PBS News, africanews, Sky News, CAN 24/7, Roylab Stats, Google News, The New York Times, Doctor Mike Hansen, TEDX & TED-ED, and Colossal

PBS News: May 20 – 24, 2020 and How Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Songs of Comfort’ are inspiring musical collaboration

 africanews Live

Sky News live

CNA 24/7 LIVE

Roylab Stats [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Google News: COVID-19 resources

The New York Times:  The Morning, May 21, 2020

 Doctor Mike Hansen: 12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19

 TEDX: Marah J Hardt The quirky sex lives of ocean creatures, and TED-Ed Aaron Reedy Sex determination more complicated than you thought

 Colossal: Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 24, 2020

May 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 24, a look at how contact tracing works in the fight against the coronavirus, how the federal stimulus is providing alternatives to layoffs through a work-sharing agreement, and climate activism pivots online amid COVID-19 concerns. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show May 23, 2020

Streamed live 9 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, May 23, federal policy is driving some immigrants to drop their healthcare coverage in the middle of the outbreak, Brazil is on track to become the newest hotspot in the global coronavirus pandemic, and some tips for getting back together as social distancing restrictions loosen up in the United States. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 22, 2020

May 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Americans prepare for Memorial Day while mourning the 95,000 people lost to the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus: Beijing seeks to limit pro-democracy activity in Hong Kong, the debate over the origins of the novel coronavirus, testing for COVID-19 antibodies, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering COVID-19 victims and a lifesaving British water mill. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Americans prepare for a Memorial Day transformed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4gkK… News Wrap: Passenger jet crashes in Pakistan  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t_KS… China is proposing to limit Hong Kong’s autonomy. Why now? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMuVe… Why virus research is a tension point for the U.S., China https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z41Ul… What we know about COVID-19 antibodies — and what we don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4PSk… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s call to reopen, mail-in voting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iltfg… Remembering 5 more victims of the COVID-19 pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxDTI… This medieval mill is providing a British county with bread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J40lr… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 21, 2020

May 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the U.S. sees millions more jobless claims, although they appear to be plateauing. Plus: Modeling the spread of COVID-19 if Americans had locked down earlier, Gov. Ralph Northam on reopening Virginia, U.S. plans to withdraw from another nuclear treaty, pandemic implications for retail, the risks faced by transportation workers and Ask Us about coronavirus transmission. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. sees another 2.4 million jobless claims amid pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJNa4… New COVID-19 model shows why early action matters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmZ27… News Wrap: Powerful cyclone batters India, Bangladesh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Emun2… Why Gov. Ralph Northam delayed reopening parts of Virginia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCHDD… U.S. cites Russian treaty violations as cause for withdrawal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7OLT… How the pandemic has pushed U.S. retail to brink of collapse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epl6e… Can transit workers be kept safe among crowds of passengers? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6MTU… A virologist answers questions on coronavirus transmission https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQHiT… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 20, 2020

May 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, all 50 states have begun lifting restrictions put in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. Plus: The firing of a State Department inspector general investigating Mike Pompeo, a cyclone slams India and Bangladesh, child deportations during COVID-19, Brazil’s coronavirus crisis, modeling infectious disease, government preparation for pandemic and trucking through COVID-19. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS All 50 states have now begun the process of reopening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrNbg… Pompeo says he didn’t know fired IG was investigating him https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lncVV… Strongest cyclone in a decade slams India, Bangladesh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfBJV… News Wrap: Record floodwaters in Michigan are still rising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yfp1s… How Trump is leveraging COVID-19 to tighten immigration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWq0e… Brazil’s Lula slams Bolsonaro for downplaying coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPxDE… The value — and the limitations — of COVID-19 models https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLa97… Why U.S. federal government was unprepared for pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gIPe… A truck-driving couple on surviving COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YNEP… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 5,435,789 699 2,184,995 345,442
United States 1,684,273 5,111 346,492 98,169
Brazil 365,213 1,728 149,911 22,746
Russia 353,427 2,408 118,798 3,633
United Kingdom 259,559 3,907 36,793
Spain 235,823 5,007 150,376 28,773
Italy 230,158 3,820 141,981 32,877
Germany 180,523 2,171 162,648 8,389
Turkey 156,827 1,886 118,694 4,340
France 144,921 2,161 64,617 28,367
India 138,845 102 57,721 4,021
Iran 137,724 1,653 107,713 7,451
Peru 119,959 3,733 49,795 3,456
Canada 85,104 2,241 44,207 6,453
Mainland China 82,985 59 78,268 4,634
Chile 73,997 3,873 29,302 761
Mexico 68,620 542 47,424 7,394
Belgium 57,342 4,976 15,297 9,312
Pakistan 56,349 257 17,482 1,167
Netherlands 45,445 2,604 5,830
Ecuador 36,756 2,106 3,560 3,108
Sweden 33,843 3,275 4,971 4,029
Portugal 30,788 2,996 17,822 1,333
Switzerland 30,746 3,581 28,100 1,642
Ireland 24,698 5,018 21,060 1,608
Indonesia 22,750 85 5,642 1,391
Poland 21,631 564 9,276 1,007
Ukraine 21,245 507 7,234 623
Colombia 21,175 429 5,016 727
Romania 18,283 942 11,630 1,193
Egypt 17,265 172 4,807 764
Philippines 14,319 132 3,323 873
Argentina 12,063 268 3,719 452
Denmark 11,360 1,951 9,900 562
Algeria 8,503 198 4,747 609

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected  COVID-19 resources

 

The New York Times   The Morning  May 21, 2020

Good morning. Vaccine research is making progress. Chinese leaders have regained their swagger. And a new study shows the severe costs of delayed U.S. action on the virus.
Inaction that cost lives
By the final days of February, many public health experts were sounding the alarm about the coronavirus, and some people were listening.
In the San Francisco area, major employers began directing their employees to stay home. Washington State declared a state of emergency. South Korea, Vietnam and other countries ordered aggressive measures.
President Trump did not.
On Feb. 26, he said — incorrectly — that the number of cases was “going very substantially down, not up.” As late as March 10, he promised: “It will go away. Just stay calm. It will go away.”
Some local leaders also continued to urge business as usual. In early March, Mayor Bill de Blasio told New Yorkers to “get out on the town despite coronavirus.”
This kind of advice appears to have cost tens of thousands of American lives, according to a new analysis by researchers at Columbia University.
If the U.S. had enacted social-distancing measures a week earlier than it did — in early March rather than mid-March — about 36,000 fewer Americans would have died, the study found. That’s more than one third of the current death toll, which is about 100,000.
If the measures had been in place two weeks earlier, on March 1, the death toll would be 54,000 lower.

By The New York Times
These are hypothetical estimates, of course, and they’re unavoidably imprecise. But they are consistent with real-world evidence from places that responded to the virus more quickly, including San Francisco, Washington State, South Korea and Vietnam — where per capita deaths have been much lower than the U.S. average.
Jeffrey Shaman, the leader of the Columbia research team, told The Times: “It’s a big, big difference. That small moment in time, catching it in that growth phase, is incredibly critical in reducing the number of deaths.”
Related: Trump and some top White House officials are arguing that the reported virus death toll is overstated, The Times reports. Public health experts overwhelmingly reject this view.
A simple way to understand why experts believe the official count is actually understated: The number of Americans who have died in recent weeks is much higher than normal.
FOUR MORE BIG STORIES
1. Hope for a coronavirus vaccine
Developing a vaccine usually takes years, sometimes decades. Yet many scientists around the world are now cautiously optimistic that a coronavirus vaccine could be ready by next year. One sign of progress: Researchers published a report yesterday showing that a prototype vaccine protected monkeys from infection.
In other virus developments:
2. Flooding in Michigan after dams burst

Tittabawassee River in Midland, Mich.Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
Days of torrential rainfall breached two privately owned dams in Central Michigan yesterday, sending water surging at least 10 feet high and forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes. The floodwaters flowed into a Dow Chemical complex and threatened a Superfund toxic-cleanup site, raising concerns of environmental fallout.
The evacuations complicate the state’s social-distancing efforts. “It’s hard to believe that we’re in the middle of a 100-year crisis, a global pandemic, and we’re also dealing with a flooding event that looks to be the worst in 500 years,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said.
3. Pompeo defends firing of watchdog
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo defended his recommendation for Trump to fire the State Department’s inspector general and denied the firing was retaliation for investigations into potential misuses of government resources by Pompeo and his wife, Susan.
NBC News reported this week that the Pompeos had used taxpayer money to pay for lavish dinners that included Fox News hosts, a NASCAR driver and the chairman of Chick-fil-A.
“Trump’s purge of inspectors general is unprecedented,” Jen Kirby writes in a Vox article explaining the history and role of the job.
When a mask makes a statement

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on Capitol Hill in Washington.Erin Schaff/The New York Times
For public figures including Emmanuel Macron and Ivanka Trump, the act of wearing a mask — or not wearing one — has become political. Nowhere is this more visible than in Nancy Pelosi’s color-coordinated facial wardrobe, Vanessa Friedman, The Times’s fashion critic, writes.

12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19

May 14, 2020  Doctor Mike Hansen

This is the link to the main study in this video: https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.73… 12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19 #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19 Coronavirus | COVID-19 YouTube Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… In all 12 cases, the cause of death was found within the lungs or the pulmonary vascular system. For the ones who did not die of large pulmonary emboli, they died of the extensive inflammation within the lungs, meaning pneumonia with ARDS. In these cases, the lungs were wet and heavy, much like a sponge that is saturated with water. The surfaces of the lung often had a distinct patchy pattern, with pale areas alternating with slightly protruding and firm, deep reddish-blue hypercapillarized areas. This is indicative of areas of intense inflammation, with endothelial dysfunction that can be seen at the microscopic level. When they look at slices of the lungs under the microscope, they found diffuse alveolar damage in 8 cases. Specifically, they saw hyaline membrane formation, and tiny clots in the capillaries, and capillaries that were engorged with red blood cells, and other inflammatory findings. All these findings represent ARDS. They also found lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, infiltrated these areas of infiltration. This fits the picture of viral pathogenesis. They also looked at the pharynx of these patients, meaning in their throat. The lining of the throat, or mucosa, was hyperemic, meaning very red and irritated, and at the microscopic level, they saw lymphocytes invading there, which is consistent with a viral infection. In one case, a patient had lymphocytes invade his heart muscle, findings that are consistent with what we call viral myocarditis. More than half of the patients in this study had large blood clots. One-third of the patients had pulmonary embolism as the direct cause of death. All the others died of intense inflammation in their lungs related to pneumonia with ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome). Recently there’s been studies showing that about 1/3rd of patients with severe COVID have blood clots. Another study of 191 patients with coronavirus aka COVID-19, half of those who died had clots, compared with 7% of survivors. And levels of D-dimer that were greater than 1000 µg/L were associated with a fatal outcome. So it’s pretty clear now that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is causing a lot of clots to form in moderate to severe COVID disease. How is this happening? It’s likely a combination of reasons, that has to do with downregulation of the ACE2 receptor in the lung alveoli, with a subsequent shift towards having more angiotensin II in the lungs, and less angiotensin 1-7 and 1-9 in the lungs, and when this happens, this leads to more cytokine storm with more inflammation, more constriction of pulmonary arteries, and more clots that develop. That, in turn, leads to more endothelial dysfunction in the capillaries that surround the alveoli. Also, there is evidence that the virus attaches to the ACE2 receptors of those endothelial cells that line those capillaries, which further propagates inflammation and clotting. And in the cytokine storm that develops there, RANTES, a chemokine, binds to the CCR5 receptor of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, and that causes those lymphocytes to infiltrate those areas of inflammation, and in doing so, further contributes towards the inflammatory reaction. This is why we are seeing low levels of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in severe COVID. Endothelial damage can also lead to the development of antiphospholipid antibodies, and these antibodies are bad because they trigger the formation of blood clots. That’s why patients who have clots with the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome need to be on blood thinners. Also, 11 out of the 12 patients in this study had underlying heart disease and were obese. These are known risk factors not just for cardiovascular disease, but also known risk factors for endothelial dysfunction, and are known risk factors for COVID. So the big takeaways from the findings in this study are that most people who die of COVID, it’s primarily a lung problem. Either related to inflammation with ARDS and/or blood clots. Antiphospholipid syndrome might be a commonality among patients with thrombosis in COVID-19 patients. Dr. Mike Hansen, MD Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine Website: https://doctormikehansen.com/ Instagram Account: http://instagram.com/doctor.hansen/ #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19

Category  Education

The ocean plays host to a peculiar party of wild, marine sex life that’s perhaps quirkier (and kinkier) than you can fathom. But is human behavior interrupting these raunchy reproductive acts? Take a deep dive with marine biologist Marah J. Hardt to discover what exactly goes down under the sea — and why your own wellness depends on the healthy sex lives of fish.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMileHigh, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Marah J. Hardt · Marine scientist and storyteller

Marah J. Hardt keeps one foot wet in the field while the other wanders the crossroads of science, storytelling and strategy.

MORE RESOURCES

Sex in the Sea

Marah J. Hardt

St Martin’s Press (2016)

TAKE ACTION  LEARN

Find out the many ways we can help make the oceans more sex-friendly.

Learn more ?  ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

From something as small and complex as a chromosome to something as seemingly simple as the weather, sex determination systems vary significantly across the animal kingdom. Biologist and teacher Aaron Reedy shows us the amazing differences between species when it comes to determination of gender. [Directed by Buzzco Associates, Inc., narrated by Aaron Reedy].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Aaron Reedy · Teacher

Aaron Reedy teaches at Thomas Kelly High School in Chicago, where he uses innovative projects to connect his classroom to the wider world of science.

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

How Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Songs of Comfort’ are inspiring musical collaboration

May 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The ‘Songs of Comfort’ project world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma launched on social media continues to expand in new directions. Jeffrey Brown looks at the growing collaboration in these mini performances, as tough times bring people together through music — and technology. It’s part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. Editor’s note: For the record,  one of the talented musicians shown in this piece singing harmony with herself is NewsHour producer Ali Rogin, at 3:11. Thanks to all of the performers for sharing with us. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

MAY 29, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Artist Josie Morway creates fierce portraits of wildlife set in abstracted apocalyptic environments and interspersed with geometric linework, colorful paint drips, and mysterious Latin text. Morway often features birds in her oil and enamel paintings, using the graceful shapes of the animals’ elongated necks and sweeping wings to draw the viewer’s eye around the artwork. Many of Morway’s works also interweave plants: ferns, succulents, and blossoming flowers emerge from around her animal subjects’ bodies.

The artist shares with Colossal that the Latin lettering that embellishes some of her paintings is heavily abstracted from old mottos. “I don’t mean for them to be read too literally, but rather hope they lend a certain feeling of portentousness to the pieces,” Morway explains. “I like referencing religious icon paintings and other forms of ‘serious’ historic painting, but using animals and birds in the place of saints, etc. I’m going for the feeling of narrative realism, but working with a narrative that’s mysterious, missing some information, open to the viewer’s interpretation.”

Morway will have a piece on view at Antler Gallery in Portland starting June 9, 2018, as part of PDX/LAX II, a collaborative exhibit with Los Angeles gallery Thinkspace Projects, as well as a two person show in October. You can also find her work in Australia at Beinart Gallery’s group show starting July 13. The artist shares updates on her work via Instagram.

This is the first large pink rose bloom in our garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA.  No matter how many unpleasant events happen in this world, if we are cultivating the garden, nature will always give us happiness.  I was trapped in our apartment for two months and thirteen days, due to COVIT-19 (Corona-virus).  But when I see flowers blooming in our garden, I feel more lively seeing the freshness and beauty comes alive.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, May 25, 2020

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, The New York Times, and BoredPanda

PBS News: May 15 – 19, 2020

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories, and Autopsies reveal: Coronavirus is more than a lung infection | COVID-19 Special

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The New York Times:   The Morning May 20, 2020 and A drive-by art show

BoredPanda: 10-Year-Old Designs A Plastic Curtain to Be Able to Hug Her Grandparents Safely During Quarantine

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 19, 2020

May 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Senate is divided over when to provide additional coronavirus aid — and to whom. Plus: Sens. Pat Toomey and Sherrod Brown on federal pandemic relief, California Gov. Gavin Newsom on COVID-19 trends in his state, coronavirus infections surge in Russia, grappling with COVID-19 in the most vulnerable facilities, and a NewsHour Bookshelf choice that seems to echo reality. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Senate divided over providing more coronavirus relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVxqS… Sen. Toomey on the need to get Americans back to work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=to4Zz… Sen. Brown on the risk of new workplace COVID-19 outbreaks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeRaN… News Wrap: India, Bangladesh brace for tropical cyclone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JgI5… Newsom: Calif. reopening based on ‘evidence, not ideology’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hElKa… In Russia, doctors treating COVID-19 pay a deadly price https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fmEJ… COVID-19 highlights systemic flaws of U.S. nursing homes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83cew… Lawrence Wright’s prescient novel about a global pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3zcK… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 18, 2020

May 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces he is taking a controversial drug unproven to treat COVID-19 as more states lift their restrictions. Plus: How U.S.-China tensions are affecting the global pandemic response, a medical view of when and how to reopen, the firing of a State Department watchdog, college admissions tests during COVID-19, Politics Monday and singing the pandemic blues. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS As states reopen, Trump says he’s taking hydroxychloroquine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUeDj… U.S.-China tensions take center stage at WHO summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRyp6… News Wrap: FBI says Pensacola gunman tied to al-Qaida https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pzF9… How to apply lessons from health care workers to daily life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZ1Yy… Trump’s ‘highly unusual’ politicization of government IGs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYnfi… What does COVID-19 mean for college admissions? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFwqm… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Obama speaking out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGsD7… Why this blues musician is now playing for an audience of 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUNg9… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 17, 2020

May 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 17, more stay-at-home orders are lifted and businesses start to reopen, concerns over COVID-19 as the Keystone pipeline construction continues, children’s literary titles reimagined for pandemic times, and a Chicago photographer captures the faces behind shuttered businesses. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 16, 2020

May 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, May 16, several states ease restrictions on businesses and public life, and how the pandemic is complicating the hard-fought voting rights for former felons. Also, a rare visit to Rose Atoll in American Samoa where scientists are studying the impact of climate change. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 15, 2020

May 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. House considers another round of coronavirus relief, but it could face major opposition. Plus: An inflammatory response in some children exposed to COVID-19, Bangladesh braces for the pandemic, investigating sexual assault allegations against former Vice President Joe Biden, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, in memoriam and messages for graduates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump vows return to business, ‘vaccine or no vaccine’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4QCL… News Wrap: Khalilzad blames hospital attack on Islamic State https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMeq7… Why do some kids develop inflammatory response to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbk50… Bangladesh confronts dual challenges of poverty, pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6j5i… What we learned about Biden’s Senate offices in the 1990s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrKNA… Shields and Brooks on Tara Reade allegations, Burr probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=344Oi… Mourning 5 people killed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mba1s… Commencement messages for graduates in an age of uncertainty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5yHF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube

channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 4,931,057 634 1,710,337 324,240
United States 1,559,750 4,733 297,628 92,333
Russia 308,705 2,104 85,392 2,972
Brazil 275,382 1,303 106,794 18,130
United Kingdom 248,293 3,737 35,704
Spain 232,555 4,937 150,376 27,888
Italy 227,364 3,774 132,282 32,330
Germany 177,827 2,139 155,614 8,193
Turkey 152,587 1,835 113,987 4,222
France 143,845 2,145 63,354 28,132
Iran 126,949 1,523 98,808 7,183
India 106,750 78 42,298 3,303
Peru 99,483 3,096 36,524 2,914
Mainland China 82,965 59 78,244 4,634
Canada 80,081 2,109 40,670 6,027
Saudi Arabia 59,854 1,749 31,634 329
Belgium 55,983 4,858 14,847 9,150
Mexico 54,346 429 37,325 5,666
Chile 53,616 2,806 22,504 544
Pakistan 45,898 209 13,101 985
Netherlands 44,447 2,547 5,748
Qatar 35,606 12,960 5,634 15
Ecuador 34,151 1,956 3,433 2,839
Belarus 32,426 3,445 11,415 179
Sweden 31,523 3,051 4,971 3,831
Switzerland 30,618 3,566 27,700 1,614
Portugal 29,432 2,864 6,431 1,247
Singapore 29,364 5,148 11,207 22
Bangladesh 25,121 149 4,993 370
United Arab Emirates 25,063 2,534 10,791 227
Ireland 24,315 4,941 19,470 1,571
Poland 19,569 510 7,903 953
Ukraine 19,230 459 5,955 564
Indonesia 19,189 72 4,575 1,242
Romania 17,387 896 10,356 1,141
South Africa 17,200 293 7,960 312
Colombia 16,935 343 4,050 613
Kuwait 16,764 3,793 4,681 121
Israel 16,650 1,814 13,299 277
Japan 16,433 130 12,286 784

Source:Wikipedia·  About this data  Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Autopsies reveal: Coronavirus is more than a lung infection | COVID-19 Special

May 15, 2020  DW News

Coronavirus is more than just a lung infection. From the first known instance of Covid-19 nearly half a year ago in the Chinese city of Wuhan medical scientists are still learning all the ways the virus can cause harm. A research team at New York’s Irving Medical Center says it has never seen so many extreme, abnormal cases. In a new study, scientists say that thromboses and pulmonary embolisms were frequently found in the deceased, something intensive care medics have already suspected. Intensive care medics from China, North America, and Europe are seeing more and more thromboses caused by blood clots. These blood clots are not just dangerous for a patient’s limbs. They can break away and affect the lungs, the heart, or the brain in the form of pulmonary embolisms, heart attacks, or strokes. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts…

Category  News & Politics

The New York Times   The Morning May 20, 2020
By David Leonhardt

 

Good morning. Virus cases are surging in France and Iran. The U.S. is deporting children. And colleges are reopening. Let’s start with the debate over stimulus.
A struggling stimulus program
There have clearly been problems with the business loan programs in the federal government’s coronavirus stimulus.
Many companies, especially small businesses, have struggled to get loans. And in a high-profile hearing yesterday, several senators criticized Jerome Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, for those problems.
More quietly, though, there also seems to be a growing recognition in Congress — among members of both parties — that the execution of the stimulus program hasn’t been the main problem. The design of the program has been.
Much of the rest of the world — including Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Germany and South Korea — has followed one strategy on coronavirus stimulus. Governments have temporarily paid the salaries of workers in order to prevent millions of layoffs.
The United States has taken a different path. It created a complicated mix of different stimulus policies, including loans to businesses and checks for families. This approach doesn’t appear to be working: The U.S. has had a sharper rise in unemployment than other countries. Many jobless Americans have also lost their health insurance — in the midst of a pandemic.
Now Congress may be on the verge of changing its approach.
The stimulus bill that House Democrats passed last week includes a new paycheck subsidy program, similar to those in other countries. For businesses that have lost substantial revenue, it would cover — as grants, not loans — as much as 80 percent of payroll costs, up to $60,000 per worker in annual salary. The policy would be expensive, yet still cheaper than the previous stimulus plans.
The bill is only one sign of the idea’s growing popularity. Yesterday, almost 100 House Democrats introduced a more ambitious version of the program. And senators across the ideological spectrum — from Josh Hawley (a Missouri Republican) on the right to Doug Jones (an Alabama Democrat) in the center to Bernie Sanders (you know who he is) on the left — are pushing their own versions of the plans.
Janet Yellen, the former Fed chair, has praised the idea as a “smart, quick and effective way to channel aid to workers through their firms.”
It’s still not clear what will happen. Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, continues to speak skeptically about the need for any further stimulus. Regardless, any bill is likely to be more diffuse and complex than the approach of other countries, and any paycheck subsidy is likely to be less ambitious.
But the U.S. may soon be moving in the direction of those other countries.
FOUR MORE BIG STORIES
1.              Spikes in new virus cases in Iran and France
A crowded street in Tehran.Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times
Two countries are facing challenges after starting to reopen. French authorities shut some schools just a week after many students returned because of a spike in new cases. France’s education minister said that some new cases were “inevitable” and added, “The consequences of not going back to school are much more serious.”
In Iran, weeks after leaders began easing coronavirus restrictions to help the economy, cases are spiking in eight provinces. Health experts attributed the resurgence to the country’s reopening before cases were consistently falling and before Iran had established widespread testing and contact tracing.
A long read: When you have some extra time, I recommend a New Yorker article, by Dexter Filkins, on Iran. It’s a good way to understand the broader political turmoil there.
In the U.S.: As of today, all 50 states have reopened to some degree. The rules vary widely.
2. The U.S. is deporting children
American authorities have deported hundreds of migrant children and teenagers, without giving them the opportunity to speak to a social worker or to plead for asylum, The Times’s Caitlin Dickerson reports. Some children are being deported in the middle of night, without their families being notified.
In expelling the children, the Trump administration is abandoning protections that both Democratic and Republican presidents have granted to young migrants for decades. Federal officials are justifying the practices under a 1944 law that grants the president broad power to prevent the “serious threat” of a dangerous disease.
Live music lives on

Travis McCready on stage during the first socially-distanced concert in Ft. Smith, Ark.Kevin Mazur/Getty Images
On Monday, fans of the country musician Travis McCready experienced the nation’s first live concert in months. Some drove for hours to attend the Arkansas show, where they had their temperatures taken and wore masks. Four of every five seats were kept empty. The show offered a preview of what live music might look like for the foreseeable future.

BoredPanda:10-Year-Old Designs A Plastic Curtain To Be Able To Hug Her Grandparents Safely During Quarantine

Andželika Jasevi?i?t?   BoredPanda staff

To protect our loved ones from COVID-19, especially those who are in the risk group, we are forced to keep a distance from them. This means that we cannot even visit them for a brief minute and must refrain from hugs and kisses. However, we all know that nothing feels better than a hug from your grandparents, so a smart girl from Riverside created a walkaround.

This 10-year-old girl couldn’t wait for social distancing to end so she could hug her grandparents

After seeing a video of someone making a blanket that intended to allow people to give hugs to their family members while keeping them safe from the coronavirus, the 10-year-old girl, Paige, got an idea.

So she decided to create a curtain that allows to safely embrace them

She decided to construct a safe curtain that has sleeves to allow two people to hug each other.

With this creation, Paige and other family members were able to embrace each other without the threat of the virus.

Watch the video of the beautiful moment

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A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries

The outdoor exhibition on Long Island featured works installed at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, with social isolation as just one theme.

Paintings by Darius Yektai were part of the “Drive-By-Art” event. Its organizer, Warren Neidich, said the show grew out of the question: “How do we show empathy and solidarity in this new age?”Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

By Stacey Stowe  May 11, 2020

No one was supposed to get too close to each other over the weekend during a drive-by exhibition of works by 52 artists on the South Fork of Long Island — a dose of culture amid the sterile isolation imposed by the pandemic. But some people couldn’t help themselves.

“At least this one looks like art,” said one man, as he stepped out of a convertible BMW onto the driveway of a rustic home in Sag Harbor on Saturday. He and two others examined the paintings, a cheeky homage to old masters by Darius Yektai that were affixed to two-by-fours nailed to trees. “Not like the other stuff.”

“The other stuff” was on display on the lawns, porches, driveways and garage doors at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, some from prominent artists and others by those lesser known. On a windy, blue-skied weekend, most people drove but others came on foot or by bicycle for the show, “Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing).”

Sabina Streeter, in Sag Harbor, preparing for the show on the South Fork. She also had elegant portraits on her porch.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

The exhibition was conceived by Warren Neidich, an artist and theorist who lives in Los Angeles and Berlin. He has also planned a drive-by exhibition in Los Angeles for Memorial Day weekend.

“How do we show empathy and solidarity in this new age that is lacking in emotional solidarity?” asked Mr. Neidich, who put the show together in less than three weeks while living in a Wainscott cottage. “I was feeling a need to find a way to revisit and create a new vocabulary.”

The exhibition had a homespun air. Its signs, on thin yellow paper, sometimes pointed in the wrong direction. The map on the website lacked some detail; there was at least one mistaken address. But people showed up, some wearing masks, some not, in muddy pickup trucks and shiny S.U.V.s, sports cars and Subarus, snaking past the properties and looking, for a change, at something other than a television or computer screen.

The sculptor Monica Banks winked at the signature hedges of the Hamptons with “Brains in Our Arms,”  steel wool octopuses positioned in her own hedge.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Jeremy Dennis’s “Destinations,” wood silhouettes with photocopied images of Disney World, the Eiffel Tower, and the meeting of Elvis and President Richard M. Nixon.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Eric Fischl’s life-size sculptures of nymphs, titled “Young Dancers Dancing,” amid a grove of trees at his home in Sag Harbor.Credit…Eric Fischl/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY; Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

The artists included Jeremy Dennis, with a tart commentary on pop culture and politics with wood silhouettes papered over with images, like one of a meeting of Elvis and President Richard M. Nixon; the sculptor Monica Banks, whose work winked at the signature hedges of the Hamptons; and Joe Brondo, an interdisciplinary artist, who positioned three glowing orbs on the lawn of his East Hampton home. Under a chandelier strung from a tree, Dianne Blell presented “Table for Two/Separate Tables,” with furniture set for a spaced-apart restaurant meal, and in the same vein, Toni Ross and her daughter Sara Salaway positioned folding chairs along a fence in Wainscott, with dates and words, making a calendar of social isolation.

Stripped of the imprimatur of a gallery wall or an august museum setting, the works stood alone for better or worse. Eric Fischl’s life-size sculptures of nymphs dancing were amplified by a grove of trees in light leaf at his home in Sag Harbor, while a lone piece of driftwood propped on a driveway and painted by Joan Jonas to mark off six feet stood forlornly.

Bastienne Schmidt with her work “Grids and Threads” (2020), which has stakes six feet apart. She and her husband, Philippe Cheng, participated in the show.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Mr. Cheng, working on “AirMail,” in the “Drive-By-Art” event.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

There was spontaneous interaction. The artist Bastienne Schmidt, dressed in a bright blue pea coat and red pants, waved to those who checked out her installation of canvas-wrapped posts set six feet apart at the Bridgehampton home she shares with her husband, the photographer Philippe Cheng. Kathryn McGraw Berry, an architect sampling the tour in a champagne-colored Audi, chatted with Eric Dever, who was checking the wind resistance of his 12 paintings mounted on posts at his 18th-century Water Mill home.

“It’s nice seeing one’s work in the landscape when you’ve been cooped up in the house,” Mr. Dever said. “I grew up in Southern California so I appreciate the drive-through idea.”

Eric Dever’s “Áquas de Março (Waters of March).” “It’s nice seeing one’s work in the landscape when you’ve been cooped up in the house,” he said. Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

At the East Hampton home of Suzanne Anker, an artist who established the Bio-Art Laboratory at the School of Visual Arts in New York, three illuminated, galvanized boxes of seedlings sat atop pedestals. The boxes are part of a series of 31 to create part of the light process that produces photosynthesis in plants.

She said she participated in the drive-by show to give people something to do while cultural institutions have been shut down. “It’s a unique treasure trove where you follow the clues, see the art and see where artists live,” she said. “There is a whole diversity of places and the kind of intimacy that you don’t typically get to experience.”

 

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PBS News: May 4 – 8, 2020, and Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Scientific America: Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

TED Talks: Dianna Cohen Tough truths about plastic pollution, and Melati and Isabel Wijsen Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The New York Times: The Morning

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

DailyTop10s: This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

 Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 8, 2020

May 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, as U.S. unemployment rises to its highest level since the Great Depression, more states let businesses reopen. Plus: How the government can address the economic crisis, COVID-19 in the American West, Pulitzer honors for local news, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the pandemic, the 75th anniversary of VE-Day and flowers for the sick. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Can states reopen their economies safely? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycq4J… Why U.S. economic crisis is even worse than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6O8E… News Wrap: Suspects in Ahmaud Arbery killing appear in court https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oysat… The western U.S. counties COVID-19 has barely reached https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_ZKk… 2 Pulitzer winners on the changing landscape of local news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyhS1… Shields and Brooks on DOJ politics, Trump’s economic hopes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITSQU… Remembering Americans lost to the coronavirus pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzKKN… What these World War II veterans remember most about VE-Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ4Rl… How this Calif. artist is sharing ‘Flowers for Sick People’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMjO1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 7, 2020

May 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, facing lost tax revenue and budget shortfalls, more U.S. states start to reopen. Plus: The Justice Department wants to drop the case against Michael Flynn, a public health expert on U.S. testing for COVID-19, Americans lose health insurance along with their jobs, pandemic in India, outcry over Ahmaud Arbery’s death and Ask Us questions about working during the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Pandemic’s economic damage spreads to all corners of U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-ZK6… Why does DOJ want to drop its case against Michael Flynn? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMBqP… News Wrap: Supreme Court overturns ‘Bridgegate’ convictions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szGZi… Public health expert fears states are reopening too soon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dj1hZ… For many Americans, layoff means loss of health insurance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw1vx… How COVID-19 is inflaming India’s religious tensions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Q3i… Ahmaud Arbery’s shooting a ‘hate crime,’ says his father https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3STD… Viewer questions about workplace safety during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaCWf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 6, 2020

May 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, more countries lift pandemic restrictions in the face of historic economic loss. Plus: Outcry over a black man’s shooting death in Georgia, the Supreme Court hears major cases remotely, the political battle over funding states and cities, South Dakota Sen. John Thune on pandemic response, new rules around campus sexual assault, COVID-19 in conflict zones and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The new life emerging after pandemic restrictions expire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XG2R… News Wrap: New reports of pandemic fallout in North Korea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=866PE… Video appearing to show Ahmaud Arbery killing sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFmsd… 2 major cases come before a Supreme Court operating remotely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsX2p… State, local workers: Federal aid not ‘a red or blue issue’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XEB-… Sen. Thune on funding states, PPP and safety in the Senate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8y0h… What Trump’s Title IX rules mean for survivors, the accused https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooa3… Are people in medical crisis avoiding ER due to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7y0z… In Libya and Yemen war zones, COVID-19 adds a 2nd front https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwPsE… Southwest Airlines CEO on ‘worst economic environment’ ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01M7E… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 5, 2020

May 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump makes his first cross-country trip since the pandemic took hold of American life. Plus: Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on reopening his state, when critical COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter, the global competition for scarce protective medical gear, what the pandemic means for mental health, high mortality for British people of color and quarantine DIY. Correction: Due to an editing error in Malcolm Brabant’s segment on the United Kingdom, we incorrectly said that country was now second to the United States in per capita rate of deaths due to COVID-19. The UK is second in total deaths to the United States, per official counts. The NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Traveling to Arizona, Trump dismisses new death projections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXe0x… News Wrap: DNI pick Ratcliffe vows to avoid political bias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lra6W… Gov. Asa Hutchinson on he’s ready to reopen Arkansas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Bx8F… When lifesaving COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vCuA… Why the U.S. has struggled to source enough PPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0Dh7… The ominous impact of COVID-19 on American mental health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLYiM… An intimate portrait of a British family’s COVID-19 loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rJdU… Stuck at home, some Americans are mastering new skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deZal… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Apr 21, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

An investigation into the U.S. response to COVID-19, from Washington State to Washington, D.C. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate How did the U.S. become the country with the worst known coronavirus outbreak in the world? FRONTLINE and veteran science reporter Miles O’Brien investigate the American response to COVID-19, and examine what happens when politics and science collide. #Coronavirus #Documentary #COVID-19 Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,955,984 509 1,319,306 275,188
United States 1,318,289 4,000 182,930 78,244
Spain 223,578 4,747 133,952 26,478
Italy 217,185 3,605 99,023 30,201
United Kingdom 211,364 3,181 31,241
Russia 198,676 1,354 31,916 1,827
Germany 170,588 2,052 138,214 7,510
Brazil 145,894 690 59,297 10,017
France 138,421 2,064 55,782 26,230
Turkey 135,569 1,630 86,396 3,689
Iran 104,691 1,256 83,837 6,541
China 82,887 59 78,046 4,633
Canada 66,434 1,749 30,226 4,569
Peru 61,847 1,925 19,012 1,714
India 59,662 44 17,847 1,981

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/stopping-deforestation-can-prevent-pandemics/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=earth&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-05-06_top-stories&spMailingID=64678544&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1880744581&spReportId=MTg4MDc0NDU4MQS2

Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

By THE EDITORS on May 1, 2020

Credit: Taylor Callery

SARS, Ebola and now SARS-CoV-2: all three of these highly infectious viruses have caused global panic since 2002—and all three of them jumped to humans from wild animals that live in dense tropical forests.

Three quarters of the emerging pathogens that infect humans leaped from animals, many of them creatures in the forest habitats that we are slashing and burning to create land for crops, including biofuel plants, and for mining and housing. The more we clear, the more we come into contact with wildlife that carries microbes well suited to kill us—and the more we concentrate those animals in smaller areas where they can swap infectious microbes, raising the chances of novel strains. Clearing land also reduces biodiversity, and the species that survive are more likely to host illnesses that can be transferred to humans. All these factors will lead to more spillover of animal pathogens into people.

Stopping deforestation will not only reduce our exposure to new disasters but also tamp down the spread of a long list of other vicious diseases that have come from rain forest habitats—Zika, Nipah, malaria, cholera and HIV among them. A 2019 study found that a 10 percent increase in deforestation would raise malaria cases by 3.3 percent; that would be 7.4 million people worldwide. Yet despite years of global outcry, deforestation still runs rampant. An average of 28 million hectares of forest have been cut down annually since 2016, and there is no sign of a slowdown.

Societies can take numerous steps to prevent the destruction. Eating less meat, which physicians say will improve our health anyway, will lessen demand for crops and pastures. Eating fewer processed foods will reduce the demand for palm oil—also a major feedstock for biofuels—much of which is grown on land clear-cut from tropical rain forests. The need for land also will ease if nations slow population growth—something that can happen in developing nations only if women are given better education, equal social status with men and easy access to affordable contraceptives.

Producing more food per hectare can boost supply without the need to clear more land. Developing crops that better resist drought will help, especially as climate change brings longer, deeper droughts. In dry regions of Africa and elsewhere, agroforestry techniques such as planting trees among farm fields can increase crop yields. Reducing food waste could also vastly lessen the pressure to grow more; 30 to 40 percent of all food produced is wasted.

As we implement these solutions, we can also find new outbreaks earlier. Epidemiologists want to tiptoe into wild habitats and test mammals known to carry coronaviruses—bats, rodents, badgers, civets, pangolins and monkeys—to map how the germs are moving. Public health officials could then test nearby humans. To be effective, though, this surveillance must be widespread and well funded. In September 2019, just months before the COVID-19 pandemic began, the U.S. Agency for International Development announced it would end funding for PREDICT, a 10-year effort to hunt for threatening microbes that found more than 1,100 unique viruses. USAID says it will launch a new surveillance program; we urge it to supply enough money this time to cast a wider and stronger net.

In the meantime, governments should prohibit the sale of live wild animals in so-called wet markets, where pathogens have repeatedly crossed over into humans. The markets may be culturally important, but the risk is too great. Governments must also crack down on illegal wildlife trade, which can spread infectious agents far and wide. In addition, we have to examine factory farms that pack thousands of animals together—the source of the 2009 swine flu outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people in the U.S. and multitudes worldwide.

Ending deforestation and thwarting pandemics would address six of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals: the guarantee of healthy lives, zero hunger, gender equality, responsible consumption and production, sustainably managed land, and climate action (intact tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide, whereas burning them sends more CO2 into the atmosphere).

The COVID-19 pandemic is a catastrophe, but it can rivet our attention on the enormous payoffs that humanity can achieve by not overexploiting the natural world. Pandemic solutions are sustainability solutions.

Read more about the coronavirus outbreak here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

THE EDITORS

Recent Articles

Artist Dianna Cohen shares some tough truths about plastic pollution in the ocean and in our lives — and some thoughts on how to free ourselves from the plastic gyre.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dianna Cohen · Artist and activist

Dianna Cohen co-founded the Plastic Pollution Coalition, which is working to help end our cycle of plastics use.

Mission Blue Voyage | April 2010

Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they’re used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts — including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike — paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. “Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’re too young or you won’t understand,” Isabel says to other aspiring activists. “We’re not telling you it’s going to be easy. We’re telling you it’s going to be worth it.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melati and Isabel Wijsen · Activists

Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to ban plastic bags in Bali.

TEDGlobal>London | September 2015

The New York Times    The Morning      May 7, 2020

By David Leonhardt

Good morning. We’ve made some changes to this newsletter, and we welcome any feedback you have.
More kids are going hungry. States are reopening without a declining number of coronavirus cases. And mom and dad disagree about who’s doing the home schooling. Let’s start with President Trump’s climate agenda.
Dismantling the rules

A coal-fired generating station in Sidney, Mont. Janie Osborne for The New York Times

This newsletter will often start with coronavirus news. And you’ll always find plenty of news about it below. But the virus isn’t the only story we’re going to cover in depth.
Today, we’re going to start with another one of the world’s vital stories: the battle over climate policy.
Shortly after taking office, President Trump and congressional Republicans found an innovative way to reduce business regulations, one of their top policy priorities. They began using a 1996 law — called the Congressional Review Act, and rarely used before — that allowed them to reverse rules enacted by the Obama administration in its final few months.
Now that Trump’s first term is winding down, administration officials realize that the same law could undo some of their policies — if the Democrats win in November. So the administration has been hurrying to finish as many regulations as possible this spring, to make sure they are not vulnerable to reversal under the Review Act.
And the administration has been particularly focused on the environment. As Nadja Popovich, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Kendra Pierre-Louis of The Times report: Trump’s drive to dismantle major climate and environmental policies is now mostly complete.
This agenda, Trump and his aides say, helped to speed up economic growth (before the coronavirus lockdown) by giving companies more flexibility to behave as they want. Many climate and health experts counter that the rule changes are leading to more pollution-related illnesses and are accelerating climate change.
The Times, working with academic researchers, has created a graphic with all 64 of Trump’s environmental rollbacks, as well as an additional 34 in progress. Among the areas where rules have been loosened:
  • vehicle pollution
  • power-plant emissions
  • braking systems on trains hauling flammable liquids
  • dumping of coal-mining debris into streams
  • chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to developmental disabilities in children
  • species endangered by climate change
The larger debate: The Times editorial board has argued that Trump’s policy “imperils the planet,” while National Review has praised Trump for pursuing “American dominance in energy production.”
1. More kids are going hungry
A food distribution center in Queens.Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
The coronavirus pandemic is creating a hunger crisis: More than 17 percent of young children in the United States lack sufficient food, according to research — a rate three times higher than during the worst of the Great Recession.
The most likely explanations are the rise in unemployment and the interruption in school meal programs. “I’ve eaten a lot less just to make sure they get what they need,” said one Ohio woman, who is trying to make $170 in monthly food stamps go far enough to feed her grandchildren.
Here’s what else is happening

Ian Prasad Philbrick, Lara Takenaga, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com.

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

https://inhabitat.com/inspiring-rammed-earth-hospital-brings-affordable-care-to-rural-nepal/

written by Lucy Wang  on April 28,2020

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

An inspiring beacon of humanitarian architecture has arrived to one of the poorest and most remote regions of Nepal — the new Bayalpata Hospital in Accham. Opened earlier this month to replace an aged and overrun clinic, the new hospital is a model of sustainable rural health made possible through a collaboration between the government of Nepal and NGO Possible Health. New York City-based Sharon Davis Design crafted the 7.5-acre campus, which is built primarily from locally sourced rammed earth and powered by rooftop solar panels. oearth and powered by rooftop solar panels.

Located on a hilltop surrounded by the terraced slopes of the Seti River Valley, the new Bayalpata Hospital is expected to provide low-cost, high-quality care to more than 100,000 patients a year from Accham and its six surrounding districts — a number that’s more than eight times its original capacity. The hospital comprises five medical buildings with outpatient, inpatient, surgery, antenatal and emergency facilities for 70 beds as well as clinical functions such as pharmacy, radiology and laboratory spaces. The campus also includes an administration block for offices, a 60-seat cafeteria and 10 single-family houses plus an eight-bedroom dormitory to house the hospital staff and their families.

Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal”

Because of the site’s remote and mountainous location, the hospital is primarily built from rammed earth using a low-tech construction method and local labor. Soil from the site was mixed with 6% cement content for stabilization and seismic resistance. This mixture was then formed into blocks with reusable plastic formwork and set atop foundations constructed from local stone, which was also used for pathways and retaining walls.

Local Sal wood was used for built-in furniture, exterior doors and louvers. In addition to the thermal mass of the massive rammed earth walls, passive heating and cooling design strategies were used to keep the hospital comfortable year-round. The campus also includes a new water supply and storage, wastewater treatment facilities and bioswales to manage monsoon-driven erosion. The hospital’s south-facing roofs are topped with a grid-connected 100 kW photovoltaic array that is powerful enough to generate all of the campus’ electricity needs.

“We see this project as a model of how rammed earth, and other vernacular materials, can be utilized to create modern architecture,” said Sharon Davis, principal of Sharon Davis Design. “Without local materials, this project may not have been possible because of its incredibly remote location — a 10-hour drive from the nearest regional airport and a three-day drive on narrow, mountainous roads from the nearest manufacturing centers around Kathmandu.”

+ Sharon Davis Design

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

Aug 6, 2019  DailyTop10s

The world is home to thousands of species of caterpillars, and some of them are very unique indeed. These are the strangest caterpillars on the planet! DailyTop10s brings you fun and informative top ten lists in a variety of different topics. Join us and sub for regular posts. If you have a top ten topic you’d like us to do make a video on, let us know in the comments! We usually focus on top tens that bring educational / informational value to the viewer. Thanks for watching DailyTop10s!

Category  Entertainment

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015  Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Copyright Dominique Lalonde Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, Africanews, Sky News, CAN, Roylab Stats, Google news, 92nd Street Y, The New York Times, Miumiu Guitargril, and boredpanda

PBS News: April 17 – 20, 2020, Washington Week, and In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

 Africanews Live

 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

92nd Street Y: Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

The New York Times: Morning Briefing, April 19, 2020

 Miumiu Guitargril – [ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old

 boredpanda: 29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 20, 2020

Apr 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, protesters demand U.S. government restrictions be lifted despite the continued spread of COVID-19. Plus: The price of oil tanks, evaluating the risks of reopening the U.S., the pandemic’s effect on agriculture, Brazil’s president minimizes the public health threat, a fragile Afghanistan confronts COVID-19, Politics Monday and an essential worker on taking out the trash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Crowds protest restrictions as health experts warn of risks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQApS… Troubled global oil market tanks amid pandemic’s demand drop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DPob… News Wrap: Nova Scotia reels as mass shooting kills 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PeRr… The ‘fantasy’ that normal American life will resume in weeks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn52p… How COVID-19 is causing chaos for American agriculture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zlpx2… Brazil’s people fear COVID-19 threat their president denies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kl2xm… Can politically fragile Afghanistan combat COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDdtn… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on U.S. pandemic response polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBT9V… The special hazards of collecting garbage during a pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeJYU… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 19, 2020

Apr 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 19, states weigh-in on re-opening for business, the coronavirus exposes the need for programmers for outdated unemployment systems, the popularity of animal fostering during a pandemic, and a breakdown of the debate for the latest federal relief package as millions of small businesses languish. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 18, 2020

Apr 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 18, the latest on the coronavirus, what scientists are finding out about antibody testing, some big companies are redeploying their employees during the outbreak, and the impact of the pandemic on a cultural cornerstone in Portland, Oregon. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 17, 2020

Apr 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump offers states guidance on reopening, but some governors fear it’s too soon. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on COVID-19 testing and PPE, why testing remains slow, an assault allegation against former Vice President Joe Biden, the latest from Congress on funding economic relief, Shields and Brooks, in memory of those lost to COVID-19 and a Broadway triumph. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States try to balance economic crisis, public health threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e_S9… Pence: Health care ‘has not been overwhelmed’ by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQow7… News Wrap: Ukraine wildfires cause surge in air pollution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waqx5… The supply chain fiasco has derailed U.S. COVID-19 testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piPGT… What we know about sexual assault allegation against Biden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hblpN… What’s holding up additional funding for U.S. small business https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS3m7… Shields and Brooks on Trump vs. states on COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqYr… Remembering some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvORW… This Broadway cast ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ for digital performance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrErM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

 

Apr 17, 2020  Washington Week

President Trump unveiled his plan for states to shoulder the brunt of the burden on deciding when to reopen. The panel also discussed the effort among congressional Republicans and Democrats and the White House to negotiate more funding for the small business lending program, which has maxed out. Panel: Kimberly Atkins, Senior News Correspondent, WBUR, Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent, The New York Times, Paula Reid, White House Correspondent, CBS News, Kristen Welker, White House Correspondent, NBC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,478,634 318.76 651,736 170,389
United States 799,456 2,425.86 72,368 42,604
Spain 200,210 4,250.71 80,587 20,852
Italy 181,228 3,008.26 48,877 24,114
Germany 147,065 1,768.69 84,717 4,862
United Kingdom 124,743 1,877.65 16,509
France 114,657 1,709.36 37,409 20,265
Turkey 90,980 1,094.1 13,430 2,140
Iran 83,505 1,002.09 59,273 5,209
China 82,758 59.03 77,123 4,632
Russia 47,121 321.11 3,446 405
Brazil 40,581 192.02 22,130 2,575
Belgium 39,983 3,469.41 8,895 5,828
Canada 36,831 969.77 12,586 1,690
Netherlands 33,405 1,914.21 3,751
Switzerland 27,673 3,222.83 18,600 1,429

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

Sep 17, 2018  92nd Street Y

Watergate journalist Bob Woodward’s new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House, announced as the most acute and penetrating portrait of a sitting president ever published during the first years of an administration, is unprecedented. Talking with Jacob Weisberg, Bob Woodward gives a front-row-seat view of life inside Donald Trump’s White House, as revealed in his new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, an associate editor at The Washington Post, shows how the president makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Drawing from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, contemporaneous meeting notes, files, documents, and personal diaries, FEAR brings to light the most explosive debates that drive decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence. It’s the inside story on President Trump as only Bob Woodward can tell it. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear first-hand as the legendary journalist sits down with the chairman and editor-in-chief of Slate. Recorded on September 12, 2018 at 92nd Street Y. Subscribe for more videos like this: http://bit.ly/1GpwawV Your support helps us keep our content free for all. Donate now: http://www.92y.org/donatenow?utm_sour… Facebook: http://facebook.com/92ndStreetY Instagram: http://Instagram.com/92ndStreetY Twitter: https://twitter.com/92Y Tumblr: http://92y.tumblr.com/ On Demand: http://www.92yondemand.org

Category  Nonprofits & Activism

The New York Times – Morning Briefing

By Remy Tumin and Elijah Walker

 

Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.  April 19, 2020

Mark Felix/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

1. Demonstrators across the country violated social-distancing orders to call for the reopening of states and the American economy.

The rallies, like the one outside the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, above, rode a wave of similar protests this past week. On Saturday alone, people also gathered in Indianapolis, Ind.; Carson City, Nev.; Annapolis, Md.; Salt Lake City, Utah, and Brookfield, Wis.

President Trump on Friday openly encouraged the right-wing protests in states with stay-at-home orders, even after officially and publicly conceding that reopening was up to governors.

2. What does the year ahead look like?
There will be no quick return to normal American life, but there is hope for managing the outbreak now and in the long term. Our global health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. spoke to over 20 experts on what to expect in the coming months.
Some of their predictions:
  • The lockdowns will end haltingly. Putting safety first could mean reopening only after coronavirus cases declined for 14 days, 90 percent of contacts of infected people could be traced, infections of health care workers were eradicated, recuperation sites existed for mild cases — and many other hard-to-reach goals.
  • It is not clear whether recovery from the virus and antibodies confer immunity. If they do, or are believed to, America could be split into two classes: those protected (or thought to be) and those still vulnerable.
  • The virus can be kept in check, but only with expanded resources like widespread testing. And treatments are likely to arrive before a vaccine.
3. The U.S. needs to triple the number of coronavirus tests it is currently administering before the country can reopenexperts say. Above, a testing line in the Bronx.
An average of 146,000 people per day have been tested for the virus nationally so far this month, according to the COVID Tracking Project. A total of 3.6 million tests have been administered. But to reopen the U.S. by mid-May, the number of daily tests performed should be 500,000 to 700,000, according to researchers at Harvard University.
Continue reading the main story
Germany was the first large democracy to contain the spread of the virus, and is now the first to methodically go about reopening its economy: It is aiming to test the entire population for antibodies in the coming months to assess the virus’s spread.
And in Africa, limited testing is only part of the problem. Basic supplies like oxygen and soap are needed first.
4. Access to food is changing.
Many U.S. school cafeterias are now operating more like soup kitchens, sending days’ worth of food home for entire families even though the federal school meals program will not reimburse them.
Slaughterhouses have turned out to be the weakest link in the nation’s food supply chain. Some of the country’s highest-producing meat plants have closed because workers are getting sick.
But shutting down a plant backs up production, crushes prices paid to farmers and eventually leads to months of shortages.
5. In normal times, men are a majority of the overall work force. The pandemic has flipped that.
One in three jobs held by women has been designated as essential, according to a Times analysis of census data. Nonwhite women are more likely to have essential jobs — cashier, emergency room nurse, home health aide and more — than anyone else. Above, Constance Warren, who works the cold cuts counter in a New Orleans grocery.

No matter their sex, race or income level, most Americans are united on one thing, according to a Times survey: a sense of deep pessimism about the economy.

6. Republicans think blaming China for the coronavirus is a winning strategy for the November elections. But President Trump keeps going off message.
Republican senators locked in difficult races are preparing commercials that will condemn China. Party officials are brandishing polling data in hopes that Mr. Trump will confront Beijing. But with a reliance on China’s manufacturers for lifesaving medical supplies as well as trade talks and unstable markets to consider, Mr. Trump has repeatedly muddied those efforts.

We also spoke to Bernie Sanders’s supporters about whether they’ll be voting for Joe Biden. They weren’t unenthusiastic.

7. The latest threat to Indonesia’s wildlife: bird-singing competitions.
Officials and conservationists say wild songbirds are disappearing at a tremendous rate across the vast archipelago. One bird protection organization estimates that poachers capture more than 20 million songbirds a year.

Much of the demand is fueled by the growing craze for high-stakes bird singing contests at which government officials frequently preside. To build a bird’s stamina, one poacher said that he would slap the sides of its 20-foot-cage to make it fly 500 laps a day.

[ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old INS @miumiuguitargril

Feb 24, 2020  Miumiu Guitargirl

INS @miumiuguitargril Thank you for your encouragement.I will continue to study hard. To fulfill my dream to be an excellent guitarist. Please forgive me for my poor English. This is not my native language. I’ve tried my best to do it well. Because of my English level, I can’t Reply every message. If you have any good suggestions, please email me. My mother will help me reply. 234361800@qq.com

Category  Music

In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

Apr 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

During a period when art lovers can’t simply visit a museum or gallery, a new social media phenomenon has arisen as a creative outlet. Participants isolating at home amid the pandemic are encouraged to recreate a prominent work of art using everyday objects. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

29 Paintings by My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

Tristan and V?j?n? Rimaši?t?

Tristan is my five-year-old son who was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder at the age of three. Despite this life-changing diagnosis, he is still a very and playful child.

One day Tristan saw his older sister painting. After a while, he showed great interest and asked us, his parents, if he could also paint sometimes. I found myself in a little awkward situation because I didn’t know what to answer to my beloved son who’s having difficulty with fine motor skills.

Then, I came up with the idea that Tristan could paint but in a different way and style. The next day, Tristan got his first acrylic color set and right away started splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures.

After he had created a few paintings, we realized that they were unique and rather special. We decided to create an Instagram profile to show off his works. During his painting sessions, I record him and after he’s finished, Tristan watches and analyses his creations back with a big smile on his face.

For Tristan as an autistic child, creating these paintings in his own unique style and for us to enjoy, is priceless and we believe very therapeutic for him. His movements and actions when he is expressing himself and his thoughts through his art are really quite magical.

We want to share these happy moments with you so we’ve created this Bored Panda profile to show the world our cute and special artist and his amazing works.

More info: Instagram

Tristan

Splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures

His artwork

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.boredpanda.com/boy-with-autism-paintings-tristan/

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PBS News, Roylab Stats, Al Jazeera, DW News, FRANCE 24 English, TED Talks, Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, WEHImovies, and The New York Times

PBS News: March 30 – 31, 2020

Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Al Jazeera English – Live

DW News Livestream – Latest news and breaking stories

FRANCE 24 English: LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

TED Talks: Seth Berkley HIV and flu the vaccine strategy

Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell: The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

WEHImovies: DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

The New York Times: Coronavirus Map – Tracking the Global Outbreak Updated April 1, 020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 31, 2020

Mar 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the death toll from novel coronavirus in the U.S. has now exceeded that in China. Plus: Food banks struggle to feed the newly unemployed, teachers and students adapt to distance learning, unlocking the science of the virus, President Trump relaxes fuel efficiency standards, an update from the White House, how the military is handling the outbreak and Now Read This. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The U.S. novel coronavirus death toll now tops China’s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9effA… News Wrap: Dow Jones concludes worst quarter since 1987 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqbW… How food bank are trying to cope with a surge in demand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul96q… How learning changes when school happens at home and online https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9Thm… What scientists know about COVID-19 — and what they don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RO37V… Trump hastens deregulation with fuel efficiency rollback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPe7Y… Trump tells Americans to brace themselves for more pain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGFaK… U.S. Navy says it won’t evacuate ship with infected sailors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy2ta… ‘Inheritance’ author Dani Shapiro answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImIHT… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 30, 2020

Mar 30, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, COVID-19 continues to burn through the U.S. population, with New York as the most severe national hot spot. Plus: Why U.S. coronavirus testing is still problematic, Illinois’ surging number of cases, a Greek refugee camp poised for disaster, U.S. delivery workers fear for their health, President Trump’s update, Politics Monday and one family’s story of coping with pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lock populations down as COVID-19 cases climb https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-Ki3… How ‘constrained’ virus testing has crippled U.S. response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPmWa… ‘Everyone is afraid’ as Illinois virus cases spike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8azIz… At Greek refugee camp, few defenses against COVID-19 threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TQsl… News Wrap: Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozC06… As more people order delivery, workers fear virus exposure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmWrt… How the president’s coronavirus approach has changed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh5rT… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Trump and COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XTsI… The particular pain of losing a loved one during quarantine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6xKV… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

Novel coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases, recovered cases(COVID-19). I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the coronavirus spreading. For anyone that wants to know the numbers and progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. At first, I tried to show only official data from governments without any manipulation. But many people wanted to apply an up-to-date format of data to stream. I added a procedure to manually manipulate data with my computer. After seeing the inflicted countries numbers had sharply increased, I realized that I could no longer keep up with new information from 100 countries. So I made another procedure which enables moderators the ability to manipulate the numbers on screen remotely. Not only the moderators who willingly accepted the hard work, but also everyone that gave us reliable information were able to add streaming data. The role of this streaming is to show basic information to undertand situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites. References: 1. WORLDOMETER: https://www.worldometers.info/coronav… 2. BNO News: https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02… 3. JHU CSEE: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/ap… 4. 1point3acres (for USA/CAN):https://coronavirus.1point3acres.com/en 5. RiskLayer (DEU): http://www.risklayer-explorer.com/eve… 6. MorgenPost (DEU): https://interaktiv.morgenpost.de/coro… 7. DXY (CHN): https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneum… 8. J.A.G Japan (JPN): https://jagjapan.maps.arcgis.com/apps… 9. VG (NOR): https://www.vg.no/spesial/2020/corona… 10. Wiki – Brazil page (BRA): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_co… I majored in life science and joined bioinformatics laboratory for master degree. At that time I used python. Since I decided to change my career as dentist, I have been stopped programming for 15 years. Now, I start to learn more about python with googling. Because my job doesn’t allow mistakes, I won’t try something new works. Still I am wondering how can i start this live streaming. Sometimes python program doesn’t work as i intended. If I can devote all my free time to this live stream, I would give more accurate and faster information. But please understand that I can’t manipulate data all day. While I am working and sleeping, data gathering is done automatically. I live in South Korea. At the beginning of streaming, the number of confirmed cases were not so high in South Korea. After sudden appearing local transmission that can’t be trackable, the number has been dramatically increased. Please be warned that COVID-19 is highly contagious disease. Although the stream started off crude and basic, many people have supported me in improving and maintaining this. It is because of your support that I am encouraged to keep streaming. I especially appreciate all moderators for willingly accepting the role. They have given their precious time to making this live stream better – Max Mustermann, Stephanie Hughes, Random, Entrenched Trader, Droid Knight, Craft Fan, Fries, jlpowell73, The NCV, Josh Leathers,The Eldritch God, srpk khin, Hitz1001, Red Chiref, GildArt by Gilda, emmamec, lambi, AmberLeanne, DukeHeart, Green Rock Films, Charlie and amithist57. I hope this live stream can be a useful source of information for you. Please keep track of the numbers that impact you and let them inform the decisions you make when you have to make them. Please take care. Keeping good immunity is very important!!! Please sleep, eat and rest fully for resilience. Keep those affected by this unfortunate outbreak in your thoughts. Data1 – screen numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Data2 – Daily numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Eyes_of_Glory/ Heaven_and_Hell / Heaven_and_Hell_Part_2 / Hero_Down/ Into_the_Sky / Lonely_Troutman / Lonely_Troutman_II / Parzival / Mountain/The_Heartache Hero Down: http://incompetech.com/ from www.bensound.com from www.epidemicsound.com

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020   Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019   DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

FRANCE 24 English – LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

Started streaming on Jan 24, 2020  FRANCE 24 English

Watch FRANCE 24 live in English on YouTube for free Subscribe to France 24 now https://f24.my/YouTubeEN Watch France 24 live news: all the latest news live broadcasted from Paris, France. Le DIRECT France 24 en français : https://f24.my/YTliveFR France 24 EN VIVO en Español: https://f24.my/YTliveES ????? 24 ???? ??????? https://f24.my/YTliveAR Like us on Facebook: https://f24.my/FBen Follow us on Twitter: https://f24.my/TWen Watch our stories on Instagram: https://f24.my/IGen FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 https://www.france24.com/en/

Category  News & Politics

Seth Berkley explains how smart advances in vaccine design, production and distribution are bringing us closer than ever to eliminating a host of global threats — from AIDS to malaria to flu pandemics.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

TED2010 | February 2010

The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

Mar 19, 2020  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell

Get Merch designed with ? from https://kgs.link/shop Join the Patreon Bird Army ? https://kgs.link/patreon ?? More infos and links are just a click away ?? A huge thanks to the experts who helped us on short notice with the video. Especially “Our World in Data”, the online publication for research and data on the world’s largest problems – and how to make progress solving them. Check out their site. It also includes a constantly updated page on the Corona Pandemic. In December 2019 the Chinese authorities notified the world that a virus was spreading through their communities. In the following months it spread to other countries, with cases doubling within days. This virus is the “Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2”, that causes the disease called COVID19, and that everyone simply calls Coronavirus. What actually happens when it infects a human and what should we all do? Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources… OUR CHANNELS ?????????????????????????? German Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeDE by FUNK Spanish Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeES by WIX HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US?

DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

Jul 16, 2018  WEHImovies

Edit of wehi.tv’s DNA animations. Created for V&A exhibition “The Future Starts Here” 2018 No narration, Yes sound and text.

Category  Science & Technology

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_NN_p_20200331&instance_id=17204&nl=morning-briefing&regi_id=105496626&section=topNews&segment_id=23382&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Global Outbreak

By The New York Times Updated April 1, 2020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

World, U.S., Europe, Asia, Tips

The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 873,200 people, according to official counts. As of Wednesday morning, at least 41,624 people have died, and the virus has been detected in at least 171 countries, as these maps show.

Where cases are rising fastest

Avg. number of new cases each day (for the last 7 days)

Sources: Local governments; The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; World Health Organization.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

CASESDEATHSNEW CASES
United States188,0493,909Jan. 22 Mar. 31
Italy105,79212,428
Spain94,4178,189
Mainland China83,2233,312
Germany61,913583
France52,1283,523
Iran44,6052,898
Denmark28,76090
U.K.25,1501,789
Switzerland16,176373
Turkey13,531214
Belgium12,775705
Netherlands12,5951,039
Austria10,180128
South Korea9,887165
Canada8,53696
Portugal7,443160
Brazil5,812202
Israel5,35820
Australia4,70720
Norway4,64139
Sweden4,435180
Czech Republic3,30831
Ireland3,23571
Japan2,87464
Malaysia2,76643
Chile2,73812
Russia2,33717
Poland2,31133
Ecuador2,30279
Romania2,24582
Luxembourg2,17823
Philippines2,08488
Pakistan1,93826
Thailand1,65110
Saudi Arabia1,56310
Indonesia1,528136
Finland1,41817
India1,39735
South Africa1,3535
Greece1,31449
Mexico1,21529
Panama1,18130
Iceland1,1352
Dominican Rep.1,10951
Peru1,06530
Argentina1,05427
Singapore9263
Colombia90616
Serbia90016
Croatia8676
Slovenia80215
Qatar7812
Estonia7454
Algeria71644
Hong Kong7144
Egypt71046
New Zealand7081
Iraq69450
U.A.E.6646
Ukraine64517
Morocco61736
Bahrain5674
Lithuania5378
Armenia5323
Hungary49216
Lebanon47012
Bosnia and Herzegovina42013
Bulgaria3998
Latvia3980
Tunisia39410
Andorra37612
Slovakia3630
Moldova3534
Kazakhstan3482
Costa Rica3472
Uruguay3381
North Macedonia3299
Taiwan3225
Azerbaijan2985
Kuwait2890
Jordan2745
Cyprus2628
Burkina Faso26114
Albania24315
San Marino23626
Vietnam2120
Cameroon1936
Oman1921
Cuba1866
Ivory Coast1791
Senegal1750
Afghanistan1744
Honduras17210
Uzbekistan1722
Faroe Islands1690
Malta1690
Ghana1615
Belarus1521
Sri Lanka1432
Mauritius1435
Channel Islands1413
Nigeria1352
Venezuela1353
Brunei1291
West Bank & Gaza1191
Bolivia1157
Kosovo1121
Georgia1100
Cambodia1090
Montenegro1092
Kyrgyzstan1070
Congo988
Trinidad and Tobago874
Rwanda750
Gibraltar690
Liechtenstein680
Paraguay653
Isle of Man600
Kenya591
Madagascar570
Aruba550
Monaco521
Bangladesh515
Uganda440
Guatemala381
Jamaica382
Zambia360
Barbados340
Niger343
Togo341
Bermuda320
El Salvador321
Djibouti300
Mali282
Ethiopia260
Guinea220
Republic of the Congo190
Tanzania191
Maldives180
Gabon161
Bahamas150
Eritrea150
Equatorial Guinea150
Haiti150
Myanmar151
Cayman Islands141
Saint Lucia130
Dominica120
Guyana122
Mongolia120
Namibia110
Curaçao111
Greenland100
Libya100
Macau100
Seychelles100
Suriname100
Syria102
Benin90
Grenada90
Laos90
Eswatini90
Guinea-Bissau80
Saint Kitts and Nevis80
Mozambique80
Zimbabwe81
Antigua and Barbuda70
Angola72
Sudan72
Chad70
Cape Verde61
Mauritania61
Vatican City60
Sint Maarten60
Fiji50
Montserrat50
Nicaragua51
Nepal50
Somalia50
Turks and Caicos Islands50
Bhutan40
Botswana41
Gambia41
Belize30
Central African Republic30
Liberia30
British Virgin Islands30
Anguilla20
Burundi20
Papua New Guinea10
Sierra Leone10
Timor-Leste10
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines10 
 
 

Notes: New cases are represented as seven-day averages. Japan’s count includes 696 cases and seven deaths from a cruise ship that docked in Yokohama. The data excludes cases on the Zandaam cruise ship, which has not yet docked. France and the U.S. figures include overseas territories.

While the outbreak is a serious public health concern, most people who contract the coronavirus do not become seriously ill, and only a small percentage require intensive care. Older people and those with existing health conditions, like heart or lung disease, are at higher risk.

Follow the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

United States

The number of known coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow quickly. As of Wednesday morning, at least 188,049 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times database, and at least 3,909 patients with the virus have died.

Reported cases

Ala.900+

Alaska100+

Ariz.1,200+

Ark.500+

Calif.8,500+

Colo.2,900+

Conn.3,100+

Del.300+

D.C.400+

Fla.6,700+

Ga.4,100+

Hawaii200+

Idaho500+

Ill.5,900+

Ind.2,100+

Iowa400+

Kan.400+

Ky.500+

La.5,200+

Maine300+

Md.1,600+

Mass.6,600+

Mich.7,600+

Minn.600+

Miss.900+

Mo.1,300+

Mont.100+

Neb.100+

Nev.1,100+

N.H.300+

N.J.18,600+

N.M.300+

N.Y.75,800+

N.C.1,500+

N.D.100+

Ohio2,100+

Okla.500+

Ore.600+

Pa.4,900+

R.I.400+

S.C.1,000+

S.D.100+

Tenn.2,000+

Texas3,500+

Utah800+

Vt.200+

Va.1,200+

Wash.5,200+

W.Va.100+

Wis.1,300+

Wyo.100+

Note: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by county. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive, which may differ from where they contracted the illness. Some people who traveled overseas were taken for treatment in California, Nebraska and Texas. Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories are not shown. Sources: State and local health agencies, hospitals, C.D.C.

See our page of maps, charts and tables tracking every coronavirus case in the U.S.

The New York Times is engaged in a comprehensive effort to track details about every confirmed case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. Many people are infected despite having no known connection to previous cases, which suggests local, person-to-person spread of the virus.

Europe

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to surge across Europe, there are now more total confirmed cases outside of China than inside China, the country where the virus first spread.

Total confirmed coronavirus cases

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; Local governments.

Many of the cases across Europe have been traced back to Italy, which has one of the world’s largest outbreaks. At least 105,792 people have tested positive as of Wednesday morning.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

ITALY105,700+

SPAIN94,400+

GERMANY61,900+

FRANCE52,100+

U.K.25,100+

NORWAY4,600+

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; local governments.

Asia

The outbreak is believed to have begun in a seafood and poultry market in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in central China. The virus seems to spread very easily, especially in confined spaces, making containment efforts difficult. It is difficult to know how many people who contract the virus die, but some early estimates put the fatality rate at roughly 1 percent.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

SOUTH KOREA9,800+

JAPAN2,800+

MALAYSIA2,700+

PHILIPPINES2,000+

THAILAND1,600+

INDIA1,300+

MEXICO1,200+

ICELAND1,100+

SINGAPORE900+

NEW ZEALAND700+

TAIWAN300+

VIETNAM200+

NIGERIA100+

500+

67,800+

CHINA

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; local governments.

The precise dimensions of the outbreak are hard to know. Not all infected people have received a diagnosis, and some countries, like Singapore, have more proactive testing and containment efforts than others do.

Tips

Experts’ understanding of how the virus spreads is still limited, but there are four factors that likely play a role: how close you get; how long you are near the person; whether that person projects viral droplets on you; and how much you touch your face.

If your community is affected, you can help reduce your risk and do your part to protect others by following some basic steps:

Wash your hands! Scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, and then dry them with a clean towel or let them air dry.

Keep distance from sick people. Try to stay six feet away from anybody showing flu- or cold-like symptoms, and don’t go to work if you’re sick.

Prepare your family, and communicate your plan about evacuations, resources and supplies. Experts suggest stocking at least a 30-day supply of any needed prescriptions. Consider doing the same for food staples, laundry detergent and diapers, if you have small children.

Here’s a complete guide on how you can prepare for the coronavirus outbreak.

Note: Data are based on reports at the time of publication. At times, officials revise reports or offer incomplete information.

By Jin WuAllison McCannKeith CollinsKaren YourishSarah AlmukhtarRich HarrisJon HuangK.K. Rebecca LaiDerek WatkinsAnjali SinghviJugal K. Patel and Scott Reinhard.  ·   Mitch SmithAmy Harmon and Mike Baker contributed reporting.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_NN_p_20200331&instance_id=17204&nl=morning-briefing&regi_id=105496626&section=topNews&segment_id=23382&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

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PBS News, Global National, CNN, DW News, ABC News, TED Talks, The New York Times, and Scientific American

PBS News: March 15 & 16, 2020, and Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

 Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

CNN: Fareed Zakaria – Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

DW News: Coronavirus update – Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders

ABC News: Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency – Four Corners – ABC News In-depth

TED Talks: Adam Kucharski How can we control the coronavirus pandemic?

The New York Times: We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L. By Chris Stanford

Scientific American: Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there By Jane Qiu, and WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 16, 2020

Mar 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the novel coronavirus pandemic dominates the U.S., as numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb and cities essentially shut down. Plus: The economic fallout from the outbreak, what epidemiologists mean by “flattening the curve,” the Biden-Sanders debate, Politics Monday, coronavirus threatens Lebanon with another crisis, coping through art and song and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 15, 2020

Mar 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 15, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, what you need to know about “social distancing,” how the coronavirus scare is shaping the political playing field, and what’s being done to stop Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

Mar 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the unique magnitude of the novel coronavirus pandemic, how President Trump is handling the crisis, what the government should do to reassure fearful Americans, and how the outbreak might affect the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race.

Category  News & Politics

Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

Mar 15, 2020  Global News

Canadian travellers are scrambling to return home amid the COVID-19 outbreak as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says nothing is ‘off the table” in combating the pandemic in Canada. Abigail Bimman reports on whether those plans could also involve border closures, and Jennifer Johnson reports on how U.S. health authorities are raising the possibility of more country-wide crackdowns. Heather Yourex-West reports on how many Canadian provinces are beginning to enforce tough measures by closing public spaces and schools. Robin Gill reports on a disastrous pipeline explosion in Nigeria and why the COVID-19 pandemic is halting Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial. Plus, Mike Le Couteur looks at why hundreds of millions of dollars allocated to support Canadian veterans has not been spent. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #Coronavirus #COVID19

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

Mar 15, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria discusses how President Trump is handling coronavirus and America’s well-being in comparison to other countries’ response to the global pandemic. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus update: Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders | DW News

Mar 15, 2020  DW News

Germany joins a growing list of EU countries to at least partially shut out its neighbors. Authorities here have decided to close borders with Switzerland and Austria. That’s according to German media reports. Added restrictions are also being imposed on the French-German boundary. Spain is in lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus Covid-19. Unprecedented lockdowns and border closures are coming into effect in many European countries, and the streets are empty throughout Europe, with Spain and France among the worst hit by the virus’ spread behind Italy. England is planning self-isolation measures for all people over 70, for up to four months. Austria’s Chancellor Sebstian Kurz says his government is banning gatherings of more than five people. Iran’s coronavirus death toll has leapt by 113 in one day to reach 724. And the Vatican says all Easter services will take place without worshipers in attendance. Pope Francis will hold Sunday blessings via TV and the internet. Meanwhile, the United States has tightened its ban on visitors from Europe. President Donald Trump says it will now include travelers from Britain and Ireland. In countries that are far away from coronavirus hotspots, like Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia, the response from authorities has ranged from tough to nonexistent.Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #dwNews

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency | Four Corners

Feb 24, 2020  ABC News In-depth

It’s likened to a scene from an apocalypse. Wuhan — a city more populous than London or New York — placed in ‘lockdown’ following the outbreak of the new and deadly coronavirus. In China, more than two thousand people have died, with tens of thousands more infected, and authorities are resorting to extreme measures to try to halt the contagion. In interviews filmed on smartphones, Chinese activists and Australians trapped in the lockdown explain what they are going through. Four Corners charts how the outbreak occurred and investigates whether a cover-up by Chinese authorities allowed the virus to spread. _________ Watch more Four Corners investigations here: https://bit.ly/2JbpMkf You can also like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abc4corners/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/4corners And sign up to our newsletter: https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/newsl… _____________

Category  News & Politics

As the threat of COVID-19 continues, infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski answers five key questions about the novel coronavirus, providing necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what might need to change about our social behavior to end the pandemic. (This video is excerpted from a 70-minute interview between Kucharski and head of TED Chris Anderson. Listen to the full interview at go.ted.com/adamkucharski.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Adam Kucharski · Infectious disease scientist

Adam Kucharski is working to understand how epidemics spread — and how they can be controlled.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread — and Why They Stop Hardcover

Adam Kucharski

Basic Books (2020)

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Monday, March 16, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L.
 

By Chris Stanford

Chelsea Market in Manhattan on Sunday. Restaurants and bars were ordered closed in several parts of the U.S.  Jose A. Alvarado Jr. for The New York Times
Americans are urged to ‘hunker down’
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that no gatherings of 50 people or more be held in the U.S. for the next two months, one of the federal government’s most sweeping efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
“For a while, life is not going to be the way it used to be in the United States,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Sunday. “We have to just accept that if we want to do what’s best for the American public.”
Here are the latest updates on the outbreak and maps of where the virus has spread.
In other developments:
? New York City’s public school system, the largest in the country, will be closed starting today. The city has also ordered a shutdown of tens of thousands of bars and restaurants, except for delivery and pickup services.
To ease a bottleneck in coronavirus testing, federal officials are setting up more drive-through centers and increasing commercial laboratories’ ability to process multiple samples at once.
? The Trump administration tried to persuade a German company that is developing a possible vaccine to move its work to the U.S., German officials said, raising fears in Berlin that any inoculation would be available first — and perhaps exclusively — in the U.S.
? Italy, the hardest-hit country outside China, reported a death toll of 1,809, a 25 percent increase over the day before. In a communal effort to lift the mood, Italians stuck in their homes have been breaking out in song. “It’s not like we’re maestros,” a woman in Rome said, but “it’s a moment of joy in this moment of anxiety.”
? As part of restrictions across Europe, Germany will close its borders with several neighbors.
? A Tennessee man who became a subject of national scorn after stockpiling more than 17,000 bottles of hand sanitizer donated the supplies. The state has begun a price-gouging investigation.
? Movie theaters had their worst weekend in two decades. Domestic ticket sales totaled $55.3 million, a 44 percent drop from the previous weekend.
What to know: Here’s how to practice social distancing and clean your phone. The Times is providing free access to much of our coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, like all of our newsletters, is free.
Another angle: On a special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. The story is a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” Listen here.
Fed cuts rates to near zero
The Federal Reserve on Sunday cut its benchmark interest rate by a full percentage point and said it would inject hundreds of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy, making an aggressive effort to address the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.
If the measures remind you of the 2008 global financial crisis, you’re not alone, our senior economics correspondent writes.
Global markets fell today. Here’s the latest.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the financial system’s response to the pandemic.
Related: Retailers, dairy farmers and meat producers say the U.S. food supply chain remains intact and has been ramping up to meet pandemic stockpiling.
Another angle: As the outbreak forces the cancellation of trips, nights out and large gatherings, economic damage is mounting. “Last week, I would have told you nothing had changed,” a California real estate agent said. “This week, it has all gone to hell.”  
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders bumped elbows rather than shaking hands before Sunday’s debate.  Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Democrats debate pandemic, and each other
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders called on Sunday for far more aggressive government action against the coronavirus and its economic effects, during their first one-on-one debate of the Democratic primary race.
The shadow of the pandemic loomed over the event, which was held without a live audience and with a six-foot distance between the candidates, following guidelines for social distancing.
Mr. Biden committed for the first time to selecting a female running mate, and Mr. Sanders said that “in all likelihood” he would do so as well. Here are six takeaways from the debate. We also fact-checked some of the candidates’ remarks.
Perspective: Writers from our Opinion section ranked the performances.
What’s next: Polls suggest that Mr. Biden is likely to win the four states with primaries on Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio. Georgia, which had been scheduled to vote March 24, postponed its primary for two months because of the coronavirus.
Go deeper: The Times Magazine looks at Mr. Sanders’s campaign. “Even as the two-man race has taken a more pugilistic turn while the economy reels and a pandemic sweeps the globe, Sanders has remained steadfast in his willingness to let the Democratic voters judge him by his democratic-socialist vision of what America should be. And so, it would seem, they have.”
Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. Shira Ovide wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

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How China’s “Bat Woman” Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

     By Jane Qiu on March 11, 2020 

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Shi Zhengli, known as China’s “bat woman” for her virus-hunting expeditions in bat caves, releases a fruit bat after taking blood and swab samples from it. Credit: Wuhan Institute of Virology

BEIJING—The mysterious patient samples arrived at Wuhan Institute of Virology at 7 P.M. on December 30, 2019. Moments later, Shi Zhengli’s cell phone rang. It was her boss, the institute’s director. The Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention had detected a novel coronavirus in two hospital patients with atypical pneumonia, and it wanted Shi’s renowned laboratory to investigate. If the finding was confirmed, the new pathogen could pose a serious public health threat—because it belonged to the same family of bat-borne viruses as the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that plagued 8,100 people and killed nearly 800 of them between 2002 and 2003. “Drop whatever you are doing and deal with it now,” she recalls the director saying.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-chinas-bat-woman-hunted-down-viruses-from-sars-to-the-new-coronavirus1/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=health&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-03-16_featured-this-week&spMailingID=64310566&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1841993808&spReportId=MTg0MTk5MzgwOAS2

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

     By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT on March 11, 2020

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

Coronavirus illustration. Credit: Dowell Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, acknowledging what has seemed clear for some time—the virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe.

Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the situation will worsen.

“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” said Tedros, as the director general is known.

As of Wednesday, 114 countries have reported that 118,000 have contracted Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, known as SARS-CoV2. In the United States, where for weeks state and local laboratories could not test for the virus, just over 1,000 cases have been diagnosed and 29 people have died. But authorities here warn continuing limits on testing mean the full scale of spread in this country is not yet known.

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Read more from this special report:

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

The virus causes mild respiratory infections in about 80% of those infected, though about half will have pneumonia. Another 15% develop severe illness and 5% need critical care.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/who-declares-the-coronavirus-outbreak-a-pandemic/

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PBS News, The New York Times, DW Documentary, BBC Click, TED Talks, Bored Panda, and My Modern Met

PBS News: March 6 – 9. 2020, How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’, What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case, and How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

DW Documentary: Better brain health

BBC Click: Foldable Phones and Medical Tech

TED Talks: The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings – Renzo Piano, and Jill Seubert How a miniaturized atomic clock could revolutionize space exploration

Bored Panda:  NASA’s Curiosity Has Been on Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

My Modern Met: These Exotic Trees Transform into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

PBS NewsHour live episode, Mar 9, 2020

•Streamed live 83 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 8, 2020

Mar 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday March 8, the coronavirus outbreak spreads and Italy imposes strict travel restrictions, and after years of planning the 2020 census makes its debut this week. Also, a new approach in Louisiana for prison reform focuses on rehabilitation. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 7, 2020

Mar 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 7, concerns over coronavirus continue as the number of cases rise, the presidential democratic candidates rally ahead of the upcoming primaries, tensions escalate amid migrant push on Greece-Turkey border, and can women landowners in Iowa help conservation efforts? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 6, 2020

Mar 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump signs a bipartisan emergency spending deal to fund the government’s novel coronavirus response, as the global number of cases approaches 100,000. Plus: Questions about how to handle sick leave and medical bills amid the novel coronavirus outbreak, a conversation about women in politics, political analysis with Shields and Brooks and a music documentary. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Spread of novel coronavirus yields new global reality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEB94… News Wrap: February saw strongest U.S. hiring since 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIfKt… How lack of paid sick leave complicates U.S. virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JrYP… Are female presidential candidates held to higher standard? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNLVk… Shields and Brooks on Warren’s farewell, Biden’s surge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcP7u… Robbie Robertson on building The Band https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxRL7… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How painter Jacob Lawrence reframed early American history with ‘Struggle’

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Amid the McCarthy hearings and the launch of the civil rights movement in the 1950s, painter Jacob Lawrence sought to frame early American history the way he saw it. His ensuing work, the sprawling series “Struggle,” has been reassembled and is now on a national tour, with its first stop at the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts. Special correspondent Jared Bowen of WGBH visits the exhibit. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s Louisiana abortion law case

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case about access to abortion doctors in Louisiana. The law in question is similar to a Texas one struck down by the Court in 2016 — but decided by a different group of justices. Lisa Desjardins talks to the National Law Journal’s Marcia Coyle and Mary Ziegler, professor and author of “Abortion and the Law in America: Roe v. Wade to the Present.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How San Francisco is fighting novel coronavirus — and the stigma that comes with it

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On Wednesday, California officials confirmed the state’s first death from novel coronavirus, as the number of infections nationwide continues to rise. But beyond the serious medical implications of the virus, it is also provoking fear, suspicion and ethnic stereotyping. Amna Nawaz reports from San Francisco, a city long known for its ties to China and the Chinese-American community. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Monday, March 9, 2020 – Morning Briefing  

Monday, March 9, 2020 | View in browser
(Want to get this briefing by email? Here’s the sign-up.)
Good morning.
We’re covering updates in the coronavirus outbreak and the latest in the Democratic presidential race. We also explain a dispute over classified portions of the U.S. agreement with the Taliban.
 By Chris Stanford
A plunge in stocks to start the week
Global markets fell sharply today, and Wall Street looked set to follow suit, as the effects of the coronavirus outbreak deepened and Saudi Arabia cut oil prices nearly 10 percent over the weekend. Here are the latest market updates.
The Saudi decision was in retaliation for Russia’s refusal to join OPEC in a large production cut as the outbreak continues to slow the global economy.
In the U.S., the number of coronavirus cases has grown to more than 530. On Sunday, the country’s leading expert on infectious diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said regional lockdowns could become necessary and recommended that those at greatest risk — older adults and people with underlying health conditions — abstain from travel.
Here are the latest updates on the virus and a map of where it has spread.
Related: A cruise ship that has been held off California after 21 people aboard tested positive for the virus is set to dock today in Oakland. More than 3,500 passengers and crew members will be taken to military facilities around the country to be quarantined for 14 days. The State Department on Sunday advised Americans against traveling on cruise ships.
Closer look: Dr. Fauci has become the chief explainer of the epidemic, partly because other government scientists have either avoided the spotlight or been reined in by the Trump administration.
News analysis: President Trump, who seems at his strongest politically when he has a human target to attack, has found it harder to confront the threat of an invisible pathogen, our chief White House correspondent writes.
In other developments:
? State and federal officials have yet to require school closings, but more individual districts and schools are shutting down.
? Two members of Congress, including Senator Ted Cruz, said they would self-quarantine after interacting at the Conservative Political Action Conference with a person who tested positive for the virus. Mr. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke at the meeting last week.
? One of the world’s leading tennis tournaments has been canceled. Qualifying matches for the BNP Paribas Open, known as Indian Wells, were to have begun today.
What to know: Here’s how to quarantine yourself if you need to and answers to questions about the virus.
Italians are urged to respect lockdown
As the site of the worst outbreak of the coronavirus outside Asia, Italy has announced strict measures that limit the movements of about a quarter of the population. To bolster the effort, the country’s leaders have appealed to Italians to reject “furbizia,” the sort of cleverness typically channeled into getting around bureaucracy.
“We are the new Wuhan,” one woman in the closed-off northern region of Lombardy said on Sunday.
Go deeper: The lockdown may save lives, but analysts say it will paralyze Italy’s economic heartland and almost certainly tip Europe into a recession.

Better brain health | DW Documentary

Mar 5, 2020  DW Documentary

Chocolate reduces stress. Fish stimulates the brain. Is there any truth to such popular beliefs? The findings of researchers around the world say yes: It appears we really are what we eat. A study in a British prison found that inmates who took vitamin supplements were less prone to violent behavior. And in Germany, a psychologist at the University of Lübeck has shown that social behavior is influenced by the ingredients consumed at breakfast. But what really happens in the brain when we opt for honey instead of jam, and fish rather than sausage? Scientists around the world are trying to find out. Neuro-nutrition is the name of an interdisciplinary research field that investigates the impact of nutrition on brain health. Experiments on rats and flies offer new insight into the effects of our eating habits. When laboratory rats are fed a diet of junk food, the result is not just obesity. The menu also has a direct influence on their memory performance. The role of the intestinal flora has been known for some time, but scientists are currently discovering other relationships. So-called “brain food” for example: The Mediterranean diet that’s based on vegetables and fish is said to provide the best nutrition for small grey cells. Omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, for example, protect the nerve cells and are indispensable for the development of the brain – because the brain is also what it eats! ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories

Category  Education

Foldable Phones and Medical Tech – BBC Click

Mar 8, 2020  BBC Click

Click checks out a new foldable phone, but is the technology worth the hype? Also, we meet a man having a microcomputer implanted into his heart. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

The genius behind some of the world’s most famous buildings | Renzo Piano

Jul 13, 2018  TED

Legendary architect Renzo Piano — the mind behind such indelible buildings as The Shard in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and the new Whitney Museum of Art in New York City — takes us on a stunning tour through his life’s work. With the aid of gorgeous imagery, Piano makes an eloquent case for architecture as the answer to our dreams, aspirations and desire for beauty. “Universal beauty is one of the few things that can change the world,” he says. “This beauty will save the world. One person at a time, but it will do it.” Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category  Science & Technology

Ask any deep space navigator like Jill Seubert what makes steering a spacecraft difficult, and they’ll tell you it’s all about the timing; a split-second can decide a mission’s success or failure. So what do you do when a spacecraft is bad at telling time? You get it a clock — an atomic clock, to be precise. Let Seubert whisk you away with the revolutionary potential of a future where you could receive stellar, GPS-like directions — no matter where you are in the universe.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxUCLA, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Jill Seubert · Interplanetary navigator

Jill Seubert navigates spacecraft throughout the solar system, exploring with robots where humans cannot yet go.

ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxUCLA | May 2019

NASA’s Curiosity Has Been On Mars For More Than 7 Years And Here Are Its 30 Best Photos

Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?  BoredPanda staff

For us, mere mortals, Mars is a no man’s land where survival seems like a distant dream. After all, no man has ever walked on its surface (as far as we know) and plans to send one to the red planet are only in the early stages of its development. However, humans have touched Mars through the durable wheels of Mars rovers. We’ve had 4 successful robotically operated Mars rovers (all of which were managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA) so far: Sojourner, Opportunity, Spirit, and Curiosity. 

As Opportunity’s mission was declared complete on February 13, 2019 when NASA lost all contact with the vehicle, Curiosity became the lone survivor on the red planet, rolling over its surface to examine and explore the unknown land all by itself. The spacecraft first landed on Mars on August 6, 2012 and started carrying out its objectives throughout the years. In fact, Curiosity did its job so well and held on for so long that its original mission duration of 687 days was expanded indefinitely. 

Here’s how Curiosity looked 7 years ago and now

#1 Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

Ripples On Surface Of Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score:  102points 12 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

Curiosity is approaching its 8 year anniversary on Mars and while it is currently the only functional rover on the planet (after we all, unfortunately, had to say goodbye to Oppy), NASA has plans to send it some company in the shape of Mars 2020 rover. The 2020 mission is scheduled to start on 17 July to 5 August 2020 when the rocket carrying the rover will be launched. NASA also announced a student naming contest for the rover that was held in the fall of 2019. The final name will be announced in early March 2020, so we definitely have something to look forward to!

#2 Sunset Sequence In Mars’ Gale Crater

Sunset Sequence In Mars' Gale Crater

NASAReport

Final score:85points  21 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#3 Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

Curiosity Rover Finds And Examines A Meteorite On Mars

NASAReport

Final score:  84points  69 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#4 Curiosity’s Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

Curiosity's Color View Of Martian Dune After Crossing It

NASAReport

Final score: 76points  29 Reply  View more comments

#5 Martian Rock ‘Harrison’ In Color, Showing Crystals

Martian Rock 'Harrison' In Color, Showing Crystals

NASAReport

Final score: 72points   27 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#6 Curiosity’s Dusty Selfie At Duluth

Curiosity's Dusty Selfie At Duluth

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 51 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#7 Jake Matijevic Rock

Jake Matijevic Rock

NASAReport

Final score: 68points 30 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#8 Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

Multiple Layers Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 64points 29 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#9 First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

First Sampling Hole In Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 63points  18 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#10 Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

Curiosity Took Dozens Of Mast Cam Images To Complete This Mosaic Of A Petrified Sand Dune

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 63points 25 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#11 Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

Remnants Of Ancient Streambed On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 13 Reply View more comments

#12 Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

Outcrop In The Murray Buttes Region Of Lower Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 61points 26 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#13 Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

Mount Sharp Comes In Sharply

NASAReport

Final score: 59points  7 Reply View more comments

#14 Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

Curiosity Self-Portrait At Martian Sand Dune

NASAReport

Final score: 56points  52 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#15 Curiosity Visited An Area Named “Fracture Town” Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

Curiosity Visited An Area Named "Fracture Town" Which Contains Many Pointed, Layered Rock Formations

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#16 Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

Having Reached The Base Of Mount Sharp, Curiosity Captured This Image Of Its Rocky Surroundings

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 53points  26 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#17 Wheel Scuff Mark At ‘Rocknest’

Wheel Scuff Mark At 'Rocknest'

NASAReport

Final score: 52points  25  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#18 Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

Focusing The 100-Millimeter Mastcam

NASAReport

Final score: 49points  44  Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#19 Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named “Gobabeb”, Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As “Bagnold”

Curiosity Arrived At This Active Sand Dune Named "Gobabeb", Which Is Part Of A Larger Dune Field Known As "Bagnold"

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 48points  22 Reply  View More Replies…View more comments

#20 View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At ‘Shaler’

View From Mars Orbiter Showing Curiosity Rover At 'Shaler'

NASAReport

Final score: 47points 19 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#21 Mars Rover Curiosity In ‘Buckskin’ Selfie

Mars Rover Curiosity In 'Buckskin' Selfie

NASAReport

Final score: 45points  32 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#22 Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

Layers At The Base Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score:44points  1 Reply  View more comments

#23 Getting To Know Mount Sharp

Getting To Know Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 44points  7 Reply View more comments

#24 Curiosity Tracks In ‘Hidden Valley’ On Mars

Curiosity Tracks In 'Hidden Valley' On Mars

NASAReport

Final score: 42points Reply View more comments

#25 Curiosity Rover’s View Of Alluring Martian Geology

Curiosity Rover's View Of Alluring Martian Geology

NASAReport

Final score: 41points 15 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#26 Curiosity Self-Portrait At ‘Windjana’ Drilling Site

Curiosity Self-Portrait At 'Windjana' Drilling Site

NASAReport

Final score: 41points  7 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#27 A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

A Mudstone Rock Outcrop At The Base Of Mount Sharp

marscuriosityReport

Final score: 41points 15  Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#28 Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

Bone Up On Mars Rock Shapes

NASAReport

Final score: 39points 10 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#29 Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

Strata At Base Of Mount Sharp

NASAReport

Final score: 38points 31 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

#30 Resistant Features In ‘Pahrump Hills’ Outcrop

Resistant Features In 'Pahrump Hills' Outcrop

NASAReport

Final score: 37points 15 Reply View More Replies…View more comments

Note: this post originally had 44 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

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Giedr? Vai?iulaityt?

Author, BoredPanda staff

As a writer and image editor for Bored Panda, Giedr? crafts posts on many different topics to push them to their potential. She’s also glad that her Bachelor’s degree in English Philology didn’t go to waste (although collecting dust in the attic could also be considered an achievement of aesthetic value!) Giedr? is an avid fan of cats, photography, and mysteries, and a keen observer of the Internet culture which is what she is most excited to write about. Since she’s embarked on her journalistic endeavor, Giedr? has over 600 articles under her belt and hopes for twice as much (fingers crossed – half of them are about cats).

These Exotic Trees Transform Into Rainbows as Their Barks Shed

By Jessica Stewart on January 31, 2020

Rainbow Eucalyptus Trees in Hawaii

Photo: Stock Photos from Danita Delmont/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus trees are most known for their fragrant leaves and for being the main food source for koalas, but did you know that they can also be quite colorful? In fact, Eucalyptus deglupta is so colorful that it’s known as the rainbow eucalyptus. When this incredible tree sheds its bark, it almost looks like a colored pencil being sharpened. This makes for a spectacle that is unforgettable.

Also known as the Mindanao gum or rainbow gum, the rainbow eucalyptus is a tall tree that is unique in that it’s the only eucalyptus to live in the rainforest and only one of four species found outside of Australia. It can be found in the Philippines, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea, where it can soar up to 250 feet in the air. While its height is impressive, it’s really the tree’s multicolor bark that makes it stand out.

As the rainbow eucalyptus sheds, it first reveals a bright green inner bark. Over time, this ages into different colors—blue, purple, orange, and maroon. The colorful striations are created due to the fact that the tree doesn’t shed all at once. Slowly, over time, different layers fall off, while other exposed areas have already begun aging.

This process makes for a spectacular visual, with the rainbow eucalyptus looking like it could be pulled from Alice in Wonderland. Its unique appearance has also made it quite popular amongst garden enthusiasts. It can be found in botanical gardens around the world and is often planted as an ornamental tree in Hawaii, Texas, Louisiana, and Southern California, where the frost-free climate allows it to thrive.

Interestingly, the rainbow eucalyptus also has a high commercial value that has nothing to do with its color. The tree is often found at tree plantations, as it’s an excellent source for pulpwood—the main ingredient in making white paper. So the next time you pull out a blank sheet, just remember that it may have originally been something much more colorful.

The rainbow eucalyptus gets its name from its colorful appearance.

Eucalyptus deglupta

Photo: Stock Photos from Sean D. Thomas/Shutterstock

Bark of the Rainbow Eucalyptus

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

Eucalyptus deglupta takes on different colors as bark sheds and the inner bark slowly ages.

Rainbow Eucalyptus Tree
Rainbow Gum Tree

Photo: Stock Photos from Martina Roth/Shutterstock

Photo: Stock Photos from Ilya Images/Shutterstock

Mindanao gum tree

Photo: Stock Photos from A. Michael Brown/Shutterstock

h/t: [Earthly Mission]

JESSICA STEWART

Jessica Stewart is a writer, curator, and art historian living in Rome, Italy. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London. She cultivated expertise in street art led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book ‘Street Art Stories Roma‘ and most recently contributed to ‘Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini‘. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog

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PBS News, TED Talks, Democracy Now !, Inhabitat, The New York Times, Wonder World, VIVSVIBE, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: Mar 2 – 5, 2020, Washington state coronavirus outbreak ‘a mystery so far’, How the Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice, Greenland Melting (360°), and Yosemite ‘firefall’ slows to a trickle amid drought

TED Talks: David Heymann What we do and don’t know about the coronavirus?

Democracy Now!: Sanders & Socialism: Debate Between Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman & Socialist Economist Richard Wolff

CNN: Fareed Zakaria: I want to talk about Bernie Sanders

Inhabitat: Margot Krasojevic – hydroelectric Art Gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100 self sustaining/

The New York Times: By Chris Stanford, Thursday, March 5, 2020 – Morning Briefing     

Wonder World: Yosemite Horsetail Falls

VIVSVIBE: Yosemite National Park Firefall 2019 Behind the Scenes | Horsetail Falls Viewing Location and Tips

Thisiscolossal: Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia, 3D Ship Drawn on Three Flat Sheets of Paper by Ramon Bruin, and New Geometric Creatures from TRÜF Creative

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 5, 2020

Mar 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the global impact of novel coronavirus continues to rise as countries close schools and restrict travel. Plus: A former Obama campaign manager on the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race, a troubling report on migrant families separated by the U.S. government, Britain’s defense secretary on crisis in Syria and a preacher’s reminder that “everybody is somebody.” WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The IMF seeks to reduce novel coronavirus’ economic fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oauQ5… News Wrap: Schumer denies threatening Supreme Court justices https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kPth… How Obama’s campaign manager thinks Democrats can beat Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sU9M… Why HHS struggled to reunite separated migrant families https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCAcL… UK defense secretary on Syria crisis, U.S.-Taliban deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Jsm0… A Brief But Spectacular take on how ‘everybody is someb Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 4, 2020

Mar 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Congress agrees on $8.3 billion bill to fund virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKOF1… News Wrap: Netanyahu appears to fall short of a majority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XA2q… 2 Democratic strategists on Biden’s Super Tuesday momentum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPKyi… Novel coronavirus fears also drive stigma and stereotypes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOpbS… What’s at stake in Supreme Court’s latest abortion law case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzwuy… Painter Jacob Lawrence’s early American ‘Struggle’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivDIA…

PBS NewsHour 9pm full episode, Mar 3, 2020

Mar 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. public health officials rush to respond to the growing novel coronavirus outbreak. Plus: Super Tuesday results reshape the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination as former Vice President Joe Biden takes the delegate lead, deadly tornadoes slam Tennessee, Iran struggles with its novel coronavirus outbreak and a naturalist inspired by old-growth forests. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 2, 2020

Mar 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, novel coronavirus is now blamed for six deaths in the U.S., all in Washington state — but officials fear there may be more cases not yet diagnosed. Plus: A tumultuous 48 hours in the Democratic primary, Super Tuesday previews of California and North Carolina, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter and what’s next for Afghanistan after a provisional peace deal. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Wash. health officials fear virus may have quietly spread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqXXL… News Wrap: Netanyahu looks victorious in Israeli election https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNk5A… After SC winnows field, 2020 Dems prep for Super Tuesday https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmPBP… How California voters are deciding among 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhCgx… Why many NC voters worry they can’t trust election process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gt5u… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden’s pre-Super Tuesday win https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp8YM… How Afghan government feels about U.S.-Taliban peace deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VG7Cg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Washington state coronavirus outbreak ‘a mystery so far’

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The coronavirus has now spread to more than 60 countries and more confirmed cases are being reported in the United States. Washington on Saturday reported the first U.S. death from the virus as new cases continue to emerge in the state. Los Angeles Times Seattle Bureau Chief Richard Read joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on the state’s outbreak. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice

Feb 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The mantra of the Dallas Street Choir is “homeless, not voiceless.” Some 2,000 singers have passed through the group in the last five years, seeking support, artistic expression and community as they contend with life on the streets. The organization also aims to raise awareness of Dallas’ growing homelessness problem, even as the city’s economy booms. Jeffrey Brown reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Greenland Melting (360°)

Sep 20, 2018

NOVA PBS Official

Greenland’s glaciers are melting faster and faster. If they were all to disappear, the sea level around the world would rise by 20 feet, scientists estimate. A FRONTLINE I NOVA I Emblematic collaboration

Category  Science & Technology

What happens if you get infected with the coronavirus? Who’s most at risk? How can you protect yourself? Public health expert David Heymann, who led the global response to the SARS outbreak in 2003, shares the latest findings about COVID-19 and what the future may hold.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

David Heymann · Epidemiologist, professor

David Heymann is a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He led the World Health Organization’s global response to the SARS epidemic in 2003.

TAKE ACTION  LEARN

Learn more about the coronavirus disease outbreak from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Check out the World Health Organization’s information and guidance on the coronavirus disease outbreak.

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Currently | February 2020

Sanders & Socialism: Debate Between Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman & Socialist Economist Richard Wolff

Feb 24, 2020  Democracy Now!

As Bernie Sanders’s runaway win in Nevada cements his position as the front-runner for the Democratic nomination, the Democratic Party establishment and much of the mainstream media are openly expressing concern about a self-described democratic socialist leading the presidential ticket. His opponents have also attacked his ambitious agenda. Last week during the primary debate in Las Vegas, Bernie Sanders addressed misconceptions about socialism. Invoking the words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Sanders decried what he called “socialism for the very rich, rugged individualism for the poor.” For more, we host a debate on Bernie Sanders and democratic socialism, featuring two well-known economists. Paul Krugman is a New York Times op-ed columnist and author of many books, including his latest, “Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future.” One of his recent columns is headlined “Bernie Sanders Isn’t a Socialist.” Richard Wolff is professor emeritus of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and visiting professor at The New School. He is the founder of Democracy at Work and hosts the weekly national television and radio program “Economic Update.” He’s the author of several books, including “Understanding Socialism.” #DemocracyNow Democracy Now! is an independent global news hour that airs on nearly 1,400 TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9AM ET: https://democracynow.org Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: https://democracynow.org/donate FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/podcast/demo… Daily Email Digest: https://democracynow.org/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: I want to talk about Bernie Sanders

Mar 1, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria analyzes Bernie Sanders’ economic proposals, and how they have fared in other countries. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Inhabitat: Margot Krasojevic – hydroelectric Art Gallery will generate enough wave power to be 100% self sustaining/

London-based architect Margot Krasojevic has just unveiled a futuristic art gallery that runs on hydroelectric power. Slated for the coastal Russian region of Sochi, the Hydroelectric Sculpture Gallery will harness enough wave energy to not only be 100% self-sufficient, but it will also be able to channel surplus energy back into the grid, powering around 200 nearby houses and businesses as a result.

large hydroelectric sculpture

The art gallery will be located on Sochi’s coastline, where it will use the exceptionally strong coastal swells from the Black Sea to power a water turbine system. Krasojevic’s vision depicts a sculptural volume that rises out of an existing wooden promenade. The building, which will be partly submerged into the sea, will be strategically angled at 45 degrees to the coastline for maximum wave exposure.

Related: Oil rig off South Korea’s coast to become a floating hotel that operates on tidal energy

large hydroelectric structure on coastline

According to the design plans, the building will “use the environment’s characteristics to generate clean, sustainable energy, without affecting the quality and nature of the landscape.” State-of-the-art engineering will allow the structure to harvest wave energy through oscillating water columns as the waves crash against it. Generating up to 300kW, the system will enable the gallery to operate completely off the grid and channel surplus energy back into the grid. It could supply clean energy to approximately 200 households and businesses in the same area.

immense sculpture on desert landscape

Visitors to the futuristic gallery will enter through a long walkway stretching out from the shore. The robust exterior of the building will comprise various walkways and ramps that wind around the steel structure. Sinuous volumes will conceal the building’s many turbines, which will also be partially submerged underwater.

upclose shot of concrete base of large sculpture

Inside, the spaces will reflect the building’s functions. The various galleries will be laid out into a power plant format, with steel clad ceilings that mimic the rolling waves that crash into the exterior. Irregularly shaped skylights will also create a vibrant, kaleidoscope show of shadow and light throughout the day.

+ Margot Krasojevic

Images via Margot Krasojevic

immense sculpture next to beach deck

The Daily Conversation: The World’s Future MEGAPROJECTS: 2019-2040’s (Season 2 – Complete)

The World’s Future MEGAPROJECTS: 2019-2040’s (Season 2 – Complete)

Jun 22, 2017  The Daily Conversation

A documentary on eight of the most ambitious mega-projects currently under development around the world, featuring: Istanbul’s building boom (Turkey); the Mission to put a human on Mars; the effort to develop Lagos (Nigeria); Africa’s unprecedented clean energy opportunity; the project to probe the nearest Earth-like exoplanet; Atlanta’s stadium of the future (Georgia, United States); India’s effort to modernize its highways; and China’s unprecedented One Belt One Road, “New Silk Road” initiative. Get your free audiobook: http://www.audibletrial.com/TheDailyC… Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConve… Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: By Matt Stewart-Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stew… Alex Gopher: https://soundcloud.com/alexgopher https://www.youtube.com/user/go4music… http://www.go4music.fr/ Glimpse https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Kevin MacLeod http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-… And the YouTube Audio Library Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconve… All images and videos used under the ‘Fair Use’ provision of United States Copyright Law: http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html

Caption author (Portuguese (Brazil))

Romulo Silva

Category  News & Politics

The New York Times – Morning Briefing    nytimes.com

Thursday, March 5, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the state of emergency in California and other responses to the coronavirus outbreak, the latest in the Democratic presidential race, and a rare rebuke from the Supreme Court’s chief justice, John Roberts.

 By Chris Stanford

California holds cruise ship offshore
A ship with suspected links to two coronavirus cases, one fatal, was being held off the coast of San Francisco until everyone on board could be tested, Gov. Gavin Newsom said. At least 21 people on the ship had symptoms.
On Wednesday, a former passenger became the first U.S. coronavirus death outside Washington State and the 11th over all. Here are the latest updates and maps of where the virus has spread.
Federal health officials announced new testing criteria, requiring only a doctor’s agreement. But it’s unclear whether there are enough tests for everybody who’ll want one.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the outbreak in Washington State.
Related: New Jersey has announced its first case, a man in his 30s who had been hospitalized just across the Hudson River from New York City. Nine new cases in New York were connected to a patient in Westchester County.
Closer look: Some patients experienced no physical discomfort from Covid-19, the disease brought on by the virus. Others are still coughing as they recover. Six Americans who have tested positive spoke to The Times about their experiences.
Read more about the symptoms of the coronavirus and the prospects for vaccines and treatments. For an informed guide to the outbreak, sign up for our coronavirus newsletter.
Chloe Lau, a high school student, doing her schoolwork at home in Hong Kong. By Wednesday, 22 countries had announced school closures of varying degrees.  Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times
The toll of the outbreak
The coronavirus has already disrupted the education of nearly 300 million students worldwide, according to the United Nations. A Seattle-area school district said on Wednesday that it would cancel classes for two weeks, the largest virus-related shutdown in the U.S.
Among other effects:
? United Airlines became the first American carrier to announce a widespread cut to domestic service, suggesting that fear was eroding ticket sales even away from the epidemic’s hot spots.
? Congress is expected to vote this week on a funding package, including help for small businesses.
? The London Book Fair and the Geneva International Auto Show were canceled. (The Summer Olympics in Tokyo are still on, for now.)
? The Louvre in Paris reopened after a three-day closure, but guards will not move around to maintain order in the room where the Mona Lisa hangs.
Watch: We used satellite images to show what the outbreak’s effects look like from space.
Joe Biden addressed supporters in Los Angeles on Tuesday, when he won 10 of the 14 states up for grabs.  Josh Haner/The New York Times
A shift of momentum in the Democratic race
Since Joe Biden won the South Carolina primary in a landslide last weekend, much of the Democratic establishment has aligned behind the former vice president.
Mr. Biden was endorsed by Michael Bloomberg on Wednesday, after the former New York City mayor ended his brief, multimillion-dollar candidacy.
Bernie Sanders, who seemed to have a clear advantage a week ago, faces pressure to show that he can expand his political base, and he acknowledged on Wednesday that his campaign hadn’t generated the turnout among young people that he had counted on.
Related: Elizabeth Warren’s campaign manager told staff members that the senator was assessing her options after failing to finish in the top two of any Super Tuesday contest. Here are the near-final results.
What’s next: Most delegates awarded after Super Tuesday are at stake in the East, where Mr. Sanders has underperformed. Our Upshot columnist Nate Cohn looked at the state of the race.
Another angle: Wall Street executives are opening their checkbooks for Mr. Biden. That could be a mixed blessing for a candidate who presents himself as anti-elitist.
If you have 5 minutes, this is worth it
A police tool, and a plaything of the rich

Krista Schlueter for The New York Times

The Times reported in January about a groundbreaking facial recognition system being used by hundreds of law enforcement agencies, developed by a start-up called Clearview AI. In response to subsequent criticism, the company said that its technology was “available only for law enforcement agencies and select security professionals.”
But The Times has found multiple other individuals with access to the technology among Clearview’s investors, clients and friends. They include John Catsimatidis, above, the billionaire owner of the Gristedes grocery store chain in New York, who used Clearview to surveil shoppers and to identify a man he saw on a date with his daughter.
Here’s what else is happening
Supreme Court rebuke: Chief Justice John Roberts denounced remarks by Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, after the Democratic leader criticized President Trump’s two Supreme Court appointees. A spokesman for the lawmaker said his comments had been misrepresented.
Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex
Snapshot: Above, antennas in Australia that are part of the Deep Space Network. The system, which lets spacecraft communicate with Earth, will be taken offline for almost a year starting Monday for upgrades and repairs.
In memoriam: Javier Pérez de Cuéllar, a two-term secretary general of the United Nations during the 1980s and ’90s, died on Wednesday at 100. He helped broker several peace agreements, including the end of a 10-year war between Iran and Iraq, and the withdrawal of Soviet forces from Afghanistan.
Late-night comedy: After Jill Biden confronted protesters who rushed onstage during her husband’s victory rally on Tuesday, Jimmy Fallon said, “Forget first lady — she should be secretary of defense.”
What we’re reading: Anahad O’Connor, a health reporter, highlights a fascinating — and somewhat frightening — new study of coral species that suggests that Earth’s “sixth extinction” may be well underway. The science journalist Emily Laber-Warren tells the story in Newsweek.

Yosemite ‘firefall’ slows to a trickle amid drought

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A natural spectacle called “firefall” happens each February in California’s Yosemite National Park when light from the setting sun strikes the park’s Horsetail Falls, making it look like it’s ablaze with fire. But this year the waterfall slowed to a trickle. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker spoke with University of California Berkeley climate scientist Patrick Gonzalez to learn more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

FIREFALL – Yosemite Horsetail Falls

•Aug 21, 2018  Wonder World

Firefall is one of Yosemite National Park most amazing spectacles. Around the second week of February, the setting sun hits Horsetail Falls at just the right angle, to illuminate the upper reaches of the waterfall, and when conditions are perfect, Horsetail Falls glows orange and red at sunset, giving the illusion it’s on fire. As the sun sets, and dips behind the horizon line, everything will begin to go dark and it will seem, for a moment, as if the Firefall has failed to ignite. But as the last of the sunlight disappears, it will hit and reflect off the falls at the exact right angle, creating a spectacular if short-lived effect, that looks like a beautiful flowing cascade of fluid fire. The phenomenon known as “Firefall” draws scores of photographers to a spot near Horsetail Fall, which flows down the granite face of the park’s famed rock formation, El Capitan. Thanks for watching ___________________________________________________________________ CREDIT LINKS ? AreStraka Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWM… ? AreStraka Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdSfy… ? Amazing Places Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYWJ… ? Amazing Places Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANSOd… ? mrbsellers72 Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcuu… ? mrbsellers72 Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8TcJ… ? Yosemitebear62 Youtube Channel – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTyF… ? Yosemitebear62 Video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLQo2… ___________________________________________________________________ ? Wonder World Twitter – https://twitter.com/WonderWorld_YTC For business enquiries, content submission or copyright concerns or disputes, please contact me

Category  Entertainment

Yosemite National Park Firefall 2019 Behind the Scenes | Horsetail Falls Viewing Location and Tips

Jan 29, 2020  VIVSVIBE

Every year in February the light hits Horsetail falls perfectly and creates a firey illusion. Firefall has been captured many times over the years and continues to grow in popularity as it becomes more and more well-known. In order to get a picture of this phenomenon, the conditions have to be perfect. Even a single cloud can mess up the colors and vibrancy of Firefall. The natural beauty of this phenomenon is epic, but what I found even more outstanding was the effort, time and the sheer number of people who made the trek out in the freezing cold to witness the cascade of “fire” down El Cap. My feet froze the first and second night, so by the third night, I was bundled up real nice and stayed warm while watching the show. If you’re going to witness Firefall, it’s wise if you can block out a few days, you might not get it first the first day… this gives you a few chances to see and capture the falls. Even one cloud can hinder the glow of the falls, as we experienced the last night we watched. Even if you take the trip out to Yosemite and don’t get to witness the glow, the park and people are amazing! I hope this gives y’all a better idea of what to expect and what it takes to capture Firefall. Thanks for watching! Enjoy! Things to do in Yosemite while you wait: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzKI0… Huge thanks to David Bobbitt for editing the footage!

Horsetail Waterfall becomes Firefall at Yosemite National Park on February 15-26, 2018

Horsetail Waterfall, Firefall at Yosemite National Park, California

My Modern Met – Spectacular Yosemite Firefall Ignites Waterfall in Brilliant Blaze

The firefall!

Horsetail Waterfall, Firefall at Yosemite National Park, California – Shiyu Photography

Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia

FEBRUARY 20, 2020  GRACE EBERT

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

In 1832, artist John Jesse Barker added depth to a drawing by Philadelphia-based William G. Mason to create an optical illusion titled “Horizontorium.” Part of a tradition of anamorphic works, this depiction of the Bank of Philadelphia is one of the two surviving works looking at the historic financial building designed by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. At the time, it was the unofficial bank of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that sat at the southwest corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets. The structure was razed in 1836.

Horizontoriums became popular throughout England and France in the 18th century, although this piece is the only one known to be made in America. Viewers would set the lithograph on a flat surface and perpendicularly position their face at the center of the work (note the semicircle on this lithograph suggesting a spot for a chin) to peer over the image. The sharp angle would produce a distorted perspective that appears to project the building and its passersby upward. Sometimes, viewers even would peek through a small hole carved out of paper or cardboard to block out their peripheral vision and give the work a more distinct look. (via Graphic Arts CollectionThe Morning News)

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

“Horizontorium” (1832), hand-colored lithograph, 22.5 x 16.5 inches

3D Ship Drawn on Three Flat Sheets of Paper by Ramon Bruin

JUNE 17, 2013  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

boat-1

Artist Ramon Bruin (previously) recently drew this fun anamorphic illusion that appears to be a 3D ship but is actually a skewed drawing on three sheets of flat paper. You can see more of his recent work over on deviantART. (via my modern met)

New Geometric Creatures from TRÜF Creative

OCTOBER 15, 2019  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Charming new illustrations by TRÜF Creative (previously) combine a conservative color palette with wildly imaginative interpretations of animals. An ongoing passion project by the Santa Monica-based design studio, the series’s latest chapter is titled “Animals Strike Curious Poses,” (which is a reference to Prince, for fans who are wondering). The TRÜF team describes the project as “our minimalistic and strange interpretation of the animal kingdom that only exists in our heads.” If you’d like to make one of their geometric birds, whales, or fish your own, find prints in their online store.

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PBS News, DW History Documentary, TED Talks, The New York Times, Encyclopædia Britannica, and Inspiration Grid

PBS News: February 28, 29 and March 1, 2020, New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank, and In the Age of AI (full film) – FRONTLINE,

DW History Documentary: Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology

TED Talks: Rebecca Knill How technology has changed what it’s like to be deaf?, and Sinead Burke Why design should include everyone

The New York Times: Morning Briefing – March 1, 2020

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 1, 2020

Mar 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 1, a look ahead to what’s at stake on Super Tuesday, new concerns over the coronavirus outbreak in Washington, the legacy of photographer Jim Marshall lives on through his iconic imagery, and climate change’s impact on a natural spectacle in California’s Yosemite National Park. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 29, 2020

Feb 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 29, President Trump addresses the first U.S. death from the novel coronavirus, South Carolina’s Democratic presidential primary takes center stage, the U.S. and the Taliban sign a peace agreement, and Venezuela’s second largest city of Maracaibo was once an oil-wealthy playground, now it’s a ghost town. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 28, 2020

Feb 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, global disruption from novel coronavirus increases, as governments and businesses shut down travel and large events. Plus: Renewed fighting between Syria and Turkey, the U.S. and the Taliban prepare to sign a provisional peace deal, South Carolina gets ready to go to the polls, Shields and Brooks analyze the week’s political news and a Dallas choir gives the homeless hope. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How U.S. government should react to virus’ economic impact https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t05u_… A pandemic expert questions speed of U.S. COVID-19 response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQoaL… News Wrap: Appeals court blocks ‘remain in Mexico’ policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NakPJ… As fighting escalates, Idlib’s humanitarian crisis worsens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynSu6… Afghans nurture hope for peace ahead of U.S.-Taliban deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjABT… How SC Democratic voters are weighing 2020 primary choice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brU3-… Shields and Brooks on SC stakes, Trump’s virus response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nh6Fz… How Dallas Street Choir grants homeless residents a voice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrKi-… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The fallout from the 2008 global financial crisis revealed that some of the world’s most powerful banks were involved in reckless financial dealings. Germany’s Deutsche Bank took a particularly aggressive approach — the consequences of which are still playing out now, more than a decade later. Paul Solman talks to The New York Times’ David Enrich, who has written a new book on the subject. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In the Age of AI (full film) | FRONTLINE

Dec 2, 2019  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

A documentary exploring how artificial intelligence is changing life as we know it — from jobs to privacy to a growing rivalry between the U.S. and China. FRONTLINE investigates the promise and perils of AI and automation, tracing a new industrial revolution that will reshape and disrupt our world, and allow the emergence of a surveillance society. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #ArtificialIntelligence #Automation #documentary Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category News & Politics

Archeology – exploring the past with modern technology | DW History Documentary

Oct 7, 2018  DW Documentary

Today modern archaeology often works with digital technology. Geophysics has allowed thousands of ancient sites to be located – a huge gain for science. The dig is no longer the be-all and end-all of archeology. We accompany some archeologists on their journey into the virtual past. Geophysics comprises a range of techniques with various geological and military functions. Geomagnetism is used to locate enemy submarines or potential reserves of oil or other minerals. Now, German and Irish archeologists have teamed up to use it to trace prehistoric grave systems. Researchers in western Germany are applying it to locate ancient procession and pilgrimage routes. Shipping archeologists in Bremerhaven are availing of digital technology to create virtual models of shipwrecks and, in Berlin, archeologists and game designers have also embarked on a joint project. As luck would have it, they scanned every millimeter of a temple in the Syrian city of Aleppo, not suspecting that, soon afterwards, the complex would be largely destroyed in the country’s civil war. Their virtual model is evidence that the study of the past can have uses for the present, just as technologies of the present can help us to study the past. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

“Complete silence is very addictive,” says Rebecca Knill, a writer who has cochlear implants that enable her to hear. In this funny, insightful talk, she explores the evolution of assistive listening technology, the outdated way people still respond to deafness and how we can shift our cultural understanding of ability to build a more inclusive world. “Technology has come so far,” Knill says. “Our mindset just needs to catch up.”

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with Wells Fargo. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rebecca Knill · Writer, business systems consultant manager

A writer and a part-time cyborg, Rebecca Knill embraces the humor in her bionic journey while balancing life as a deaf person with cochlear implants which enable her to hear.

TAKE ACTION  PARTICIPATE

Support Dogs for Better Lives to match assistance dogs with individuals who are Deaf or with hearing loss.

Sinéad Burke is acutely aware of details that are practically invisible to many of us. At 105 centimeters (or 3′ 5″) tall, the designed world — from the height of a lock to the range of available shoe sizes — often inhibits her ability to do things for herself. Here she tells us what it’s like to navigate the world as a little person and asks: “Who are we not designing for?”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sinéad Burke · Writer, educator

Sinéad Burke amplifies voices and instigates curious conversations.

MORE RESOURCES

As Me with Sinéad

Sinéad Burke   Lemonada Media ()

“Poorly designed public toilets aren’t just annoying, they’re dehumanizing”

Sinead Burke discusses the need for more accessible accommodations in public spaces with Quartz.

More at qz.com ?

TAKE ACTION  PARTICIPATE

Donate to Little People of Ireland.

TEDNYC | March 2017

The New York Times Morning Briefing March 1, 2020

Your Weekend Briefing
By Tom Wright-Piersanti and Stephen Reiss
Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.

Grant Hindsley for The New York Times

1. The first known death in the United States from the coronavirus was reported in Kirkland, Wash., near Seattle.
The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there was no evidence that the person had traveled recently or had contact with someone known to have the virus, adding to growing signs that the virus might be spreading in the United States. Above, EvergreenHealth Medical Center, where the patient had been treated.
The number of confirmed cases around the globe passed 85,000 on Saturday, according to a tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University, and more than 2,900 infected people have died. While the virus’s growth appeared to slow in China last week, it was accelerating elsewhere, with many new cases linked to an outbreak in Italy.
How prepared is the U.S. for an outbreak? It’s better positioned than most countries, according to experts, though there could be shortages of ventilators and protective equipment. The most important thing you can do: Wash your hands often.
Sign up for our new coronavirus newsletter, which will have the latest developments and expert advice about prevention and treatment. 2
Continue reading the main story
Maddie McGarvey for The New York Times
2. Joe Biden won the South Carolina primary with 49 percent of the vote,a victory that could provide his candidacy with a much-needed jolt after disappointing results in the earlier contests.
Bernie Sanders finished in a distant second with 20 percent, followed by Tom Steyer, who dropped out of the presidential race on Saturday night. Mr. Steyer, a billionaire hedge fund executive, had spent considerable resources in South Carolina, and had pinned the hopes of his campaign on the state.
Continue reading the main story
He said on Saturday night: “I said that if I didn’t see a path to winning, I would suspend my campaign. And I honestly don’t see a path.”
Pete Buttigieg finished in fourth, and Elizabeth Warren in fifth. See full results here.
South Carolina’s Democrats were the first predominantly black electorate to vote in the race. Many said they were eager to send a message to the Democratic Party: that their views on electability — which candidate is best suited to beat President Trump — would not be shaped by outcomes in overwhelmingly white states like Iowa and New Hampshire.
Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times
3. The U.S. signed a deal with the Taliban on Saturday that laid out a timetable for the final withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, setting the stage to end America’s longest war.
Continue reading the main story
“When historians look back at the moment,” David Sanger writes in an analysis of the news, “they may well conclude that Washington ended up much like other great powers that entered Afghanistan’s rugged mountains and punishing deserts: frustrated, immobilized, no longer willing to bear the huge costs.”
The agreement unlocks a difficult but crucial next step: negotiations between the Taliban and other Afghans, including the government, which the Taliban has refused to recognize. Here are four takeaways.
Aly Song/Reuters
4. Stock markets suffered their worst week since 2008, with the S&P 500 index falling 11.5 percent amid worries that the coronavirus outbreak could become a worldwide pandemic.
The Federal Reserve and other central bankers are poised to respond, suggesting they may cut interest rates as soon as next month. But their efforts may only go so far: Rates are historically low across advanced economies, and it’s doubtful a rate cut can do much to restart production lines hobbled by workers placed in quarantine.
“If a potential coronavirus downturn were a fire,” Neil Irwin writes in The Upshot, “the recession-fighters would be like a fire brigade low on supplies, fighting among themselves, and probably lacking the right chemicals to quench the flames anyway.”
Cengiz Yar for The New York Times
5. For migrants on the Mexican border, Friday was a day of hopes uplifted, and then quickly dashed.
A federal appeals court ruled that the so-called Remain in Mexico policy — which has forced asylum seekers to wait there for months while their cases are reviewed — was legally invalid, leading to cheers and hugs at the Good Samaritan shelter in Ciudad Juárez. But by the end of the day, nothing had changed, as the court stayed the ruling to allow the government time to appeal.
And in Turkey, thousands of migrants trying to reach Europe clashed with riot police on the Greek border on Saturday morning, signaling a new and potentially volatile phase in the migration crisis.
Jessica Pons for The New York Times
6. The country’s richest state doesn’t feel that way.
California’s unaffordability crisis — wide-scale homelessness, poverty and the stress of making ends meet — has emerged as a foundational issue as the state prepares to vote in the Super Tuesday primaries.
Nearly 150,000 homeless people sleep on sidewalks, in alleys, on vacant lots and in vehicles. “I pay the bills and I have nothing extra,” Mark Marquez, above, said.
Esme Gibson
7. In memoriam: Joseph Coulombe, the founder of Trader Joe’s, died Friday at age 89.
In the mid-1960s, when he started the grocery chain, he thought the rise in international travel could lead Americans to be more interested in exotic foods. Soon he was emphasizing organic foods, and had launched Trader Joe’s own label for numerous products, many of them at low prices.
In 2011, he told The Los Angeles Times that he envisioned the stores as being “for overeducated and underpaid people, for all the classical musicians, museum curators, journalists.”
Lam Yik Fei for The New York Times
8. Meet the “dirt spoons” of South Korea.
In Seoul, many of the urban poor live in semi-basements, a reality captured in the Oscar-winning film “Parasite.” Just like in the movie, the elevation of one’s home in the congested city? often reflects wealth and status.
“They keep going higher ?and higher, ?so they won’t have to smell the smell down below,” said a 63-year-old taxi driver. “Those living up there must look down on people like me like pigs.” For more information Please visit the following link: [Message clipped]  View entire message  

Encyclopædia Britannica: Yellowstone National Park, U.S.

March 1, 1872
Establishment of Yellowstone as world’s first national park

Yellowstone National Park

NATIONAL PARK, UNITED STATES

WRITTEN BY:   Kenneth Pletcher

LAST UPDATED: Feb 26, 2020 See Article History

Behold Yellowstone's hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal species

Behold Yellowstone’s hot springs and geysers such as Old Faithful and its various large animal speciesOverview of Yellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.See all videos for this article

Yellowstone National Park, the oldest, one of the largest, and probably the best-known national park in the United States. It is situated principally in northwestern Wyoming and partly in southern Montana and eastern Idaho and includes the greatest concentration of hydrothermal features in the world. The park was established by the U.S. Congress on March 1, 1872, as the country’s first national park. It is also generally considered to have been the first national park in the world, though some naturalists and others have argued that there is evidence that indicates that the creation of Yellowstone was predated by the creation of Bogd Khan Mountain National Park in Mongolia, which may date from as early as 1778. Yellowstone was designated a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage site in 1978. The park, which forms a squarelike rectangle with an irregular eastern side, is 63 miles (101 km) from north to south and 54 miles (87 km) from east to west at its widest point and covers an area of 3,472 square miles (8,992 square km). The John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway, an 80-mile (130-km) scenic roadway that was established in 1972, connects Yellowstone with Grand Teton National Park to the south. In addition, Yellowstone is surrounded by Gallatin (northwest and north), Custer (northeast), Shoshone (northeast and east), Bridger-Teton (southeast and south), and Caribou-Targhee (southwest) national forests. Headquarters are at Mammoth Hot Springs near the northern entrance to the park.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Old Faithful geyser erupting, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National ParkYellowstone National Park, northwest-central United States, designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1978.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Natural Environment: Geology

Yellowstone is situated in a region that has been volcanically and seismically active for tens of millions of years. Tectonic movement of the North American Plate has thinned Earth’s crust in the area, forming a hot spot (a place where a dome of magma, or molten rock, comes close to the surface). About 2.1 million years ago a subsurface magma dome that had been building up in the Yellowstone area blew up in one of the world’s most cataclysmic volcanic eruptions. Some 600 cubic miles (2,500 cubic km) of rock and ash were ejected, equivalent to about 6,000 times the amount of volcanic material that was released during the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980. (Observations made in the early 21st century indicated that this single eruption actually consisted of two events about 6,000 years apart: one very large and a second much smaller one. Subsequent massive eruptions occurred about 1,300,000 and 640,000 years ago—the last event (consisting in large part of lava flows) producing about two-fifths as much material as the first one.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Portion of Obsidian Cliff, northwestern Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

Each of those eruptions caused the magma dome that had built up to collapse as its contents were released, leaving an enormous caldera. The present-day Yellowstone Caldera, the product of the third eruption, is a roughly oval-shaped basin some 30 by 45 miles (50 by 70 km) that occupies the west-central portion of the national park and includes the northern two-thirds of Yellowstone Lake. Two resurgent magma domes—one just north of and the other just west of Yellowstone Lake—have been forming in the caldera, and the western dome underlie many of the park’s best-known hydrothermal features.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

Northern end of Yellowstone Lake, within Yellowstone Caldera, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Jim Peaco/U.S. National Park Service

00:4302:38

The Yellowstone region is also extremely active seismically. A network of faults associated with the region’s volcanic history underlies the park’s surface, and the region experiences hundreds of small earthquakes each year. The great majority of those quakes are of magnitude 2.0 or less and are not felt by people in the area, but occasionally a more powerful temblor will strike in the region and have effects in the park. One such event, a deadly quake that struck in 1959 in southern Montana just outside the northwestern corner of the park, affected a number of hydrothermal features in Yellowstone, including its iconic geyserOld Faithful.

Eagle Peak in the Absaroka Range, the highest point in Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.R Lake/U.S. National Park Service

Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.Scenics of America/PhotoLink/Getty Images

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, north-central Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© magmarcz/Shutterstock.com

Morning Glory Pool hot spring, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park,

 northwestern Wyoming, U.S.

©Ferenc Cegled(/Shutterstock.com)

Yellowstone National Park: Castle Geyser

Castle Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

©Kenneth Keifer/Fotolia

Travertine terraces at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.© Jason Maehl/Shutterstock.com

Grove of aspen trees in autumn, Yellowstone National Park, northwestern Wyoming, U.S.S. Gniadik/U.S. National Park Service

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://www.britannica.com/place/Yellowstone-National-Park/Physical-features

Inspiration Grid: Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung

ARTPHOTOGRAPHY

Balancing Act: Still Life Photography by ChangKi Chung                                             Published Sep 4, 2019        

Korean artist and photographer ChangKi Chung creates incredible, gravity-defying still life compositions of stacked fruits and vegetables.More art on the grid via Colossal

POSTED BY

IG Team       214

For more information Please visit the following link:

https://theinspirationgrid.com/balancing-act-still-life-photography-by-changki-chung/

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PBS News, BBC Click, The New York Times, My Modern Met, China Icons, TED Talks, To Scale, Thisiscolossal and Adrien M & Claire B

PBS News: February 21 – 24, 2020

BBC Click: Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry

The New York Times: Morning Briefing by Chris Stanford – Learning how to reverse an overdose

My Modern Met: Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

China Icons: FAST – The World’s Largest Telescope

TED Talks: Alexander Tsiaras Conception to birth visualized

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Thisiscolossal: Go See This Eclipse, Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse and The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

Adrien M & Claire B – Vimeo:  The movement of air / The movement of air

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 24, 2020

Feb 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, as novel coronavirus spreads far beyond China, how is it affecting the global economy? Plus: The latest medical concerns about COVID-19, Harvey Weinstein’s conviction, Sen. Bernie Sanders’ Nevada caucus victory, political analysis with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, President Trump’s trip to India and Los Angeles remembers NBA legend Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS With COVID-19 outbreaks, are we on ‘precipice’ of pandemic? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hewq… Why economic impact of COVID-19 might outlast the outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQ_F… News Wrap: Man drives into German parade, injuring dozens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wi-TD… Mogul Harvey Weinstein convicted on 2 felony sex charges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La6iR… What Weinstein verdict means for the MeToo movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp2ua… After Nevada win, how strong is Sanders’ 2020 momentum? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfdVZ… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sanders’ Nevada victory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cwEG… Trump’s India visit prompts both hero’s welcome and protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jogSC… In Los Angeles, 20,000 gather to honor Kobe, Gianna Bryant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbSDg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 23, 2020

Feb 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 23, Sen. Bernie Sanders gains a foothold after the Nevada caucuses, a new documentary explores who killed Malcolm X, and a new concept in caring for people with dementia. Plus, updates on the novel Coronavirus’ spread in Italy and Asia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 22, 2020

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 22nd, voters turnout for Saturday’s Democratic caucuses in Nevada, and a look at how gender is playing a role in local Nevada and South Carolina politics. Also, the first report in our series of stories from India explores exclusionary citizenship laws that are leaving nearly 2 million people in limbo. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 21, 2020

Feb 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. and the Taliban begin a week-long “reduction in violence” in Afghanistan. Plus: Political uproar over a report that Russia is again trying to intervene in a U.S. election on behalf of President Trump, a Nevada caucus preview, political analysis with Shields and Brooks, the suffering of Venezuela’s children and Major League Baseball’s cheating scandal. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: WHO warns about novel coronavirus’ global spread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVziw… What’s in short-term U.S.-Taliban deal over Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQkLD… Why politicization of intelligence leaves U.S. ‘vulnerable’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyB2k… How will 2020 Democrats fare in more diverse Nevada? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLYp7… Shields and Brooks on Las Vegas debate, Trump’s pardons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-xxw… Venezuela’s suffering children could yield lost generation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKs82… Why MLB players are upset over Astros’ lack of punishment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBIld… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry – BBC Click

Nov 7, 2019  BBC Click

We head to Taiwan to find out what ‘Made in Taiwan’ really means in the 21st century; from healthcare artificial intelligence to solving the pollution crisis. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Learning how to reverse an overdose nytimes.com Morning Briefing Monday, February 24, 2020, by Chris Stanford
Mike Belleme for The New York Times Carter County, Tenn., is one of many American communities hit hard by the opioid crisis. In an effort to save lives, county health officials have embraced a practical — if radical — strategy: teaching children as young as 6 how to reverse an overdose, using a nasal spray called Narcan. Above, after a training session at a library, each child received a blue bag containing two doses of Narcan to take home.
But in a socially conservative region, where addiction is often seen as a sin, health workers have encountered strong opposition to the training.

Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

By Emma Taggart on February 14, 2020

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Followtheflow/Shutterstock

Homelessness is a problem all over the world, but Finland is leading the way with an initiative that could provide a long-term solution. In 2008, the Northern European nation introduced the “Housing First” policy. The concept is simple: everyone is entitled to a small apartment, even those with mental health and financial issues. Since then, the number of homeless people has fallen drastically, and continues to decline.

Like most cities, Finland previously provided short-term shelters for the homeless, but found that the quick fix didn’t help people to get back on their feet permanently and build a stable life. Affordable rental housing providers such as Y-Foundation began renovating old flats, and the NGO even turned former emergency shelters into apartments in order to offer long-term housing. “It was clear to everyone that the old system wasn’t working; we needed radical change,” says Juha Kaakinen, CEO of Y-Foundation. “We had to get rid of the night shelters and short-term hostels we still had back then. They had a very long history in Finland, and everyone could see they were not getting people out of homelessness. We decided to reverse the assumptions.”

In the last 10 years, the Housing First initiative provided 4,600 homes in Finland, making it the only country in Europe where homelessness is on the decline. Not only does the country now provide shelter to anyone that needs it, but the government also helps support people to integrate into their community. Social workers are available for counseling and to help people apply for social benefits. The extra support helps encourage people to find a job and become financially independent, as well as to take care of their physical and mental health.

Find out more about Housing First on the Y-Foundation website.

Thanks to its Housing First policy, Finland is the only country in Europe where homelessness is in decline.

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Subodh Agnihotri/Shutterstock

h/t: [Reddit]

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Finland Is Offering Free Trips to Teach People the Finnish Art of Happiness

FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope | A China Icons Video

Sep 25, 2016  China Icons

What’s really out there? In September 2016, China unveiled the world’s largest telescope – an instrument engineered so finely it is 3 times more sensitive than Arecibo and may help in the international search for understanding more on the origin of the universe and the Big Bang. Sadly, since filming this video, FAST’s chief engineer and scientist, Professor Nan Rendong lost his fight with cancer. Not only was Professor Nan a talented and well-respected scientist who dedicated over 20 years to the FAST project, but we found him to be a kind, intelligent and dedicated man who took the time to explain his work and the importance of it to us. The Five-Hundred-Metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, known as FAST had been constructed over five years in a remote area of Guizhou province, south central China. It was built in a 45 million year old crater, unlikely to be affected by flooding and far from human interference. The 500m dish surpasses Arecibo radio telescope, built in Puerto Rico in 1963, as the world’s largest and is three times more sensitive in detecting radio waves thousands of light years away. FAST consists of 4450 individual panels and Chinese project engineers had to design a cable net of ten thousand cables to manipulate it to detect signals. FAST’s focus cabin is also unique thanks to a directional tracking system. A key mission for the telescope will be detecting pulsars, the matter that remains when a star eight times the size of the sun explodes. These pulsars rotate thousands of times per second and are the universe’s most accurate clock. Experience the construction and meet the creators of FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope. For more insights and guides to China, SUBSCRIBE to China Icons. Join in the conversation on our Facebook site www.facebook.com/ChinaIcons. Get the latest news as it happens from our Twitter page https://twitter.com/chinaicons. We’re also on Instagram! Follow us for exclusive behind-the-scenes photography and more. www.instagram.com/china_icons. Remember to check out our official website too with our blog! www.chinaicons.com.

Category  Science & Technology

Image-maker Alexander Tsiaras shares a powerful medical visualization, showing human development from conception to birth and beyond. (Some graphic images.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Alexander Tsiaras · Medical image maker

Using art and technology, Alexander Tsiaras visualizes the unseen human body.

MORE RESOURCES BOOK

From Conception to Birth

Alexander Tsiaras

Doubleday (2002)

INK Conference | December 2010

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Aug 14, 2017   To Scale:

On August 21st, 2017, the United States will host its first total solar eclipse in nearly forty years. While a partial eclipse will be visible throughout the continental US, only a thin strip across fourteen states will experience what is regarded as the most astounding celestial event one can witness: a total solar eclipse. This film is about why you should do everything you can to go see it. “Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him, or as flying in an airplane does to falling out of an airplane.” — Annie Dillard

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh

AUGUST 15, 2017  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. Just make sure you’re prepared.

Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse

MAY 9, 2013  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

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Shot by Czech photographer Miloslav Druckmüller from the Brno University of Technology, these amazing composite images capture the moon during a total solar eclipse revealing a vast solar corona. To achieve the crystal clear effect the shots are comprised from some 40+ photos taken with two different lenses. Additional clarity was achieved due to the incredibly remote location chosen to view the eclipse from, a pier just outside the Enewetak Radiological Observatory on the Marshall Islands, smack dab in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. You can see several more images from the project at Druckmüller’s website and don’t miss this much higher resolution version including some 209 stars. All images courtesy the photographer. (via this isn’t happiness)

The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

NOVEMBER 11, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

Artist duo Adrien M & Claire B have lifted the curtain on their latest acrobatic dance performance utilizing digital projection titled The Movement of Air. Seen in this video is a handful of moments taken from an hour-long piece performed in France last month by a trio dancers. Unlike more common uses of digital project mapping where a recorded animation or scene is projected in a space, Adrien M & Claire B instead utilize fully interactive “scenes” that respond to human interaction. Nothing you see on the set is animated beforehand.

“This ‘living light’ is produced by video projectors and generated in real time by a set of algorithms,” Adrien shares with us. “It is a mix of control room operated human interventions and onstage data sensors that outlines a precise writing of motions and generative behaviors. Thus, the images are never pre-recorded for a rigid show on an imposed rhythm: on the contrary, they breathe and move with the dancers and organize a new space for them to explore.”

The overall effect is dizzying, and in many ways enhances the dancer’s work instead of looking like a gimmick added as an afterthought. A great marriage of physical performance and digital special effects. You can watch several earlier interactive creations by Adrien & Claire here on Colossal including Pixel and Kinetic Sand.

RESIDENCE CREATION CIE AM-CBADRIEN MONDOT / CLAIRE BARDAINNELE MOUVEMENT DE L AIRTHEATRE DE L ARCHIPEL / SCENE NATIONALEPERPIGNAN 01/02 OCTBORE 2015.
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The movement of air / The movement of air

Adrien M & Claire B PLUS

2015 creation of the company Adrien M / Claire B

Conception, artistic direction, scenography and staging: Claire Bardainne & Adrien Mondot
IT design: Adrien Mondot
Choreography: Yan Raballand
Dance: Rémi Boissy, Farid-Ayelem Rahmouni, Maëlle Reymond
Choreographic collaboration: Guillaume Bertrand
Original music and interpretation: Jérémy Chartier
Lumière : David Debrinay
Costumes: Marina Pujadas
Construction & flight systems: Silvain Ohl and Eric Noël
Light management: alternating
General management: Pierre Xucla
Sound management, alternating: Christophe Sartori, Régis Estreich
Stage management & flight systems : Arnaud Gonzalez
Technical director: Alexis Bergeron
Production and distribution: Charlotte Auché, Marek Vuiton, Margaux Létang
The IT development of the show was carried out with the help of the Anomes team and Millumin v2 software.

Production
Adrien M / Claire B

Coproductions
Théâtre de L’Archipel, national stage of Perpignan
Le Cirque-Théâtre d’Elbeuf
La Brèche, National Pole of Circus Arts, Cherbourg-Octeville
GREC Festival, Barcelona (Spain)
With the support of Adami. The Adami, society of performers, manages and develops their rights in France and around the world for fair compensation for their talent. It also supports them with its financial aid for artistic projects.
With the participation of DICRéAM
Fondazione Romaeuropa – Arte e Cultura (Italy)
Center des Arts d’Enghien-les-Bains, scene approved for digital writing
Maison des Arts, national scene of Créteil and Val-de-Marne
Espace Jean Legendre Theater of Compiegne, national stage of the Oise foreshadowing
Odyssey, National Institute of Arts of mime and gesture Périgueux
L’Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts-Sciences – Meylan
National Choreographic Center of Créteil and Val de-Marne / Cie Käfig, as part of Accueil Studio

Support
Le Toboggan, scene approved by Décines
Les Subsistances, international laboratory for artistic creation, Lyon

The company Adrien M / Claire B is approved by the DRAC Rhône-Alpes, by the Rhône-Alpes Region and supported by the City of Lyon.

Photos © Romain Etienne / item and © AMCB
Video © Adrien M / Claire B – with the precious help of Guillaume Faure

“The movement of the air” is a frontal spectacle for three dancers evolving according to a choreographic score in an immersive environment made up of projected images, generated and animated live.
The purpose of the show is to give body to the imperceptible: to make visible the invisible of a movement of air, in its trajectories with infinite nuances, imaginary varying from the most gentle and slow, to the most lively and transparent, from the most powerful at the most subtle. A journey between the dream of flight and the anxiety of falling.
A suspension device allows the bodies to get rid of their weight.
The original music is performed live on stage.

2 Credits  Adrien M & Claire B,  Design  Millumin, Software dev

4 Categories  Arts & Design  Animation  Projection Mapping

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