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/he… https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsand… https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/us-…

Photos show officers reenacting chokehold on Elijah McClain

Jul 3, 2020  CBS News

Several officers in Aurora, Colorado, have been fired over a photo that reenacted a chokehold their colleagues used on Elijah McClain, who died in police custody in 2019.

Celebs React To ‘Justice For Elijah McClain’

Jun 25, 2020  ET Canada

During “ET Canada Live”, Roz Weston, Graeme O’Neil and guest co-host Elamin Abdelmahmoud discuss the “Justice For Elijah McClain” call for action and the celeb reaction from Ellen DeGeneres and Klay Thompson. SUBSCRIBE to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ETCanada…

Elijah McClain’s ‘Greatest Crime Was Walking Home While Being Black’ | Stephanie Ruhle | MSNBC

Jun 26, 2020  MSNBC

Colorado’s governor has appointed a special prosecutor to investigate the death of Elijah McClain- 10 months after he died after an interaction with police. His family’s attorney Mari Newman joins Stephanie Ruhle to discuss the latest. Aired on 06/26/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc

District Attorney: No Injuries To Elijah McClain

Jun 26, 2020  The Young Turks

Colorado will investigate the death of Elijah McClain. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian discuss on The Young Turks. Keep Hope (and TYT) Alive: http://tyt.com/go Read more here: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti… “The Colorado governor has reopened the investigation into the death of Elijah McClain, who died after being placed in a chokehold by cops and being sedated with ketamine. Governor Jared Polis announced Thursday he has ordered prosecutors to reopen the inquiry into the black unarmed 23-year-old’s death after being ‘moved’ by speaking to the victim’s mother. He said the state ‘owe[s] it to his family to take this step’ and warned that charges could be brought against the officers involved – after the Colorado District Attorney earlier defended his decision not to charge the cops.” Hosts: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian Cast: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian

From Breonna Taylor To Elijah McClain, Rev. Al Sharpton Clues In On Cases Of Police Brutality

Jun 28, 2020  MSNBC

In this moment of protest, Rev. Al Sharpton gives an update on the individual cases that have sparked the new civil rights movement. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc About: MSNBC is the premiere destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, MSNBC offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Jordan Klepper vs. Trump Supporters | The Daily Show

Jul 4, 2020  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

What’s better than Jordan Klepper at a Trump rally? Here’s a compilation of his greatest hits: #TheDailyShow #JordanKlepper #TrevorNoah Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh… Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow Watch full episodes of The Daily Show for free: http://www.cc.com/shows/the-daily-sho… Follow Comedy Central: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentral Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentral Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentral About The Daily Show: Trevor Noah and The Daily Show correspondents tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture. The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.

The New York Times <nytdirect@nytimes.com> Our Weekend Briefing,

July 4, 2020

By Remy Tumin and David Scull

 

Good morning, and happy Independence Day.
We tend to pause at the end of December to recognize and reflect on the year’s most memorable moments. But six months into 2020, it feels as if we’ve already lived decades. And we still have a presidential election to get through.
The first three months of the year seem a distant memory, or as your Weekend Briefing writer likes to refer to it, “a time ago.” Here’s a recap of 2020 so far with some help from Times reporters and editors.

Abedin Taherkenareh/EPA, via Shutterstock
1. We started 2020 nearly going to war with Iran. Perhaps we should have taken that as a hint of the tumultuous year ahead.
Iran’s top security and intelligence commander was killed on Jan. 2 in a drone strike at Baghdad International Airport that President Trump authorized. Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani was the architect of nearly every significant operation by Iranian intelligence and military forces over the past two decades, claiming the lives of hundreds of Americans in Iraq.
General Suleimani’s killing propelled the U.S. to the precipice of war with Iran and plunged the world into seven days of roiling uncertainty. Online searches for “will there be a draft?” soared.
Earlier this week, Iran issued an arrest warrant for Mr. Trump and 35 others it says were involved in the general’s killing. Interpol, an international police organization, said it would not step in. — Remy
Doug Mills/The New York Times
2. Less than a week into the new year, John Bolton announced that he would be willing to testify in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.
It was a tantalizing prospect. Mr. Bolton, the former national security adviser, above in 2019, was privy to the inner workings of the White House. He was said to be deeply troubled by Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine, and had even written a memoir that, when it was finally released months later, divulged, as promised, much of the inside story.
The possibility of his testimony — and of an outcome that wasn’t a party-line acquittal — hung over the trial for weeks. But Republicans, who had endured countless hours of damaging testimony during the House investigation, had no interest in changing the rules of the trial to allow new witnesses.
The Senate voted against hearing from Mr. Bolton, and days later voted to acquit Mr. Trump. — Tom Wright-Piersanti, Briefings editor
Jordan Gale for The New York Times
3. From the beginning, it was always Joe Biden.
Sure, his chances of winning the Democratic presidential nomination looked shaky after devastating early defeats in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada. But his staunch support among Black voters powered a comeback in South Carolina. The one-two-three punch of support from Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Beto O’Rourke led to blowout victories on Super Tuesday, effectively spelling the beginning of the end of the competition.
Still, a primary field more than two dozen strong was nothing if not historic. The most women ever to run for president. The biggest age gap. The most racially diverse field. The first openly gay major presidential candidate.
But after three years of President Trump, Democratic voters proved themselves to be tired of the unprecedented. In 2020, the pragmatic outweighed the possible. — Lisa Lerer, political reporter
Tolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
4. It was the breakup heard around the world.
Prince Harry and Meghan delivered a jarring blow to Britain’s royal family when they announced on Jan. 8 that they would “step back” from their official duties. It was an extraordinary retreat by the couple, who had grown increasingly isolated within the House of Windsor since their wedding in 2018.
The couple did not originally have the queen’s approval for their plan to become part-time royals, and went rogue to get ahead of a leak. A deal with Buckingham Palace, which included giving up their royal titles, became official on March 31. Above, their last royal appearance.
They now live in Los Angeles with their son, Archie. — Remy
Jenna Schoenefeld for The New York Times
5. Kobe Bryant’s death in a helicopter crash plunged the N.B.A. — and seemingly much of the world — into a state of mourning that persists among the many fans and fellow athletes who idolized him.
The former Los Angeles Lakers star, 41, and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, were among nine people who died in the Jan. 26 accident, which occurred in foggy conditions on a hillside outside of Los Angeles.
Public memorials sprang up overnight, including one in the plaza outside Staples Center, the arena where Bryant had crafted so many singular moments for the Lakers over the course of his 20-year career. — Scott Cacciola, N.B.A. reporter

Brittainy Newman/The New York Times
6. A landmark #MeToo victory.
On March 11, Harvey Weinstein, the glorified producer who for years dominated Hollywood, was sentenced to 23 years in prison for sex crimes, effectively putting the 67-year-old behind bars for the rest of his life.
His sentencing capped a sharp downfall for the once-powerful media mogul that started in October 2017 when several women openly accused him of sexual assault and harassment, and fundamentally altered the perception of sex crimes and power dynamics. — Alisha Haridasani Gupta, gender reporter
Victor Moriyama for The New York Times
7. It first appeared in The Times on Jan. 6 as a “mysterious, pneumonialike illness” that had sickened a few dozen people in Wuhan, China.
Days later, Chinese researchers identified the source as a coronavirus. Two weeks later, the virus was on the front page of The Times as China scrambled to contain the contagion.
Then, time seemed to accelerate. Once-in-a-generation events began erupting one after the next.
Professional sports leagues around the world suspended seasons. Stocks plunged and a bear market emerged after 11 years in bull territory. The World Health Organization declared the virus a global pandemic. President Trump cut off travel from Europe.
And that was just March 11.
More than 10.9 million people have been sickened worldwide and more than half a million have died. Above, gravediggers in São Paulo, Brazil. In the U.S., the country hit hardest by the virus, a surge in new cases shows that the outbreak is spiraling out of control. And from what we can tell, the virus will most likely be with us for some time. — Jonathan Wolfe, Briefings writer
The New York Times
8. A pandemic does strange things to the economy.
The sharp, sudden drop in activity has produced one of the deepest recessions in history, and also perhaps the shortest. Indeed, it may already be over: The upswing in May and June, measured against the depths of March and April, make a range of economic indicators look as if they are soaring.
But compared with a year earlier, those same numbers reveal an economy that remains deep in a hole, with millions of jobs destroyed and billions in sales lost. The damage done will take a long time to repair, and reopenings that have been paused or rolled back may make things worse. — Jason Karaian, DealBook editor

9. Everything from work to theater moved online.
Sex work and sex content make an intriguing leading indicator about where both work and entertainment consumption are going.
This year we saw that our unhappy surprise always-at-home culture made opportunities of all kinds, for the kind of professional streaming sex performers pictured above, amateur dancers and entrepreneurs alike.
That will trickle down! Contributing strongly to that? More and more time spent online, the vast majority of that in apps. If you’re not watching TikTok and Instagram and listening to podcasts in the ways that we used to watch CBS and read Condé Nast magazines, the world is leaving you behind, sir or madam! (Fair, that may be a good choice.) — Choire Sicha, Styles editor
Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi for The New York Times
10. Which brings us to the current national unrest.
On Memorial Day, a graphic video captured the police killing of a Black man suspected of using a counterfeit $20 bill. What followed may be the largest movement in U.S. history.
George Floyd died after a white officer knelt on Mr. Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes, ignoring his pleas of “I can’t breathe.” The phrase has been a part of scores of deaths in police custody, but this time, national outrage crested over the use of deadly police restraints and the treatment of African-Americans, sparking a deep examination of the country’s racist past and present.
It manifested in Black Lives Matter protests around the world, including the one above in New York City, with chants of Mr. Floyd’s name along with Breonna TaylorAhmaud ArberyRayshard Brooks and more; in corporate companies confronting enduring forms of racial discrimination; in the removal of statues and Confederate flags; and in police reform.
“A truly great country does not ignore or excuse its sins. It confronts them and then works to make them right,” Nikole Hannah-Jones wrote in The Times Magazine in her case for reparations. “If we are to be redeemed, if we are to live up to the magnificent ideals upon which we were founded, we must do what is just.”
If you’re celebrating this weekend, stay safe. You can find the full text of the Declaration of Independence here.
Did a friend forward you the briefing? You can sign up here.
What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.
Browse our full range of Times newsletters here.

Investigative journalist Katherine Eban set out to report on a seemingly straightforward question: Are generic drugs really identical to their brand-name counterparts? The answer sparked a decade of interviews, meetings with whistleblowers, on-the-ground reporting across four continents and digging into confidential FDA documents. In this alarming talk, she takes us inside overseas manufacturing plants and exposes the fraud behind many low-cost generic medicines.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Katherine Eban · Investigative journalist

Katherine Eban’s articles on pharmaceutical counterfeiting, gun trafficking and coercive interrogations by the CIA have won international attention.

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Dangerous Doses: A True Story of Cops, Counterfeiters, and the Contamination of America’s Drug Supply

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Mariner Books (2006)

Rebecca Onie asks audacious questions: What if waiting rooms were a place to improve daily health care? What if doctors could prescribe food, housing and heat in the winter? At TEDMED she describes Health Leads, an organization that does just that — and does it by building a volunteer base as elite and dedicated as a college sports team.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rebecca Onie · Health innovator

Rebecca Onie is a nationally recognized leader in the intersection of social determinants, population health and health care delivery

MORE RESOURCES  FURTHER READING

Progress amidst large shifts in the US healthcare system

More funding and increased interest in addressing patients’ nonmedical needs has helped Rebecca Onie’s organization expand. Read more at the TEDMED blog.

More at blog.tedmed.com ?

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Join the movement for better healthcare with Health Leads.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Day_(United_States)

The History of America’s Independence Day and Name Your Favorite Firework!

 Photo of the “original Rough draught” of the Declaration of Independence courtesy of the Library of Congress.

“Taxation without representation!” was the battle cry in America’s 13 Colonies, which were forced to pay taxes to England’s King George III despite having no representation in the British Parliament. As dissatisfaction grew, British troops were sent in to quell the early movement toward rebellion. Repeated attempts by the Colonists to resolve the crisis without military conflict proved fruitless.

On June 11, 1776, the Colonies’ Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and formed a committee whose express purpose was drafting a document that would formally sever their ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, crafted the original draft document (as seen above). A total of 86 changes were made to his draft and the Continental Congress officially adopted the final version on July 4, 1776.

The following day, copies of the Declaration of Independence were distributed, and on July 6, The Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first newspaper to print the extraordinary document. The Declaration of Independence has since become our nation’s most cherished symbol of liberty.

Bonfires and Illuminations

On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

In June of 1826, Thomas Jefferson sent a letter to Roger C. Weightman, declining an invitation to come to Washington, D.C. to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It was the last letter that Jefferson, who was gravely ill, ever wrote. In it, Jefferson says of the document:

“May it be to the world, what I believe it will be … the signal of arousing men to burst the chains … and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form, which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. …For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.”

– Thomas Jefferson
June 24, 1826 Monticello

Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870, and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a paid holiday for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, firework displays, picnics and performances of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa.

http://www.pbs.org/a-capitol-fourth/fireworks-fun/firework-names/

Name Your Favorite Firework!

Each year A Capitol Fourth strives to bring you the best fireworks display of any July Fourth celebration. But, did you know there are more than a dozen different types of aerial fireworks? Here are 10 examples of the pyrotechnics that you might see at this year’s celebration.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Peony

The most common type of firework, the peony shell is characterized by a spherical break of colored stars that burn without generating a trail of sparks, or tail effect.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Chrysanthemum

Similar to a peony, a chrysanthemum has a spherical break of colored stars, though its stars leave behind a trail of sparks.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Willow

The willow resembles a chrysanthemum, but with long burning silver or gold stars that produce a soft, dome-shaped weeping willow-like effect.

Diadem

As a type of peony or chrysanthemum, a diadem has a cluster of stationary stars at its center.

Palm

This shell contains a few large comet stars, which in bursting create large tendrils that give it the appearance of a palm tree.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Crossette

A crossette produces stars that each break apart into four smaller stars, creating a crisscross effect.

Horsetail

The horsetail shell is identifiable by its break, which resembles a short tail.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Ring

A ring shell emits stars in a halo-like shape. Smiley faces, stars and other such identifiable shapes are common variants.

Roman Candle

A Roman candle is a long cylinder that can discharge either a single large star or a series of them between short intervals.

Photo courtesy of Matt Buck via Wikimedia Commons.

Cake

With a fuse that sets off a variety of effects in succession, a cake is essentially many Roman candles fused together. Cakes vary widely in size, though some can contain over 1,000 shots.

Photo courtesy of KSDigital via Wikimedia Commons.

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