PBS News, NBC News, NOVA PBS, National Geographic, and DW Documentary

PBS News, NBC News, NOVA PBS, National Geographic, and DW Documentary

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

NBC News: Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

National Geographic: COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

DW Documentary: Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives?, Can viruses be beneficial? and Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

Oct 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, employment numbers in the United States fall short of expectations as workers continue to leave their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Then, the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to news editors from Russia and the Philippines for their reporting in the face of political repression. And, David Brooks and Karen Tumulty consider the week in politics. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Biden to send Trump records to Jan. 6 committee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQdO7… Why so many U.S. workers quit their job during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNwfu… Why the Nobel Peace Prize was won by to 2 journalists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1pNx… Fiona Hill reflects on Trump presidency, opportunity in U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZhSE… Brooks and Tumulty on debt ceiling, Jan. 6 investigation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwWe6… Bill T. Jones’ new work explores collective American ‘we’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G9JR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

Oct 8, 2021  NBC News

U.S. added 194,000 jobs in September, unemployment rate down, two parents convicted in college admissions scandal trial, and combat medics unite after forming special connection a decade ago. 00:00 Intro 02:01 Major Jobs Setback 04:36 Mandate Battles 07:36 College Admissions Conviction 10:04 Biden – Trump Showdown 14:05 Travel Price Warning 18:28 Those Who Serve » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

 

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

BY SUKEE BENNETT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2021 NOVA NEXT

The winning image of the Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition shows a southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels. Image credit: Jason Kirk, Baylor College of Medicine

The winners of the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition, which aims to showcase “the beauty and complexity of life as seen through the light microscope,” were announced today.

This is the 47th year of the photo competition, which is open to anyone with an interest in microscopy—the use of microscopes to view samples and objects—and photography. This year the contest received almost 1,900 entries from 88 countries. A panel of five judges* evaluated the entries for originality, informational content, technical proficiency, and visual impact, Nikon reported. The results of the sister video competition, Small World In Motion, were announced last month.

Here are this year’s top 10 images:

A southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels photographed by Jason Kirk, a professional imager and core director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core. Kirk used a custom-made microscope system to take around 200 individual images of the leaf, which he stacked together to create this image, Nikon reports.

Trichomes, stomata, and vessels are all “essential to plant life,” Nikon writes. Trichomes, fine outgrowths that protect a plant from extreme weather and insects, are featured in white. “In purple, Jason highlights the stomata, small pores that regulate the flow of gases in a plant. Colored in cyan are the vessels that transport water throughout the leaf,” Nikon said in a statement.

  1. Networking neurons in microfluidic device

Image credit: Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen, Dementia Research Centre, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia

This image is of a microfluidic device, which contains 300,000 networking neurons divided into two isolated populations (left and right) bridged by axons (center). The isolated populations were each treated with a unique virus, Nikon reports. The image was taken at 40X magnification by Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen of Macquarie University’s Dementia Research Centre in New South Wales, Australia, using fluorescence imaging, which uses high-intensity illumination to excite fluorescent molecules in a sample. “When a molecule absorbs photons, electrons are excited to a higher energy level,” Nikon writes. “As electrons ‘relax’ back to the ground-state, vibrational energy is lost and, as a result, the emission spectrum is shifted to longer wavelengths.”

  1. Rear leg, claw and respiratory trachea of a louse

Image credit: Frank Reiser, Nassau Community College, New York

A rear leg, claw, and respiratory trachea of a louse, a wingless parasitic insect, at 5X magnification taken by Frank Reiser, a biologist at Nassau Community College in New York. Reiser used darkfield micrography, which “creates contrast in transparent unstained specimens” and “depends on controlling specimen illumination so that central light which normally passes through and around the specimen is blocked,” Nikon writes, and image stacking to produce this image.

  1. Embryonic rat neuron

Image credit: Paula Diaz, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

A sensory neuron from an embryonic rat taken by Paula Diaz, a physiologist at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in Santiago, Chile. Diaz took the image at 10X magnification and used fluorescence imaging to produce it.

  1. Housefly proboscis

Image credit: Oliver Dum, Medienbunker Produktion, Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany

A proboscis of a housefly (Musca domestica) taken by Oliver Dum of Medienbunker Produktion in Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany. Dum took the image at 40X magnification and assembled it using image stacking.

  1. Mouse brain vasculature

Image credit: Dr. Andrea Tedeschi, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University

3D vasculature of an adult mouse brain taken by Dr. Andrea Tedeschi of Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Tedeschi took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging, which involves scanning a specimen to create extremely thin (down to 250 nanometer thickness) computer-generated optical sections using visible light, to create it.

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  1. Tick head

Image credit: Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley, Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility

Head of a tick taken by Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley of Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility in Columbus, Ohio. Zhang and Stoodley took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging to produce it.

  1. Mouse intestine

Image credit: Dr. Amy Engevik, Medical University of South Carolina

Cross section of a mouse intestine taken at 10X magnification using fluorescence imaging by Dr. Amy Engevik of the Medical University of South Carolina’s Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology in Charleston, South Carolina.

  1. Water flea

Image credit: Jan van IJken, Jan van IJek Photography & Film, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

A water flea (Daphnia) carrying embryos and ciliated vase-shaped protozoans called peritrichs taken at 10X magnification using image stacking and darkfield microscopy by Jan van IJken of Jan van IJek Photography & Film in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

  1. Butterfly wing

Image credit: Sebastien Malo, Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France

Vein and scales on a Morpho didius butterfly wing taken at 20X magnification using image stacking and reflected light photography by Sebastien Malo of Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France.

*NOVA Science Editor Robin Kazmier was a judge in this year’s competition.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/nikon-small-world-photography-winners-2021-/

 

National Geographic

A medical student gives a woman a blood glucose test to check possible diabetes at a screening post in Alameda Dom Afonso Henriques during the COVID-19 pandemic on May 29, 2021 in Lisbon, Portugal.

PHOTOGRAPH BY HORACIO VILLALOBOS, CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

In addition to driving new cases of diabetes, the virus may be directly damaging the pancreas in ways that could lead to chronic inflammation and even cancer.

BYAMY MCKEEVER

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 8, 2021

Almost daily microbiologist Peter Jackson receives emails from people who recovered from COVID-19 only to discover that their health troubles have just begun.

Recently, a mother of two in her 30s wrote to the Stanford University professor to say that she now takes a slew of diabetes medications every day—even though she hadn’t been at risk for the disease before her coronavirus infection.

Experts have known since the beginning of the pandemic that having diabetes—a condition when the body doesn’t make enough insulin or use it well enough to counteract a rise in blood sugar—is a risk factor for more severe COVID-19 infections. But they have also long suspected that the inverse might be true as well. In May, Jackson published a study in the journal Cell Metabolism showing that SARS-CoV-2 infects cells in the pancreas that produce insulin and may even target and destroy them—suggesting that the virus may also cause diabetes. (Why scientists began investigating the link between COVID-19 and diabetes.)

“This is a real thing,” Jackson says of the complaints from newly diabetic people that have flooded his inbox. Although some experts argue that the condition is rare, Jackson says the data suggests that in 2020 as many as 100,000 people were diagnosed with an unexpected case of diabetes.

He is one of many scientists who worry there could be a new wave of diabetes patients who will have to monitor their blood sugar levels for the rest of their lives. But he and his colleagues are also concerned that the virus may be harming the pancreas in ways that may not be visible now but could one day have troubling implications for the organ itself and for the rest of the digestive system.

“This could be a pandemic in a pandemic,” says Paolo Fiorina, a professor of endocrinology at the University of Milan and lecturer at Harvard Medical School, who has also spearheaded investigations into the connection between COVID-19 and diabetes.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-many-ways-covid-19-seems-to-be-harming-the-pancreas?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=SpecialEdition_20211008::rid=B26F10713FF3E74BB579E77159591C7D

Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives? | DW Documentary

Oct 7, 2021  DW Documentary

What can animals’ emotions tell us about ourselves? This documentary takes us on a fascinating journey into the lives of the great apes. Did you know that chimpanzees wage war? Not only that, but they also show compassion, engage in cooperative behavior, and value fairness and reciprocity. Chimpanzees reconcile after fights, and comfort each other. Chimpanzee communities also have customs and traditions that vary from tribe to tribe. All this begs the question: are things like morality and culture solely human achievements? This documentary takes us into one of the last great wildernesses of West Africa – the mountainous jungles of Nigeria – and shows footage of chimpanzees in the wild. What is the significance of the mysterious stone piles left by chimpanzees near trees or in hollows? Are they a form of religion? How intelligent are our closest relatives in the animal kingdom? In what kinds of societies did our common ancestors live? And where does the phenomenon of xenophobia come from? #documentary #freedocumentary #chimpanzees ______

Can viruses be beneficial? | DW Documentary

Aug 7, 2021  DW Documentary

Viruses can be fatal, but some viruses can in fact be life-sustaining. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has killed large numbers of people during the current pandemic. But humans wouldn’t exist without viruses. How can they benefit us? Viruses aren’t living beings, yet they have had a great influence on evolution. Some viral elements have embedded themselves into the human genome and reproduce along with us – so-called endogenous retroviruses. One type of virus helps form the placenta, for example, while other viruses attack harmful bacteria. Viruses also maintain balance in marine ecosystems, curbing the growth of algae and attacking bacteria that are harmful to sea animals. Soon, viruses may even replace antibiotics in fish farming. Thousands of viruses have already been sequenced, including Ebola, Zika and bird flu. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world, with a mortality rate of up to 90%. But experts see greater danger in the less deadly diseases like Spanish flu and COVID-19: Because they spread much further, they kill more people overall. Viruses can also be used to create vaccines. In Rome, the shell of a virus found in gorilla feces has been used as a vector for the COVID-19 vaccine, turning a pathogen into a life-saving drug. __

Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis | DW Documentary

Oct 5, 2021  DW Documentary

Extreme weather is occurring more frequently worldwide. Rising sea levels and heavy rain are causing devastating floods. Most researchers agree that these are the consequences of climate change. But what can we do to protect ourselves? In July 2021, the Ahr Valley in western Germany was hit by a flash flood after heavy rainfall. Over 100 people were killed, thousands of homes were severely damaged. Experts are calling it the ‘flood of the century’. Yet extreme weather events such as the Ahr Valley floods have become more frequent in recent years – not only in Germany but worldwide. Mozambique has been hit by devastating cyclones for the third year running. In Bangladesh, the monsoon season has become heavier and more unpredictable due to climate change. More and more land has been flooded as a result. At the same time, heavy storms that cause flooding and rising sea levels threaten the south of the country. Experts estimate that 30 per cent of Bangladesh will be permanently flooded in a few years, making millions of people climate refugees. Wealthy countries such as Germany are now investing billions in the battle against the floods. The Netherlands have long pioneered in flood management, building powerful pumping stations, ever higher dikes and flood barriers. None of these options are available to poor countries. All they can do, along with improving early flood warning systems, is to resettle the people affected. The film ‘Global Climate Crisis – How to Tackle the floods?’ shows the unequal fight against the consequences of climate change with examples from Germany, the Netherlands, Bangladesh, and Mozambique. #documentary #flooding #climatechange #extremeweather ______

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Ing’s Street Art, My Little Red Shoes, Elephant Bath, In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace, and U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction Part 2

Ing’s Street Art, “My Little Red Shoes”, “Elephant Bath”, “In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”, and “U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction”

Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Part 2

 In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

 In the midst of trouble

Global warming

Causes the fires in California and elsewhere

 

The weather turns more violence

Hurricane Ida caused destruction in Haiti

Louisiana and other places in its path to the North East

 

Strong winds, rain and floods

Whole cities had to evacuate

Millions homeless caused by the nature

 

What causes nature to be violent?

Who causes Global warming?

 

Humans blame nature

Causing the destruction

 

No one can be blamed but ourselves

 

Let us start again

To care for Nature

for our lives now

And generations to come

  

Where can I Find Peace Street?

 

I got lost.

 

Where do you want to go?

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I can find my mother

Father and my family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I am happy

To see a peaceful Village

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children have a joyful time

With parents and family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children are not afraid

Or cry for food

And no place to stay

 

I want to go to Peace Street

where everyone is happy

No fighting

No disaster

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no weapons produced

And sold to kill each other

For profit and wealth

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no corrupt politicians

And greedy rich people who keep

Everything for themselves

Leaving non for the poor

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where people are kind

And helpful to one another

 

I want to go to Peace Street

To see beautiful nature

With no pollution

Clean oceans

With all the creatures

Living happily

 

Can you direct me to Peace Street?

I got lost

I am hungry

Where are my mother, father,

my husband, my daughter, my grandsons

and the others in my family?

I miss them

I am lonely

 

Please help to direct me to Peace Street

My life is short

I am lost

Where I can find Peace Street on Earth

I woke up this morning.  I felt sad, thinking about my family and other unfortunate people.  Biden had a policy to deport Haitian people who suffered in their country.  Most immigrants want to have an opportunity to work for survival of their families.  It is cruel to send people back to suffer and die while politicians try to find a way to gain credit for their future election to office.


Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, September 25, 2021

 

U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction

 

Low-income people have difficulty to survive

Even to have enough money to buy food

 To feed themselves and their children

 

A few days ago, a report from the news media stated that

700,000 people in the US died from COVID-19

 

The epidemic of the virus may cause some people not to get jobs

Especially families that have children

No money to pay rent

 

Thanks to an eviction moratorium policy

From Biden’s administration

 Landlords were prevented from evicting families

 

This policy to help the poor

Is just a drop of water to quench the thirst

Of dying families

 

Now! Six Republican Supreme Court Justice Appointees

Declared that landlords can evict poor families

That cannot pay rent

 

Millions of poor families

With children are going to be homeless

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic

Powerful people receive

Benefits and salary from the tax payers of the country

 

These people use their power to cause the poor

Who cannot get jobs because the COVID-19 epidemic

To suffer even more than they were facing before

 

“Where is the justice?”

I want to ask these six Justices of the Supreme Court  

If it makes you happy to see children and their parents suffer?

These poor families who have difficulty to feed children and themselves

Now have no home to stay

 

Where is your humanity?

Where is your empathy toward the poor?

Where is your kindness for the poor?

Where is your morality toward these citizens?

We, the citizens of the country

Especially the unfortunate poor and homeless

 Who has no voice

Ask the Six Republican Appointed Justices of the Supreme Court

The above questions

 

What were you thinking when you made your decision?

You represent the Supreme Court of the land

 Are happy now that you have

Paid back the favor to billionaires that appointed you

To the Throne of Justice?

 

It is sad to see these humans

These so-called Supreme Court Justices walk the earth

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

Where I can find Peace?

I could not control my tears for the evicted families

My heart is aching to hear such an order from this group of

United State Supreme Court Justices

 

Let me calm down

At least for my recording of the event

Let it be etched into history for future

Generations to learn

To cultivate the next generation

To be kind human beings

helping the unfortunate who

Suffer more than they

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

I will calm myself

Get back to my garden

And continue doing my artwork

 

At least my minuscule contributions

Brings happiness to the others

 

Hearing people pass my little garden

And artwork saying

“The flowers are beautiful”

And commenting

“You changed your artwork.

I like the children in your painting”

 

“The painting is called, My Little Red Shoes”

I respond

  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, October 2, 2021

 

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996. 

Daily Mail:

Supreme Court says letting the Biden administration keep the eviction moratorium in place could open the door to mandates for ‘free grocery delivery for the sick and vulnerable and free computers to let Americans work from home’

  • Conservatives on the Supreme Court said extending eviction moratoriums could lead to government mandates on ‘free grocery delivery and free computers’ 
  • ‘Could the CDC mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads from the six conservatives on the court
  • ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free Internet?’
  • The Supreme Court voted 6-3 to block the eviction moratorium, allowing landlord to kick out renters who haven’t paid rent in the midst of the pandemic
  • Argued that preventing landlords from evicting tenants who breach their leases strips them of their ‘right to exclude’  
  • The six conservative justices elected to end the eviction freeze from the CDC and the three liberals justices voting it should stay
  • Said the CDC overextended its authority in imposing the moratorium 

By KATELYN CARALLE, U.S. POLITICAL REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM  and AP

PUBLISHED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021 | UPDATED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021

Conservatives on the Supreme Court said that allowing the eviction moratorium to continue could set a precedent for government mandated ‘free grocery delivery’ and ‘free internet’ for people to work from home.

‘Preventing [landlords] from evicting tenants who breach their leases intrudes on one of the most fundamental elements of property ownership—the right to exclude,’ the majority opinion reads from the Thursday decision.

The court’s decision will allow for landlords to evict tenants who have not paid rent in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Questioned in the unsigned opinion from the six conservative justices was hypothetical situations for how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could overreach its authority in the future, as they claim it did so in extending the moratorium.

‘Could the CDC, for example, mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads. ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free high-speed Internet service to facilitate remote work?’

All this to say, the court feels that the CDC cannot decide for the sake of public health that other aspects of business can be impacted, like preventing landlords from collecting rent.

They also claim that congressional action is needed to extend the moratorium.

The Supreme Court elected to end the national eviction moratorium in a 6-3 vote on Thursday, claiming it would lead to a precedent of mandated ‘free grocery delivery for the sick’ or ‘free computers and internet’ to work from home

The decision again exhibited the power Republicans have with the court’s 6-3 conservative majority, which is now allowing evictions to resume across the U.S. as it blocks the Biden administration from continuing to enforce a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The vote was split by party line with conservatives John Roberts, Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett voting to end the eviction moratorium, and liberals Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan voting to keep it.

The justices said in an unsigned opinion Thursday that the CDC, which reimplemented the moratorium on August 3, lacked the authority to do so under federal law without explicit congressional authorization.

‘It would be one thing if Congress had specifically authorized the action that the CDC has taken,’ the court wrote. ‘But that has not happened. Instead, the CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination. It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts.’

Real estate groups in Georgia and Alabama had argued this point and told the high court that the moratorium caused property owners across the nation significant financial hardships, USA Today reports.

Property owners had to continue to pay expenses while not receiving payments from renters. They were also banned from evicting nightmare tenants, who were given free reign to make their neighbors’ lives a misery.

Court said the CDC did not have the power to extend the moratorium. Housing advocates protest on August 4 to allow the eviction moratorium to continue in New York

As of August 25, nearly 90 per cent of the federal funds meant to help landlords make up for the loss of funds had not been distributed, the U.S. Treasury Department said in a statement.

Roughly 3.5 million people in the United States said they faced eviction in the next two months, according to Census Bureau data from early August.

After the Thursday ruling, several progressive lawmakers pleaded with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to act with the ‘highest levels of urgency’ to combat evictions.

The lawmakers asked the leaders in a Friday letter to work to revive the national eviction moratorium after the Supreme Court ruled congressional action is needed.

‘Millions of people who are currently at risk for eviction, housing insecurity, or face becoming unhoused desperately look to their elected representatives to implement legislation that will put their health and safety first and save lives,’ the letter reads.

The effort was led by Representative Ayanna Pressley and signed on by more than 60 Democrats, including fellow ‘squad’ members Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Cori Bush.

Bush, who was once homeless before running for office, led protesters in sleeping outside the Capitol earlier this summer when the moratorium faced its end before the CDC expanded it.

The Supreme Court had originally allowed the eviction freeze to continue to July in a 5-4 vote, but Kavanaugh, who voted to keep it, indicated that he would vote against any further extension.

Roberts followed suit and voted against the moratorium with Kavanagh on Thursday.

In his dissenting opinion, Breyer asserted that the court should not end the moratorium on an expedited basis.

‘Applicants raise contested legal questions about an important federal statute on which the lower courts are split and on which this court has never actually spoken,’ Breyer wrote. ‘These questions call for considered decision making, informed by full briefing and argument. Their answers impact the health of millions.’

The national eviction freeze was set in place at the start of the pandemic and continued on until July, when the Supreme Court previously upheld it in a 5-4 vote

The Biden administration’s extension of the eviction moratorium was heralded by members the ‘the Squad,’ including U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who had celebrated the announcement earlier this month.

She and fellow Democratic congress woman Cori Bush had demonstrated outside the Capitol in protest of the moratorium’s original deadline at the start of August.

Bush was hailed as a key figure who pushed Biden and his administration to extend the deadline after five continuous days of protest, tweeting about her accomplishment.

‘Squad’ member Ilhan Omar also acknowledged Bush’s efforts in spearheading the moratorium extension, The Hill reported.

U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, a fellow democrat from California who sponsored a House bill to extend the eviction freeze, also thanked Biden ‘from the bottom of my heart and on behalf of millions of renters.

‘This extension of the moratorium is the lifeline that millions of families have been waiting for. From the very beginning of this pandemic, it was clear that eviction moratoriums not only kept people housed, but also saved lives,’ Waters said in a statement.

A group of Democratic lawmakers wrote a letter to Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer urging them to act congressionally to extend the moratorium after the Supreme Court said the CDC overreached 

This was the second high court loss for the administration this week at the hands of the court’s conservative majority.

On Tuesday, the court effectively allowed the reinstatement of a Trump-era policy forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their hearings.

The new administration had tried to end the Remain in Mexico program, as it is informally known.

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court voted the same way to strike down part of New York’s eviction moratorium.

In the same 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled against allowing COVID-19 hardships to stand as a reason to ban landlords from kicking out tenants. The state’s rules allowed renters to simply state they’d suffered financial hardship and avoid eviction without providing any evidence.

New Yorkers renting apartments will also now no longer be able to stay in homes they’ve stopped paying rent on by claiming that doing so would endanger their health.

The pause on evictions expires at the end of August, meaning people could start getting kicked out of their apartments by the end of this month.

Incoming Governor Kathy Hochul criticized Thursday’s ruling, saying that she and state lawmakers would work to try and reinforce the moratorium.

Both parts of the law that have been cut were enacted when COVID decimated many of New York’s biggest industries – including hospitality and travel – leaving people who worked in them fearful of being made homeless.

The state has since largely reopened, and its economy appears to be on the path to recovery.

Demonstrators protesting evictions are arrested by NYPD

Eviction moratorium finally set to expire 18 months after it was created amid COVID first wave

The national eviction moratorium was put in place last September by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide aid for those struggling from the economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020.

The moratorium was supposed to end in December, but Congress voted to extend it until January 2021.

The Biden administration then pushed the deadline further, once in January and then again in March.

Although the moratorium was set to expire at the end of July, the spread of the delta variant and summer spikes in COVID-19 cases continued to leave millions vulnerable.

Data showed that in July, roughly 3.6 million people would face evictions by September if the moratorium was halted, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision to allow the deadline to extend one final time until the end of July.

The pressure came as landlords and property owners grieved over the loss of income rent while the federal aid set aside for them trickled in at a snail’s pace.

Of the $47 billion in rental assistance that was supposed to go to help tenants pay off months of rent, only about 10% has been distributed as of Aug. 25.

Some states like New York have distributed almost nothing, while several have only approved a few million dollars.

After weeks of protests to extend the eviction moratorium were held at the Capitol, the Biden administration extended the deadline one more time into August.

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who voted to extend the deadline to July, had warned that he would switch his vote if the administration tried extending it again.

True to his word, Kavanaugh voted against the order on August 26, with Chief Justice John Roberts following suit.

The Supreme Court ultimately banned the eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision.

For more information, please view the following link:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9941319/Supreme-Court-says-extending-eviction-moratorium-open-door-free-grocery-delivery.html

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Supreme Court says extending eviction moratorium could open the door to ‘free grocery delivery’

In dissent, Justice Breyer wrote that “the public interest is not favored by the spread of disease or a court’s second-guessing of the C.D.C.’s judgment.”

The Biden administration and other moratorium proponents predicted that the decision would set off a wave of dire consequences.

“As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to Covid-19,” Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said in a statement.

The ruling also renewed pressure on congressional Democrats to try to extend the freeze over the opposition of Republicans.

“Tonight, the Supreme Court failed to protect the 11 million households across our country from violent eviction in the middle of a deadly global pandemic,” said Representative Cori Bush, a Missouri Democrat who slept on the steps of the Capitol this month to protest the expiration of the previous moratorium. “We already know who is going to bear the brunt of this disastrous decision: Black and brown communities, and especially Black women.”

But landlords, who have said the moratoriums saddled them with billions of dollars in debt, hailed the move.

“The government must move past failed policies and begin to seriously address the nation’s debt tsunami, which is crippling both renters and housing providers alike,” said Bob Pinnegar, the president of the National Apartment Association, a trade association representing large landlords.

It will most likely take a while for the backlog of eviction cases in many states to result in the displacement of renters. But tenant groups in the South, where fast-track evictions are common, are bracing for the worst.

In recent days, Mr. Biden’s team has been mapping out strategies to deal with the likely loss of the moratorium, with a plan to focus its efforts on a handful of states — including South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio — that have large backlogs of unpaid rent and few statewide protections for tenants.

The administration had at first concluded that a Supreme Court ruling in June had effectively forbidden it from imposing a new moratorium after an earlier one expired at the end of July. While the administration had prevailed in that ruling by a 5-to-4 vote, one member of the majority, Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh, wrote that he believed the moratorium to be unlawful and that he had cast his vote to temporarily sustain it only to allow an orderly transition. He would not support a further extension without “clear and specific congressional authorization (via new legislation),” he wrote.

Congress did not act. But after political pressure from Democrats, a surge in the pandemic and new consideration of the legal issues, the administration on Aug. 3 issued the moratorium that was the subject of the new ruling.

The administration’s legal maneuvering might have failed, but it bought some time for tenants threatened with eviction. In unusually candid remarks this month, President Biden said that was part of his calculus in deciding to proceed with the new moratorium, which was set to expire Oct. 3.

Congress declared a moratorium on evictions at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, but it lapsed in July 2020. The C.D.C. then issued a series of its own moratoriums, saying that they were justified by the need to address the pandemic and authorized by a 1944 law. People unable to pay rent, the agency said, should not be forced to crowd in with relatives or seek refuge in homeless shelters, spreading the virus.

The last moratorium — which was put in place by the C.D.C. in September and expired on July 31 after being extended several times by Congress and Mr. Biden — was effective at achieving its goal, reducing by about half the number of eviction cases that normally would have been filed since last fall, according to an analysis of filings by the Eviction Lab at Princeton University.

The challengers in the current case — landlords, real estate companies and trade associations led by the Alabama Association of Realtors — argued that the moratorium was not authorized by the law the agency relied on, the Public Health Service Act of 1944.

That law, the challengers wrote, was concerned with quarantines and inspections to stop the spread of disease and did not bestow on the agency “the unqualified power to take any measure imaginable to stop the spread of communicable disease — whether eviction moratoria, worship limits, nationwide lockdowns, school closures or vaccine mandates.”

What to Know About the Supreme Court Term

A blockbuster term begins. The Supreme Court, now dominated by six Republican appointees, returns to the bench to start a momentous term this fall in which it will consider eliminating the constitutional right to abortion and vastly expanding gun rights.

The big abortion case. The court seems poised to use a challenge to a Mississippi law that bars most abortions after 15 weeks to undermine and perhaps overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling could effectively end legal abortion access for those living in much of the South and Midwest.

A major decision on guns. The court will also consider the constitutionality of a longstanding New York law that imposes strict limits on carrying guns outside the home. The court has not issued a major Second Amendment ruling in more than a decade.

A test for Chief Justice Roberts. The highly charged docket will test the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who lost his position at the court’s ideological center with the arrival last fall of Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

A drop in public support. Chief Justice Roberts now leads a court increasingly associated with partisanship. Recent polls show the court is suffering a distinct drop in public support following a spate of unusual late-night summer rulings in politically charged cases.

The C.D.C. responded that the moratorium was authorized by the 1944 law. Evictions would accelerate the spread of the coronavirus, the agency said, by forcing people “to move, often into close quarters in new shared housing settings with friends or family, or congregate settings such as homeless shelters.”

The moratorium, the administration told the justices, was broadly similar to quarantine. “It would be strange to hold that the government may combat infection by prohibiting the tenant from leaving his home,” its brief said, “but not by prohibiting the landlord from throwing him out.”

The case was complicated by congressional action in December, when lawmakers briefly extended the C.D.C.’s moratorium through the end of January in an appropriations measure. When Congress took no further action, the agency again imposed moratoriums under the 1944 law.

In its Supreme Court brief, the government argued that it was significant that Congress had embraced the agency’s action, if only briefly.

The central legal question in the case was whether the agency was entitled to act on its own. In June, with the earlier moratorium about to expire, the court voted 5 to 4 in favor of the administration, allowing that measure to stand.

But that victory was distinctly provisional. Justice Kavanaugh, who voted with the majority, wrote that he had cast his vote reluctantly and had taken account of the then-impending expiration of the earlier moratorium.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exceeded its existing statutory authority by issuing a nationwide eviction moratorium,” Justice Kavanaugh wrote. “Because the C.D.C. plans to end the moratorium in only a few weeks, on July 31, and because those few weeks will allow for additional and more orderly distribution of the congressionally appropriated rental assistance funds, I vote at this time to deny the application” that had been filed by the challengers.

The other members of the court did not give reasons for their votes in the June ruling. But four of them — Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett — voted to lift the earlier moratorium. Taken together with Justice Kavanaugh’s statement, that distinctly suggested that a majority of the justices would not look favorably on another extension unless it came from Congress.

The Biden administration initially seemed to share that understanding, urging Congress to act and saying it did not have the unilateral power to impose a further moratorium through executive action. When Congress failed to enact legislation addressing the issue, the moratorium expired.

Under pressure from Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats and wary of the rise of the Delta variant, the administration reversed course a few days later.

The new moratorium was not identical to the earlier one, which had applied nationwide. It was instead tailored to counties where Covid-19 was strongest, a category that currently covers some 90 percent of counties in the United States.

Mr. Biden was frank in discussing his reasoning, saying the new measure faced long odds but would buy tenants some time.

“The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it’s not likely to pass constitutional muster,” he said on Aug. 3. “But there are several key scholars who think that it may — and it’s worth the effort.”

Many states and localities, including New York and California, have extended their own moratoriums, providing another layer of protection for some renters. In some places, judges, aware of the potential for large numbers of people to be put out on the street even as the pandemic intensifies again, have said they would slow-walk cases and make greater use of eviction diversion programs.

Evictions, the Pandemic and the Courts

As Democrats Seethed, White House Struggled to Contain Eviction Fallout

Aug. 7, 2021

The Biden administration issues a new eviction moratorium as the virus surges.

Aug. 3, 2021

Federal Judge Strikes Down Moratorium on Evicting Renters

May 5, 2021

Adam Liptak covers the Supreme Court and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments. A graduate of Yale Law School, he practiced law for 14 years before joining The Times in 2002. @adamliptak • Facebook

A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 27, 2021, Section A, Page 15 of the New York edition with the headline: Justices End Biden’s Eviction Moratorium, Leaving Thousands at Risk. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Boston, MA – August 12: Homes for All Massachusetts hosted a rally outside the State House in Boston on August 12, 2021 to voice support for a bill (H 1434 / S 891) up for a hearing later in the day that would temporarily pause evictions and foreclosures for 12 months following the end of the state of emergency. (Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Tenants rights groups block the north entrance to the Los Angeles County Superior Courthouse in protest of the coming mass evictions if Gov. Gavin Newsom does not replace the Judicial Council’s eviction moratorium Rule 1 and if AB 1436 is not passed on Friday, August 21, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

Tenants’ right advocates march down the Alameda to the offices of the California Apartment Association in San Jose, Calif., Thursday, April 6, 2017. They are protesting against no-cause evictions, which allows landlords to evict tenants in retaliation without giving a reason, displacing families and destabilizing communities. (Patrick Tehan/Bay Area News Group)U.S. Supreme Court on Eviction

On the eviction moratorium, the Supreme Court turns the law on its head | Opinion

Published: Oct. 04, 2021, 5:15 p.m.

Patrick Hill, an author and associate professor at Rutgers University, says that since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on an impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman, File)AP

By Star-Ledger Guest Columnist

By T. Patrick Hill

When the U.S. Supreme Court, on Aug. 26, ruled against President Biden’s extension of the moratorium on evictions, it sacrificed the safety and quite possibly the lives of hundreds of Americans to a legal ideology known as legal positivism or the understanding of law as justified simply because it is law, no matter its consequences.

In an eight-page unsigned decision, made with the concurrence of the six conservative justices and the dissent of the three liberal justices, the Court concluded that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which is responsible nationally for the public’s health, had exceeded its statutory authority by issuing the moratorium.

The statute, the Court correctly notes, is the 1944 Public Health Service Act which authorizes the Health and Human Services secretary (HHS) to “make and enforce such regulations as in his (sic) judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases … from one State or possession into any other State or possession.” Subsequently, this authority was placed in the hands of the CDC.

But from this point, the Court’s reading of the statute goes from bad to worse. Inexplicably, the statute appears to be suspect because, since enactment, it has rarely been used, and certainly not used to justify an eviction moratorium. Are we to conclude from this that the Court considers rarely invoked statutes as something less than law? But even when invoked, the statute has been confined, the Court insists, to measures like quarantining infected individuals, for example. But why should that logically justify the inference that an eviction moratorium exceeds the purposes of the statute?

And just because the statute has specifically included measures like fumigation, disinfection and pest extermination, that cannot be thought logically to mean it has specifically excluded other measures, such as an eviction moratorium. If the statute authorizes something as extreme as quarantining infected individuals in the interests of the public’s safety, why is it, as the Court puts it, a stretch to think an eviction moratorium would also be authorized?

Like any legislation, the statute may be thought to acknowledge that since we may not know, at any particular moment, everything there is to be known about controlling infectious disease, it is prudent to provide reasonably broadly for that inevitable moment when an infectious disease presents itself in radically unprecedented features.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more than 701,000 deaths in the U.S. so far. Yet, what is a major concern for the Court in its decision? The moratorium, it emphasizes, encroaches on “an area that is the particular domain of state law: the landlord-tenant relationship,” adding that earlier decisions of the Court have insisted on exceedingly clear language when congressional legislation might change the balance between state and federal power, in particular, governmental power over private property.

It is surely curious how, for the Court, the language of the 1944 statute is not sufficiently clear that it might be thought to include an eviction moratorium, but it is indeed sufficiently clear to exclude it. More curious is how, in the estimation of the Court, measures to control a raging pandemic, that is no respecter of state borders, are to play second fiddle to a narrow state-based interest.

Bottom of Form

The best that the Court can bring itself to acknowledge how indisputable the strong interest of the American public is in resisting the spreading threat of COVID-19, but not so strong as to justifiably override the private property interests that make up the landlord-tenant relationship. These are the calculations of justices, like Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, who believe so much in what they do but understand so little of what that is, and, as a consequence, bring down upon our heads a perfect storm of irrationality that undermines the very essence of law and its purpose in society.

There can be no clearer demonstration of this than the Court’s declaration, upon closing its argument, that “… our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully even in pursuit of desirable ends.” With what understanding of the law can it be said that to act, simply as one should, to protect human life from disease and even death is to act unlawfully? That can be only when the law is understood as a law unto itself, as self-justifying, and in no way accountable for its justification to ethics, from which all human law is ultimately derived.

Since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on this impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. Nevertheless, how mistaken to think that acting for the good of the public is to act unlawfully when actually it is to act ethically and must therefore be to act lawfully.

  1. Patrick Hill is an associate professor at Rutgers University and the author of the book, No Place for Ethics:Judicial Review, Legal Positivism and the Supreme Court of the United States.

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U.S. Supreme Court ends Biden’s Covid-19 eviction moratorium

Aug 27, 2021  Yahoo Finance

#EvictionMoratorium #moratoriumeviction #Biden Yahoo Finance’s Dani Romero reports on the U.S. Supreme Court blocking the Biden administration’s eviction moratorium. Watch the 2021 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting on YouTube: https://youtu.be/gx-OzwHpM9k Subscribe to Yahoo Finance: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb About Yahoo Finance: At Yahoo Finance, you get free stock quotes, up-to-date news, portfolio management resources, international market data, social interaction and mortgage rates that help you manage your financial life. Yahoo Finance Plus: With a subscription to Yahoo Finance Plus get the tools you need to invest with confidence. Discover new opportunities with expert research and investment ideas backed by technical and fundamental analysis. Optimize your trades with advanced portfolio insights, fundamental analysis, enhanced charting, and more. To learn more about Yahoo Finance Plus please visit: https://yhoo.it/33jXYBp Connect with Yahoo Finance: Get the latest news: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb Find Yahoo Finance on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2A9u5Zq Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2LMgloP Follow Yahoo Finance on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2LOpNYz Follow Cashay.com Follow Yahoo Finance Premium on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3hhcnmV

CDC Announces Targeted Eviction Moratorium After Protests

Aug 4, 2021  NBC News

The CDC has announced a new targeted eviction moratorium after the previous moratorium expired, leaving more than 10 million Americans at risk of losing their homes. NBC News’ Leigh Ann Caldwell explains how the new moratorium differs from the expired one and how Democrats were able to influence the CDC’s decision.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #Eviction #Housing #CDC

NJ eviction moratorium to end soon for some tenants

For the last 1 ½ years, renters across New Jersey have been able to keep a roof over their head regardless of nonpayment of rent, thanks to an eviction moratorium in the state. But a new law is ending that protection as of Aug. 31 for people who make more than 80% of their county’s area median income. For those who make less than 80% of the area median income, the moratorium will be extended through Dec. 31.

Tenants who make more than 80% of the area median income and who are still struggling to pay rent will have to certify under penalty of law that their failure to pay is related to COVID-19. If they can prove that, the moratorium will be extended for them.

While housing advocates say the measure will provide some relief, landlords say it continues to put the brunt of the financial weight on them.

What to know about the eviction moratorium as it nears expiration again

Aug 25, 2021  PBS NewsHour

The clock is ticking away again for those who could face eviction this fall. The CDC’s pandemic moratorium on evictions is set to expire in early October — or possibly even sooner. The Biden administration is pushing states, cities, and counties to tap into more federal aid, and get it to those who need it. But as John Yang reports, new data shows those efforts are moving much slower than needed. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Oct 4, 2021   PBSNewsHour

The “Pandora Papers,” written by a worldwide consortium of journalists, reveal how world leaders and the mega-rich can hide billions of dollars in secret offshore accounts, which investigators say drain money from government treasuries and can undermine national security. Nick Schifrin talks to Drew Sullivan, co-founder and editor of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, or OCCRP. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newsho

What are the Pandora Papers?

Oct 3, 2021  Washington Post

A massive trove of private financial records shared with The Washington Post exposes vast reaches of the secretive offshore system used to hide billions of dollars from tax authorities, creditors, criminal investigators and citizens around the world. Read more: https://wapo.st/3A0AVdi. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/ #WashingtonPost #PostDocs #PandoraPapers

The Pandora Papers: How the world of offshore finance is still flourishing | Four Corners

Oct 4, 2021  ABC News In-depth

In a major international investigation, Four Corners reveals the secrets of the Pandora Papers. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/abcnewsindepth For months, more than 600 journalists from around the world, including the ABC, the Washington Post and the BBC, have been working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists on this top-secret investigation. One of the biggest data leaks in history, the papers reveal how the wealthy and powerful are continuing to use offshore tax havens to hide their ownership of assets and stash their cash – despite attempts to rein the industry in.  _________

Political Divisions Threaten President Biden’s Agenda | Washington Week | October 1, 2021

Oct 1, 2021  Washington Week PBS

Democrats clashed over the size of President Biden’s infrastructure package, as Congress passed a bill to avoid a federal government shutdown before the deadline. The panel also discussed America’s continued division over COVID vaccines and mandates, plus a look into the testimony from military leaders on the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan. Panel: Laura Barrón-López of POLITICO, Natasha Bertrand of CNN, Garrett Haake of NBC News, Carl Hulse of The New York Times

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20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 9, 10, 11 and 12, 2021

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world, Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour,

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

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America After 9/11 (full documentary), Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

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9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN, Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

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9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight, Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero, Sep 9, 2021 

The New York Times:  By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

AXIOS AM: By Mike Allen, Sep 12, 2021, 20 years ago this morning

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty,  In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

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PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 12, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, September 12, President Joe Biden’s latest vaccine mandate fuels political division, the Taliban takes initial steps in forming their government, and a 9/11 survivor continues to fight for healthcare for other victims of the tragedy. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 11, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, September 11, the nation commemorates the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks as President Biden, Vice President Harris, and others including former presidents Obama, Clinton and Bush attend memorial events at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Jersey City, New Jersey. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour Full Episode, Sept. 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, how President Biden’s inoculation requirements for millions of Americans might be enforced in the workplace, a look at the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart discuss the anniversary of 9/11 and the politics of vaccinations. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: 19 Americans among group allowed to leave Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCjhV… What Biden’s vaccine mandates mean for companies, workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my263… How the 9/11 attacks changed America’s role in the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXYdL… Brooks and Capehart on 9/11 anniversary, Biden’s mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhi_c… Smithsonian Institution pieces together history of 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BYrJ… Educators reflect on the significance of teaching about 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35I1J… Teens facing off at U.S. Open create ‘fairy tale moment’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKjbj… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Sept. 9, 2021

Sep 9, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Taliban orders an end to all protests as they finally allow the departure of some 200 American citizens from Afghanistan. Then, we talk with Dr. Anthony Fauci about the difficult path ahead in navigating the pandemic. And, 9/11 first responders reflect on the trauma of that day and how it compares to the stresses of the current pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ sues Texas over 6-week abortion ban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmHQU… How Taliban rule triggered Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeuJp… Scattered thunderstorms complicate Louisiana’s recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXRRP… Why the ATF is often leaderless and how that affects it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFrUS… Dr. Fauci on vaccine mandates, reopening schools, boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-V5Q… NYC’s first responders reflect on trauma of 9/11, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRD1n… Robert Hogue reflects on surviving 9/11 Pentagon attack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTDvG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

This week PBS NewsHour has been marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by exploring how they have impacted the U.S. at home and abroad. Judy Woodruff leads our latest conversation on the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report

Premiered 5 hours ago, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

Two decades after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, PBS NewsHour explores how the world has changed since that day. This documentary compiles a series of special reports to help viewers understand how the attacks on the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon and Flight 93 have left a lasting mark on victim’s families, first responders, survivors and the nation as a whole. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How 9/11 Changed American Life | Washington Week | September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel continues the conversation, reflecting on the 20 year anniversary of 9/11. The panel also discussed how the attacks shifted American life, politics, and the impact the event had on Muslim Americans. Panel: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Asma Khalid of NPR, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Vivian Salama of The Wall Street Journal, Pierre Thomas of ABC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

America After 9/11 (full documentary) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

FRONTLINE traces the U.S. response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the devastating consequences that unfolded across four presidencies. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker and chronicler of U.S. politics Michael Kirk, this feature-length documentary draws on both new interviews and those from the dozens of documentaries Kirk and his award-winning team have made in the years since 9/11. “America After 9/11” offers an epic, two-hour re-examination of the decisions that changed the world and transformed America — from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol — and the ongoing challenges that legacy poses for the U.S. president and the country. #AmericaAfter911 #January6th For more reporting in connection with this investigation, visit FRONTLINE’s website: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/fi… Find FRONTLINE on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation; the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Park Foundation; and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen.

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 11th, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  NBC News

U.S. remembers the lives lost on 9/11, families of 9/11 victims honor their loved ones, and tribute paid to heroes of Flight 93. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11th

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 10th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden responds to Republican pushback over vaccine mandate, Los Angeles school district approves Covid vaccine mandate for eligible students, and how September 11 changed security in America. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:14 Biden On Vaccine Mandate Lawsuits 04:54 Back To School Battle 07:23 America Remembers: 9/11 15:38 Afghan Refugee Flights Halted » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11 #Biden

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden announces new vaccine mandates for millions of Americans, DOJ announces lawsuit over Texas abortion law, and 9/11 survivors and first responders ‘forgotten’ by health program, employees say. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:11 Biden’s Covid Strategy 8:44 DOJ Taking On Texas 10:25 American Evacuated From Afghanistan 12:57 9/11 Survivors: Broken Promises 17:19 Missing Airline Funds » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #VaccineMandates #Texas

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

Reflecting on 9/11 20 years after the attacks, GOP outraged over Biden vaccine mandates, Jan. 6 committee receives first set of documents.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #GOP #September11

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  NBC News

Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy breaks down Biden’s shift in Covid strategy. Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ark.) discusses the GOP response to vaccine and mask mandates. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) talks all things infrastructure. Doris Kearns Goodwin, Hallie Jackson, Kimberly Atkins Stohr and George Will join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #FullEpisode #MTP #Politics Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN

Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

President Biden visited all three sites where planes crashed on September 11, 2001 and cities held ceremonies to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. We followed all of these events and more starting with a CBS News Special Report anchored by Norah O’Donnell. #livenews #livestream CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary

Sep 10, 2021  DW Documentary

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 sent the world into a state of shock. Yet some had been loudly and publicly warning of the dangers posed by terrorism. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan Mujahideen commander, was among them. It’s September 9, 2001, two days before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan commander fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, is assassinated. Who ordered his murder? The same man who masterminded the attacks on the US two days later: Osama Bin Laden. For months, Massoud had tried to make his voice heard, warning about the global dangers posed by an ascendant Taliban in Afghanistan. But Europe and the United States weren’t listening. Why not? Would heeding his warnings have affected lucrative arms deals with Pakistan? Did economic interests take precedence over security? This little-known story is told firsthand by diplomats, political leaders and military officials. It sheds new light on the events leading up to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Above all, it’s the story of a man who could have changed the fate of the world if his warnings had been heeded sooner. #documentary #dwdocumentary #September11 #USA #WorldTradeCenter ______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: ? DW Documentary (English): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary ? DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental ? DW Documentary (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia ? DW Doku (German): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH1k… ? DW Documentary (Hindi): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC46c… For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Follow DW Documentary on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Follow DW Documental on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dwdocumental We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight

Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

Twenty years on from 9/11 and we reflect on the evolving nature of terrorism and how the attack changed the world through the transformation of US foreign policy, global security and geopolitics. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Twenty years ago, on 11 September 2001, Al-Qaeda began four coordinated terrorist attacks on the US, lasting one hour and seventeen minutes. The world watched as nineteen terrorists crashed four planes – two into the World Trade Centre, one into the Pentagon, the very symbol of American might, and the fourth into a field in Pennsylvania. To this day, Al-Qaeda’s attack 9/11 remains the deadliest terror attack in history. It was the audacity of the attack that was so shocking. The idea that in a little over an hour the United States of America – the leader of the free world – could be shown to be utterly vulnerable, not invincible. That terrible day arguably has impacted every American psyche to this day, the way America sees its place in the world and the way we see America. Newsnight’s David Grossman reports on how September 11th changed the world

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero

Sep 9, 2021  60 Minutes

60 Minutes went beneath ground zero, where an underground city had become a 16-acre burial ground and an exhausting and dangerous cleanup job was taking place. “60 Minutes” is the most successful television broadcast in history. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 and is still a hit, over 50 seasons later, regularly making Nielsen’s Top 10. Subscribe to the “60 Minutes” YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu Watch full episodes: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F Get more “60 Minutes” from “60 Minutes: Overtime”: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr Follow “60 Minutes” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry Like “60 Minutes” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao Follow “60 Minutes” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX Subscribe to our newsletter: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

The New York Times

By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

A second plane approaching the World Trade Center before hitting the South Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. Kelly Guenther for The New York Times

A missing legacy

The great crises in U.S. history have often inspired the country to great accomplishments.
The Civil War led to the emancipation of Black Americans and a sprawling program of domestic investment in railroads, colleges and more. World War II helped spark the creation of the modern middle class and cemented the so-called American Century. The Cold War caused its own investment boom, in the space program, computer technology and science education.

The attacks of Sept. 11 — which occurred on a sparkling late-summer morning 20 years ago tomorrow — had the potential to leave their own legacy of recovery. In sorrow and anger, Americans were more united in the weeks after the attacks than they had been in years. President George W. Bush’s approval rating exceeded 85 percent.

It isn’t hard to imagine how Bush might have responded to Sept. 11 with the kind of domestic mobilization of previous wars. He could have rallied the country to end its reliance on Middle Eastern oil, a reliance that both financed radical American enemies and kept the U.S. enmeshed in the region. While attacking Al Qaeda militarily, Bush also could have called for enormous investments in solar energy, wind energy, nuclear power and natural gas. It could have been transformative, for the economy, the climate and Bush’s historical standing.

Bush chose a different path, one that was ambitious in its own right: the “freedom agenda.” He hoped that his toppling of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Saddam Hussein in Iraq would inspire people around the world to rise up for democracy and defeat autocracy. For a brief period — the Arab Spring, starting in 2010 — his vision almost seemed to be playing out.

Today, though, we know it did not. Bush and his team bungled Iraq’s postwar reconstruction. In Afghanistan, the U.S. rejected a Taliban surrender offer, and the Taliban recovered to win the war. In Egypt and Syria, autocrats remain in power.

Some wars have left clear legacies of progress toward freedom — like the anti-colonization movement and the flowering of European democracy that followed World War II. The post-9/11 wars have not. If anything, the world has arguably become less democratic in recent years.

Twenty years after Sept. 11, the attacks seem likely to be remembered as a double tragedy. There were the tangible horrors: The attacks on that day killed almost 3,000 people, and the ensuing wars killed hundreds of thousands more. And there is the haunting question that lingers: Out of the trauma, did the country manage to create a better future?

A police officer covered in ash after the first building collapsed at the World Trade Center.Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Radical pessimism is a mistake,” David Ignatius argues in The Post. “These two decades witnessed many American blunders but also lessons learned.”

Twenty Years Gone”: The Atlantic’s Jennifer Senior on one family’s heartbreaking loss and struggle to move on.

“The fact that the United States itself went on to attack, and wreak even greater violence against innocent civilians around the world, was largely omitted from official narratives,” the novelist Laila Lalami writes for Times Opinion.

“The twin towers still stand because we saw them, moved in and out of their long shadows, were lucky enough to know them for a time.” Colson Whitehead wrote this essay shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Many people revisit it.

Michele Defazio on Sept. 11, holding up a poster of her missing husband, Jason Defazio, who worked in One World Trade Center.Krista Niles/The New York Times

From The Times
Dan Barry asks what it means to “never forget” given the inevitable fallibility of human memory.

Jennifer Steinhauer speaks to veterans of two wars that followed the attacks. “I am still fighting a little bit of that war, inside,” one said.

Elizabeth Dias reports that the deluge of anti-Muslim hate that followed the attacks has forged a new generation of Muslim Americans determined to define their place in the country.

The site of the World Trade Center “still feels like an alien zone,” Michael Kimmelman, The Times’s architecture critic, writes. But the rest of Lower Manhattan has bloomed.

The remains of more than 1,100 victims have never been identified. But New York City continues to search for DNA matches, Corey Kilgannon writes — a task the chief medical examiner called “a sacred obligation.”

AXIOS AM

by Mike Allen mike@axios.com   Sep 12, 2021

  1. 20 years ago this morning

An 18-page special section in today’s New York Times includes, in tiny black type, the names of all 2,977 victims at the three 9/11 attack sites.

  1. Top talker: Blazing SigAlerts

Photo: L.A. County Fire Air Operations via AP

A wildfire — the Route fire, “0% contained” — broke out yesterday in mountainous terrain near Castaic in L.A. County, prompting the CHP to close a stretch of the 5 Freeway in both directions. (L.A. Times)

7.  Salesforce offers to relocate workers with abortion concerns
After Texas’ anti-abortion law was upheld, Salesforce told employees via Slack that the company will help them relocate “if you have concerns about access to reproductive healthcare in your state,” CNBC reports.

·  The company didn’t take a stand on the Texas law, but said: “We recognize and respect that we all have deeply held and different perspectives. … [W]e stand with all of our women at Salesforce and everywhere.”

With Florida legislators planning to take up new abortion restrictions in January, Gov. Ron DeSantis is backing away from the Texas law’s bounty provision, BuzzFeed’s Kadia Goba reports.

·  DeSantis press secretary Christina Pushaw told BuzzFeed: “Gov. DeSantis doesn’t want to turn private citizens against each other.”

  1. The Boss: ” I remember you, my friend”

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen sang “I’ll See You in My Dreams” at the 9/11 Memorial, on the site of the Twin Towers:

I got your guitar here by the bed

All your favorite records and all the books that you read

And though my soul feels like it’s been split at the seams

I’ll see you in my dreams.

Watch it on YouTube.

  1. College games honor the lost

Photo: Ryan M. Kelly/Getty Images

Above, members of the U.Va. Cavaliers marching band — most not born on 9/11 — perform a memorial salute at halftime at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville.

  • College football teamsacross the country unveiled tributes, including special uniforms.

Photo: Joann Muller/Axios

  • Axios’ Joann Mullersent me this evening shot from the Big House at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.
  • Attendance: 108,345. Michigan says that’s “the 295th consecutive game with more than 100,000 fans at Michigan Stadium.”

More photos, videos 

  1. America on pause

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

An unfurled American flag greets the day at the Pentagon.

Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden greeted families and laid a wreath at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa.

  • This native, 17½ ton sandstone boulderwas placed in 2011 to show the edge of the impact site in an open field, next to a hemlock grove.

More photos from Shanksville … Read Biden’s remarks.

Photo: Brittainy Newman/AP

The “Tribute in Light” beams in Lower Manhattan consist of 88 xenon light bulbs, each 7,000 watts, positioned in two 48-foot squares on the roof of the Battery Parking Garage, south of the 9/11 Memorial.

  • They can be seenfor 60 miles.

More photos from Ground Zero.

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty

Remembrances of lives lost are plentiful as New York commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Lower Manhattan near Ground Zero. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden on Saturday were joined by former presidents, family members of victims and first responders at Ground Zero in New York City to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Driving the news: The ceremony at Ground Zero began with a moment of silence at 8:46am, when Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center, followed by a reading of the victims’ names who died in New York from the attack.

  • “Joe, we love and miss you more than you can ever imagine,” said Lisa Reina, who was eight months pregnant when her husband, Joseph Reina Jr., died on the deadly day, per the Washington Post.
  • “[While] 20 years feels like an eternity … it still feels like yesterday,” Reina said.
  • Bruce Springsteen also performed his song, “I’ll See You Ii My Dreams,” following the second moment of silence.
In photos:

Family members and loved ones of victims attend the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum on Sept. 11 in New York. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

NYPD and FDNY Memorial Ceremony at FDNY Engine 8, Ladder 2, Battalion 8 on Sept. 11 in New York City. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

A member of the FDNY visits the reflecting pool. Photo: Mike Segar-Pool/Getty Images

Katie Mascali is comforted by her fiance Andre Jabban as they stand near the name of her father, Joseph Mascali, at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Photo: Craig Ruttle/PoolAFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen performs during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden are joined by former presidents and others at the 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

People embrace during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Go deeper: Biden attends ceremony at Ground Zero on 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks

 AXIOS  Erin Doherty

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Biden attends wreath-laying ceremony at Pentagon

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Axios

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Harris, Bush preach unity at Flight 93 memorial, 20 years on from attacks

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during a 9/11 commemoration at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Kamala Harris joined former President George W. Bush at a ceremony on Saturday to honor the lives lost 20 years ago on United Airlines Flight 93.

Driving the news: The vice president and the 43rd president devoted much of their remarks to remembering the unity that brought Americans together after the 9/11 attacks.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

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Never Forgotten | Southern California remembers

Sept. 11, 2001

Press-Telegram <email@newsletters.presstelegram.com>   Sep 11, 2021

20 Years Since 9/11
Twenty years ago, we were rocked when terrorists attacked the United States and killed nearly 3,000 people. In addition to so many innocent lives, we lost our vital belief that we were safe, just as Americans had with the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

In our local coverage of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, we examine how we have changed since 9/11 and how lessons we learned have surfaced again in a new crisis. Finally, we honor those who lost their lives, including the many heroes who ran toward danger to help when they were needed most.

Enduring images of 9/11

By MICHELE CARDON | mcardon@scng.com and PAUL BERSEBACH | pbersebach@scng.com | Orange County Register

PUBLISHED: September 7, 2021 at 3:37 p.m. | UPDATED: September 10, 2021 at 1:06 p.m.

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Sept, 11, 2001 began like any other Tuesday. School kids ate breakfast before heading to class, and parents prepared for their workday. Terrorism, especially on American soil, was the farthest thought from most people’s minds. But before many could walk out their front door, events were unfolding on the East Coast that would change America, and the world, forever.

At 8:46 a.m. EDT, a jetliner carrying thousands of gallons of fuel slammed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. What began with confusion as to what could have gone wrong quickly turned to the realization of a planned attack as a second plane hit the South Tower 17 minutes later.

Within two hours, two other planes had crashed into the Pentagon and in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And the twin towers fell. The attacks 20 years ago killed nearly 3,000 people, in the hijacked planes and on the ground, and injured thousands. The attacks forever changed the world.

A plane approaches New York’s World Trade Center moments before it struck the tower at left, as seen from downtown Brooklyn, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In an unprecedented show of terrorist horror, the 110 story towers collapsed in a shower of rubble and dust after 2 hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into them. (AP Photo/ William Kratzke)

The south tower begins to collapse as smoke billows from both towers of the World Trade Center, in New York.  (AP Photo/Jim Collins/FILE)

Two women embrace each other as they watch the World Trade Center burn following a terrorist attack on the twin skyscrapers in New York. (AP Photo/Ernesto Mora)

Chief of Staff Andy Card whispers into the ear of President George W. Bush to give him word of the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, during a visit to the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Fla. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Smoke billows from one of the towers of the World Trade Center and flames and debris explode from the second tower, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

People run from the collapse of one of the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo. (AP Photo/FILE/Suzanne Plunkett)

A person falls from the north tower of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File

A fiery blast rocks the World Trade Center after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

A man with a fire extinguisher walks through rubble after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on September 11, 2001, in New York. The man was shouting as he walked looking for victims who needed assistance. Both towers collapsed after being hit by hijacked passengers planes. (Photo by DOUG KANTER/AFP via Getty Images)

People flee lower Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, following a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)

A jet airliner heads into one of the World Trade Center towers for the second attack in New York.  (AP Photo/Carmen Taylor/File)

The south side of the Pentagon burns after it took a direct, devastating hit from an aircraft Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Tom Horan)

Emergency workers look at the crater created when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville, Pa., in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Julie McDermott, center, walks with other victims as they make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Pedestrians on Beekman St. flee the area of the collapsed World Trade Center in lower Manhattan following a terrorist attack on the New York landmark Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York, Sept. 11, 2001. In a horrific sequence of destruction, terrorists crashed two planes into the World Trade Center causing the twin 110-story towers to collapse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

A helicopter flies over the Pentagon in Washington as smoke billows over the building. The terrorist-hijacked airliner that slammed into the west side of the Pentagon killed 184 people. (AP Photo/Heesoon Yim, File)

With the skeleton of the World Trade Center twin towers in the background, New York City firefighters work amid debris on Cortlandt St. after the terrorist attacks of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

As rescue efforts continue in the rubble of the World Trade Center, President George W. Bush puts his arms around firefighter Bob Beckwith while standing in front of the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)

A woman looks at missing person posters of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 14, 2001. (AP Photo/Robert Spencer)

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Michele Cardon | Director of Photography

Orange County Register Director of Photography Michele Cardon has worked at The Register for more than 25 years. Her editing skills have been honored by the National Press Photographer Association, Society of News Design and Pictures of the Year. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Journalism. As a Register photo editor, Michele has covered events such as the World Series, Stanley Cup Finals, NBA Championship, Oscars, Emmys, Los Angeles riots, and the Laguna Beach firestorm.

mcardon@scng.com

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September 11 attacks 

Encyclopedia Britannica

September 11 attacks, also called 9/11 attacks, series of airline hijackings and suicide attacks committed in 2001 by 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda against targets in the United States, the deadliest terrorist attacks on American soil in U.S. history. The attacks against New York City and Washington, D.C., caused extensive death and destruction and triggered an enormous U.S. effort to combat terrorism. Some 2,750 people were killed in New York, 184 at the Pentagon, and 40 in Pennsylvania (where one of the hijacked planes crashed after the passengers attempted to retake the plane); all 19 terrorists died (see Researcher’s Note: September 11 attacks). Police and fire departments in New York were especially hard-hit: hundreds had rushed to the scene of the attacks, and more than 400 police officers and firefighters were killed.

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 20, 2021

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – August 20th, 2021

Ransomware: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO), Aug 16, 2021  LastWeekTonight

The Genius of 3D Printed Rockets, Aug 12, 2021  Veritasium

The Plane That Will Change Travel Forever,Aug 2, 2021  Real Engineering

 Highlighting an Upcoming Earth-Observing Mission on This Week @NASA – August 20, 2021 NASA

Axios AM: By Mike Allan, Aug 20, 2021- Extreme heat becomes global health issue

Live Science: Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of power and more, Aug 19 & 20, 2021

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 20, 2021

Aug 20, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the Taliban targets Afghans who worked with the United States as their desperation to flee the country intensifies. Then, despite soaring levels of new COVID cases in Florida, school officials face backlash to face cover mandates. And, Jonathan Capehart and Michael Gerson break down President Biden’s handling of the Afghanistan crisis and the politics of mask mandates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Anxious Afghans rush airport gates in bid to flee country https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkUzA… News Wrap: FDA to grant full approval to Pfizer vaccine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBjlL… How the U.S. ignored corruption within the Afghan government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJ4Y0… Examining Florida’s politicization of school mask mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doJkI… Gerson and Capehart on Afghanistan, school mask mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrrBu… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – August 20th, 2021

Aug 20, 2021  NBC News

President Biden pledges to evacuate all Americans trapped in Afghanistan, chaos outside Kabul airport with evacuations ongoing, and the battle over masks in schools intensifies across the South. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:10 Biden: We Will Get You Home 09:06 Masks In Schools Debate 12:18 Jeopardy Host Backlash 13:58 Heat Wave Deaths 16:36 Families Of The Fallen 19:14 Inspiring America: Big Steps After An Injury » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #Afghanistan #MaskMandates

Ransomware: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Aug 16, 2021  LastWeekTonight

John Oliver discusses ransomware attacks, why they’re on the rise, and what can be done about them. Connect with Last Week Tonight online… Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/lastweektonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: www.facebook.com/lastweektonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: www.twitter.com/lastweektonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: www.hbo.com/lastweektonight

The Genius of 3D Printed Rockets

Aug 12, 2021  Veritasium

3D printed rockets save on up front tooling, enable rapid iteration, decrease part count, and facilitate radically new designs. For your chance to win 2 seats on one of the first Virgin Galactic flights to Space and support a great cause, go to https://www.omaze.com/veritasium Thanks to Tim Ellis and everyone at Relativity Space for the tour! https://www.relativityspace.com/ https://youtube.com/c/RelativitySpace Special thanks to Scott Manley for the interview and advising on aerospace engineering. Check out his channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/szyzyg ?????????????????????????? References: Benson, T. (2021). Rocket Parts. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketParts Boen, B. (2009). Winter Wonder: Rocket Icicles. NASA. — https://ve42.co/EngineIcicles Hall, N. (2021). Rocket Thrust Equation. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketEqn Benson, T. (2021). Rocket Thrust. NASA. — https://ve42.co/RocketThrust Regenerative Cooling — https://ve42.co/RegenCooling How A Gold Bullet Almost Destroyed A Space Shuttle by Scott Manley — https://ve42.co/ManleyEngine ?????????????????????????? Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Burt Humburg, Blake Byers, Dumky, Mike Tung, Evgeny Skvortsov, Meekay, Ismail Öncü Usta, Paul Peijzel, Crated Comments, Anna, Mac Malkawi, Michael Schneider, Oleksii Leonov, Jim Osmun, Tyson McDowell, Ludovic Robillard, Jim buckmaster, fanime96, Juan Benet, Ruslan Khroma, Robert Blum, Richard Sundvall, Lee Redden, Vincent, Marinus Kuivenhoven, Alfred Wallace, Arjun Chakroborty, Joar Wandborg, Clayton Greenwell, Pindex, Michael Krugman, Cy ‘kkm’ K’Nelson, Sam Lutfi, Ron Neal ?????????????????????????? Written by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev, and Emily Zhang Animation by Mike Radjabov Filmed by Derek Muller, Raquel Nuno, Trenton Oliver, and Emily Zhang Edited by Trenton Oliver SFX by Shaun Clifford Additional video supplied by Getty Images & Pond5 Produced by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev, and Emily Zhang

The Plane That Will Change Travel Forever

Aug 2, 2021  Real Engineering

Get a free month of Nebula with any Real Engineering merch: https://store.nebula.app/collections/… New streaming platform: https://watchnebula.com/ Vlog channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMet… Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=282505… Facebook: http://facebook.com/realengineering1 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brianjamesm… Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEngineer… Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebrianmcmanus Discord: https://discord.gg/s8BhkmN Get your Real Engineering shirts at: https://standard.tv/collections/real-… Credits: Writer/Narrator: Brian McManus Editor: Dylan Hennessy (https://www.behance.net/dylanhennessy1) Animator: Mike Ridolfi (https://www.moboxgraphics.com/) Sound: Graham Haerther (https://haerther.net/) Thumbnail: Simon Buckmaster https://twitter.com/forgottentowel References: References: [1] https://theicct.org/sites/default/fil… [2] https://spinoff.nasa.gov/Spinoff2010/… [3] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [4] Page 19 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [5] https://www.statista.com/statistics/6…. [6] https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [7] https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Displ… [8] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [9] Page 81 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [10] https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [11] Page 20 https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/fi… [12] Webinar by Mark Page a pioneer in the blended wing body design. https://youtu.be/x0vYuPmOPYE & https://www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/air… [13] https://www.businessinsider.com/boein… [14] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science… [15] Page 13 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [16] https://www.boeing.com/history/produc… [17] Page 22 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 [18] Page 1 https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/1.9084 Select imagery/video supplied by Getty Images Thank you to AP Archive for access to their archival footage. Music by Epidemic Sound: http://epidemicsound.com/creator Thank you to my patreon supporters: Adam Flohr, Henning Basma, Hank Green, William Leu, Tristan Edwards, Ian Dundore, John & Becki Johnston. Nevin Spoljaric, Jason Clark, Thomas Barth, Johnny MacDonald, Stephen Foland, Alfred Holzheu, Abdulrahman Abdulaziz Binghaith, Brent Higgins, Dexter Appleberry, Alex Pavek, Marko Hirsch, Mikkel Johansen, Hibiyi Mori. Viktor Józsa, Ron Hochsprung

Highlighting an Upcoming Earth-Observing Mission on This Week @NASA – August 20, 2021

Aug 20, 2021   NASA

Highlighting an upcoming Earth-observing mission, the science on the next resupply mission to the space station, and testing a new material to help future spacecraft land on distant worlds … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA! Download Link: https://images.nasa.gov/details-Highl… Producer: Andre Valentine Editor: Lacey Young Music: Universal Production Music

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Axios AM: Aug 20, 2021

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

Extreme heat becomes global health issue

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
Heat-related deaths around the world increased by 74% from 1980 to 2016, Axios’ Marisa Fernandez writes from a study published yesterday in The Lancet.

More than 356,000 people died from extreme heat-related causes in just nine countries in 2019, a death toll that’s expected to grow as temperatures increase worldwide.

  • 1.3 million deaths were related to cold — a 31% increase since 1990.

Heat stress can lead to stroke, organ and brain damage. A pair of studies out of the University of Washington found it also causes several types of heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

Live Science: Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of power and more, Aug 19 & 20, 2021

Created for ingpeaceproject@gmail.com |  Web Version
Top Science News
Milky Way has a 3,000-light-year-long splinter in its arm, and astronomers don’t know why

(NASA/JPL)

The Sagittarius arm of the Milky Way spirals out of our galaxy’s center, forming a swooping highway of gas that spans tens of thousands of light-years. This highway is dotted with the headlights of billions of stars, all seemingly moving along the same curvy track. But now, astronomers have found something unusual — a “break” in the arm, slashing perpendicularly through the spiral like a splinter poking through a piece of wood.

Spanning about 3,000 light-years, this stellar splinter makes up just a fraction of the Milky Way (which has a diameter of about 100,000 light-years). Still, the newfound break is the first major structure to be discovered disrupting the seemingly uniform flow of the galaxy’s Sagittarius arm, according to a study published online July 21 in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

History & Archaeology
Mass grave from Nazi atrocity discovered in Poland’s ‘Death Valley’

(D. Frymark; Antiquity Publications Ltd.)

Archaeologists in Poland have discovered a mass grave that the Nazis tried to destroy at the end of World War II, a new study finds.

The mass grave, filled with the remains of about 500 individuals, is linked to the horrific “Pomeranian Crime” that took place in Poland’s pre-war Pomerania province when the Nazis occupied the country in 1939. The Nazis killed up to 35,000 people in Pomerania at the beginning of the war, and they returned in 1945 to kill even more people, as well as to hide evidence of the prior massacres by exhuming and burning the bodies of victims.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Space Exploration
SpaceX Starlink satellites responsible for over half of close encounters in orbit, scientist says

(SpaceX)

Operators of satellite constellations are constantly forced to move their satellites because of encounters with other spacecraft and pieces of space junk. And, thanks to SpaceX’s Starlink satellites, the number of such dangerous approaches will continue to grow, according to estimates based on available data.

SpaceX’s Starlink satellites alone are involved in about 1,600 close encounters between two spacecraft every week, that’s about 50 % of all such incidents, according to Hugh Lewis, the head of the Astronautics Research Group at the University of Southampton, U.K. These encounters include situations when two spacecraft pass within a distance of 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) from each other.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Chinese satellite got whacked by hunk of Russian rocket in March

(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)

Yunhai 1-02’s wounds are not self-inflicted.

In March, the U.S. Space Force’s 18th Space Control Squadron (18SPCS) reported the breakup of Yunhai 1-02, a Chinese military satellite that launched in September 2019. It was unclear at the time whether the spacecraft had suffered some sort of failure — an explosion in its propulsion system, perhaps — or if it had collided with something in orbit.

We now know that the latter explanation is correct, thanks to some sleuthing by astrophysicist and satellite tracker Jonathan McDowell, who’s based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Chinese astronomers eye Tibetan Plateau site for observatory project

(NASA JSC)

Chinese astronomers hope to establish a major observatory program on the roof of the world, the Tibetan Plateau, with new research arguing for pristine observing conditions nestled in the uplands.

The analysis focuses on a study site near Lenghu Town in Qinghai Province at an altitude of more than 2.5 miles (4.2 kilometers) and some 1,900 miles (3,000 km) west of Beijing. In the paper, the scientists argue that three years of monitoring shows conditions on par with those at some of the most renowned scientific outposts on Earth.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Math & Physics
Fusion experiment breaks record, blasts out 10 quadrillion watts of energy

(Damien Jemison/NIF)

Scientists used an unconventional method of creating nuclear fusion to yield a record-breaking burst of energy of more than 10 quadrillion watts, by firing intense beams of light from the world’s largest lasers at a tiny pellet of hydrogen.

Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Northern California said they had focused 192 giant lasers at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) onto a pea-size pellet, resulting in the release of 1.3 megajoules of energy in 100 trillionths of a second — roughly 10% of the energy of the sunlight that hits Earth every moment, and about 70% of the energy that the pellet had absorbed from the lasers. The scientists hope one day to reach the break-even or “ignition” point of the pellet, where it gives off 100% or more energy than it absorbs.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Physicists give weird new phase of matter an extra dimension

(IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch)

Physicists have created the first ever two-dimensional supersolid — a bizarre phase of matter that behaves like both a solid and a frictionless liquid at the same time.

Supersolids are materials whose atoms are arranged into a regular, repeating, crystal structure, yet are also able to flow forever without ever losing any kinetic energy. Despite their freakish properties, which appear to violate many of the known laws of physics, physicists have long predicted them theoretically — they first appeared as a suggestion in the work of the physicist Eugene Gross as early as 1957.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Curious Creatures
World’s most elusive giant squid could be monogamous, female corpse hints

(Miyazu Energy Aquarium)

A female of the world’s largest squid — sometimes called the “kraken” after the mythological sea monster — that was caught off the coast of Japan apparently had just one amorous encounter in her lifetime.

The female had sperm packets from just one male giant squid embedded in her body, which surprised researchers. Because giant squid are solitary creatures that probably run across potential mates only occasionally, scientists expected that females would opportunistically collect and store sperm from multiple males over time.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/19)

Your Brain
Lab-made mini brains grow their own sets of ‘eyes’

(Elke Gabriel)

Scientists recently grew mini brains with their own sets of “eyes,” according to a new study.

Organoids are miniature versions of organs that scientists can grow in the lab from stem cells, or cells that can mature into any type of cell in the body. Previously, scientists have developed tiny beating hearts and tear ducts that could cry like humans do. Scientists have even grown mini brains that produce brain waves like those of preterm babies.

Now, a group of scientists has grown mini brains that have something their real counterparts do not: a set of eye-like structures called “optic cups” that give rise to the retina — the tissue that sits in the back of the eye and contains light-sensing cells, according to a statement.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/18)

Daily Quiz

 

POLL QUESTION:

What material is a modern penny mostly made of?

(Learn the answer here)

Zinc

 

Copper

 

Bronze
Tin
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Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ is fighting an invisible battle against the inner Earth, new study finds

(NASA)

West Antarctica is one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth. For evidence, you need look no further than Thwaites Glacier — also known as the “Doomsday Glacier.”

Since the 1980s, Thwaites has lost an estimated 595 billion tons (540 billion metric tons) of ice, single-handedly contributing 4% to the annual global sea-level rise during that time, Live Science previously reported. The glacier’s rate of ice loss has accelerated substantially in the past three decades, partially due to hidden rivers of comparatively warm seawater slicing across the glacier’s underbelly, as well as unmitigated climate change warming the air and the ocean.

Now, new research suggests that the warming ocean and atmosphere aren’t the only factors pushing Thwaites to the brink; the heat of the Earth itself may also be giving West Antarctica’s glaciers a disproportionately nasty kick.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/20)

Why this weekend’s Blue Moon is extra rare (and how to see it)

(Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)

The saying “once in a blue moon” is especially pertinent this week: This Sunday (Aug. 22), the full Sturgeon Moon is expected to impress skygazers, particularly because of its “blue” designation.

Typically, the term “Blue Moon” refers to the second full moon within the same month. The last one rose on Oct. 31, 2020, when an eerie Blue Moon lit up the night sky on Halloween. But there’s a lesser-known definition, dating to 1528, which applies to the third full moon in a season with four full moons, according to NASA.

Full Story: LiveScience (8/20)

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PBS News, NBC Nightly News, LiveScience, TED, TED-ED, Khan Academy, DNA Learning Center, Amoeba Sisters

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NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – July 30th, 2021

LiveScience: Nerve damage in cornea could be sign of ‘long COVID,’ study hints

Will we ever find COVID-19’s ‘Patient Zero?’

The real reason CDC is updating their mask guidelines

Dozens of medical groups urge COVID-19 vaccination mandates for health workers

TED: Ugur Sahin and Ozlem Tureci meet the scientist couple driving an mRNA vaccine revolution

Kiran Mazumdar Shaw the global cooperation that accelerated the covid 19 vaccines#t-907680

TED-ED: Dan Kwartler How fast can a vaccine be made

Alex Rosenthal:  When is a pandemic over?

Elizabeth Cox:  what is a coronavirus?

Alex Rosenthal and Pall Thordarson:  Which is better soap or hand sanitizer? #t-217130

Emma Bryce:  How does the immune system work?

Khan Academy:  Translation (mRNA to protein) | Biomolecules | MCAT | Jun 7, 2016 

mRNA Translation (Basic), Mar 22, 2010  DNA Learning Center

DNA vs RNA (Updated), Aug 29, 2019  Amoeba Sisters

Protein Synthesis (Updated), Jan 18, 2018  Amoeba Sisters

LiveScience: Strange DNA ‘borgs’ discovered in California

DeepMind says it can predict the shape of every protein in the human body

Horny sponges that lived nearly 1 billion years ago may be the earliest animals on Earth

Ignoring climate change will yield ‘untold suffering,’ panel of 14,000 scientists warns

Iceland may be the tip of a sunken continent

PBS NewsHour live episode, Aug. 4, 2021

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PBS NewsHour full episode, July 30, 2021

Jul 30, 2021 PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, as new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exposes how infectious and dangerous the COVID variant of the coronavirus is, we discuss the science. Then, Afghan interpreters arrive on U.S. shores, finding safety after risking it all to help America during the war. And, China tightens its grip on Hong Kong by closing the border to prevent a mass exodus. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS What to know about the CDC’s delta variant study https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gu5DV… News Wrap: Trump tax returns must go to Congress, DOJ says https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3UhD… First Afghan interpreters, their families arrive in the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZ4Aj… CIA still investigating U.S. diplomats’ ‘Havana Syndrome’  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ypQl… Hong Kong residents worry immigration law may ban their exit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W2JR… Brooks and Dionne on vaccine hesitancy, Jan. 6 hearings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bByPE… Lessons from McDonald’s’ investment in Black neighborhoods https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2lQX… A Brief But Spectacular take on reducing sexism in science https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6asps… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – August 4th, 2021

Aug 4, 2021  NBC News

Pfizer vaccine could get final FDA approval by September, growing calls for Gov. Cuomo to resign or be impeached, and surviving trees from Hiroshima garden remain powerful symbol after atomic blasts. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 01:48 FDA Fast Tracks Vaccine Approval 05:53 Cuomo Facing Impeachment? 08:05 Airline Chaos 08:56 Record Border Surge 11:25 New Eviction Moratorium 13:16 Violent Clashes In Beirut 14:44 Hiroshima Anniversary » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #Covid #Cuomo

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – July 30th, 2021

Jul 30, 2021  NBC News

CDC releases new evidence on delta variant, tornado damage across multiple states, and President Trump asked DOJ to declare 2020 election “corrupt.” Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:00 CDC: The ‘War’ Has Changed With Delta Variant 04:41 Breakthrough Infections 07:25 Tornado Outbreak 08:48 Trump Election Bombshell 10:14 Migrant Children Covid Outbreak 13:00 Christmas In July » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #Covid #Trump

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Nerve damage in cornea could be sign of ‘long COVID,’ study hints

(Shutterstock)

Nerve damage and a buildup of immune cells in the cornea may be a sign of “long COVID,” a long-term syndrome that emerges in some people after COVID-19 infection, a new study suggests.

These preliminary results will need to be verified in a larger group of people with long COVID, or COVID-19 long-haulers, as they’re known, an expert told Live Science. But the findings do hint at something scientists already suspected: Some symptoms of long COVID emerge due to peripheral nerve damage, she said.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/26)

COVID-19
Will we ever find COVID-19’s ‘Patient Zero?’

(KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY via Getty Images)

Chinese officials have rejected a World Health Organization proposal to investigate the origins of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, raising new questions about whether the world will ever learn when, where and how the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) made the leap into humans.

Without Chinese cooperation, scientists will face frustrating gaps in the data that may keep them from identifying the moment the pandemic began. However, the virus itself does hold clues to its own origin. In the coronavirus’s genetic blueprint is a history of where it came from and how long it took to cause the outbreak that led to a global catastrophe.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/27)

The real reason CDC is updating their mask guidelines

 
(Shutterstock)

On Tuesday (July 27), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their mask guidance, saying fully vaccinated people should resume wearing masks in public indoor spaces if there is substantial coronavirus transmission in their area.

Data from the U.S. and other countries indicates that some vaccinated people infected with the delta variant may be contagious and spread the virus to others. Still, breakthrough infections are uncommon and most coronavirus transmission is occurring through unvaccinated individuals, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC director said.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/27)

Dozens of medical groups urge COVID-19 vaccination mandates for health workers

(Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

More than 50 U.S. medical groups, representing millions of health care professionals, are calling for mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for all health and long-term care workers, according to news reports.

A vaccination mandate “is the logical fulfillment of the ethical commitment of all health care workers to put patients as well as residents of long-term care facilities first and take all steps necessary to ensure their health and well-being,” according to a joint statement released by the medical organizations.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/26)

COVID-19
‘The war has changed,’ against new delta variant, internal CDC presentation says

(Shutterstock)

The coronavirus delta variant may be as contagious as chickenpox and cause more severe illness than previous variants, according to an internal presentation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Vaccines continue to be highly effective, especially at preventing severe illness and death, but may be less effective at preventing infection or transmission of the delta variant, according to the internal report.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/30)

As COVID-19 spread, BioNTech cofounders U?ur ?ahin and Özlem Türeci had one goal: to make a safe, effective vaccine faster than ever before. In this illuminating conversation with head of TED Chris Anderson, the immunologists (and married couple) share the fascinating story of how their decades of mRNA research powered the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine — and forecast what this breakthrough science could mean for the future of vaccines and other immunotherapy treatments.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

U?ur ?ahin · Physician, immunologist

U?ur ?ahin is the cofounder and CEO of BioNTech and one of the world’s foremost experts on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) medicines. He initiated the historic development of the first mRNA vaccine for COVID-19.

Özlem Türeci · Physician, immunologist, cancer researcher

Özlem Türeci is the cofounder and chief medical officer of BioNTech. She leads the clinical development of “Project Lightspeed,” the company’s successful effort to develop and distribute an mRNA-based vaccine against COVID-19, a historic achievement completed in less than one year.

TEDMonterey | August 2021

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(This virtual conversation, hosted by TED technology curator Simone Ross, was recorded March 12, 2021.) Biotech entrepreneur Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw shares lessons learned from the global effort to develop COVID-19 vaccines: namely, the power of collaboration and the importance of equitable access to health care. Learn more about the innovative partnerships that helped create the vaccines — and how India became a crucial player in the supply chain delivering millions of doses to the world.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with BCG. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw · Biotech entrepreneur

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw is a biotech entrepreneur, health care visionary, global influencer and passionate philanthropist.

Simone Ross · TED technology curator

Simone Ross has spent her career observing companies, individuals and ideas at the intersection of tech, the economy and society.

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Learn more about Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw’s work and thoughts on innovation.

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ABOUT TED INSTITUTE

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

TED@BCG | March 2021

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When a new pathogen emerges, our bodies and healthcare systems are left vulnerable. And when this pathogen causes the outbreak of a pandemic, there’s an urgent need for a vaccine to create widespread immunity with minimal loss of life. So how quickly can we develop vaccines when we need them most? Dan Kwartler describes the three phases of vaccine development. [Directed by Good Bad Habits, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by Landon Trimble / Playdate Audio].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Dan Kwartler · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Consider the following scenario: a highly infectious, sometimes deadly respiratory virus infects humans for the first time. It spreads rapidly worldwide, and the WHO declares a pandemic. The death toll starts to rise and everyone is asking the same question: when will the pandemic end? Alex Rosenthal details the three main strategies governments can use to contain and end a pandemic. [Directed by Visorama, narrated by Jack Cutmore-Scott, music by Bamm Bamm Wolfgang].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Alex Rosenthal · Producer

Alex Rosenthal takes everyday experiences and turns them into mind-bending puzzles.

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

5,549,863 views

TED-Ed | June 2020

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For almost a decade, scientists chased the source of a deadly new virus through China’s tallest mountains and most isolated caverns. They finally found it in the bats of Shitou Cave. The virus in question was a coronavirus that caused an epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, in 2003. So what exactly is a coronavirus, and how does it spread? Elizabeth Cox explains. [Directed by Anton Bogaty, narrated by Bethany Cutmore-Scott, music by Jarrett Farkas].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Elizabeth Cox · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Your hands, up close, are anything but smooth. With peaks and valleys, folds and rifts, there are plenty of hiding places for a virus to stick. If you then touch your face, the virus can infect you. But there are two extraordinarily simple ways you can keep that from happening: soap and water, and hand sanitizer. So which is better? Alex Rosenthal and Pall Thordarson investigate. [Directed by Artrake Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson].

MEET THE EDUCATORS

Alex Rosenthal · Producer

Alex Rosenthal takes everyday experiences and turns them into mind-bending puzzles.

Pall Thordarson · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Inside you, a daily battle is being waged and your immune system is at the frontline. Most of the time, you may not even notice it’s there, but over the course of your life your immune system will guard you against hundreds of potentially fatal threats. Emma Bryce explores the different components of this system and how, together, they do their vital work. [Directed by Felipe Grosso & Odirlei Seixas, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Vadeco Schettini].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional

Translation (mRNA to protein) | Biomolecules | MCAT | Khan Academy

850,192 views

Jun 7, 2016  Khan Academy

A deep dive into how mRNA is translated into proteins with the help of ribosomes and tRNA. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep… Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep… MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We’ve also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK… Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_…

mRNA Translation (Basic)

Mar 22, 2010  DNA Learning Center

Originally created for DNA Interactive ( http://www.dnai.org ). TRANSCRIPT: When the RNA copy is complete, it snakes out into the outer part of the cell. Then in a dazzling display of choreography, all the components of a molecular machine lock together around the RNA to form a miniature factory called a ribosome. It translates the genetic information in the RNA into a string of amino acids that will become a protein. Special transfer molecules, the green triangles, bring each amino acid to the ribosome. The amino acids are the small red tips attached to the transfer molecules. There are different transfer molecules for each of the twenty amino acids. Each transfer molecule carries a three letter code that is matched with the RNA in the machine. Now we come to the heart of the process. Inside the ribosome, the RNA is pulled through like a tape. The code for each amino acid is read off, three letters at a time, and matched to three corresponding letters on the transfer molecules. When the right transfer molecule plugs in, the amino acid it carries is added to the growing protein chain. Again, you are watching this in real time. And after a few seconds the assembled protein starts to emerge from the ribosome. Ribosomes can make any kind of protein. It just depends what genetic message you feed in on the RNA. In this case, the end product is hemoglobin. The cells in our bone marrow churn out a hundred trillion molecules of it per second! And as a result, our muscles, brain and all the vital organs in our body receive the oxygen they need.

DNA vs RNA (Updated

1,495,503 views  Aug 29, 2019  Amoeba Sisters

Why is RNA just as cool as DNA? Join the Amoeba Sisters as they compare and contrast RNA with DNA and learn why DNA should be sharing the limelight! Video has updated handout here https://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts and is updated from the old version of this video: https://youtu.be/0Elo-zX1k8M Table of Contents: 00:00 Intro 0:54 Similarities of DNA and RNA 1:35 Contrasting DNA and RNA 2:22 DNA Base Pairing 2:40 RNA Base Pairing 2:57 mRNA, rRNA, and tRNA 4:06 Quick Quiz! Factual Reference: OpenStax Biology 2nd Edition, Biology 2e. OpenStax CNX. Aug 19, 2019 http://cnx.org/contents/8d50a0af-948b…. ****Further Reading Suggestions******************************** -Why did we say DNA is “generally” double stranded and RNA is “generally” single-stranded? Check out these fascinating exceptions! https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti… -What do we mean when we encouraged exploring the chirality of DNA—and other important characteristics—that our cartoons cannot show well? Check out https://www.nature.com/scitable/topic… -RNA World Hypothesis? Here is a great resource from NOVA to learn more: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/labs/la… *************************************************************** The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky’s certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. Learn more about our videos here: https://www.amoebasisters.com/our-videos Support Us? https://www.amoebasisters.com/support-us Our Resources: Biology Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… GIFs: https://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: https://www.amoebasisters.com/handout… Comics: https://www.amoebasisters.com/paramec… Unlectured Series: https://www.amoebasisters.com/unlectured Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasiste… Visit our Redbubble store at https://www.amoebasisters.com/store TIPS FOR VIEWING EDU YOUTUBE VIDEOS: Want to learn tips for viewing edu YouTube videos including changing the speed, language, viewing the transcript, etc? https://www.amoebasisters.com/pinkys-… MUSIC: Our intro music designed and performed by Jeremiah Cheshire. End music in this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/… COMMUNITY: We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube’s community guidelines and how YouTube handles comments that are reported by the community. We also reserve the right to remove comments. TRANSLATIONS: While we don’t allow dubbing of our videos, we do gladly accept subtitle translations from our community. Some translated subtitles on our videos were translated by the community using YouTube’s community-contributed subtitle feature. After the feature was discontinued by YouTube, we have another option for submitting translated subtitles here: https://www.amoebasisters.com/pinkys-… We want to thank our amazing community for the generosity of their time in continuing to create translated subtitles. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.

Protein Synthesis (Updated)

3,653,242 views

Jan 18, 2018  Amoeba Sisters

Explore the steps of transcription and translation in protein synthesis! This video explains several reasons why proteins are so important before explaining the roles of mRNA, rRNA, and tRNA in the steps of protein synthesis! Expand details for contents and resources. ?Video handouts and resources on http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts. This video replaces our old protein synthesis video: https://youtu.be/h5mJbP23Buo Table of Contents: 00:00 Intro 0:46 Why are proteins important? 1:48 Introduction to RNA 2:22 Steps of Protein Synthesis 2:43 Transcription 3:54 Translation 6:08 Introduction to mRNA Codon Chart 7:51 Quick Summary Image Vocabulary in this video includes DNA, mRNA, rRNA, and tRNA. This video mentions that proteins can be made of 1 or more polypeptide chains and that proteins typically experience folding and other modifications (to be functional proteins.) Codons and the amino acids they code for are represented by standard charts that can be found in the public domain. While the rectangle chart is the common format, there may be other ways to represent the information. P.S. If learning about mutations, check out this cool codon chart that includes mutations(!!) in the public domain: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi… Our videos are designed to introduce basic concepts and hopefully to inspire students to stay curious about the content. We simply cannot include all of the exceptions and minute details in a video under 10 minutes, and this is why we so frequently remind people of this in our videos. We want students to go beyond our videos to explore the depth of the material. P.S. On our website, we emphasize that our videos contain science comics- not scientific illustrations. In real life, amoebas don’t look like our characters. Our illustrated cell cartoons are definitely not to scale. Nitrogen and carbon don’t tap dance. DNA is right-handed (but there are exceptions- worth a google) and doesn’t have eyes…a face…or a top hat… Learn more about the purpose of our videos here: http://www.amoebasisters.com/our-vide… The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky’s certification and experience in teaching biology at the high school level. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us… We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/bi… Support Us? https://www.amoebasisters.com/support-us Our Resources: Biology Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… GIFs: https://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: https://www.amoebasisters.com/handout… Comics: https://www.amoebasisters.com/paramec… Unlectured Series: https://www.amoebasisters.com/unlectured Connect with us! Website: https://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasiste… Visit our Redbubble store at https://www.amoebasisters.com/store TIPS FOR VIEWING EDU YOUTUBE VIDEOS: Want to learn tips for viewing edu YouTube videos including changing the speed, language, viewing the transcript, etc? https://www.amoebasisters.com/pinkys-… MUSIC: Music in this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/… COMMUNITY: We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube’s community guidelines and how YouTube handles comments that are reported by the community. We also reserve the right to remove comments. TRANSLATIONS: While we don’t allow dubbing of our videos, we do gladly accept subtitle translations from our community. Some translated subtitles on our videos were translated by the community using YouTube’s community-contributed subtitle feature. After the feature was discontinued by YouTube, we have another option for submitting translated subtitles here: https://www.amoebasisters.com/pinkys-… We want to thank our amazing community for the generosity of their time in continuing to create translated subtitles. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.

BIOLOGY
Strange DNA ‘borgs’ discovered in California

(Shutterstock)

Scientists accidentally discovered a mysterious — and unusually large — DNA structure deep in the mud in California wetlands. The structure, known as a “Borg,” likely belongs to a single-celled organism and carries many genes that are unknown to science. It’s not totally clear what these massive strings of DNA do, but they may help supercharge the organisms’ ability to break down chemicals in the soil.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/29)

YOUR BODY
DeepMind says it can predict the shape of every protein in the human body

(JUAN GAERTNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY via Getty Images)

The artificial intelligence (A.I.) company DeepMind says it will soon release a database of the shape of every protein known to science — more than 100 million.

That’s every structured protein in the human body, as well as in 20 research species, including yeast and E. coli bacteria, fruit flies and mice. Prior to the company’s AlphaFold project, which uses artificial intelligence to predict protein shapes, only 17% of the proteins in the human body had their structures identified, according to Technology Review.”It looks astonishingly impressive,” Tom Ellis, a synthetic biologist at Imperial College London, told Technology Review.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/29)

CURIOUS CREATURES
Horny sponges that lived nearly 1 billion years ago may be the earliest animals on Earth

(Elizabeth Turner, Laurentian University)

That sea sponge hanging in your shower may be able to trace its evolutionary lineage to nearly a billion years ago, according to fossils that could be the oldest examples of animal life on Earth.

The 890-million-year-old fossils of what may be ancient sponges were found in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and their tiny and delicately branching tendrils are invisible to the naked eye. But under a microscope, the preserved organic tissue revealed a mesh-like structure that was strikingly similar to that of skeleton fibers in modern bath sponges, which are part of a soft-bodied-sponge group known as keratose demosponges, or horny sponges.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/28)

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Ignoring climate change will yield ‘untold suffering,’ panel of 14,000 scientists warns

(NASA)

Nearly 14,000 scientists have signed a new climate emergency paper, warning that “untold suffering” awaits the human race if we don’t start tackling global warming head-on, effective immediately.

Earth’s vitals have only deteriorated over the last two years, with 18 of the report’s 31 categories showing new all-time record highs or lows, the authors wrote. Greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time high, while glacial ice thickness is at its lowest point in 71 years of record keeping, the report found. The world is richer than it’s ever been (measured by global GDP), while the sky is more polluted than ever (measured by carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide concentrations in the atmosphere).

Full Story: LiveScience (7/28)

AMAZING EARTH
Iceland may be the tip of a sunken continent

(Norbert Figueroa / EyeEm via Getty Images)

Iceland may be the last exposed remnant of a nearly Texas-size continent — called Icelandia — that sank beneath the North Atlantic Ocean about 10 million years ago, according to a new theory proposed by an international team of geophysicists and geologists.

The theory goes against long-standing ideas about the formation of Iceland and the North Atlantic, but the researchers say the theory explains both the geological features of the ocean floor and why Earth’s crust beneath Iceland is so much thicker than it should be. Outside experts not affiliated with the research told Live Science they are skeptical that Icelandia exists based on the evidence collected so far.

Full Story: LiveScience (7/28)

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Biden honors victims of Tulsa race massacre on 100th anniversary, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, VOX, Tulsa Public Schools, HISTORY News and AP News

Biden honors victims of Tulsa race massacre on 100th anniversary, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, VOX, Tulsa Public Schools, HISTORY News and AP News

PBS News: Biden honors victims of Tulsa race massacre on 100th anniversary, 6.01,2021 

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 31 & June 1, 2021

PBS News: How art is retelling powerful stories of Tulsa massacre, capturing community’s hopes, May 28, 2021 

Washington Week PBS: America Faces Its History of Race Violence, May 28, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – May 31st, 2021

 NBC News: Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – May 30th, 2021

CBS News: “Tulsa 1921: An American Tragedy”

VOX: The massacre of Tulsa’s “Black Wall Street”

Tulsa Public Schools: The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now

HISTORY News: ‘Black Wall Street’ Before, During and After the Tulsa Race Massacre – PHOTOS

AP News: Hundreds gather at historic Tulsa church’s prayer wall

 

WATCH LIVE: Biden honors victims of Tulsa race massacre on 100th anniversary

Streamed live 5 hours ago, 6.01,2021  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 1, 2021

Fundraiser

Jun 1, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate Tuesday on the NewsHour, the anniversary of the Tulsa massacre renews calls to address the massive and widening racial wealth gap in the U.S. Then, Latin America sees huge spikes in COVID cases across the region after an explosion of cases in Brazil. And, questions arise about applications and tuition for community colleges amid a precipitous drop in enrollment, especially among students of color. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: JBS meat plants downed globally after cyberattack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXB-7… Biden makes history with Tulsa visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAP0k… What would reparations for Black Americans look like? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xv2im… COVID is driving political, economic crises in Latin America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cv4t0… How community colleges are retooling to raise enrollment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uujC1… The ‘enormous’ pressures of professional sports https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DiBS… Adichie on being unprepared for the ‘pain of absence’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kPkC… Cleveland barbershop offers haircut, and a COVID-19 vaccine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4BZY… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, May 31, 2021

May 31, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, honoring those who gave all for our country, while celebrating the chance to gather once again for Memorial Day. Then, looking at the painful past and how the racial terror of the Tulsa massacre still resonates 100 years later. And, a new museum strives to remember — but not glorify —the toll of war. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS As COVID restrictions ease, here’s how the country marked Memorial Day https://youtu.be/NcLPVfETSaQ News Wrap: Miami Manhunt for 3 banquet hall shooters continues https://youtu.be/Tw1rsNVXrCI How a racist white mob ruined ‘Black Wall Street’ 100 years ago https://youtu.be/3kmRc1OX284 Tulsa’s Black community still waiting for ‘atonement, repair and respect’ https://youtu.be/lCq0iZJKW9w Why this Indianapolis school district will keep remote learning on the table this fall https://youtu.be/kKbtibd0Mh8 Amy Walter and Errin Haines on Texas voting law, filibuster rules, Biden agenda https://youtu.be/AEgjJ-EndZw  The dangers of reporting from Russia during the Cold War https://youtu.be/F-s50VxLa4I Massachusetts museum tells the hulking history of wars https://youtu.be/N5hJympHVfU Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

How art is retelling powerful stories of Tulsa massacre, capturing community’s hopes

May 28, 2021  PBS NewsHour

100 years ago Monday, a white mob descended on a Black neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma, killing people and burning homes and businesses. The Tulsa massacre, as it came to be known, is being remembered in many ways — one of them, an art and history project known as the Greenwood Art Project. Jeffrey Brown has our report for our arts and culture series, CANVAS. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

 

America Faces Its History of Race Violence | Washington Week | May 28, 2021

May 28, 2021  Washington Week PBS

Next week marks the 100-year anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre that ravaged a community known as “Black Wall Street.” The panel also discussed the 1917 East St. Louis Massacre, the gaps in our education, & what the major political and culture changes seen in the country over the past year. Panel: Trymaine Lee of MSNBC, Wesley Lowery of 60 Minutes+, Ayesha Rascoe of NPR, Sara Sidner of CNN Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – May 31st, 2021

May 31, 2021  NBC News

New TSA record set as millions travel over holiday weekend, controversial Texas voting law temporarily derailed, and new video released in Miami mass shooting. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 01:42 Holiday Travel 04:36 Texas Voting Battle 06:24 Miami Mass Shooting Manhunt 08:25 Tulsa Confront Trauma Of Massacre 10:55 Dangerous Drought 13:39 Theaters Reopen 15:05 Wedding Prices Surge 16:49 Memorial Day: Honoring Those Who Served » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – May 30th, 2021

May 30, 2021  NBC News

Former Rep. Barbara Comstock and Rep. Jason Crow (D-Colo.) discuss the failure to form a bipartisan Jan. 6 commission. Matthew Pottinger and Dr. Peter Hotez explain why the Covid-19 lab leak theory is gaining legitimacy from the Biden administration. Geoff Bennett, Stephanie Cutter, Sara Fagen and Ayesha Rascoe join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

“Tulsa 1921: An American Tragedy”

Jun 2, 2021

CBS News

It’s been 100 years since the Tulsa Race Massacre, a two-day attack on Black Americans in the thriving business district of Greenwood. Hear from survivors, descendants of victims and thought leaders in the CBS News special, “Tulsa 1921: An American Tragedy,” anchored by “CBS This Morning” co-host Gayle King.

1 month ago

Rosewood 1923 an American tragedy, Clinton massacre 1875 an American tragedy, Ocoee massacre 1920 an American tragedy, Atlanta 1906 an American tragedy Chicago 1919 an American tragedy, New Orleans 1866 an American tragedy…. There many, many more American tragedies!

VOX: The massacre of Tulsa’s “Black Wall Street”

Feb 27, 2019

White mobs destroyed “Black Wall Street” in 1921. But where are the victims’ bodies? Help our reporting on hidden histories. Submit a story idea here: http://bit.ly/2RhjxMy 100 years ago, a white mob destroyed an American neighborhood called “Black Wall Street,” murdering an estimated 300 people in Tulsa, Oklahoma. That incident — known as the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre — has been largely left out of US history books. Today, a century later, the city still has a lot of questions. For one, where are the bodies of the victims? As the city’s mayor re-opens the search for mass graves, we take a look at what happened back in 1921…and why finding these graves still matters to the people of Tulsa. For more reading, check out the links below: Vox’s reporting on an eyewitness account of the horrific attack: https://www.vox.com/2016/6/1/11827994… The Washington Post’s in-depth story on the massacre and the current challenges of gentrification: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/l… And to take a look through more digitized photos, audio, and documents from 1921, check out the Tulsa Historical Society’s collection: https://www.tulsahistory.org/exhibit/… Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: https://vox.com/missing-chapter Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! http://bit.ly/2RhjxMy? Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now

Jun 1, 2018

Tulsa Public Schools

UPDATED April 2021: For a new video series, lesson plans, and more resources about the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, continue the journey here: www.tulsaschools.org/tulsaracemassacre

 

Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images

HISTORY News: ‘Black Wall Street’ Before, During and After the Tulsa Race Massacre – PHOTOS

BY  MISSY SULLIVAN

At the turn of the 20th century, African Americans founded and developed the Greenwood district in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Built on what had formerly been Indian Territory, the community grew and flourished as a Black economic and cultural mecca—until May 31, 1921.

That’s when a white mob began a rampage through some 35 square blocks, decimating the community known proudly as “Black Wall Street.” Armed rioters, many deputized by local police, looted and burned down businesses, homes, schools, churches, a hospital, hotel, public library, newspaper offices and more. While the official death toll of the Tulsa race massacre was 36, historians estimate it may have been as high as 300. As many as 10,000 people were left homeless.

The incident stands as one most horrific acts of racial violence, and domestic terrorism, ever committed on American soil.

WATCH: The full episode of Tulsa Burning: The 1921 Race Massacre online now.

In May 2021, 100 years after the massacre, 107-year-old Viola Fletcher testified before Congress: “On May 31, of ‘21, I went to bed in my family’s home in Greenwood,” she recounted. “The neighborhood I fell asleep in that night was rich, not just in terms of wealth, but in culture…and heritage. My family had a beautiful home. We had great neighbors. I had friends to play with. I felt safe. I had everything a child could need. I had a bright future.”

Then, she said, came the murderous rampage, still vivid in her mind 100 years later: “I still see Black men being shot, Black bodies lying in the street. I still smell smoke and see fire. I still see Black businesses being burned. I still hear airplanes flying overhead. I hear the screams.”

Below, a selection of photos that show Greenwood before, during and after the tragedy:

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Families of Anita Williams Christopher and David Owen Williams

North Greenwood Avenue in Tulsa (above), prior to the 1921 Tulsa race massacre, was a main thoroughfare of the Greenwood commercial district. This photograph was taken looking north down the avenue from East Archer Street. Between segregation laws that prevented Black residents from shopping in white neighborhoods, and the desire to keep money circulating in their own community, Greenwood residents collectively funneled their cash into local Black businesses. Greenwood became a robust and self-sustaining community, which boasted barber shops and salons, clothing stores, jewelers, restaurants, taverns and pool halls, movie houses and grocers, as well as offices for doctors, dentists and lawyers.

READ MORE: 9 Entrepreneurs Who Helped Build ‘Black Wall Street’

Greenwood: Tulsa’s Black Wall Street

GALLERY

At the time of the massacre, Greenwood was considered by many to be the wealthiest Black enclave in the nation. As the seven photos above show, it wasn’t uncommon to see its residents stylishly dressed. Some boasted new luxury motorcars.

READ MORE: Tulsa’s ‘Black Wall Street’ Flourished as a Self-Contained Hub in the Early 1900s

The incident began on the morning of May 30, 1921, after a young Black man named Dick Rowland, who worked shining shoes, rode the elevator of Tulsa’s Drexel building to use one of the few available segregated public restrooms downtown. After the female elevator operator screamed, Rowland fled the elevator and rumors quickly spread of an alleged sexual assault. The next day, he was arrested, leading to an armed confrontation outside the courthouse between a growing white crowd and Black men hoping to defend Rowland from being lynched. As things became heated and shots were fired, the vastly outnumbered African Americans retreated to the Greenwood district. The white group followed, and as the night unfolded, violence exploded.

Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images

Throughout that night and into June 1, much of Greenwood became enveloped in billowing dark smoke, as members of the mob went from house to house and store to store, looting and then torching buildings. Fleeing residents were sometimes shot down in the streets. Many survivors report low-flying planes, some raining down bullets or inflammables.

READ MORE: What Role Did Airplanes Play in the Tulsa Race Massacre?

GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Among the many buildings looted and torched by the white mob was the Mount Zion Baptist Church, above, an impressive brick structure that had opened its doors less than two months earlier. It was one of numerous houses of worship destroyed in the massacre.

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

The east corner of Greenwood Avenue and East Archer Street, the epicenter of “Black Wall Street,” is shown above, in the early aftermath of the attack. Among the thoroughfare’s landmarks left in smoldering ruins were the Stradford Hotel and the Dreamland Theater.

Universal HIstory Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

By noon of June 1, Oklahoma Governor Robertson declared martial law and sent in the Oklahoma National Guard. Officials arrested and detained thousands of Black Tulsans, shepherding them to the local convention center and fairgrounds. Above, the rear view of a truck transporting Black people to detainment.

Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images

National Guard troops carrying rifles with bayonets escort unarmed Black men to detainment, above.

Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Above, a truck is shown carrying soldiers and Black men during the Tulsa race massacre. Officials rounded up Greenwood’s Black residents, deeming them to be the primary threat to law and order—instead of any members of the white mob who had murdered and pillaged. Indeed, for decades after, the incident was erroneously characterized as a “race riot,” implying that it had been instigated by the Black community. No one was ever held to account for the destruction or loss of life.

LISTEN: ‘Blindspot: Tulsa Burning’ from The HISTORY® Channel and WNYC Studios

Library of Congress, American National Red Cross Photograph Collection

After being rounded up under martial law, traumatized Greenwood residents were kept under armed guard—some for hours, some for days. To be released, Black Tulsans had to be vouched for by an employer or white citizen.

Library of Congress, American National Red Cross Photograph Collection

At Tulsa’s American Red Cross hospital, victims of the massacre are shown still recovering from injuries months later. More than 800 people were treated for injuries.

Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images

According to the 2001 Tulsa Race Riot Commission report, the most comprehensive review of the massacre, in the year after the attacks, Tulsa residents filed riot-related claims against the city valued at over $1.8 million dollars. But the city commission, like insurance companies, denied most of the claims—one exception being when a white business owner received compensation for guns taken from his shop. Above, Black Tulsans salvaged what they could from their burned homes and businesses and began to rebuild on their own.

GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

November 1921: With millions in property damage and no help from the city, the rebuilding of Greenwood nonetheless began almost immediately. 

GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Many Black Tulsa residents fled the city, and never returned. But many stayed and started from scratch—some housed in Red Cross tents until they could rebuild their homes and, later, community landmarks like the Dreamland Theater. In 2001, the Tulsa Race Riot Commission report recommended that survivors be paid reparations, calling it “a moral obligation.” The pursuit of restitution continues.

TAGS: BLACK HISTORY

BY  MISSY SULLIVAN

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.history.com/news/tulsa-massacre-black-wall-street-before-and-after-photos

 

HISTORY News: ‘Black Wall Street’ Before, During and After the Tulsa Race Massacre – PHOTOS

 

AP News: Hundreds gather at historic Tulsa church’s prayer wall

https://apnews.com/article/tulsa-race-massacre-centennial-bbfa1f6ad42b104d258c13999a2d7aa4

By PETER SMITH May 31, 2021

 

1 of 21

People pray during the dedication of a prayer wall at the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

 

2Rev. Jesse Jackson meets people after the dedication of a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal

Church in the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla.

The church was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing,

looting and leveling a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

3 of 21

People hold their hands on a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Greenwood neighborhood

during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church was largely destroyed when a white

mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling a 35-square-block area.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

 

4 of 21

People raise up their arms during the dedication of a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in

the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church

was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling

a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

5 of 21

People pray as they hold their hands on a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Greenwood

neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church was largely destroyed

when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling a 35-square-block area.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

 

6 of 21

Clergy and religious leaders hold their hands on a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in

the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church

was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling

a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

7 of 21

People pray at the dedication of a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Greenwood

neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church was largely

destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling

a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

8 of 21

Edna Osborne, center holds her head down in prayer during the dedication of a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African

Methodist Episcopal Church in the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31,

2021, in Tulsa, Okla. The church was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921,

burning, killing, looting and leveling a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

9 of 21

Faith Hailey, left, and Brian Hailey touch hold their hands on a prayer wall outside of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal

Church in the Greenwood neighborhood during the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla.

The church was largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing,

looting and leveling a 35-square-block area. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

10 of 21

In this May 28, 2021, photo, Rev. Robert R.A. Turner, pastor of the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church, prays in

the sanctuary of the church between meetings around centennial commemorations of the Tulsa Race Massacre in Tulsa, Okla.

Only the basement remained of the church, partially destroyed in the massacre in 1921 that destroyed the area known as Black Wall Street.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

 

11 of 21

People attend a joint service for the centennial of the Tulsa Race Massacre at First Baptist Church of North Tulsa, Sunday, May 30, 2021,

in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

12 of 21

A woman views a mural at 322 North Greenwood during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre centennial Monday, May 31, 2021 in Tulsa, Okla.

Hundreds have gathered for an interfaith service dedicating a prayer wall outside historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in

Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood. Monday’s event comes on the centennial of the first day of one of the deadliest racist massacres in

the nation. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)

 

13 of 21

Meg Chang views the installation called “Society’s Cage” after the dedication of the Prayer Wall for Racial Healing at Vernon AME Church

Monday, May 31, 2021 in Tulsa, Okla. Hundreds have gathered for an interfaith service dedicating a prayer wall outside historic Vernon

African Methodist Episcopal Church in Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood. Monday’s event comes on the centennial of the first day of one

of the deadliest racist massacres in the nation. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)

 

14 of 21

Ana Nunez, right, and Connor Coney embrace as they visit a makeshift memorial beside stairs leading to a now empty lot near the historic

Greenwood district during centennial commemorations of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

 

15 of 21

Raekeisha Watkins visits flowers left as a memorial for the Tulsa Race Massacre near the historic greenwood district during

centennial commemorations of the massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

16 of 21

Ana Nunez, right, and Connor Coney embrace as they visit a makeshift memorial beside stairs leading to a now empty lot near

the historic Greenwood district during centennial commemorations of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa,

Okla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

17 of 21

Ana Nunez, left, and Connor Coney embrace as they visit flowers left at a memorial for the Tulsa Race Massacre near the historic

greenwood district during centennial commemorations of the massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

 

18 of 21

People hold hands after leaving flowers besides others at a makeshift memorial beside stairs leading to a now empty lot near

the historic greenwood district during centennial commemorations of the Tulsa Race Massacre, Monday, May 31, 2021, in Tulsa, Okla.

(AP Photo/John Locher)

 

19 of 21

A sign is pictured Oaklawn Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., nearly 100 years after the Tulsa race massacre. Fencing has been erected

and markers placed in the ground in preparation for the start of mapping, site preparation and excavations of Tulsa race massacre

victims in mass graves beginning June 1, 2021. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

 

20 of 21

The headstones of Reuben Everett, left, and Eddie Lockard, right, victims of the Tulsa race massacre, are pictured with flowers

Monday, May 31, 2021, at Oaklawn Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., nearly 100 years after the massacre. Fencing has been erected

and markers placed in the ground in preparation for the start of mapping, site preparation and excavations of Tulsa race massacre

victims in mass graves beginning June 1, 2021. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

 

21 of 21

The headstones of Reuben Everett, left, and Eddie Lockard, right, victims of the Tulsa race massacre, are pictured with flowers Monday,

May 31, 2021, at Oaklawn Cemetery in Tulsa, Okla., nearly 100 years after the massacre. Fencing has been erected and markers placed

in the ground in preparation for the start of mapping, site preparation and excavations of Tulsa race massacre victims in mass graves

beginning June 1, 2021. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Hundreds gathered Monday for an interfaith service dedicating a prayer wall outside historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church in Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood on the centennial of the first day of one of the deadliest racist massacres in the nation.

National civil rights leaders, including the Revs. Jesse Jackson and William Barber, joined multiple local faith leaders offering prayers and remarks outside the church that was under construction and largely destroyed when a white mob descended on the prosperous Black neighborhood in 1921, burning, killing, looting and leveling a 35-square-block area. Estimates of the death toll range from dozens to 300.

Barber, a civil and economic rights activist, said he was “humbled even to stand on this holy ground.”

“You can kill the people but you cannot kill the voice of the blood.”

Although the church was nearly destroyed in the massacre, parishioners continued to meet in the basement, and it was rebuilt several years later, becoming a symbol of the resilience of Tulsa’s Black community. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2018.

As the ceremony came to an end, participants put their hands on the prayer wall along the side of the sanctuary while soloist Santita Jackson sang “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” Traffic hummed on a nearby interstate that cuts through the Greenwood District, which was rebuilt after the massacre but slowly deteriorated 50 years later after homes were taken by eminent domain as part of urban renewal in the 1970s.

Full Coverage: Tulsa Race Massacre

Among those who spoke at the outdoor ceremony were Democratic U.S. Reps. Barbara Lee of California, and Lisa Brunt Rochester and U.S. Sen. Chris Coons, both from Delaware. Rochester connected the efforts toward reparations in Tulsa with a wider effort: pending House legislation that would create a commission to study and propose reparations for African Americans.

“We’re here to remember, to mourn, to rebuild equitably,” Rochester said.

Through the course of a drizzly afternoon, visitors wearing rain gear walked along Greenwood Avenue, photographing historic sites and markers.

Many took time to read plaques on the sidewalk, naming numerous Black-owned buildings and businesses that were destroyed during the 1921 massacre, and indicating whether they had ever been rebuilt.

Monday’s slate of activities commemorating the massacre was supposed to culminate with a “Remember & Rise” headline event at nearby ONEOK Field, featuring Grammy-award-winning singer and songwriter John Legend and a keynote address from voting rights activist Stacey Abrams. But that event was scrapped late last week after an agreement couldn’t be reached over monetary payments to three survivors of the deadly attack, a situation that highlighted broader debates over reparations for racial injustice.

In a statement tweeted Sunday, Legend didn’t specifically address the cancellation of the event, but said: “The road to restorative justice is crooked and rough — and there is space for reasonable people to disagree about the best way to heal the collective trauma of white supremacy. But one thing that is not up for debate — one fact we must hold with conviction — is that the path to reconciliation runs through truth and accountability.”

On Monday night, the Centennial Commission planned to host a candlelight vigil downtown to honor the victims of the massacre, and President Joe Biden is scheduled to visit Tulsa on Tuesday.

___

For more AP coverage of the Tulsa Race Massacre anniversary, go to https://apnews.com/hub/tulsa-race-massacre

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Americans Celebrate Juneteenth After It Becomes A National Holiday, PBS News, NBC News, NPR, The Atlantic, and The Public Domain Review

Americans Celebrate Juneteenth After It Becomes A National Holiday, PBS News, NBC News, NPR, The Atlantic, and The Public Domain Review

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode June 17, 18 & 19, 2021

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – June 20th, 2021, NBC News

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – June 17th & 18th, 2021, NBC News

Can You Hear Us Now: Juneteenth Edition, Jun 19, 2021  NBC News

NPR: Photos – Americans Celebrate Juneteenth After It Becomes A National Holiday

NPR: Slavery Didn’t End On Juneteenth. What You Should Know About This Important Day

The Atlantic: Black Joy-Not Corporate Acknowledgment – Is the Heart of Juneteenth 

 The Public Domain Review: Early Photographs of Juneteenth Celebrations

 

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode June 19, 2021

Jun 19, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, June 19, the nation’s newest federal holiday, Juneteenth, and Iran’s hard-line candidate, Ebrahim Raisi wins the presidential election. Also, inside Maryland’s truth and reconciliation process as part of the state’s reckoning with its racist, violent past. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 18, 2021

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Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 17, 2021

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Jun 17, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate Thursday on the NewsHour, the Affordable Care Act survives a third major Supreme Court argument. We talk to the secretary of health and human services about the challenges still ahead. Then, counterterrorism forces in Iraq search for remnants of the Islamic State — with civilians often caught in the middle. And, we examine the emotional toll gun violence takes on youth who have lost a loved one. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – June 20th, 2021

Jun 20, 2021   NBC News

Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rob Portman (R-Ohio) discuss the future of bipartisanship and President Biden’s infrastructure plan. Fiona Hill breaks down the Biden-Putin summit. Ashley Parker, Cornell Belcher, Brad Todd and Amna Nawaz join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

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Jun 18, 2021  NBC News

A look into the new Covid variant and what it’s mutation means for U.S. residents, fact checking the ongoing election audit in Maricopa County, AZ, as it enters the final stage of the controversial process, Juneteenth cooking traditions and the significance behind them.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – June 17th, 2021

Jun 17, 2021  NBC News

Cities and states across the west experiencing record high temperatures, Supreme Court rejects challenge to Affordable Care Act, and White House to develop antiviral Covid pills as delta variant spreads. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:41 Record Breaking Heat Wave In The West 04:56 Obamacare Supreme Court Victory 07:23 Anti-Covid Pills 09:08 Biden’s Next Challenges 10:39 America The Vulnerable: No Access To Water 14:53 Juneteenth National Holiday 18:36 Inspiring America: Love Dad » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #Obamacare #Covid

Can You Hear Us Now: Juneteenth Edition

Jun 19, 2021  NBC News

This is a rebroadcast which originally aired on June 19, 2020. NBC News Now and NBCBLK present ‘Can You Hear Us Now: Juneteenth’ an examination of how free African Americans really are, hosted by Trymaine Lee. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC

NPR: Photos – Americans Celebrate Juneteenth After It Becomes A National Holiday

June 19, 20217:12 PM ET

ELENA MOORE Twitter

People watch the Juneteenth Parade in historic Galveston, Texas on Saturday — where 156 years ago news reached the city that slavery had been abolished.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Juneteenth celebrations are underway across the United States, commemorating the 156th anniversary of the date that is often considered the end of chattel slavery in the country.

Events this year come two days after Presidet Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law, which is the latest national holiday to be recognized since Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 1983.

 

POLITICS

Juneteenth Is Now A Federal Holiday

It dates to June 19, 1865, when Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union Army arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce that enslaved people were now free. This came two months after the end of the Civil War and over two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which was supposed to free all slaves living in Confederate states.

The holiday has gone on to be a cause for celebration, remembrance and a call to action as Americans continue to reckon with the country’s history of systemic racism.

HISTORY

Slavery Didn’t End On Juneteenth. Here’s What You Should Know About This Important Day

Commemorative events ranging from festivals and celebrations to rallies and memorials are expected to take place throughout the weekend.

Galveston

People admire a new mural created for Juneteenth that chronicles what happened in Galveston 156 years ago. The mural was created as part of the city’s Juneteenth Legacy Project.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

A Black Lives Matter banner is draped off the back of a pickup truck during a city’s parade.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Brooklyn

Activists unveil a new memorial honoring George Floyd in Flatbush Junction on Saturday morning. Terrance Floyd, center, the brother of George Floyd, attended and spoke at the event.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Dancers of the P.U.S.H. (Practice Until Something Happens) dance team perform at a Juneteenth rally outside the Brooklyn Library.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Tulsa

Marlon F. Hall leads a yoga class next to Interstate 244, which runs through the Tulsa neighborhood of Greenwood, the location of the Tulsa Race Massacre 100 years ago. Tulsa’s celebration of Juneteenth comes less than three weeks after the anniversary.

Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

A father and son take a selfie while visiting Greenwood’s Black Wall Street Memorial on Saturday.

Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Louisville

Louisville residents march in honor of Juneteenth, steered by the River City Drum Corps. The crowd heads to the launch of the Roots 101 Museum’s newest art project, which spotlights the city’s history with slavery.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A woman displays an embroidered “1865” in her hair while attending the launch of a new art project at Louisville’s Roots 101 Museum on Saturday. The project, titled “On the Banks of Freedom,” explores Louisville’s participation in slavery and commemorates the lives of enslaved people whose names were not recorded.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Detroit

A mural displaying the words “Power To The People” is repainted in honor of Juneteenth by students studying at the University Prep Art Design. The mural was first painted last year for the holiday.

Ed White/AP

Atlanta

Participants walk in Atlanta’s Juneteenth parade, rain or shine.

Megan Varner/Getty Images

Food vendors gather together on Friday in Atlanta’s Castleberry Hill to honor Juneteenth. The event, named, “Celebration of Truth,” was hosted by The Black News Network.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Black News Chan

Boston

Acting Mayor Kim Janey, right, takes a photo as Bostonians gather together on Friday in Nubian Square. Janey is the first woman and first Black person to serve as mayor of Boston.

Elise Amendola/AP

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/1008368899/photos-americans-celebrate-juneteenth-after-it-becomes-a-national-holiday

 

NPR: Slavery Didn’t End On Juneteenth. What You Should Know About This Important Day

June 17, 20216:00 AM ET

SHARON PRUITT-YOUNG

 

Emancipation Day is celebrated in 1905 in Richmond, Va., the onetime capital of the Confederacy.

Library of Congress

It goes by many names. Whether you call it Emancipation Day, Freedom Day or the country’s second Independence Day, Juneteenth is one of the most important anniversaries in our nation’s history.

On June 19, 1865, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, who had fought for the Union, led a force of soldiers to Galveston, Texas, to deliver a very important message: The war was finally over, the Union had won, and it now had the manpower to enforce the end of slavery.

The announcement came two months after the effective conclusion of the Civil War, and even longer since President Abraham Lincoln had first signed the Emancipation Proclamation, but many enslaved Black people in Texas still weren’t free, even after that day.

That was 156 years ago. Here are the basics of Juneteenth that everyone should know.

What Juneteenth represents

First things first: Juneteenth gets its name from combining “June” and “nineteenth,” the day that Granger arrived in Galveston, bearing a message of freedom for the slaves there.

Upon his arrival, he read out General Order No. 3, informing the residents that slavery would no longer be tolerated and that all slaves were now free and would henceforth be treated as hired workers if they chose to remain on the plantations, according to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

General Order No. 3 was the final execution and fulfillment of the terms of the Emancipation Proclamation. The people to whom this order was addressed were the last group of Americans to be informed that all formerly enslaved persons were now free.

National Archives

“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired laborer,” the order reads, in part.

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It’s perhaps unsurprising that many former slaves did not stay on the plantations as workers and instead left in search of new beginnings or to find family members who had been sold away.

“It immediately changed the game for 250,000 people,” Shane Bolles Walsh, a lecturer with the University of Maryland’s African American Studies Department, told NPR.

Enslaved Black people, now free, had ample cause to celebrate. As Felix Haywood, a former slave, recalled: “Everybody went wild. We all felt like heroes … just like that, we were free.”

Slavery did not end on Juneteenth

When Granger arrived in Galveston, there still existed around 250,000 slaves and they were not all freed immediately, or even soon. It was not uncommon for slave owners, unwilling to give up free labor, to refuse to release their slaves until forced to, in person, by a representative of the government, historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. wrote. Some would wait until one final harvest was complete, and some would just outright refuse to submit. It was a perilous time for Black people, and some former slaves who were freed or attempted to get free were attacked and killed.

For Confederate states like Texas, even before Juneteenth, there existed a “desire to hold on to that system as long as they could,” Walsh explained to NPR.

Before the reading of General Order No. 3, many slave owners in Confederate states simply chose not to tell their slaves about the Emancipation Proclamation and did not honor it. They got away with it because, before winning the war, Union soldiers were largely unable to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation in Southern states. Still, even though slavery in America would not truly come to an end until the ratification of the 13th Amendment, the Emancipation Proclamation still played a pivotal role in that process, historian Lonnie Bunch told NPR in 2013.

“What the Emancipation Proclamation does that’s so important is it begins a creeping process of emancipation where the federal government is now finally taking firm stands to say slavery is wrong and it must end,” Bunch said.

People have celebrated Juneteenth any way they can

After they were freed, some former slaves and their descendants would travel to Galveston annually in honor of Juneteenth. That tradition soon spread to other states, but it wasn’t uncommon for white people to bar Black people from celebrating in public spaces, forcing Black people to get creative. In one such case, Black community leaders in Houston saved $1,000 to purchase land in 1872 that would be devoted specifically to Juneteenth celebrations, according to the Houston Parks and Recreation Department. That land became Emancipation Park, a name that it still bears.

Juneteenth is celebrated in Houston’s Emancipation Park, which was created specifically for such celebrations, in 1880.

Wikimedia Commons

” ‘If you want to commemorate something, you literally have to buy land to commemorate it on’ is, I think, just a really potent example of the long-lasting reality of white supremacy,” Walsh said.

Nevertheless, Black Americans found a way to continue to celebrate and lift one another up. Early on, Juneteenth celebrations often involved helping newly freed Black folks learn about their voting rights, according to the Texas State Historical Association. Rodeos and horseback riding were also common. Now, Juneteenth celebrations commonly involve cookouts, parades, church services, musical performances and other public events, Walsh explained.

People celebrate last year’s Juneteenth by riding horses through Washington Park in Chicago. This year, it is a federal holiday.

Natasha Moustache/Getty Images

It’s a day to “commemorate the hardships endured by ancestors,” Walsh said. He added, “It really exemplifies the survival instinct, the ways that we as a community really make something out of nothing. … It’s about empowerment and hopefulness.”

And there’s reason to be hopeful. After literal decades of activists campaigning for change, Congress has approved Juneteenth as a federal holiday.

 

CorrectionJune 19, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Black community leaders bought the land for Emancipation Park in Houston in 1867. The land was purchased and park established in 1872.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/17/1007315228/juneteenth-what-is-origin-observation

The Atlantic: Black Joy-Not Corporate Acknowledgment – Is the Heart of Juneteenth                                                                                                                    

Companies and state governments are finally recognizing Emancipation Day as an official holiday, but black Americans have honored its significance all along.

By Kellie Carter Jackson

Historically, Juneteenth has not been widely recognized outside of black communities. (Library of Congress)

JUNE 19, 2020

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In 2002 I was at the University of Iowa conducting research on the history of Emancipation Day celebrations in the state. I remember at one point being somewhat baffled by what Leslie Schwalm, the professor I was working with, had found: From 1865 to 1963, there were more than 200 Emancipation Day festivities in Iowa alone. I had always thought of the event as a Texas holiday.

While most enslaved people were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation put forth by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, those in Texas weren’t made aware of the decree until 1865. On June 19 of that year, Major General Gordon Granger landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war was over and the enslaved were now, finally, free. Scholars have debated the many reasons for the two-year delay, but one thing is clear: Black people in almost every state have celebrated June 19, or Juneteenth, for generations.

Children celebrate Juneteenth at Fair Park in Dallas, Texas, in 1952. (Marion Butts/Dallas Express / Dallas Public Library)

Historically, Juneteenth has not been widely recognized outside of black communities, and it’s taken some time for the general public to acknowledge the date officially. Over the past 40 years, 47 of 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have come to recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday or a day of observance, but it’s not yet a federal holiday. And given the current nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism, major corporations such as Nike, Uber, Spotify, and J. C. Penney have designated Juneteenth as a paid holiday. Though holidays, symbols, statues, and flags matter, it will take more than increased recognition of Juneteenth to combat racism. If not followed with substantive change, the relatively recent scramble to acknowledge Juneteenth will just feel like virtue signaling, acts of solidarity that ring hollow.

Whether companies and governments get it right or not, black-led celebrations will remain the heart of Juneteenth. Early events venerated black Civil War veterans and were mainly held in private places that could be shielded from the white gaze. Later ones were marked by reunions, parades, and symbolic foods such as strawberry soda, red beans and rice, red velvet cake, and watermelon (the color red represents the perseverance of black ancestors). Black churches often spearheaded the day’s programming, which could include speeches from children who memorized quotes from their favorite black heroes, or singing of the black national anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” Post–World War II commemorations were not complete until someone read the Emancipation Proclamation aloud.

THE OAK PARK DRILL TEAM MAKES THEIR WAY THROUGH NORTH MINNEAPOLIS IN PARADE FORMATION AS PART OF JUNETEENTH CELEBRATIONS.

 

A drill team performs in a Juneteenth parade in Minneapolis in 1995. (Marlin Levison / Star Tribune / Getty)

Today, Juneteenth serves as an occasion for voter-registration drives and to support black-owned businesses or community fundraisers. This year in Houston, you can attend a virtual parade or take a Juneteenth bike ride. In Los Angeles, you can go on a four-mile walk to the Juneteenth monument at Ganesha Park. In New Orleans, you can visit Congo Square, a historical gathering place for enslaved and free people, or you can spend the day at the Whitney Plantation, the only plantation museum in Louisiana with a direct focus on the lives of enslaved people.

Despite the numerous ways to honor Juneteenth, one thing about the holiday endures throughout generations: the paradox of black people’s lived experiences. How could they at once celebrate freedom and acknowledge that the residue of slavery continues to influence their lives? The turn of the century represented the height of black minstrelsy, violent attacks on black communities, and the Supreme Court ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, which made segregation the law of the land. John L. Thompson, the editor of the Iowa State Bystander, the state’s most prestigious black newspaper at the time, grappled with how to negotiate what he saw as a new era of American race relations. At an Emancipation Day celebration in 1898, Thompson asked the audience to “see the slave scarred veterans who are before me today and have witness to their once cruel and inhuman treatment,” noting that “all of this was done under our beautiful and so-called flag of the free.”

Now many black Americans are wrestling with how to celebrate Juneteenth amid the protests and the coronavirus pandemic. I came across a tweet that read, “Some of us fight racism by raising our black children to know joy. This matters too.” Black Americans have always held both jubilation and sorrow in their hands: Demonstrators will chant “I can’t breathe” and in the same space break out into a collective electric slide. As Imani Perry wrote for The Atlantic, “Racism is terrible. Blackness is not.

Miss Juneteenth 2015 waves to her fans in Denver, Colorado. (Kathryn Scott Osler / The Denver Post / Getty)

One of my colleagues at Rhodes College, the professor Charles McKinney, wrote recently to his black students: “We are not solely the history of fighting white folks. That is not who we are. We are double-dutch in summer. We are letting the air out of Big Mama’s house. We are Uncle Ray’s jokes on top of jokes. We are collards, second lines, and blue lights in the basement. We are swagger in the midst of chaos. We are reunions and step shows. We are the borough and the bayou. We are church till two, and the corner till four. We are a universe of experiences.”

And so, in the middle of a chaotic period in this nation’s history, Black Americans pause to celebrate. They will barbecue, and dance, and pray, and love, and live in the name of freedom. The rest of America can use the day off to work on its own freedom—from a shameful past and a violent present.

Kellie Carter Jackson is an assistant professor of Africana studies at Wellesley College, and the author of Force and Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence. Twitter

 

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/06/juneteenth-has-always-been-worthy-celebration/613270/

 

The Public Domain Review: Early Photographs of Juneteenth Celebrations

 

Martha Yates Jones (left) and Pinkie Yates (right), daughters of Rev. Jack Yates, in a decorated carriage parked in front of the Antioch Baptist Church located in Houston’s Fourth Ward, 1908 — Source

Although Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, the Civil War then raging prevented it being enacted in much of the American South until months or even years later. Emancipation Day, or Juneteenth, is a celebration to mark the eventual country-wide realization of the decree — on June 19, 1865, when around 250,000 enslaved people were finally declared free in Texas — the last state in the US to be reached by the Union Army, commanded by General Gordon Granger, meaningfully accompanied, as historian Elizabeth Hayes Turner notes, by “two transports of colored troops”. Although Granger did not read out the Emancipation Proclamation itself on that day in Galveston, he did read out “General Order No. 3”, which began:

The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection therefore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.

One year later, the first anniversary of Juneteenth — or “Jubilee Day” as it was then called — was celebrated in several places in Texas. The tradition soon took hold throughout the state. Communal barbecues, concerts, prayer services, parades, as well as baseball games, fishing, and rodeos, all featured in the festivities. Some former enslaved people and their descendants living in far-flung parts of Texas made a pilgrimage to Galveston, and many dressed in their finest clothes — partly in response to the pre–1865 statewide laws that had prevented enslaved people from dressing in any clothing not given to them by those who held them in slavery.

Many of the photographs that survive from these early decades of the celebration — including sets from Houston and Corpus Christi — depict elegantly dressed groups in horse-drawn carriages elaborately decorated with flowers down to the wheels. Another set from Austin — taken in 1900 by Grace Murray Stephenson — shows a group of older people, many or all of whom would have been born into slavery, dressed up for the day, as well as a very well-posed six-piece band, and a group of men decked out in Civil War uniforms (perhaps reenacting the Union’s entry into Galveston).

Of course, violence toward Black Americans did not magically evaporate with emancipation, and racial segregation and prejudice in some places made Juneteenth celebrations very difficult. Often forbidden from celebrating on public land, many gatherings had to be disparately held in remote rural areas or small church grounds, leading some Black Texan communities to band together and buy land specifically for celebrating Juneteenth (and other community occasions). The first such communally-bought land was Houston’s Emancipation Park, a ten-acre lot purchased in 1872 by the Colored People’s Festival and Emancipation Park Association led by the Baptist minister and formerly enslaved Jack Yates. You can see Reverend Yates pictured (far left) in the Juneteenth group shot below (and in the featured image above, two of his daughters in a decorated carriage).

Group on Emancipation Day, circa 1880s, in Houston’s Emancipation Park. Reverend Jack Yates, who led the community purchase of the Park in 1872, is pictured on the far left, and his daughter Sallie Yates dressed in black in the centre — Source

Following Houston’s example, in 1898, Mexia’s Nineteenth of June Organization bought an area of land on the banks of the Navasota River, now known as Booker T. Washington Park, which was said to draw up to 30,000 for the celebration. Another dedicated community-bought land was in Austin. The photographs we’ve featured of the city’s Juneteenth celebrations of 1900 took place in what was then called Wheeler’s Grove (now Eastwoods Park) but a few years later an association, led by the formerly enslaved Thomas J. White, purchased a plot for the purpose, also named Emancipation Park (although 30 years later the city of Austin seized it to build housing).

Over the course of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Juneteenth festivities became increasingly common outside of Texas — often brought to new places throughout the country by Black Americans who’d moved away from the state. In the 1950s, the holiday temporarily faded in popularity. This was to some extent due to the Great Migration, when many Black Americans found themselves in northern cities, working for bosses who did not recognize Juneteenth. (The US Congress has still not recognized it as a national holiday, although forty-seven states do at least acknowledge its existence.) It was also to some extent due to the changing political attitudes of the mid–twentieth century, when celebration of difference was sometimes seen as antithetical to integration.

During the last half century, however, Juneteenth has grown more and more popular again. In addition to the old traditions of parades, cookouts, and music, new traditions have sprung up — including readings of work by Black American writers such as Maya Angelou and Ralph Ellison (whose second, long, and long-unfinished novel was titled Juneteenth). The celebration of difference and the commemoration of the ongoing struggle for freedom, equality, and respect have become central to this second American Independence Day.

You can read more about Juneteenth —past, present, and future — here and browse our selection of historical photographs of Juneteenth celebrations from across the US below.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/juneteenth-photographs

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Joe Biden spent the day in Geneva for a much anticipated summit with Vladimir Putin, we revisit the one compliment from Putin that Trump never stopped talking about, Joe Exotic is launching a line of cannabis products from prison, Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner has signed on to write a definitive recounting of the Trump Administration and they already secured a respected director to make the film version, the Unintentional Joke of the Day courtesy of Cy Young Award winner Pedro Martinez, and Jimmy makes a huge announcement that the first ever bowl game named after a human being will be hosted on Saturday, December 18th – The Jimmy Kimmel LA Bowl! SUBSCRIBE to get the latest #Kimmel: http://bit.ly/JKLSubscribe Watch Mean Tweets: http://bit.ly/KimmelMT10

 

Reporter SHREDS Putin, leaves him stammering with brutal question

Jun 16, 2021  Brian Tyler Cohen

BREAKING: An American reporter just SHREDDED Putin and left him stammering with a brutal question. To call for Marjorie Taylor Greene to be expelled from Congress, sign here ? http://odaction.com/expel-greene Suit by JB CLOTHIERS in Los Angeles ? https://jbclothiers.com/btc Subscribe for more and follow me here: PODCAST: https://apple.co/36UvEHs (or search “No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen” on podcast app) TWITTER: https://twitter.com/briantylercohen INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/briantylerc… FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohen PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohen “DON’T BE A MITCH” FUND: https://secure.actblue.com/donate/don… NEWSLETTER: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-up/ Sources: https://www.theguardian.com/world/202… https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/fourt…

 

Biden’s Grim Meeting With Putin | The Daily Show

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Jun 16, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

President Biden and Vladimir Putin have the most emo summit ever, and Biden takes Putin to task for Russian cyberattacks on U.S. infrastructure. #DailyShow #Biden #Putin This week we’re supporting The Trevor Project. Donate at https://www.dailyshow.com/TrevorProject to support their work on suicide prevention, crisis intervention and education, research and advocacy programs for LGBTQ youth. Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh… Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow Stream full episodes of The Daily Show on Paramount+: http://www.paramountplus.com/?ftag=PP… Follow Comedy Central: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentral Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentral Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentral About The Daily Show: Trevor Noah and The Daily Show correspondents tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture. The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.

 

 

Biden Stands Firm Against Putin, In Contrast To No. 45’s Bootlicking

Jun 16, 2021  The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

President Biden’s firm hand in dealing with Vladimir Putin marked a departure from the nauseating acquiescence our previous president displayed when meeting with the Russian leader. #Colbert #Comedy #Monologue Subscribe To “The Late Show” Channel: http://bit.ly/ColbertYouTube Watch full episodes of “The Late Show”: http://bit.ly/1Puei40 Like “The Late Show” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1df139Y Follow “The Late Show” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1dMzZzG Follow “The Late Show” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/29wfREj Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS. — The Late Show with Stephen Colbert is the premier late night talk show on CBS, airing at 11:35pm EST, streaming online via Paramount+, and delivered to the International Space Station on a USB drive taped to a weather balloon. Every night, viewers can expect: Comedy, humor, funny moments, witty interviews, celebrities, famous people, movie stars, bits, humorous celebrities doing bits, funny celebs, big group photos of every star from Hollywood, even the reclusive ones, plus also jokes.

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> Wed, Jun 16, 2021, 6:53 AM

 

 

Axios AM                       by Mike Allen ·Jun 16, 2021

 

Happy Wednesday! Smart Brevity™ count: 1,190 words … 4½ minutes. Edited by Zachary Basu.

 

 

2. “Red lines” summit

Courtesy TIME
After a bitter blast from Russia’s Vladimir Putin and tough talk from President Biden, both sides agree: Don’t count on much from today’s summit.

·  “We’re not expecting a big set of deliverables out of this meeting,” a senior Biden administration official told reporters on Air Force One from Brussels to Geneva. “No breaking of bread.”

·  “I’m not sure that any agreements will be reached,” Putin foreign policy adviser Yuri Ushakov said.

Biden said this week at his NATO press conference that in areas where he and Putin don’t agree, he’ll “make it clear what the red lines are.”

·  Biden and Putin will greet each other about 7 a.m. ET in Villa La Grange, a mansion in a 75-acre park overlooking Lake Geneva.

·  A Putin news conference is scheduled for noon EDT, followed by a Biden news conference.

Graphic: MSNBC’s “Morning Joe”

Former Russian diplomat Vladimir Frolov told Reuters that Putin wants respectful treatment like members of the Soviet Politburo got in the 1960s-1980s, with “a symbolic recognition of Russia’s geopolitical parity with the U.S.”

·  In contrast to President Trump’s 2018 meeting with Putin in Helsinki, which included a meeting accompanied only by interpreters, Biden and Putin aren’t expected to have any solo dealings.

Go deeper: “Making history: The scramble to document presidents’ summits.”

 

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>   Wed, Jun 16, 4:37 PM
1 big thing: Feisty finish to Biden-Putin

 

Presidents Biden and Putin shake hands before the summit. Photo: Peter Klaunzer via Getty Images
President Biden arrived in aviator shades, tossed his jacket off and tried a one-liner about invading Russia that he clarified as a joke.

·  In classic Biden fashion, the president used a post-summit news conference to explain a shorter-than-expected meeting with Vladimir Putin that produced few immediate results, Axios’ Margaret Talev, Glen Johnson, Dave Lawler and Zachary Basu report.

Between the lines: There were parallels with Biden’s early approach to his dealings with Congress. He sought common ground while making clear he’ll muscle ahead when they can’t work together.

·  “My agenda is not against Russia” but for the U.S., Biden said in Switzerland.

·  There were “no threats,” no hyperbole — just “simple assertions.” The relationship is “not about trust,” but self-interest and verification.

·  “I did what I came to do,” Biden said, using words like “practical,” “mutual interest” and “benefit the world” — while saying he wanted Putin to hear directly from him what the U.S. considers out of bounds.

·  He said he addressed election interference, cyberattacks, Ukraine, trade, the fate of imprisoned Americans, and the treatment of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. If Navalny dies, Biden said, it would be “devastating for Russia.”

In a flash of exasperation at a skeptical question shouted by CNN’s Kaitlan Collins as he left the stage, Biden snapped that when it comes to Putin, “I am not confident he will change his behavior.”

·  Biden later offered a more nuanced explanation to reporters: There’s “a value to being realistic,” he said, while putting on “an optimistic face.”

Speaking Russian at a 55-minute news conference just before Biden’s, Putin called the summit “constructive,” and noted the countries had agreed their ambassadors would imminently return to their posts in Moscow and Washington.

·  “Many of our joint positions are divergent,” Putin said. “I think both sides manifested a determination to try and understand each other and try and converge our positions.”

Go deeper … Fact check: Putin offers baseless claim on cyberattacks (AP)

2. Being there

Photo: Sergei Bobylev via Getty Images

Above: The press view of Putin’s post-summit news conference.

Below: Biden poses with staffers before heading home.

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

 https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57504755

BBC News: Biden and Putin praise Geneva summit talks but discord remains

Published 6.16.2021

media caption Biden Putin Summit: Decoding the world leaders’ body language

The presidents of the US and Russia have praised their talks in Geneva but have made little concrete progress at the first such meeting since 2018.

Disagreements were stated, said US President Joe Biden, but not in a hyperbolic way, and he said Russia did not want a new Cold War.

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Mr. Biden was an experienced statesman and the two “spoke the same language”.

The talks lasted around three hours, less time than was scheduled.

Mr. Biden said they did not need to spend more time talking and there was now a genuine prospect to improve relations with Russia.

As a gift to the Russian leader, Mr. Biden brought Mr. Putin a custom-made pair of aviator sunglasses, a style favoured by the US president, and a crystal sculpture of a bison. It is unclear whether Mr. Putin gave Mr. Biden a gift. In 2018, the Russian leader gave former President Donald Trump a soccer ball after a meeting in Helsinki, Finland.

The two sides agreed to begin a dialogue on nuclear arms control. They also said they would return ambassadors to each other’s capitals – the envoys were mutually withdrawn for consultations in March, after the US accused Russia of meddling in the 2020 presidential election.

However, there was little sign of agreement on other issues, including cyber-security, Ukraine and the fate of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who is currently serving a two-and-a-half-year sentence in a penal colony.

Mr Biden said there would be “devastating consequences” for Russia if Navalny died in prison.

media caption.WATCH: “If you don’t understand that you’re in the wrong business”

What did the leaders discuss?

Before the summit, both sides said relations were at rock bottom.

Mr. Putin hinted at a possible deal on exchanging prisoners, saying he believed compromises could be found.

On cyber-attacks, Mr. Putin brushed away accusations of Russian responsibility, saying that most cyber-attacks in Russia originated from the US.

Mr. Biden said he told Mr. Putin that critical infrastructure, such as water or energy, must be “off-limits” to hacking or other attacks.

“I looked at him and said how would you feel if ransomware took on the pipelines from your oil fields? He said it would matter,” Mr. Biden said, adding that if Russia violated these “basic norms” the US would retaliate.

The two sides differed sharply on human rights, including the right to protest.

Mr. Putin dismissed US concerns about Navalny, who recently undertook a 24-day hunger strike.

He said Navalny had ignored the law and knew he would face imprisonment when he returned to Russia after having sought medical treatment in Germany. Navalny says he was poisoned with a nerve agent on Mr. Putin’s orders – an accusation Mr. Putin denies.

He said Russia did not want disturbances on its territory comparable to the Capitol riots or the Black Lives Matter movement.

Mr. Biden dismissed Mr. Putin’s comments about Black Lives Matter as “ridiculous”, and said human rights would “always be on the table”.

media caption.The Russian president discusses the US president’s calls for “stable and predictable” relations

Asked why Russia would want to co-operate with the US, Mr. Biden said it was “in a very, very difficult spot right now”.

“They are being squeezed by China. They want desperately to remain a major power,” he told reporters, shortly before leaving Geneva.

At one point during his press conference, the US president appeared to nod in response to a reporter who asked if he trusted Mr. Putin. But the White House sent a tweet out soon after saying Mr. Biden was “very clearly not responding to any one question, but nodding in acknowledgment to the press generally”.

When a CNN journalist asked why Mr. Biden was confident Mr. Putin would change his behaviour, the US president became visibly irritated, retorting: “If you don’t understand that, you’re in the wrong business.” He later apologised for being a “wise guy”.

BBC Moscow correspondent Sarah Rainsford says Mr. Putin was keen to underline several times that Russia was a nuclear power – an important country, with an economy smaller than that of the US, but one that still mattered and that was why Mr. Biden had come to talk to him.

A worthy adversary

What is the metric for success following this summit? I think that Joe Biden will see a success as the fact that they engaged in detailed conversations about the knottiest issues around.

I think Mr. Biden – for a domestic audience – also wanted to prove that the ‘America is back’ tour also means ‘I’m not Donald Trump’. And I think he was very keen to underline this in his news conference that I attended a little while ago.

But as Mr. Biden goes back to the US now on Air Force One, he said: “We will respond if Russia doesn’t do what we want, on cyber, on human rights and the rest of it.” But respond how? That’s the bit of it that is unclear.

And I’m sure Mr. Putin returning to Moscow will be thinking: “Well, he said all these things, but what’s he going to do about it?” Mr. Putin has seen down Western leaders before. Maybe he will think that Mr. Biden is a different sort of American president.

But I think that Mr. Putin is going to test his boundaries, and Mr. Biden will eventually have to decide how he is going to respond.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57504755

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BBC News – In pictures: World leaders bask in Cornwall sun at G7 summit

Published 6.14.2021

Related Topics  G7 summits

The G7 summit in the resort of Carbis Bay in Cornwall, in the south-west of England, has seen the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the US and UK gather in person for the first time since the pandemic.

Here are pictures from the event.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTSIMON DAWSON/NO 10

image caption The second day of the G7 summit on Saturday took place amid blue skies and summery temperatures – and appropriately wrapped up with a beachside barbecue. Carrie and Boris Johnson’s one-year-old son, Wilfred, was introduced to the guests.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTANDREW PARSONS/NO 10

image caption A display by the RAF’s Red Arrows captivated the G7 leaders.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Members of the public also turned out to watch the Red Arrows over Carbis Bay.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Boris Johnson hosted a press conference at the end of the summit – outlining a pledge to donate one billion doses of Covid vaccines to poorer countries.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption After leaving Cornwall, US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden met the Queen for tea at Windsor Castle.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Earlier on Sunday, they were pictured attending Mass at a church in St Ives, near the G7 summit venue.

image caption The prime minister was up early on Sunday morning, taking a dip in the sea ahead of the final days of talks.

image caption The prime minister was greeted by his wife Carrie after the swim.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTANDREW PARSONS/NO 10

image caption The tensions of Saturday’s discussions on Northern Ireland appeared to be put aside as French President Emmanuel Macron and Boris Johnson chatted at the barbecue.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTANDREW PARSONS/NO 10

image caption The discussions among the leaders continued earlier in the day – against the stunning backdrop of the Cornish coast.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTSIMON DAWSON/NO 10

image caption Carrie Johnson and US First Lady Jill Biden – as well as France’s Brigitte Macron – visited the open air Minack Theatre on the cliffs at Porthcurno.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Sunday’s business began with the PM meeting South African President Cyril Ramaphosa.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA

image caption World leaders gather on the beach in Carbis Bay for a photo on Friday, the first day of the summit. Pictured (left to right): Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister; Charles Michel, president of the European Council; US President Joe Biden, Yoshihide Suga, Japan’s prime minister; Boris Johnson, the UK’s prime minister; Mario Draghi, Italy’s prime minister; Emmanuel Macron, France’s president; Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission and Angela Merkel, Germany’s chancellor.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTREUTERS

image caption Most of the discussions over the three day summit are taking place behind closed doors.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA

image caption Mr Johnson greeted France’s President Mr Macron with an elbow bump as their spouses, Carrie Johnson (right) and Brigitte Macron (left), looked on. Global coronavirus vaccinations and climate change are due to be the focus of the summit between the leaders of the seven nations.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTREUTERS

image caption And US President Biden and French President Macron also made the most of the sunny weather on Saturday by posing outside as they met for talks.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Later on, protesters took part in a mass paddle at Gyllyngvase Beach near Falmouth, as part of a campaign by Surfers Against Sewage.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Separately, climate change protesters organised by Extinction Rebellion walked through Falmouth’s town centre.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-57438878

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President Joe Biden’s First Overseas Trip, G7 leaders meet at the seaside, PBS News, NBC News, Washington Week PBS, BBC News, AP News and The Daily Show

President Joe Biden’s First Overseas Trip, G7 leaders meet at the seaside, PBS News, NBC News, Washington Week PBS, BBC News, AP News and The Daily Show

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 11, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – June 11th, 2021

Washington Week PBS: President Joe Biden’s First Overseas Trip, June 11, 2021

BBC News: In Pictures-G7 leaders meet at the seaside, Published 6.11.2021

AP News: Biden urges G-7 leaders to call out and compete with China

US Pres Biden meets French Pres Macron at G7, Jun 12, 2021  Associated Press

The Daily Show: Biden Visits the U.K., Toobin Is Back on CNN & Scientists Discover Another Ocean

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 11, 2021

Jun 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Biden meets with other leaders face-to-face to discuss global vaccination efforts and an initiative to increase taxes on the world’s wealthiest, how the Trump administration sought cell phone data from Democratic members of Congress and their families, and two street artists on either side of the sectarian divide in Northern Ireland turn walls into messages. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – June 11th, 2021

Jun 11, 2021  NBC News

An NBC News exclusive interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin, President Biden meets with G7 leaders, and Johnson & Johnson told to destroy 60 million vaccine doses. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:04 NBC News Exclusive: Vladimir Putin Interview 07:46 Royal Welcoming For Biden 09:39 60 Million Vaccine Doses Ruined 11:40 Trump DOJ Under Investigation 13:44 Texas Boat Rescue 15:02 Westminster Dog Show 16:35 Class Of 2021 » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #Putin #Vaccines

President Joe Biden’s First Overseas Trip | Washington Week | June 11, 2021

Premiered 6 hours ago  Washington Week PBS

President Biden is on his first trip abroad, promoting democracy as he meets with the G7 ahead of a meeting next week with Russia’s Vladimir Putin. The panel discussed the challenges abroad, as well as Vice President Harris’s trip to Central America to deal with immigration. Ed O’Keefe of CBS News co-moderates. Panel: Jonathan Martin of The New York Times, Anna Palmer of Punchbowl News, Vivian Salama of The Wall Street Journal Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

BBC News: In Pictures-G7 leaders meet at the seaside

Published 6.11.2021

G7 summits

The G7 summit in the resort of Carbis Bay in Cornwall, in the south-west of England, has seen the leaders of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the US and UK gather in person for the first time since the pandemic.

Here are pictures from the event.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA

image captionWorld leaders gather on the beach in Carbis Bay for a photo on Friday, the first day of the summit. Pictured (left to right): Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister; Charles Michel, president of the European Council; US President Joe Biden, Yoshihide Suga, Japan’s prime minister; Boris Johnson, Britain’s prime minister; Mario Draghi, Italy’s prime minister; Emmanuel Macron, France’s president; Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission and Angela Merkel, Germany’s chancellor.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTREUTERS

image caption The leaders began their talks on Friday. Most of the discussions over the three days will take place behind closed doors.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA

image caption Prime Minister Boris Johnson greeted France’s President Emmanuel Macron with an elbow bump as their spouses, Carrie Johnson (right) and Brigitte Macron (left), looked on. Global coronavirus vaccinations and climate change are due to be the focus of the summit between the leaders of the seven nations.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY

image caption All eyes were on the Queen as she joined leaders for a reception at the Eden Project on Friday evening.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption A head of the summit, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and wife Carrie met US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden. After the meeting, Mr Johnson told the BBC the alliance between the US and the UK should be known as the “indestructible relationship”.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption For some, life has continued more or less as normal in St Ives, Cornwall, this week. Tourists bought fish and chips, and locals took their paddle boards out for a spin. But there is one key difference, as this picture hints at: the neighbouring village of Carbis Bay is hosting some of the world’s most powerful leaders.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Extra security saw police officers on a rigid inflatable boat in St Ives.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption Also in St Ives, a local bakery got into the spirit of the event with commemorative G7 pasties.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTAARON CHOWN / PA MEDIA

image caption The Duchess of Cambridge was also in town, here with First Lady Jill Biden, looking at the work of children at Connor Downs Academy in Hayle, West Cornwall.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Mr. Biden and his wife First Lady Jill Biden at Cornwall Airport, Newquay, on Wednesday.

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption The couple, who are on the first foreign trip of Mr. Biden’s presidency, were accompanied by Boris and Carrie Johnson, on a visit to the beach on Thursday.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Mrs. Biden and Mrs. Johnson took their shoes off on the sand at Carbis Bay, as Wilfred Johnson – Mr. and Mrs. Johnson’s son – looked on.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption They were soon to be joined by other leaders including French President Emmanuel Macron and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau – depicted here on the sand in Newquay by activists from the group Avaaz, calling for the distribution of the Covid-19 vaccine around the world.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wore a face covering when he arrived on Thursday.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption As did Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, who arrived on Friday.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Macron also arrived on Friday.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption The G7 leaders aren’t the only prominent figures in attendance. President of the European Council Charles Michel wore a face covering adorned with the ring of stars on the EU flag when he arrived.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA

image caption As did European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

 

IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES

image caption Police lined the street outside a pub decorated with the flags of the G7 countries, as delegates left the Tregenna Castle in Carbis Bay.

 

All pictures are subject to copyright.

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Published 6.11.2021 1 day ago

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Published 6.11.2021 18 hours ago

For more information, please visit the following link:

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 AP News: Biden urges G-7 leaders to call out and compete with China

By JONATHAN LEMIRE, AAMER MADHANI and JILL LAWLESS39 minutes ago 6.12.2021

 

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Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, center, with from left, Italy’s Prime Minister Mario Draghi, Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa, South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in, US President Joe Biden, French President Emmanuel Macron, Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga and President of the European Council Charles Michel during the G7 summit in Cornwall, England, Saturday June 12, 2021. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP)

 

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Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, left, and US President Joe Biden during the G7 summit in Cornwall, England, Saturday June 12, 2021. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP)

 

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President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron visit during a bilateral meeting at the G-7 summit, Saturday, June 12, 2021, in Carbis Bay, England. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives at an official welcome at the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (Leon Neal/Pool Photo via AP)

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A security boat patrols off the coast of Carbis Bay, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021, as the G-7 summit takes place. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

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Climate Protestors march in potato sacks with signs during a demonstration in Falmouth, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. Leaders of the G7 gather for a second day of meetings on Saturday, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant

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Climate activists from Oxfam, wearing giant heads depicting the leaders of the G7, sit on beach chairs as they participate in an action on Swanpool Beach in Falmouth, Cornwall, England, Saturday, June 12, 2021. Leaders of the G7 gather for a second day of meetings on Saturday, in which they will discuss COVID-19, climate, foreign policy and the economy. Leaders depicted from left, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Joe Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

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U.S. President Joe Biden on Saturday met with French President Emmanuel Macron on the sidelines of the G-7 Summit in Cornwall. The meeting came on the second day of the summit, being held in south western England, hosted by Britain. (June 12)

during the G7 summit in Cornwall, England, Saturday June 12, 2021. (Leon Neal/Pool via AP)

 

US Pres Biden meets French Pres Macron at G7

Jun 12, 2021  Associated Press

U.S. President Joe Biden on Saturday met with French President Emmanuel Macron on the sidelines of the G-7 Summit in Cornwall. The meeting came on the second day of the summit, being held in south western England, hosted by Britain. (June 12) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Website: https://apnews.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP Facebook: https://facebook.com/APNews Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ ? You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/you…

CARBIS BAY, England (AP) — Leaders of the world’s largest economies unveiled an infrastructure plan Saturday for the developing world to compete with China’s global initiatives, but they were searching for a consensus on how to forcefully to call out Beijing over human rights abuses.

Citing China for its forced labor practices is part of President Joe Biden’s campaign to persuade fellow democratic leaders to present a more unified front to compete economically with Beijing. But while they agreed to work toward competing against China, there was less unity on how adversarial a public position the group should take.

Canada, the United Kingdom and France largely endorsed Biden’s position, while Germany, Italy and the European Union showed more hesitancy during Saturday’s first session of the Group of Seven summit, according to two senior Biden administration officials. The officials who briefed reporters were not authorized to publicly discuss the private meeting and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The communique that summarizes the meeting’s commitments was being written and the contents would not be clear until it was released when the summit ended Sunday. White House officials said late Saturday that they believed that China, in some form, could be called out for “nonmarket policies and human rights abuses.”

In his first summit as president, Biden made a point of carving out one-on-one-time with the leaders, bouncing from French president Emmanuel Macron to German chancellor Angela Merkel to Italian prime minister Mario Draghi, a day after meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson as if to personally try to ward off memories of the chaos that his predecessor would often bring to these gatherings.

Macron told Biden that collaboration was needed on a range of issues and told the American president that “it’s great to have a U.S. president part of the club and very willing to cooperate.” Relations between the allies had become strained during the four years of Donald Trump’s presidency and his “America first” foreign policy.

Merkel, for her part, downplayed differences on China and the Nord Stream 2 pipeline which would transport natural gas from Russia to Germany, bypassing Ukraine.

“The atmosphere is very cooperative, it is characterized by mutual interest,” Merkel said. “There are very good, constructive and very vivid discussions in the sense that one wants to work together.”

White House officials have said Biden wants the leaders of the G-7 nations — the U.S., Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan and Italy — to speak in a single voice against forced labor practices targeting China’s Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic minorities. Biden hopes the denunciation will be part of a joint statement to be released Sunday when the summit ends, but some European allies are reluctant to split so forcefully with Beijing.

China had become one of the more compelling sublots of the wealthy nations’ summit, their first since 2019. Last year’s gathering was canceled because of COVID-19, and recovery from the pandemic is dominating this year’s discussions, with leaders expected to commit to sharing at least 1 billion vaccine shots with struggling countries.

The allies also took the first steps in presenting an infrastructure proposal called “Build Back Better for the World,” a name echoing Biden’s campaign slogan. The plan calls for spending hundreds of billions of dollars in collaboration with the private sector while adhering to climate standards and labor practices.

It’s designed to compete with China’s trillion-dollar “Belt and Road Initiative,” which has launched a network of projects and maritime lanes that snake around large portions of the world, primarily Asia and Africa. Critics say China’s projects often create massive debt and expose nations to undue influence by Beijing.

Britain also wants the world’s democracies to become less reliant on the Asian economic giant. The U.K. government said Saturday’s discussions would tackle “how we can shape the global system to deliver for our people in support of our values,” including by diversifying supply chains that currently heavily depend on China.

Not every European power has viewed China in as harsh a light as Biden, who has painted the rivalry with China as the defining competition for the 21st century. But there are some signs that Europe is willing to impose greater scrutiny.

Before Biden took office in January, the European Commission announced it had come to terms with Beijing on a deal meant to provide Europe and China with greater access to each other’s markets. The Biden administration had hoped to have consultations on the pact.

But the deal has been put on hold, and the European Union in March announced sanctions targeting four Chinese officials involved with human rights abuses in Xinjiang. Beijing responded with penalties on several members of the European Parliament and other Europeans critical of the Chinese Communist Party.

Biden administration officials see an opportunity to take concrete action to speak out against China’s reliance on forced labor as an “affront to human dignity.”

While calling out China in the G-7 communique would not create any immediate penalties for Beijing, one senior administration official said the action would send a message that the leaders were serious about defending human rights and working together to eradicate the use of forced labor.

An estimated 1 million people or more — most of them Uyghurs — have been confined in reeducation camps in China’s western Xinjiang region in recent years, according to researchers. Chinese authorities have been accused of imposing forced labor, systematic forced birth control, torture and separating children from incarcerated parents.

Beijing rejects allegations that it is committing crimes.

Johnson, the summit host, also welcomed the leaders from “guest nations” South Korea, Australia and South Africa, as well as the head of the United Nations, to the summit to “intensify cooperation between the world’s democratic and technologically advanced nations.”

The leaders planned to attend a barbecue Saturday night, complete with toasted marshmallows, hot buttered rum and a performance by a sea shanty troupe.

India was also invited but its delegation is not attending in person because of the severe coronavirus outbreak in the country.

Biden ends the trip Wednesday by meeting in Geneva with Russia’s Vladimir Putin. The White House announced Saturday that they will not hold a joint news conference afterward, which removes the opportunity for comparisons to the availability that followed Trump and Putin’s 2018 Helsinki summit, in which Trump sided with Moscow over his own intelligence agencies. Only Biden will address the news media after the meeting.

Putin, in an interview with NBC News, said the U.S.-Russia relationship had “deteriorated to its lowest point in recent years.”

He added that while Trump was a “talented” and “colorful” person, Biden was a “career man” in politics, which has “some advantages, some disadvantages, but there will not be any impulse-based movements” by the U.S. president.

___

Lemire reported from Plymouth, England. Associated Press writers Danica Kirka and Sylvia Hui in Falmouth, England, contributed to this report.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://apnews.com/article/government-and-politics-donald-trump-joe-biden-g-7-summit-europe-dbecfbc9d28d3d3665c0f187547def1f?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosam&stream=top

 

Biden Visits the U.K., Toobin Is Back on CNN & Scientists Discover Another Ocean | The Daily Show

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Jun 10, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Joe Biden lands in the U.K. for his first international trip as president, National Geographic recognizes a fifth ocean, a tiny worm survives 24,000 years in a deep freeze, and Jeffrey Toobin is back at CNN with a very awkward interview. #DailyShow #Biden #Toobin This week we’re supporting Brave Space Alliance. Donate at https://dailyshow.com/BraveSpaceAlliance to help provide lifesaving resources like support groups, HIV prevention options, and housing and food services for Chicago’s LGBTQ+ community. Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh… Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow Stream full episodes of The Daily Show on Paramount+: http://www.paramountplus.com/?ftag=PP… Follow Comedy Central: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentral Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentral Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentral About The Daily Show: Trevor Noah and The Daily Show correspondents tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture. The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.

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PBS News, NBC News, TED-Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease, You are your microbes & More, Live Science-Human brain, and Colossal

PBS News, NBC News, TED-Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease, You are your microbes & More, Live Science-Human brain, and Colossal

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 28, 2021 

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – May 27th, 2021 

TED: Khalil Ramadi Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease?  2021-05-25

TED: Bianca Tylek – The multibillion dollar us prison industry and how to dismantle it?

TED: Rohan Pavuluri – How to empower people to solve their own legal problems?

TED: Peter Paccone – How do us supreme court justices get appointed?

TED: Steven Allison – Earth’s original inhabitants and their role in combating climate change, 2021-04-19

TED:  Henna Maria Uusitupa – How the gut microbes you reborn with affect your lifelong health?

TED: Dan Knights – How we study the microbes living in your gut#t-513930?

TED: Rob Knight – How our microbes make us who we are#t-1025438?

TED-Ed: Jessica Green and Karen Guillemin – You are your microbes.

Live Science – Human brain: Facts, functions & anatomy                                                                                                                                                  by Tanya Lewis – Staff WriterAshley P. Taylor – Live Science Contributor

Colossal – Jewels in the Night Sea: Luminous Plankton Captured in the Dark Waters off the South Coast of Japan, AUGUST 17, 2018  KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 28, 2021

May 28, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Republican senators block the push for an independent investigation into the mob attack on the capitol on January 6. The western U.S. faces a critical shortage of water as the threats of wildfires loom on the horizon. Then, David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart analyze the failure to investigate the insurrection, how QAnon is breaking up families, and the Biden budget. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Why a commission to investigate Jan. 6 was not established https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0nWu… News Wrap: News Wrap: Air travel to see pre-pandemic highs this weekend https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1KJX… Remembering the victims of the San Jose mass shooting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVouo… Former NJ Gov. Kean ‘sad’ that GOP blocked Jan. 6 commission https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEYD2… 2021 could be one of the driest years in a millennium https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qDYi… 15% of Americans believe outlandish QAnon conspiracies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Zd75… Brooks and Capehart on Jan. 6 commission vote, Biden budget https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYbv-… In memory of 5 amazing Americans lost to COVID https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX-KN… How art is retelling the powerful stories of Tulsa massacre https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4UNG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – May 27th, 2021

May 27, 2021  NBC News

The latest on the deadly San Jose rail yard shooting, Ohio announces the first winner of $1 million vaccine lottery, and a California health official urges caution for Memorial Day weekend. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 01:59 San Jose Shooting 04:25 Memorial Day Travel Rush 08:00 Mother Of Capitol Hill Officer Urges Commission 09:52 Cybersecurity Crackdown 11:29 Anti-Asian Hate Crimes 13:27 Tulsa Confronts Trauma Of Massacre 16:52 Lost Submarines Of WWII » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #MemorialDay #Tulsa

Could a small jolt of electricity to your gut help treat chronic diseases? Medical hacker and TED Fellow Khalil Ramadi is developing a new, noninvasive therapy that could treat diseases like diabetes, obesity, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s with an electronic pill. More targeted than a traditional pill and less invasive than surgery, these micro-devices contain electronics that deliver “bionudges” — bursts of electrical or chemical stimuli — to the gut, potentially helping control appetite, aid digestion, regulate hormones — and even stimulate happiness in the brain.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Khalil Ramadi · Medical hacker

Khalil Ramadi builds medical technologies that leverage the connection between the brain and the gut.

MORE RESOURCES

WATCH

TED Fellows: Shape Your Future

This groundbreaking selection of talks from the TED Fellows are snapshots of influential, new ideas from leading voices in medicine, human rights, conservation, astrophysics, education and beyond. Dive in to discover what (and who) is shaping your future.

More at ted.com/shapeyourfuture ?

A phone call to a US prison or jail can cost up to a dollar per minute — a rate that forces one in three families with incarcerated loved ones into debt. In this searing talk about mass incarceration, criminal justice advocate and TED Fellow Bianca Tylek exposes the predatory nature of the billion-dollar prison telecom industry and presents straightforward strategies to dismantle the network of corporations that has a financial interest in seeing more people behind bars for longer periods of time.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Bianca Tylek · Criminal justice advocate

Bianca Tylek is dismantling the US prison industry.

ThePrisonIndustry

MORE RESOURCES

The Prison Industry: How it started. How it works. How it harms.

Worth Rises

Blurb (2021)

WATCH

TED Fellows: Shape Your Future

 

This groundbreaking selection of talks from the TED Fellows are snapshots of influential, new ideas from leading voices in medicine, human rights, conservation, astrophysics, education and beyond. Dive in to discover what (and who) is shaping your future.

More at ted.com/shapeyourfuture ?

TAKE ACTION

PARTICIPATE

Donate to Worth Rises to join the fight against the prison industry.

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JOIN

Take action for prison phone justice to connect families and their incarcerated loved ones.

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LEARN

Demand that Tom Gores either sell Securus or the Detroit Pistons.

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TED Fellows: Shape Your Future | May 2021

If you can’t afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you, right? Not in US civil court. From high legal fees to confusing paperwork and expensive lawyers, it can be difficult to settle civil matters. Entrepreneur and TED Fellow Rohan Pavuluri is working to streamline cumbersome legal processes with an app that empowers people to solve their own legal problems.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rohan Pavuluri · Civil rights entrepreneur

Rohan Pavuluri helps American families navigate an increasingly complex and expensive legal system.

There’s a job out there with a great deal of power, pay, prestige, and near-perfect job-security. And there’s only one way to be hired: get appointed to the US Supreme Court. But how do US Supreme Court Justices actually get that honor? Peter Paccone outlines the difficult process of getting a seat on the highest bench in the country. [Directed by Hernando Bahamon, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Manuel Borda].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Peter Paccone · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

TED-Ed | November 2016

Every environment on the planet — from forested mountaintops to scorching deserts and even the human gut — has a microbiome that keeps it healthy and balanced. Ecologist Steven Allison explores how these extraordinarily adaptable, diverse collections of microorganisms could help solve big global problems like climate change and food insecurity — and makes the case for getting to know Earth’s original inhabitants in fascinating ways.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxUCIrvine, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Steven D. Allison · Ecologist

For Steven Allison, it’s no longer sufficient to just study the natural world — we must make sure our world stays ecologically sound for generations to come.

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PARTICIPATE

Volunteer or donate to restore habitat with groups like The Nature Conservancy.

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ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxUCIrvine | October 2020

Your lifelong health may have been decided the day you were born, says microbiome researcher Henna-Maria Uusitupa. In this fascinating talk, she shows how the gut microbes you acquire during birth and as an infant impact your health into adulthood — and discusses new microbiome research that could help tackle problems like obesity and diabetes.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with DuPont. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Henna-Maria Uusitupa · Microbiome researcher

Henna-Maria Uusitupa investigates innovative solutions to minimize health risks that infants might have due to disruptions in microbiota development.

 ABOUT TED INSTITUTE

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

TED@DuPont | September 2019

There are about a hundred trillion microbes living inside your gut — protecting you from infection, aiding digestion and regulating your immune system. As our bodies have adapted to life in modern society, we’ve started to lose some of our normal microbes; at the same time, diseases linked to a loss of diversity in microbiome are skyrocketing in developed nations. Computational microbiologist Dan Knights shares some intriguing discoveries about the differences in the microbiomes of people in developing countries compared to the US, and how they might affect our health. Learn more about the world of microbes living inside you — and the work being done to create tools to restore and replenish them.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dan Knights · Computational microbiologist

Dan Knights develops computational methods for doing precision medicine with gut bacterial communities, or microbiomes, and he applies those methods to study human disease.

TEDMED 2017 | November 2017

Rob Knight is a pioneer in studying human microbes, the community of tiny single-cell organisms living inside our bodies that have a huge — and largely unexplored — role in our health. “The three pounds of microbes that you carry around with you might be more important than every single gene you carry around in your genome,” he says. Find out why.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rob Knight · Microbial ecologist

Rob Knight explores the unseen microbial world that exists literally right under our noses — and everywhere else on (and in) our bodies.

MORE RESOURCES

Follow Your Gut

Rob Knight

TED Books (2015)

FURTHER READING

How the microbiome shapes our world

Rob Knight talks to biologist Jonathan Eisen and biodiversity scientist Jessica Green about the latest research on complex microbial ecosystems — out in the world and inside our guts.

More at ideas.ted.com ?

From the microbes in our stomachs to the ones on our teeth we are homes to millions of unique and diverse communities which help our bodies function. Jessica Green and Karen Guillemin emphasize the importance of understanding the many organisms that make up each and every organism. [Directed by Celine Keller and Paula Spagnoletti, narrated by Jessica Green].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Jessica Green · Engineer and biodiversity scientist

Jessica Green wants people to understand the important role microbes play in every facet of our lives: climate change, building ecosystems, human health, even roller derby — using nontraditional tools like art, animation and film to help people visualize the invisible world.

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

1,801,761 views

TED-Ed | January 2013

Live Science: Human brain: Facts, functions & anatomy

By Tanya Lewis – Staff WriterAshley P. Taylor – Live Science Contributor 

The human brain is the command center for the human nervous system.

A medical illustration of the human brain from ‘Quain’s Elements of Anatomy, Eighth Edition, Vol.II’ (by William Sharpey MD, LLD, FRS L&E, Allen Thomson, MD, LLD, FRS L&E, and Edward Albert Schafer) depicts the right half of the brain, 1876. (Image credit: Vintage MedStock/Getty Images)

The human brain is the command center for the human nervous system. It receives signals from the body’s sensory organs and outputs information to the muscles. The human brain has the same basic structure as other mammal brains but is larger in relation to body size than the brains of many other mammals, such as dolphins, whales and elephants.

HOW MUCH DOES A HUMAN BRAIN WEIGH?

The human brain weighs about 3 lbs. (1.4 kilograms) and makes up about 2% of a human’s body weight. On average, male brains are about 10% larger than female brains, according to Northwestern Medicine in Illinois. The average male has a brain volume of nearly 78 cubic inches (1,274 cubic centimeters), while the average female brain has a volume of 69 cubic inches (1,131 cubic cm). The cerebrum, which is the main part of the brain located in the front area of the skull, makes up 85% of the brain’s weight.

HOW MANY BRAIN CELLS DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

The human brain contains about 86 billion nerve cells (neurons) — called “gray matter,” according to a 2012 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The brain also has about the same number of non-neuronal cells, such as the oligodendrocytes that insulate neuronal axons with a myelin sheath. This gives axons (thin strands through which electrical impulses are transmitted between neurons) a white appearance, and so these axons are called the brain’s “white matter.”

OTHER COOL FACTS ABOUT THE BRAIN

  • The brain can’t multitask, according to the Dent Neurologic Institute. Instead, it switches between tasks, which increases errors and makes things take longer.
  • The human brain triples in size during the first year of life and reaches full maturity at about age 25.
  • Humans use all of the brain all of the time, not just 10% of it.
  • The brain is 60% fat, according to Northwestern Medicine.
  • The human brain can generate 23 watts of electrical power — enough to fuel a small lightbulb.

Do Scientists Understand The Human Brain?  | Video

“We might someday figure out how the brain works” says NYU neuroscientist Gary Marcus, co-author of “The Future of the Brain”, in this exclusive interview with Live Science’s Bahar Gholipour. Marcus breaks down the latest advancements in neuroscience and explains where these discoveries are coming from.

ANATOMY OF THE HUMAN BRAIN

The largest part of the human brain is the cerebrum, which is divided into two hemispheres, according to the Mayfield Clinic. Each hemisphere consists of four lobes: the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital. The rippled surface of the cerebrum is called the cortex. Underneath the cerebrum lies the brainstem, and behind that sits the cerebellum.

The frontal lobe is important for cognitive functions, such as thought and planning ahead, and for the control of voluntary movement. The temporal lobe generates memories and emotions. The parietal lobe integrates input from different senses and is important for spatial orientation and navigation. Visual processing takes place in the occipital lobe, near the back of the skull.

The brainstem connects to the spinal cord and consists of the medulla oblongata, pons and midbrain. The primary functions of the brainstem include relaying information between the brain and the body; supplying most of the cranial nerves to the face and head; and performing critical functions in controlling the heart, breathing and levels of consciousness (it’s involved in controlling wake and sleep cycles).

Human brain anatomy.  (Image credit: Mark Garlick/Getty Images)

Between the cerebrum and brainstem lie the thalamus and hypothalamus. The thalamus relays sensory and motor signals to the cortex. Except for olfaction (sense of smell), every sensory system sends information through the thalamus to the cortex, according to the online textbook, “Neuroanatomy, Thalamus” (StatPublishing, 2020). The hypothalamus connects the nervous system to the endocrine system — where hormones are produced — via the pituitary gland.

The cerebellum lies beneath the cerebrum and has important functions in motor control. It plays a role in coordination and balance and may also have some cognitive functions.

The brain also has four interconnected cavities, called ventricles, which produce what’s called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This fluid circulates around the brain and spinal cord, cushioning it from injury, and is eventually absorbed into the bloodstream.

In addition to cushioning the central nervous system, CSF clears waste from the brain. In what’s called the glymphatic system, waste products from the interstitial fluid surrounding brain cells move into the CSF and away from the brain, according to the Society for Neuroscience. Studies suggest this waste clearance process mostly happens during sleep. In a 2013 Science paper, researchers reported that when mice were asleep, their interstitial spaces expanded by 60%, and the brain’s glymphatic system cleared beta-amyloid (the protein that makes up Alzheimer’s disease’s hallmark plaques) faster than when the rodents were awake. Clearing potentially neurotoxic waste from the brain or “taking out the trash” through the glymphatic system could be one reason that sleep is so important, the authors suggested in their paper.

Is The Human Brain Just a Computer? One Neuroscientist Thinks So

In recent years, much of the scientific community has backed away from the ‘computational engine’ comparison, citing the brain’s extreme complexity. But NYU neuroscientist Gary Marcus, co-author of “The Future of the Brain,” thinks “we’ve given up too soon,” in this chat with Live Science’s Bahar Gholipour. PLAY SOUND

IS BRAIN SIZE LINKED TO INTELLIGENCE?

Overall brain size doesn’t correlate with level of intelligence for non-human animals. For instance, the brain of a sperm whale is more than five times heavier than the human brain, but humans are considered to be of higher intelligence than sperm whales. A more accurate measure of an animal’s likely intelligence is the ratio between the size of the brain and body size, although not even that measure puts humans in first place: The tree shrew has the highest brain-to-body ratio of any mammal, according to BrainFacts.org, a website produced by the Society for Neuroscience.

Among humans, brain size doesn’t indicate a person’s level of intelligence. Some geniuses in their field have smaller-than-average brains, while others have brains that are larger than average, according to Christof Koch, a neuroscientist and president of the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle. For example, compare the brains of two highly acclaimed writers. The Russian novelist Ivan Turgenev’s brain was found to weigh 71 ounces (2,021 grams), while the brain of French writer Anatole France weighed only 36 ounces (1,017 g).

Brain size doesn’t indicate a person’s intelligence.   (Image credit: Shutterstock)

The reason behind humans’ intelligence, in part, is neurons and folds. Humans have more neurons per unit volume than other animals, and the only way they can all fit within the brain’s layered structure is to make folds in the outer layer, or cortex, said Dr. Eric Holland, a neurosurgeon and cancer biologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington.

“The more complicated a brain gets, the more gyri and sulci, or wiggly hills and valleys, it has,” Holland told Live Science. Other intelligent animals, such as monkeys and dolphins, also have these folds in their cortex, whereas mice have smooth brains, he said.

How the brain is integrated also seems to matter when it comes to intelligence. A genius among geniuses, Albert Einstein had an average size brain; researchers suspect his mind-boggling cognitive abilities may have stemmed from its high connectivity, with several pathways connecting distant regions of his brain, Live Science previously reported.

Humans also have the largest frontal lobes of any animal, Holland said. The frontal lobes are associated with higher-level functions such as self-control, planning, logic and abstract thought — basically, “the things that make us particularly human,” he said.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE LEFT BRAIN AND RIGHT BRAIN?

The human brain is divided into two hemispheres, the left and right, connected by a bundle of nerve fibers called the corpus callosum. The hemispheres are strongly, though not entirely, symmetrical. Generally, the left brain controls the muscles on the right side of the body, and the right brain controls the left side. One hemisphere may be slightly dominant, as with left- or right-handedness.

Related: What’s the difference between the right brain and the left brain?

The popular notions about “left brain” and “right brain” qualities are generalizations that are not well supported by evidence. However, there are some important differences between these areas. The left brain contains regions that are involved in language production and comprehension (called Broca’s area and Wernicke’s area, respectively) and is also associated with mathematical calculation and fact retrieval, Holland said. The right brain plays a role in visual and auditory processing, spatial skills and artistic ability — more instinctive or creative things, Holland said — though these functions involve both hemispheres. “Everyone uses both halves all the time,” he said.

The human brain has two hemispheres, which are popularly considered to be responsible for completely different set of skills, but there’s little scientific research to support that notion.  (Image credit: Dimitri Otis/Getty Images)

BRAIN INITIATIVE

In April 2013, President Barack Obama announced a scientific grand challenge known as the BRAIN Initiative, short for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies. The $100-million-plus effort aimed to develop new technologies to produce a dynamic picture of the human brain, from the level of individual cells to complex circuits.

Like other major science efforts, such as the Human Genome Project, the significant expense is usually worth the investment, Holland said. Scientists hope the increased understanding will lead to new ways to treat, cure and prevent brain disorders.

The project contains members from several government agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), as well as private research organizations, including the Allen Institute for Brain Science and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

In May 2013, the project’s backers outlined their goals in the journal Science. In September 2014, the NIH announced $46 million in BRAIN Initiative grants. Industry members pledged another $30 million to support the effort, and major foundations and universities also agreed to apply more than $240 million of their own research toward BRAIN Initiative goals.

When the project was announced, President Obama convened a commission to evaluate the ethical issues involved in research on the brain. In May 2014, the commission released the first half of its report, calling for ethics to be integrated early and explicitly in neuroscience research, Live Science previously reported. In March 2015, the commission released the second half of the report, which focused on issues of cognitive enhancement, informed consent and using neuroscience in the legal system, Live Science reported.

The Brain Initiative has achieved several of its goals. As of 2018, the NIH has “invested more than $559 million in the research of more than 500 scientists,” and Congress appropriated “close to $400 million in NIH funding for fiscal year 2018,” according to the initiative’s website. The research funding facilitated the development of new brain-imaging and brain-mapping tools, and helped create the BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) — an effort to catalog the brain’s “parts’ list.” The BICCN released its first results in November 2018.

Beyond a parts list, the BRAIN Initiative is working to develop a detailed picture of the circuits in the brain. For example, in 2020, BRAIN Initiative researchers published a study in the journal Neuron, reporting that they had developed a system, tested in mice, to control and monitor circuit activity at any depth in the brain. Previous efforts could only examine circuits close to the surface of the brain. Also in 2020, the initiative’s Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks (MICrONS) program, an effort to map circuits in the cortex, launched a website where researchers can share their data, including electron microscopy images of circuits.

Since 2019, the initiative has sponsored a photo and video contest in which initiative researchers are invited to submit eye-catching depictions of the brain. Check out the 2020 winners on the Brain Initiative website.

DOES THE BRAIN STAY ALIVE AFTER A PERSON DIES?

April 2019 marked a milestone for both the initiative and neuroscience research at large: BRAIN Initiative researcher Nenad Sestan, of the Yale School of Medicine, published a report in the journal Nature, revealing that his research team had restored circulation and some cellular functions to pig brains four hours after the animals’ deaths, Live Science previously reported. The results challenged the prevailing view that brain cells are suddenly and irreversibly damaged shortly after the heart stops beating. The researchers did not observe any signs of consciousness in the brains, nor were they trying to; on the contrary, the researchers injected pig brains with chemicals that mimicked blood flow and also blocked neurons from firing. The researchers emphasized that they did not bring the pig brains back to life. They did, however, restore some of their cellular activity.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

This article was updated on May 28, 2021 by Live Science contributor Ashley P. Taylor.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.livescience.com/29365-human-brain.html

Jewels in the Night Sea: Luminous Plankton Captured in the Dark Waters off the South Coast of Japan

 Colossal – Jewels in the Night Sea: Luminous Plankton Captured in the Dark Waters off the South Coast of Japan

AUGUST 17, 2018  KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI

Larval fish of Dendrochirus, all images copyright Ryo Minemizu

Japanese marine life photographer Ryo Minemizu focuses his lens on some of the tiniest and most abundant life forms in our oceans. His series Phenomenons explores the diverse beauty and extravagant colors of plankton, and is shot amongst the dark waters of the Osezaki sea near Mount Fuji and other coasts around Japan, the Philippines and Maldives. To capture the small creatures Minemizu sets his shutter speed to just a fraction of a second, while ensuring that his own movements don’t disturb the surrounding organisms.

“Plankton symbolize how precious life is by their tiny existence,” he explains. “I wanted other people to see them as they are in the sea, so it was my motivation from the beginning to shoot plankton underwater, which is quite a challenge. Most plankton are small, and their movements are hard to predict.”

His solo exhibition Jewels in the Night Sea begins a three-city tour at Canon Gallery in Ginza, Tokyo from August 20-29, 2018. It will then move to Cannon galleries in Nagoya and Osaka from September 6-12 and September 20-26, 2018. You can see more of Minemizu’s underwater photography on Instagram and Twitter. Select prints from his Phenomenons series are available in his online shop. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Abdominal fin of an unconventional trough pattern is large enough to ensure buoyancy. Body length: 35mm

Unknown a larval Gymnapogon

This fish resembles a color and a way to swim like a flatworm/body length 20mm

Batesian mimicry, larval fish of Soleichthys

Unlike as now that being shed by the tide, when it comes to adults it is not moving at the bottom of the deep sea.

Larval Tripod fish

A kind of Paralepididae, which is approaching with interest in the light.

The Paralepididae

Hyperiidea on Nausithoe jellyfish

Larval Barred soapfish

The paddle of zoea larva of Lysmata

Megalopa larva of Eplumula phalangium

Larva of Pleurobranchaea

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