Save Democracy in the United State & The World, Prevent Future Insurrections

Save Democracy in the United State & The World, Prevent Future Insurrections

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 Jan 6 Capitol Riot

11 ALIVE: These are the most striking images from the Jan. 6 Capitol riot

Rioters climbing walls, lawmakers taking cover and the QAnon Shaman. Here are some of the most striking images from the Jan. 6 insurrection.

INSURRECTION

An act or instance of rising in revolt, rebellion, or resistance against civil authority or an established government.

Author: Thais Ackerman

Published: 7:35 PM EST January 5, 2022                                               Updated: 8:35 PM EST January 5, 2022

WASHINGTON D.C., DC — It’s a day that will live on in infamy in American history. 

January, 6 2021 — when rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol, terrorizing lawmakers and vandalizing a meeting place of the nation’s legislature, and symbol of the American people.

It’s now been a year since the breach happened. Here are some of the most striking photos from that day. 

Tensions were high that Wednesday, as a joint session of Congress prepared to gather inside the Capitol to affirm now-President Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 election. But before they gathered, supporters of former President Donald Trump rallied in Washington.  

“We will never give up. We will never concede,” Trump told the roaring crowd.

Credit: AP

FILE – In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, the face of President Donald Trump appears on large screens as supporters participate in a rally in Washington. The House committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, with its latest round of subpoenas in September 2021, may uncover the degree to which former President Donald Trump, his campaign and White House were involved in planning the rally that preceded the riot, which had been billed as a grassroots demonstration. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

Less than an hour after the rally ended, the chaos began. A wave of protestors started swarming the Capitol.  Thousands of people gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud. Insurrectionists violently worked to break their way through a police barrier, and successfully did so.

 Credit: AP

FILE – Violent insurrections loyal to President Donald Trump try to break through a police barrier at the Capitol in Washington on Jan. 6, 2021. A revelation about text messages sent by three Fox News personalities to former President Donald Trump’s chief of staff on the day of the Capitol riots raise questions about whether they have lost sight of the ‘news’ aspect of their jobs. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Credit: AP

Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, at the Capitol in Washington. As Congress prepared to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, thousands of people gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Things quickly took a turn for the worse. After bulldozing their way through law enforcement, rioters even began climbing the west wall of the Capitol building, gearing up to force their way inside.

Credit: AP

FILE – In this Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The House committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, with its latest round of subpoenas in September 2021, may uncover the degree to which former President Donald Trump, his campaign and White House were involved in planning the rally that preceded the riot, which had been billed as a grassroots demonstration. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

The building now donning the shame of vandalism, with broken windows and doors throughout.

Credit: AP

Windows are cracked and broken by rioters at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A mob sweeps though the hallways, with some individuals clad in armor and equipped with weapons. The images portraying an America at war with itself.

At this point, insurrectionists have taken over the Capitol Building. Jacob Anthony Chansley, notoriously known as the QAnon Shaman, is pictured here alongside other rioters. He later became among one of the 700 people arrested in connection to the Capitol breach.

Credit: AP

Jacob Anthony Chansley, center, with other insurrectionists who supported then-President Donald Trump, are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police in the hallway outside of the Senate chamber in the Capitol, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. Chansley, was among the first group of insurrectionists who entered the hallway outside the Senate chamber. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

People were forced to take shelter in the House gallery as rioters tried to break into the House Chamber. 

Credit: AP

People shelter in the House gallery as rioters try to break into the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Credit: AP

Security forces draw their guns as rioters try to break into the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The rioters continued for hours until police were finally able to secure the inside of the building and clear the scene. 

Credit: AP

U.S. Capitol Police hold rioters at gun-point near the House Chamber inside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Credit: AP

Members of the U.S. Secret Service Counter Assault Team walk through the Rotunda as they and other federal police forces responded as violent protesters loyal to President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol today, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Lawmakers were safely escorted out of the building that evening. Even into the next day, and beyond, security forces stood guard outside the building so they could continue their duties in certifying the election.

Credit: AP

Police stand guard after a day of riots at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

 For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.11alive.com/article/news/special-reports/capitol-insurrection/most-striking-images-jan-6-insurrection/85-6789a961-48d1-4bed-90aa-a71e2296e125

Department of Justice releases graphic video from Jan. 6 Capitol riot

11Alive Dec 25, 2021

The Department of Justice released a three-hour video from the Jan. 6 attack.

Related Articles

January 6 United States Capitol attack 

Wikipedia: On January 6, 2021, following then–U.S. President Donald Trump’s defeat in the 2020 presidential election, a mob of his supporters attacked the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

WATCH: Rep. Raskin says Trump saw ‘the bloody attack unfold,’ but did not act fast enough on Jan. 6

PBS NewsHour 885,458 views Oct 13, 2022

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., said former President Donald Trump’s behavior during the Jan. 6 attack was not enough to stop the violence, despite immediate and repeated appeals from those around him. Raskin illustrated Trump’s reported lack of urgency on Oct. 13 as the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack presented its findings to the public. Raskin said the committee has evidence that Trump refused calls from close advisors and family to make a public announcement as the violence began. Members of Fox News and Republican Party leaders pleaded with Trump to tell the crowd to go home, Raskin said. New footage shows efforts by congressional leaders attempting to call for law enforcement to step in at the same time crowds broke windows and breached the Capitol on live television. “The president watched the bloody attack unfold on Fox News from his dining room,” Raskin said. “Members of Congress and other government officials stepped into the gigantic leadership void created by the president’s chilling and steady passivity that day.” In the week following Jan. 6, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., publicly stated that Trump “bears responsibility” for the attack and “should have immediately denounced the mob when he saw what was unfolding.” Raskin concluded his remarks by stating that “nothing in law or fact” could justify Trump’s failure to act and that the 14th Amendment “disqualifies from the federal and state office anyone who has sworn an oath to defend the Constitution but betrays it by engaging in insurrection or rebellion.” The committee returned to its public-facing work after nearly three months, having rescheduled the current hearing two weeks ago in light of Hurricane Ian. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

#WashingtonPost #CapitolRiot

Inside the U.S. Capitol at the height of the siege | Visual Forensics

Washington Post  4,304,015 views Jan 16, 2021

At 2:12 p.m. on Jan. 6, supporters of President Trump began climbing through a window they had smashed on the northwest side of the U.S. Capitol. “Go! Go! Go!” someone shouted as the rioters, some in military gear, streamed in. It was the start of the most serious attack on the Capitol since the War of 1812. The mob coursed through the building, enraged that Congress was preparing to make Trump’s electoral defeat official. “Drag them out! … Hang them out!” rioters yelled at one point, as they gathered near the House chamber. Officials in the House and Senate secured the doors of their respective chambers, but lawmakers were soon forced to retreat to undisclosed locations. Five people died on the grounds that day, including a Capitol police officer. In all, more than 50 officers were injured. To reconstruct the pandemonium inside the Capitol, The Washington Post examined text messages, photos and hundreds of videos, some of which were exclusively obtained. By synchronizing the footage and locating some of the camera angles within a digital 3-D model of the building, The Post was able to map the rioters’ movements and assess how close they came to lawmakers — in some cases feet apart or separated only by a handful of vastly outnumbered police officers. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost #WashingtonPost #VisualForensics #CapitolRiot

How Police Tried — and Failed — To Stop Capitol Attackers | Visual Investigations 8:54 mins

The New York Times  2,352,097 views Mar 21, 2021

Get an email as soon as our next Visual Investigation is published: https://nyti.ms/3xhj7dE The Times obtained District of Columbia police radio communications and synchronized them with footage from the scene to show in real time how officers tried and failed to stop the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video ———- Whether it’s reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It’s all the news that’s fit to watch.

How the Proud Boys Breached the Capitol | Visual Investigations

The New York Times  125,025 views Jun 18, 2022

A Times investigation of court documents, text messages and hundreds of videos shows how the Proud Boys coordinated to instigate multiple breaches of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video ———- Whether it’s reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It’s all the news that’s fit to watch.

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January 6 United State Capital Attack

 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from 2021 storming of the United States Capitol)

 Crowd shortly after the breach (top); tear gas deployed against rioters (bottom left); gallows erected by rioters (bottom right).

Public predictions of violence

Signs reading “Stop the Steal” and “Off with their heads”, photographed on the day of the attack

January 6 Trump rally

 Protesters at Washington Union Station on the morning of January 6

Donald Trump’s speech

An image of Trump delivering his rally speech from behind a bulletproof shield was projected onto this screen at the rally

March to the Capitol

 Protestors approaching the Capitol Complex

Members of the Proud Boys in front of the U.S. Supreme Court Building

Bombs discovered near Capitol Complex

This section is an excerpt from Law enforcement response to the January 6 United States Capitol attack § Bombs discovered near Capitol Complex.[edit]

One of two pipe bombs discovered adjacent to the Capitol on January 6, 2021.

FBI Wanted Poster offering up to $100,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual who placed two pipe bombs[242]

Capitol breach

Trump supporters crowding the steps of the Capitol

Officer Daniel Hodges crushed in doorway

Senate adjourned

C-SPAN broadcast of the Senate going into recess after protesters infiltrate the Capitol

Congressional staffers removed the Electoral College certificates from the Senate floor as it was evacuated.

House recessed

Rioters inside the Senate chamber

On January 6, 2021, following then–U.S. President Donald Trump‘s defeat in the 2020 presidential election, a mob of his supporters attacked the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. They sought to keep Trump in power by preventing a joint session of Congress from counting the electoral college votes to formalize the victory of President-elect Joe Biden. According to the House select committee investigating the incident, the attack was the culmination of a seven-part plan by Trump to overturn the election.[28][29] Five people died either shortly before, during, or following the event: one was shot by Capitol Police, another died of a drug overdose, and three died of natural causes.[22][30] Many people were injured, including 138 police officers. Four officers who responded to the attack died by suicide within seven months.[23] As of July 7, 2022, monetary damages caused by attackers exceed $2.7 million.[31]

Called to action by Trump,[32][33] thousands of his supporters gathered in Washington, D.C., on January 5 and 6 to support his false claim that the 2020 election had been “stolen by emboldened radical-left Democrats”[34][35][36][37] and to demand that Vice President Mike Pence and Congress reject Biden’s victory.[38] Starting at noon on January 6,[39] at a “Save America” rally on the Ellipse, Trump repeated false claims of election irregularities[40] and said, “If you don’t fight like hell, you’re not going to have a country anymore.”[41][42] In his hour-long speech Trump included 22 grammatical variations of the word “fight”.[41][42][43] During and after his speech,[39] thousands of attendees, including many that Trump knew to be armed, walked to the Capitol and hundreds breached police perimeters[44][45] as Congress was beginning the electoral vote count.

More than 2,000 rioters entered the building,[46][47][48] many of whom occupied, vandalized, and looted it,[49][50] assaulted Capitol Police officers and reporters, and attempted to locate lawmakers to capture and harm them.[51] A gallows was erected west of the Capitol, and some rioters chanted “Hang Mike Pence” after he rejected false claims by Trump and others that the vice president could overturn the election results.[52] Some vandalized and looted the offices of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D?CA) and other members of Congress.[53] With building security breached, Capitol Police evacuated and locked down both chambers of Congress and several buildings in the Capitol Complex.[54] Rioters occupied the empty Senate chamber while federal law enforcement officers defended the evacuated House floor.[55][56] Pipe bombs were found at each of the Democratic National Committee and Republican National Committee headquarters, and Molotov cocktails were discovered in a vehicle near the Capitol.[57][58]

Trump resisted sending the National Guard to quell the mob.[59] Later that afternoon, in a Twitter video, he reasserted that the election was “fraudulent” but told his supporters to “go home in peace”.[60][61] The Capitol was clear of rioters by mid-evening,[62] and the counting of the electoral votes resumed and was completed in the early morning hours of January 7. Pence declared President-elect Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris victorious. Pressured by his administration, the threat of removal, and many resignations, Trump later committed to an orderly transition of power in a televised statement.[63][64]

A week after the riot, the House of Representatives impeached Trump for incitement of insurrection, making him the only U.S. president to have been impeached twice.[65] In February, after Trump had left office, the Senate voted 57–43 in favor of conviction; because this fell short of a two-thirds majority, requiring 67 votes, he was acquitted for a second time.[66] The House passed a bill to create a bipartisan independent commission to investigate the attack, modeled after the 9/11 Commission,[67] but it was blocked by Republicans in the Senate,[51] so the House approved a select committee with seven Democrats and two Republicans to investigate instead.[68][69] By March 2022, Justice Department investigations of participants in the attack had expanded to include activities of others leading up to the attack.[70]

More than 30 members of anti-government groups, including the Oath KeepersProud Boys, and Three Percenters, were charged with conspiracy for allegedly planning their attacks on the Capitol; ten Oath Keepers and five Proud Boys were charged with seditious conspiracy,[71][72] and one Oath Keeper pled guilty.[73][74] As of January 2022, at least 57 people with roles in the day’s events were running for public office.[75] Although most people charged with crimes relating to the attack had no known affiliation with far-right or extremist groups,[27][76][77] a significant number were linked to extremist groups or conspiratorial movements.[78] By October 2022, 417 individuals charged had pleaded guilty.[79]

During summer 2022, the January 6th committee held eight televised public hearings on the January 6 attack. The ninth hearing was scheduled for September 28, 2022, but delayed due to Hurricane Ian.[80] The ninth hearing was moved to October 13,[81] and ended with a vote to subpoena Trump.[82]

Attempts to overturn the presidential election

Main article: Attempts to overturn the 2020 United States presidential election

Democrat Joe Biden defeated incumbent Republican Donald Trump in the 2020 United States presidential election.[83] Trump and other Republicans attempted to overturn the election, falsely claiming widespread voter fraud.[84]

Trump’s tweet shortly after polls had closed

Within hours after the closing of the polls, while votes were still being tabulated, Trump declared victory, demanding that further counting be halted.[85] He began a campaign to subvert the election, through legal challenges and an extralegal effort. Trump’s lawyers had concluded within ten days after the election that legal challenges to the election results had no factual basis or legal merit.[37] Despite those analyses, he sought to overturn the results by initiating the filing of at least sixty lawsuits, including two brought to the Supreme Court. Those actions sought to nullify election certifications and to void votes that had been cast for Biden. Those challenges were all rejected by the courts for lack of evidence or the absence of legal standing.[84]

Trump then mounted a campaign to pressure Republican governors, secretaries of state, and state legislatures to nullify results by replacing slates of Biden electors with those declared to Trump, or by manufacturing evidence of fraud. He further demanded that lawmakers investigate ostensible election “irregularities” such as by conducting signature matches of mailed-in ballots, disregarding any prior analytic efforts. Trump also personally made inquiries proposing the invocation of martial law to “re-run” or reverse the election[84][86] and the appointment of a special counsel to find instances of fraud, despite conclusions by federal and state officials that such cases were few and isolated or non-existent. Trump ultimately undertook neither step.[84] Trump repeatedly urged Vice President Mike Pence to alter the results and to stop Biden from taking office. None of those actions would have been within Pence’s constitutional powers as vice president and president of the Senate. Trump repeated this call in his rally speech on the morning of January 6.[87]

Some have characterized these attempts to overturn the election as an attempted coup d’état,[88] and an implementation of the big lie.[10] On October 31, 2021, a comprehensive and detailed account of the events before, during, and after the attack was published by The Washington Post.[89]

Planning

Congress was scheduled to meet jointly on January 6 to certify the winner of the Electoral College vote, typically a ceremonial affair.[90][91] In December, Congressman Mo Brooks (R-AL) organized three White House meetings between Trump, Republican lawmakers, and others. Attendees included Trump, Vice President Pence, representatives Jody Hice (R-GA), Jim Jordan (R-OH), and Andy Biggs (R-AZ), representative-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA), and members of the Trump legal team.[92] The purpose of the meetings was to strategize about how Congress could overturn the election results on January 6.[93]

On December 18, four days after the Electoral College voted, Trump called for supporters to attend a rally before the January 6 Congressional vote count to continue his challenge to the validity of several states’ election results. Trump tweeted, “Big protest in D.C. on January 6th. Be there, will be wild!”[12][94] The “March to Save America” and rally that preceded the riots at the Capitol were initially organized by Women for America First, a 501(c)(4) organization chaired by Amy Kremer, co-founder of Women for Trump.[95] On January 1, 2021, they obtained a permit with an estimated attendance of 5,000 for a first amendment rally “March for Trump”.[96] In late 2020 and early 2021, Kremer organized and spoke at a series of events across the country as part of a bus tour to encourage attendance at the January 6 rally and support Trump’s efforts to overturn the election result.[97] Women for America First invited its supporters to join a caravan of vehicles traveling to the event. Event management was carried out by Event Strategies, a company founded by Tim Unes, who worked for Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.[95]

On January 2, Trump retweeted a post by Kremer promoting the January 6 rally, adding that he would be there. From that point, although Kremer still held the permit, planning essentially passed to the White House.[97] Trump discussed the speaking lineup and the music to be played at the event. Although the initial plan for the rally called for people to remain at the Ellipse until the counting of electoral slates was complete, the White House said they should march to the Capitol, as Trump repeatedly urged during his speech.[37]

For several weeks before the event, there were over one million mentions of storming the capitol on social media, including calls for violence against Congress, Pence, and police. This was done on “alt-tech” platforms[a] such as news aggregator website Patriots.win,[b] chat app Telegram and microblogging websites Gab and Parler,[c] as well as on mainstream social media platforms, such as TikTok.[105] Many of the posters planned for violence before the event; some discussed how to avoid police on the streets, which tools to bring to help pry open doors, and how to smuggle weapons into the city.[104] They discussed their perceived need to attack the police.[103][106][107] Following clashes with Washington, D.C. police during protests on December 12, 2020, the Proud Boys and other far-right groups turned against supporting law enforcement.[108] At least one group, Stop the Steal, posted on December 23, 2020, its plans to occupy the Capitol with promises to “escalate” if opposed by police.[105] Multiple sites graphically and explicitly discussed “war”, physically taking charge at the event, and killing politicians, even soliciting opinions about which politician should be hanged first, with a GIF of a noose.[103] Joan Donovan, research director at Harvard‘s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, said that key figures in the Unite the Right rally and the Gamergate online harassment campaign worked to raise online fury ahead of the attack.[109] Facebook and Twitter have also been cited as playing a role in the fomenting of the Capitol attack.[110]

On the January 4, 2021, edition of Real America’s Voice’s The War Room (podcast), Steve Bannon, while discussing the planning for the upcoming events and speech by Trump on January 6 at The Ellipse, said: “Live from our nation’s capital, you’re in the field headquarters of one of the small divisions of the bloodless coup.”[111][112]

January 6 Trump rally

The “Save America” rally (or “March to Save America”, promoted as a “Save America March”)[199] took place on January 6 in the Ellipse within the National Mall just south of the White House. The permit granted to Women for America First showed their first amendment rally “March for Trump” with speeches running from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and an additional hour for the conclusion of the rally and dispersal of participants.[96]

Trump supporters gathered on the Ellipse to hear speeches from Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and others, such as Chapman University School of Law professor John C. Eastman, who spoke, at least in part, based on his memorandums, which have been described as an instruction manual for a coup d’état.[200][201] In a court filing in February, a member of the Oath Keepers claimed she had acted as “security” at the rally, and was provided with a “VIP pass to the rally where she met with Secret Service agents”. The U.S. Secret Service denied that any private citizens had coordinated with it to provide security on January 6.[202] On February 22, she changed her story and said she interacted with the Secret Service only as she passed through the security check before the rally.[203]

Mo Brooks (R-AL) was a featured speaker at the rally and spoke around 9 a.m., where he said, “Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass”. And later, “Are you willing to do what it takes to fight for America? Louder! Will you fight for America?”[204][205]

Representative Madison Cawthorn (R–NC) said, “This crowd has some fight”.[206] Amy Kremer told attendees, “it is up to you and I to save this Republic” and called on them to “keep up the fight”.[97] Trump’s sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, along with Eric’s wife Lara Trump, also spoke, naming and verbally attacking Republican congressmen and senators who were not supporting the effort to challenge the Electoral College vote, and promising to campaign against them in future primary elections.[207] Donald Jr. said of Republican lawmakers, “If you’re gonna be the zero and not the hero, we’re coming for you”.[208][209]

Rudy Giuliani repeated conspiracy theories that voting machines used in the election were “crooked” and at 10:50 called for “trial by combat“.[210][211] Eastman asserted that balloting machines contained “secret folders” that altered voting results.[212][f] At 10:58, a Proud Boys contingent left the rally and marched toward the Capitol Building.[39]

 Criminal charges

Main article: Criminal proceedings in the January 6 United States Capitol attack

Interim United States Attorney Michael R. Sherwin holds a press conference on criminal charges related to the events at the Capitol

By February 1, 228 people from 39 states and DC had been charged with federal and/or DC offences.[469] By April 23, 439 people had been charged.[470] By early September, there were over 600 federal defendants, 10% of whom had pled guilty,[471] and hundreds more arrests expected to come.[472] By October 13, there were over 630 federal defendants and 100 guilty pleas, with BuzzFeed publishing a searchable table of the plea deals.[473] On January 6, 2022, exactly one year following the attack, over 725 people had been charged for their involvement; as of March 2022, 778 have already been charged in relation to the attack.[474]

Most defendants face “two class-B misdemeanor counts for demonstrating in the Capitol and disorderly conduct, and two class-A misdemeanor counts for being in a restricted building and disruptive activity,” according to BuzzFeed, and therefore most plea deals address those misdemeanors. Some defendants have been additionally charged with felonies.[475] The median prison sentence, for those convicted thus far, is 45 days, with those who committed violence facing longer incarceration periods. Other punishments include home detention, fines, probation, and community service.[474] On January 13, 2022, 10 members of the Oath Keepers, including founder Stewart Rhodes, were arrested and charged with seditious conspiracy.[71]

By March 2022, Justice Department investigations of participants in the attack had expanded to include activities of others leading up to the attack. A federal grand jury was empaneled that issued at least one subpoena seeking records about people who organized, spoke at, or provided security at Trump rallies, as well as information about members of the executive and legislative branches who may have taken part in planning or executing the rallies, or attempted to “obstruct, influence, impede or delay” the certification of the election.[476][70]

On June 17, 2022, after the January 6 Committee had held three hearings, Trump told a Faith and Freedom Coalition conference that he might run again for president and if elected he would “very very seriously” consider pardoning all those who stormed the Capitol. Reporting on Trump’s speech, NBC News reported that Trump expressed no regrets about January 6 and “doubled down” on his unfounded claims about the election.[477] On September 1, 2022, Trump similarly pledged to “very, very strongly” consider “full pardons with an apology” if reelected.[478]

International reactions

These paragraphs are an excerpt from International reactions to the January 6 United States Capitol attack.[edit]

More than seventy countries and international organizations expressed their concerns over the attack and condemned the violence, with some specifically condemning President Donald Trump‘s own role in inciting the attack.[506][507] Foreign leaders, diplomats, politicians, and institutions expressed shock, outrage, and condemnation of the events.[508][509] Multiple world leaders made a call for peace, describing the riots as “an attack on democracy”.[510] The leaders of some countries, including BrazilPoland and Hungary, declined to condemn the situation, and described it as an internal U.S. affair.[511]

As early as January 2021, a few European security officials described the events as an attempted coup.[512]

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_6_United_States_Capitol_attack

PBS is an American public broadcast service.

Wikipedia

#USPolitics #Documentaries

(UPDATE) United States of Conspiracy (full documentary) | FRONTLINE 58:18 mins

FRONTLINE PBS | Official 634,718 views Jan 20, 2021

How trafficking in conspiracy theories went from the fringes of U.S. politics into the White House. This is an update of the 2020 FRONTLINE documentary, “United States of Conspiracy.” An investigation of the alliance among conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, longtime Trump associate Roger Stone and the president — and their role in the battle over truth and lies. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate As the coronavirus pandemic continues, America reckons with racism and the 2020 election looms, “United States of Conspiracy” investigates how Jones and InfoWars, Stone, and Trump helped to lay the foundation for conspiracy theories to take center stage in America’s national conversation, how the idea of truth itself became part of America’s divide, and what it means for the future of our democracy. #ConspiracyTheories #USPolitics #Documentaries Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation; Park Foundation; the Heising-Simons Foundation; the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation; and Koo and Patricia Yuen.

#2020Election #USPolitics #Documentary

Plot to Overturn the Election (full documentary) | FRONTLINE 53:17 mins

FRONTLINE PBS | Official 1,558,075 views Mar 29, 2022

How did false claims of election fraud make their way to the center of American politics? FRONTLINE and ProPublica investigate the plot to overturn the 2020 U.S. presidential election. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. FRONTLINE and ProPublica uncover how a small group of people helped to create some of the core narratives of fraud that President Donald Trump and many others would go on to champion after the election — and how the legacy of their effort is impacting democracy and shaping elections to come. “Plot to Overturn the Election” is a FRONTLINE production with Midnight Films, LLC in partnership with ProPublica. The correspondent is A.C. Thompson. The producer, writer and director is Samuel Black. The executive producer for FRONTLINE is Raney Aronson-Rath. #2020Election #USPolitics #Documentary Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Additional support for FRONTLINE is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Park Foundation; and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation, and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen.

American Reckoning – A PBS NewsHour Special Report

PBS NewsHour 1,474,657 views Jan 15, 2021

Following the aftermath of the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, “American Reckoning – A PBS NewsHour Special Report” looks at the economic and racial history that led to a political divide between Americans, the impact of President Donald Trump’s rhetoric throughout his presidency and the next steps for the nation to heal from the recent attack on American democracy. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvmasW_glUQ&t=4s

The Jan. 6 insurrection, 1 year later | PBS NewsHour presents 2:51:34

PBS NewsHour  5,625,716 views Premiered Jan 8, 2022

Congress is still investigating the people and organizations linked to the Jan. 6 attack — the most violent assault on the U.S. Capitol since the British attack during the war of 1812. The PBS NewsHour looked back at what happened that day, the lasting impacts on those who survived, where the investigations stand, and the broader effects on American politics, culture and democracy itself. 0:00 How the attack unfolded on Jan. 6 8:24 Why some Texans stormed the Capitol 17:59 Officer Brian Sicknick’s partner speaks 26:07 Far-right extremist groups move mainstream 39:18 Capitol Police officers demand accountability 49:37 Fallout from Rep. Meijer’s vote to impeach Trump 57:59 Rep. Nehls on defending the Capitol 1:05:25 Rep. Jeffries on witnessing Jan. 6 from the House floor 1:15:42 Disinformation downplays the violence 1:29:44 Biden’s Jan. 6 anniversary address 1:37:41 Harris on democracy a year after Jan. 6 1:48:50 Jan. 6’s impact on politics, culture and democracy 2:01:00 Brooks and Capehart on Jan. 6 anniversary 2:13:43 NewsHour correspondents recall Jan. 6 experiences 2:26:16 3 lawmakers of color on surviving Jan. 6 Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

#Documentary #RepublicanParty

Michael Flynn’s Holy War (full documentary) | FRONTLINE 53:18 mins

FRONTLINE PBS | Official  138,841 views Oct 18, 2022

How did Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn go from being an elite soldier overseas to waging a “spiritual war” in America? An investigation with the Associated Press. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. In “Michael Flynn’s Holy War,” FRONTLINE and the Associated Press examine how the retired three-star general and first national security adviser to former President Donald Trump has emerged as a leader in a far-right movement that seeks to put its brand of Christianity at the center of American civic life and institutions and is attracting election deniers, conspiracists and extremists from around the country. Drawing on interviews with 125 people, including Flynn’s family, friends, critics, current and former colleagues — and Flynn himself — the documentary illustrates how Flynn’s influence has grown since the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the U.S. Capitol — and how his pedigree and military career, combined with his connection to high-powered, well-financed political groups, have allowed him to travel the country and advance his movement since January 6. In the run-up to the 2022 midterm elections, “Michael Flynn’s Holy War” is a revealing look at the rise of one of the Republican party’s most active and polarizing political allies, and what his growing influence might mean for future U.S. elections. “Michael Flynn’s Holy War” is supported by Preserving Democracy, a public media reporting initiative from The WNET Group. The documentary is a FRONTLINE production with Midnight Films, LLC in partnership with The Associated Press. The director and writer is Richard Rowley. The producers are Paul Abowd and Jacqueline Soohen. The reporters are Michelle Smith, Paul Abowd and Richard Rowley. The correspondent is Michelle Smith. The international investigations editor for AP is Ron Nixon. The editor-in-chief and executive producer of FRONTLINE is Raney Aronson-Rath. #MichaelFlynn #Documentary #RepublicanParty Find FRONTLINE on the PBS Video App, where more than 300 of our documentaries available to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Additional support for FRONTLINE is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Park Foundation, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund, with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation, and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen. Funding for Michael Flynn’s Holy War is provided by the Jonathan Logan Family Foundation and The WNET Group’s Preserving Democracy, a public media reporting initiative. CHAPTERS: Prologue – 00:00 Michael Flynn’s Family Upbringing – 05:33 How Michael Flynn’s Worldview Developed During his Military Career – 11:21 Michael Flynn’s Role in the Lead-Up to January 6 – 22:07 A Far-Right Movement Attracting Election Deniers, Conspiracists and Extremists – 32:24 “Christian Nationalism” and Michael Flynn’s Movement – 36:19 Sarasota County, Florida: An Example of Michael Flynn’s Focus on “Local Action” – 42:24 Credits – 51:59

An (Un)Civil War: The Evangelical Divide | CBS Reports  27:42 mins

CBS News  980,885 views Oct 21, 2021

A new episode of CBS Reports’ Reverb series reveals that as Christian nationalism attracts followers, traditional pastors fear for their faith and the country. Evangelical Christians are a powerful political force, but an extreme faction has divided the community. In the half-hour documentary, An (Un)Civil War: The Evangelical Divide, we hear from pastors on both sides and ask what this battle means for their faith and the future of American democracy. Watch more documentaries and CBS News Specials that take a deep dive into the key issues driving the national and global conversation here: https://www.cbsnews.com/cbs/reports/ CBS News Streaming Network is the premier 24/7 anchored streaming news service from CBS News and Stations. It’s your destination for breaking news, live events, original storytelling and programs from CBS News and Stations’ top anchors and correspondents working locally, nationally and around the globe. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel:    / cbsnews?   Watch CBS News: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

The Right’s Fight to Make America a Christian Nation | CBS Reports

CBS News   508,929 views Mar 4, 2021

Freedom of religion is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. But the role that religious beliefs should play in public life has never been more contentious. As part of the Speaking Frankly series, this CBS Reports documentary explores the fusion of faith and politics in a movement that envisions the U.S. as a Christian nation. Watch more documentaries and CBS News Specials that take a deep dive into the key issues driving the national and global conversation here: https://www.cbsnews.com/cbs/reports/ CBS News Streaming Network is the premier 24/7 anchored streaming news service from CBS News and Stations. It’s your destination for breaking news, live events, original storytelling and programs from CBS News and Stations’ top anchors and correspondents working locally, nationally and around the globe. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel:    / cbsnews?   Watch CBS News: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

Inside The Pro-QAnon, Pro-Trump, Christian Nationalist Roadshow To ‘Save America’ 19:10 mins

MSNBC 290,141 views Oct 25, 2022

Trump allies are leading a pro-QAnon Christian Nationalist roadshow where conspiracy theories and shady prophecies come together to fight the left and “save America.” HuffPost reporter Christopher Mathias and political historian Nicole Hemmer join Mehdi to discuss. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc Follow the MSNBC Midterms Elections guide to the important races across the United States as Americans prepare to cast their votes. Countdown to the Midterms: https://on.msnbc.com/3KlULq8 Follow MSNBC Show Blogs MaddowBlog: https://www.msnbc.com/maddowblog ReidOut Blog: https://www.msnbc.com/reidoutblog MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House, The ReidOut, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and Alex Wagner who brings her breadth of reporting experience to MSNBC primetime. Watch “Alex Wagner Tonight” Tuesday through Friday at 9pm Eastern. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to the MSNBC Daily Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc #msnbc #trump #christiannationalism

“Fear” inside the Trump White House 26:47 mins

Washington Week PBS 89,485 views Sep 14, 2018

Veteran journalist and author Bob Woodward’s latest book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” depicts a White House in chaos, and an embattled president at odds with his own advisers. Moderator Robert Costa talks with Woodward about his search for truth, his hundreds of hours of recorded interviews with witnesses and participants in the Trump administration, and why he thinks America should wake up to the president’s behavior.

Inside Donald Trump’s 18 recorded interviews with Bob Woodward for his book “Rage” 13:27

60 Minutes  925,901 views Sep 17, 2020

In taped conversations with a Washington Post journalist, President Trump said he wanted to downplay the severity of the coronavirus. And the recordings reveal the President’s view on how close the United States came to nuclear war with North Korea. Scott Pelley reports. Subscribe to the 60 Minutes Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu Watch Full Episodes of 60 Minutes HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F Get more 60 Minutes from 60 Minutes: Overtime HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr Relive past episodes and interviews with 60 Minutes Rewind HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlZiGI Follow 60 Minutes on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry Like 60 Minutes on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao Follow 60 Minutes on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B — 60 Minutes, the most successful American television broadcast in history, began its 52nd season in September. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 is still a hit in 2020. 60 Minutes makes Nielsen’s weekly Top 10 nearly every week and was the #1 weekly television broadcast three times last season. The program still averages more than 10 million viewers, more than double the audience of its nearest network news magazine competitor. The average audience for a 60 Minutes broadcast is 150% higher than those of the network morning news programs; the audience dwarfs the number of viewers drawn by the most popular cable news programs. About a million more people listen to the 60 Minutes radio simulcast in several major cities and on its companion podcast. Tens of thousands each week experience 60 Minutes online. The broadcast’s segments can be watched at 60Minutes.com and on the CBS All Access app. Its webcast, 60MinutesOvertime.com, offers content originally produced for the web, including behind-the-scenes video about the production of 60 Minutes stories and timely archival segments. 60 Minutes has won every major broadcast award. Its 25 Peabody and 150 Emmy awards are the most won by any single news program. It has also won 20 duPont-Columbia University journalism awards. Other distinguished journalism honors won multiple times include the George Polk, RTDNA Edward R. Murrow, Investigative Reporters and Editors, RFK Journalism, Sigma Delta Chi and Gerald Loeb awards. 60 Minutes premiered on CBS September 24, 1968. Bill Owens is the program’s executive producer. The correspondents and contributors of 60 Minutes are Sharyn Alfonsi, Anderson Cooper, John Dickerson, Norah O’Donnell, Scott Pelley, Lesley Stahl, Bill Whitaker and L. Jon Wertheim.

Peril with Robert Costa 1:00:12

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Commonwealth Club of California 249,790 views Oct 20, 2021

The transition from President Donald J. Trump to President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is one of the most tumultuous periods in recent American history. Robert Costa and his co-author Bob Woodward have taken on the task of documenting the transition in a never-before-seen way in their new book, Peril. With material ranging from secret orders to transcripts of phone conversations from the Trump and Biden White House, the 2020 campaign, and more, Peril is the story about changes, a first inside look into Biden’s presidency, and the unique challenges that face the new administration. Join Costa he as analyzes this intense period in history as well as the overall landscape of American politics in 2021. NOTES OCTOBER 7, 2021 SPEAKERS Robert Costa National Political Reporter, The Washington Post; Co-Author, Peril In Conversation with Scott Shafer Senior Editor, KQED’s Politics and Government Desk; Twitter @scottshafer ?SUBSCRIBE for more VIDEOS:    / commonwealthclub   ? UPCOMING EVENTS: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events ? BECOME a MEMBER: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/memb… ? DONATE NOW: https://support.commonwealthclub.org/… ??? Watch & Listen https://www.commonwealthclub.org/watc… CWC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thecommonwea… CWC Instagram https://www.instagram.com/cwclub/ CWC Twitter https://twitter.com/cwclub The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation’s oldest and largest public affairs forum ?, bringing together its 20,000 members for more than 400 annual events on topics ranging across politics, culture, society and the economy. Founded in 1903 in San Francisco California ?, The Commonwealth Club has played host to a diverse and distinctive array of speakers, from Teddy Roosevelt in 1911 to Hillary Clinton in 2010. Along the way, Martin Luther King, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton have all given landmark speeches at the Club.

Woodward: Trump Does Not Understand The Responsibilities Of The President

MSNBC 580,926 views Oct 26, 2022

The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward joins Morning Joe to discuss interviews contained in his audio book ‘The Trump Tapes’. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc Follow the MSNBC Midterms Elections guide to the important races across the United States as Americans prepare to cast their votes. Countdown to the Midterms: https://on.msnbc.com/3KlULq8 Follow MSNBC Show Blogs MaddowBlog: https://www.msnbc.com/maddowblog ReidOut Blog: https://www.msnbc.com/reidoutblog MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House, The ReidOut, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and Alex Wagner who brings her breadth of reporting experience to MSNBC primetime. Watch “Alex Wagner Tonight” Tuesday through Friday at 9pm Eastern. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to the MSNBC Daily Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Woodward: Trump Does Not Understand The Responsibilities Of The President

Bob Woodward on ‘The Trump Tapes’ we haven’t heard (Full Stream 10/31) 32:48 mins

Washington Post Live 11,822 views Streamed live 15 hours ago, 10.31,2022

Bob Woodward, associate editor at The Washington Post, is bucking tradition and releasing the audio recordings of one of his most famous interviewees. On Monday, Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. ET, The Post’s Leigh Ann Caldwell speaks with the legendary journalist about his new audiobook, “The Trump Tapes,” his warning about the former president and his assessment of the state of American democracy heading into the midterms. Washington Post Live is the newsroom’s live journalism platform, featuring interviews with top-level government officials, business leaders, cultural influencers and emerging voices on the most pressing issues driving the news cycle nationally and across the globe. From one-on-one, newsmaker interviews to in-depth multi-segment programs, Washington Post Live brings The Post’s newsroom to life on stage. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

SAN FRANCISCO

Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker: Inside Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year 57:01 mins

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Commonwealth Club of California  209,585 views Streamed live on Jul 26, 2021

The year 2020 brought with it a nation riddled with grief as the United States descended into a raging pandemic, steep economic downfall, and unsettling political instability. As half a million perished and millions were left jobless from coronavirus, what was really going on inside the White House? And who was influencing Donald Trump as he refused to concede power after an election he had clearly lost? Washington Post reporters Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker answer these questions for the American people in I Alone Can Fix It, a gripping exposé of an administration sabotaging its own country. Their sources were in the room as Trump and the key players around him—doctors, generals, senior advisors and family members—continued to prioritize the interests of the president over that of the country. These witnesses saw firsthand Trump’s desire to deploy military force against protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death. They saw his refusal to take coronavirus seriously, even to the point of allowing himself and those around him to be infected. They, along with the rest of the world, saw him spur on what would become the January 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol building. With unparalleled access, Rucker and Leonnig delve into exactly who they say enabled—and who foiled—the president as he desperately held onto his fleeting presidency in his final year in office. Join us as Leonnig and Rucker reveal the inner workings of the 2020 Trump White House. NOTES Leonnig photo by Marvin Joseph; Rucker photo by Melina Mara. SPEAKERS Carol Leonnig Investigative Reporter, The Washington Post; Co-author, I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year; Twitter @CarolLeonnig (Participating Virtually) Philip Rucker White House Bureau Chief, The Washington Post; Co-author, I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year; Twitter @PhilipRucker (Participating Virtually) In Conversation with Yamiche Alcindor Host, “Washington Week,” PBS; Twitter @Yamiche (Participating Virtually) ?SUBSCRIBE for more VIDEOS: https://www.youtube.com/user/commonwe… ? UPCOMING EVENTS: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events ? BECOME a MEMBER: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/memb… ? DONATE NOW: https://support.commonwealthclub.org/… ??? Watch & Listen https://www.commonwealthclub.org/watc… CWC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thecommonwea… CWC Instagram https://www.instagram.com/cwclub/ CWC Twitter https://twitter.com/cwclub The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation’s oldest and largest public affairs forum ?, bringing together its 20,000 members for more than 400 annual events on topics ranging across politics, culture, society and the economy. Founded in 1903 in San Francisco California ?, The Commonwealth Club has played host to a diverse and distinctive array of speakers, from Teddy Roosevelt in 1911 to Hillary Clinton in 2010. Along the way, Martin Luther King, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton have all given landmark speeches at the Club.

Peter Baker and Susan Glasser: The Donald Trump White House Years 58:38 mins

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Commonwealth Club of California  103,199 views Sep 21, 2022

From its chaotic beginning to the violent finale, the Trump presidency was filled with moments ranging from the unthinkable to the deadly serious. That has continued until these past several weeks, and the man at the center of all of this could announce he is running for president again. That makes understanding his presidency even more important today. Veteran journalists Peter Baker and Susan Glasser chart the ambitious and lasting history of the Trump presidency, drawing on unprecedented access to key players from President Trump himself to cabinet officers, military generals, and more. Based on these exclusive interviews, Baker and Glasser reveal moments both tense and comical, from how close the United States got to nuclear war with North Korea to whether Trump asked Japan’s prime minister to nominate him for a Nobel Prize. They also explore the moral choices confronting those around Trump—how they justified working for him and where they drew their lines. Join us as Peter Baker and Susan Glasser return to the Club to discuss Donald Trump’s presidency and what a second term could mean for the country. Baker and Glasser photography by Doug Mills. September 20, 2020 Speakers Peter Baker Chief White House Correspondent, The New York Times; Co-author, The Divider: Trump in the White House, 2017-2021; Twitter @peterbakernyt Susan Glasser Staff Writer, The New Yorker; Co-author, The Divider: Trump in the White House, 2017-2021; Twitter @sbg1 In Conversation with Adam Lashinsky Journalist; Author; Twitter @adamlashinsky ?Join our Email List! https://www.commonwealthclub.org/email ? BECOME a MEMBER: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/memb… The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation’s oldest and largest public affairs forum ?, bringing together its 20,000 members for more than 500 annual events on topics ranging across politics, culture, society and the economy. Founded in 1903 in San Francisco California ?, The Commonwealth Club has played host to a diverse and distinctive array of speakers, from Teddy Roosevelt in 1911 to Anthony Fauci in 2020. In addition to the videos? shared here, the Club reaches millions of listeners through its podcast? and weekly national radio program?.

David Cay Johnston: The Big Cheat 1:05:08 mins

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Commonwealth Club of California

655,467 views Dec 16, 2021

The Trump family is one of the most talked about families in the United States. Donald Trump’s presidency elevated that and helped put them on an international stage that brought the family to the forefront of the world. Over the last half decade, journalist and Pulitzer Prize winner David Cay Johnston has provided the American people with fascinating insight into the financial world of one of America’s most influential families. Johnston talks about the financial life of the Trump Family in his new piece of work, The Big Cheat: How Donald Trump Fleeced America and Enriched Himself and His Family. This new book details the aspects of the Trump family’s finances during the four years Donald Trump spent in office, leaving no details out, to give you the complete picture. Join us as David Cay Johnston offers an inside look into the financial world of the Trump family. NOTES David Cay Johnston photo by Bonk Johnston. DECEMBER 9, 2021 SPEAKERS David Cay Johnston Co-Founder, DCReport.org; Author, The Big Cheat: How Donald Trump Fleeced America and Enriched Himself and His Family; Twitter @DavidCayJ In Conversation with Mitch Jeserich Host, “Letters and Politics,” KPFA Radio ? BECOME a MEMBER: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/memb… The Commonwealth Club of California is the nation’s oldest and largest public affairs forum ?, bringing together its 20,000 members for more than 500 annual events on topics ranging across politics, culture, society and the economy. Founded in 1903 in San Francisco California ?, The Commonwealth Club has played host to a diverse and distinctive array of speakers, from Teddy Roosevelt in 1911 to Anthony Fauci in 2020. In addition to the videos? shared here, the Club reaches millions of listeners through its podcast? and weekly national radio program?.

Jonathan Karl | Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show 1:05:57

Author Events  360,185 views Nov 22, 2021

Recorded November 22, 2021 In conversation with Tamala Edwards, anchor, 6ABC Action News morning edition Jonathan Karl is the author of Front Row at the Trump Show, an instant New York Times bestseller that peered behind the scenes into President Trump and his allies’ unprecedented actions. The chief White House correspondent and chief Washington correspondent for ABC News, Karl has written extensively about Trump’s presidency., Karl has also covered some of D.C.’s most important beats, including four presidential administrations, Capitol Hill, the Pentagon, and the State Department. He was the president of the White House Correspondents’ Association from 2019 to 2020 and has earned the Walter Cronkite Award for National Individual Achievement, an Emmy Award, and the Everett McKinley Dirksen Award, the highest honor for Congressional reporting. In Betrayal, Karl recounts the chaotic events that followed the 2020 presidential election and the former president’s stunning downfall.

Tony Schwartz: The Truth About Trump | Oxford Union Q&A

OxfordUnion 4,125,276 views Nov 4, 2016

SUBSCRIBE for more speakers ? http://is.gd/OxfordUnion Oxford Union on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theoxfordunion Oxford Union on Twitter: @OxfordUnion Website: http://www.oxford-union.org/ Announcing his candidacy for the Republican nomination back in June 2015, Donald Trump stated “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal’ “. Tony Schwartz was the ghostwriter of the book Trump calls ‘his proudest achievement’. Schwartz has been vocal about his regrets in working on the piece, but, having worked intimately with Trump, provides a fascinating perspective into the personality and idiosyncrasies of the Republican nominee ABOUT THE OXFORD UNION SOCIETY: The Oxford Union is the world’s most prestigious debating society, with an unparalleled reputation for bringing international guests and speakers to Oxford. Since 1823, the Union has been promoting debate and discussion not just in Oxford University, but across the globe.

Ing’s comment on Democracy of USA

WHEN WE LOSE THE DEMOCRATIC WAY OF LIVE ——-

NO FREEDOM, NO EQUAL RIGHTS FOR ALL,

ONLY BILLIONAIRE, AUTOCRACY,

SLAVE WORKERS  AND HOMELESSNESS REMAIN

 At present, democracy in the United States of America, is balancing on a tight rope.  At any moment, it can falter and tumble if the extreme right-wing of the Republican party gains control of Congress.   If Republican leader, Keven McCarthy, controls the House of Representatives, and Republican leader Mitch McConnell, takes control of the Senate, the government will return to the extreme right-wing policies of the Trump administration even before the presidential election of 2024.

Former president Trump, worked hand in glove with Mitch McConnell, to stack the Supreme Court with three new replacements, of ultra conservative right-wing judges.  When added to the three conservative Judges already on the court, it has created a dangerous super majority that has already begun to overturn settled law, in favor of right-wing extremist ideology.  It is now impossible for the three remaining liberal judges to prevent these actions from taking place.   

The Conservative court has already used its power support major challenges to settled law brought before the court that involve issues such as civil rights, and abortion rights.  Roe V Wade, has been the law of the land for over fifty years, but has already been gutted.  The conservative Supreme Court majority has removed the rights of women to decide for themselves whether an abortion is an appropriate choice for their circumstance.  Even when a ten years old girl is raped and becomes pregnant, in many states she is obligated to have the child.  In some states, even when the pregnancy will cause harm to a woman, the law forces her to carry her pregnancy to the end of the term.  Where are the rights of women?  Are we retuning to a dark age when women had no rights at all? 

Mr. Trump with assistance from Mitch McConnell also appointed two hundred Conservative Federal Court Judge positions to the bench.  Because of this, states now have the ability to make laws that severely restrict abortion, making is essentially illegal.  In contrast, when Barack Obama was president, he attempted to fill vacancies to the Supreme Court and Federal Courts but could not.  President Obama’s nominees were blocked in every instance by the Republican controlled senate led by Mitch McConnell. 

Just as significate in 2010, during the Obama administration, the Supreme Court, in the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission case, upheld the right of corporations to make unlimited political expenditures under the first Amendment.  This allowed corporations to donate as much money as they wish to help Republican politicians, win elections.  In return, these politicians then helped pass laws that favor these corporations.

The right wing of the Republican party, which has now become the majority of that party, continues to attempt passing laws and use any other legal maneuver to strip away the rights of the majority of American citizens.  The Midterm election of 2022 is perhaps the last chance for Democrats along with the few remaining centrist Republicans in Congress, to prevent the rightwing extremists taking full control of the government. 

If the Republicans take control of both houses of Congress in the 2022 election, they will be able to control the vote count in the 2024 election.  This is because they will have elected officials in many states who will be able to decertify the vote count in the presidential election of 2024.

This could mean the end of democracy in America because the vote count will be in the hands of those in power to continue in power.  If this happens, through voting manipulation, Donald Trump is very likely to become President in 2024 and we will live in an Autocrat System with a leader that controls our lives in the same way Putin does in Russia, and Kim Jong-un does in North Korea.  The democratic way of life for US citizens could end, and without democracy in the world’s most powerful nation, it will be under even greater threat throughout the world. 

In our retirement years my husband and I watch with great sadness at what may unfold.  We may suffer mentally and physically for the short time we have left, but future generations may suffer their whole lives under a repressive dictatorship.  Our daughter, our little grandsons, and many other families will have to live without the freedom that earlier generations have known.  I still have hope that sanity will prevail, and the United States of America will not lose our gift of freedom that has helped enlighten so many other nations of this world.

I am not a Democrat, Republican, or member of any political party, but I am for a democratic way of life.  Democracy brings freedom of thought, action, and human rights for every citizen, allowing an opportunity to live peacefully in a healthy world.

Together we can face what will be the inevitable problem of global warming, which affect the lives of all of us.  Many lives will be lost before all the complexities of the issue can be attended, but we must begin now or there will be nothing left on earth to care for.  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, November 1, 2022

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Mr. Putin, “PLEASE STOP THE WAR IN UKRAINE” May Peace, Love & Kindness be in your Heart always

Mr. Putin, “PLEASE STOP THE WAR IN UKRAINE” May Peace, Love & Kindness be in your Heart always

   A woman arrives at the border crossing in Medyka, Poland. Photo: Visar Kryeziu/AP

Are this lady and baby doing any harm to you?

You destroyed her home, her community and her country

You killed her family, her friends, and her beloved country, Ukraine.

“PLEASE STOP THE WAR!!!”

Your young Russian men, are only teenagers, just starting their lives, were killed in thousands.

“PLEASE STOP THE WAR!!!”

Millions of Ukrainians are homeless, with no place to stay, no food to eat.

Once you told people that your mother had no food to eat and she fainted, people thought that she was dead.

But now you put the Ukrainian people in a worse situation than your mother.

“PLEASE STOP THE WAR!!!”

If you want your Ukraine brothers to be with you, you have to give them Peace, Love and Kindness

 You said that Ukraine is the brother of Russia. You should not kill your brother, but that is what you are doing.   

“PLEASE STOP THE WAR!!!”

 You will never conquer Ukraine or the world.  If you use nuclear weapons, it will be suicide, because you and all your Russia people will also die.

“PLEASE STOP THE WAR!!!”

If you want the world to respect and honor you, you need to use kindness and love, which in turn will bring peace.

Imagine that you stand proudly at the highest podium, with love, kindness and open arms, offering Peace to the world. This you can do though your wealth and power.

You will be honored as a man of Peace, Love and Kindness. For this you will be remembered and recorded in history forever.

 “PLEASE STOP THE WAR IN UKRAINE!!!”

“What does Peace mean to you?”

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Sunday, March 13, 2022, 3:38 PM

   AXIOS AM: Mar 13, 2022

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

By Mike Allen ·Mar 13, 2022
 Good morning … It’s March Madness Selection SundaySmart Brevity™ count: 1,150 words … 4½ mins. Edited by Fadel Allassan.

 Bulletin: National security adviser Jake Sullivan, warning Russia could be preparing to use chemical weapons in Ukraine, told Margaret Brennan on CBS’ “Face the Nation”

“[T]here is an escalating level of rhetoric on the Russian side trying to accuse the Ukrainians and the United States of potentially using chemical or biological weapons. And that’s …. an indicator that in fact, the Russians are getting ready to do it and try and pin the blame elsewhere.”

 2. U.S. journalist killed in Ukraine

An elderly resident hides in a basement with no electricity, water or food, in the center of the Irpin, northwest of Kyiv, on Friday. Photo: Efrem Lukatsky/AP

A freelancer who formerly worked on New York Times projects was killed covering the war in Ukraine, The Times said today.

  • “We are deeply saddened to hear of Brent Renaud’s death. Brent was a talented filmmaker who had contributedto The New York Times over the years,” The Times said in a statement emailed to Axios.
  • “Though he had contributed to The Times in the past (most recently in 2015), he was not on assignment for any desk at The Times in Ukraine. Early reports that he worked for Times circulated because he was wearing a Times press badge that had been issued for an assignment many years ago.”
  • Renaud, 50was a writer, filmmaker, and photojournalist from Little Rock, according to his Nieman bio.

 NATO’s doorstep: Waves of Russian missiles pounded a military training base near Ukraine’s western border with NATO member Poland, killing 35 people, Ukrainian authorities told AP.

  • More than 30 Russian cruise missiles targetedthe sprawling facility, less than 15 miles from the closest border point with Poland, according to the governor of Ukraine’s western Lviv region.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky accused Russia of using blackmail and bribery in an attempt to force local officials in the southern Kherson region to form a “pseudo-republic.”

Axios Ukraine dashboard  Axios explainers.

  1. 1,000 words

Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Lviv preps for potential Russian invasion: Statues are wrapped yesterday at Saints Peter and Paul Garrison Church in Lviv, western Ukraine.

The church was dedicated in 1630 — 392 years ago.

  1. Split-screen America: 2 years of pandemic
Photos: David Dee Delgado and Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

At left, a lone police officer in Times Square in March 2020.

At right, supporters of the Ukrainian community in Times Square in March 2022.

See 3 more split screens, from Axios senior visual journalist Aïda Amer.

6.  Poll of the day

Graphic: CBS News

A CBS News poll out today finds “overwhelming support for sanctions on Russia’s oil and gas, and the willingness to pay more as a result.”

·  Why it matters: This is “the kind of widespread sentiment we don’t always see in public opinion these days: bipartisan, cutting across race, region, and even income,” CBS pollsters note.

Go deeper.

AXIOS AM: Mar 12, 2022

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

 Breaking: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky warned of “a new stage of terror” in a video posted to Telegram last night, referring to the abduction of the mayor of Melitopol by Russian forces.

  • Zelensky accused Russiaof “a war of annihilation” as devastation intensified across Ukraine, including in Kyiv, The New York Times reported.

Russian forces pounding the port city of Mariupol shelled a mosque sheltering 80+ people, including children, the Ukrainian government said. Get the latest.

1 big thing: Dems ask Americans to sacrifice

Speaker Pelosi and House Democratic leaders at their issues conference in Philadelphia yesterday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Facing a bleak midterm outlook, Democrats see a potential reset with voters based on President Biden’s handling of the Ukraine crisis, Axios’ Sophia Cai reports from Philadelphia:

  • Why it matters:S. sanctions on Russia are worsening inflation and increasing gas prices — adding misery for Democrats, who are bracing for the possible loss of the House and even the Senate in November.

At a conference for House Democrats in Philadelphia this week, lawmakers made the case for Americans’ shared sacrifice — including paying more for gas.

  • House Foreign Affairs Chairman Gregory Meeks(D-N.Y.) said: “I’m asking the people of the United States to also make that kind of sacrifice because in the long run, democracy is at stake.”

Between the lines: The war is giving Biden a chance to showcase attributes that appealed to Americans who backed him for president —foreign-policy experience, empathy and respect for institutions.

Reality check: Some House Dems tell Axios they’re skeptical voters will embrace surging gas prices — and reward or forgive Biden and Democrats just because they find Vladimir Putin repugnant, or value democracy over oppression.

  • “It’s not enough for us to say, ‘It’s a tough time and it’s because of the war in Russia,'” Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) told Axios. He and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) introduced legislation to tax the largest oil companies, and assist individuals earning less than $75,000 or couples earning less than $150,000.
  • “We’ve got to figure out something to reduce prices, and we need to be getting more money into the hands of working families.”

 What we’re watching: A Wall Street Journal poll out yesterda(subscription) found that “57% of voters remained unhappy with Biden’s job performance, “despite favorable marks for the president’s response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine and a recent State of the Union speech.”

  • Democratic advantagesover Republicans narrowed on education, COVID response and protecting middle-class families, the poll found.

 What they’re hoping: DCCC Chair Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.) advised Biden: “Be the man you saw on Tuesday night — who crushed it at the State of the Union, who right now is leading the world standing up to Russian aggression.”

  • “The next chapteris going to be where the American people rediscover they elected a strong, decent man who is fighting for very important things.”

Go deeper: See Wall Street Journal poll results (not paywalled).

Axios Ukraine dashboard  Axios explainers.

  1. Quote of the week: We won’t fight WW III in Ukraine

President Biden holds a drawing by Mia Parrilla as he visits Hon. Luis Muñoz-Marín Elementary School in Philadelphia yesterday. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden in the Roosevelt Room yesterday, on Day 16 of the Ukraine invasion, as he announced revocation of Russia’s most-favored-nation status:

We will not fight a war against Russia in Ukraine. Direct confrontation between NATO and Russia is World War Three, something we must strive to prevent.

But we already know Putin’s war against Ukraine will never be a victory. 

Explainer on “most favored nation” … Full remarks.

AXIOS AM: Mar 11, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Chemical weapons threat

A Ukrainian serviceman photographs a damaged church yesterday, after shelling hit a residential district in Mariupol, Ukraine. Photo: Evgeniy Maloletka/AP

The White House is sounding the alarm over a new Russian propaganda campaign that officials fear is a pretext for an appalling new phase of the war:

  • The use of biological or chemical weapons, Axios’ Zachary Basu reports.

Why it matters: Vladimir Putin has a history of deploying illegal nerve agents against enemies, including opposition leader Alexei Navalny and former double agent Sergei Skripal. In Syria, Russia helped Bashar al-Assad cover up the use of chemical weapons against his own people.

What’s happening: Kremlin propagandists have been frenetically spreading baseless claims that the Pentagon is funding dangerous bioweapons labs in Ukraine.

  • Chinese diplomats and state-controlled media have joined in on the conspiracy theories, raising fears about a level of coordination between the two powers not seen during the conflict thus far.
  • Data: Institute for the Study of War. Map: Jared Whalen/Axios

Reality check: The U.S. and Ukraine have vigorously denied the presence of any U.S.-backed bioweapons program, saying the only labs the U.S. supports in Ukraine are standard research facilities that focus on “diagnostics, therapeutics, treatment, prevention and vaccines.”

  • The Biden administration has issued statements calling the Russian claims “preposterous” and “total nonsense,” and urging the world to “be on the lookout” for Russia to use chemical weapons itself or attempt a “false flag” operation in Ukraine.
  • “Allegedly, we are preparing a chemical attack,” Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a new video address. “This makes me really worried because we’ve been repeatedly convinced: if you want to know Russia’s plans, look at what Russia accuses others of.”

Between the lines: The U.S. has repeatedly sought to debunk Russia’s narratives about Ukraine by declassifying intelligence about Putin’s plans ahead of time, a novel approach that undermines his element of surprise.

Go deeper: Axios Ukraine dashboard  Axios explainers.

  1. Social media’s new ethical minefield
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

War intensifies the impulse to share powerful images, but leaves users with uncomfortable choices and pitfalls in the social media wilderness, Axios’ Ina Fried writes in her weekly “Signal Boost” tech column.

  • Why it matters: Platform moderators face complex ethical and legal calls over photos of dead soldiers, images of teens taking up arms and videos of prisoners of war criticizing the conflict.

A video went viral of a Russian soldier denouncing the invasion after being captured in Ukraine.

  • It wasn’t long before observers pointed outthat such footage, if produced by a government, might well violate the Geneva Conventions.
  • Detainees“must be treated with dignity, and not exposed to public curiosity — like circulating images on social media,” the International Red Cross said as part of a Twitter thread explaining those rules.

Keep reading.

  1. 1,000 words

Photo: Robert Hanashiro/USA Today

Spotted yesterday on Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood, near LAX

  1. Banks reveal billions in potential Russia losses
Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

With Russia’s economy collapsing, its stock market cryogenically frozen and its bonds near default, global investors are set to endure major losses, Axios Markets co-author Matt Phillips reports.

Why it matters: For decades, Russian investments were a cornerstone of “emerging market” investing — the financial world’s marketing rubric encouraging the free-flowing global investments that helped define the post-Cold War era.

Russia was a star of the “BRICS” — a rubric coined by Goldman Sachs analysts that stood for the fast-growing emerging market economies that were investor favorites over the last two decades.

BRICS = Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa.

What we’re watching: Russia is considering seizing and potentially nationalizing assets of companies that quit the country.

Share this story.

AXIOS PM: Mar 10, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

  1. Double-digit inflation risk
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The commodity price spike caused by the war in Ukraine has increased the risks of a recession, sustained high inflation, or both, reports Axios Capital author Neil Irwin.

The big picture: It’s pretty much a mathematical certainty that inflation rates will be higher in the months ahead rather than lower.

  • Will year-over-year headline inflationhit double digits? Quite plausibly. That leaves the Fed between a rock and a hard place.

Share this story.

AXIOS AM: Mar 10, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

  1. Putin-Zelensky meeting raised at peace talks

A woman outside a maternity hospital that was shelled yesterday in Mariupol, Ukraine. Photo: Evgeniy Maloletka/AP

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and his Ukrainian counterpart Dmytro Kuleba met in Turkey this morning for the highest-level peace talks since the war began, Axios’ Zachary Basu reports.

  • The two sides discussed the possibilityof a meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, but otherwise failed to come to any agreement on a ceasefire.

The big picture: As Putin’s frustration builds, Russian forces have increasingly turned to targeting civilians with indiscriminate shelling. (Photo above.)

  • The meeting came just one day after Russia bombed a maternity ward and children’s hospital in the besieged city of Mariupol, killing three people in an attack that Zelensky calledproof of genocide.
  • Lavrov falsely claimedat his press conference in Turkey that Ukraine was the aggressor, at one point telling reporters: “We are not planning to attack other countries. We didn’t attack Ukraine in the first place.”

Breaking: The U.K. this morning froze the assets of seven Russian oligarchs, including Chelsea FC owner Roman Abramovich — who was in the midst of attempting to sell the storied London soccer team.

Go deeper: Axios Ukraine dashboard … Axios explainers.

  1. 1,000 words

Photo: Attila Kisbendek/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters form a human peace sign in Heroes’ Square in Budapest, Hungary, yesterday.

  1. Fear in Europe: Who’s next?

Photo: Richard B. Levine/Sipa USA via Reuters

Some European countries, watching Russia’s brutal war in Ukraine, fear they could be next, AP reports.

  • Why it matters: Vladimir Putin “has said right from the start that this is not only about Ukraine,” said Michal Baranowski, director of the German Marshall Fund’s Warsaw office, but also “about the eastern flank of NATO and the rest of Eastern Europe.”

Western officials say the most vulnerable could be those who aren’t members of NATO or the European Union, and thus alone and unprotected — including Ukraine’s neighbor Moldova and Russia’s neighbor Georgia, both of them formerly part of the Soviet Union — along with the Balkan states of Bosnia and Kosovo.

  • Analysts warn that even NATO members could be at risk, including Estonia, Latviaand Lithuania on Russia’s doorstep, as well as Montenegro, either from Moscow’s direct military intervention or attempts at political destabilization.

Go deeper.

AXIOS PM: Mar 9, 2022

  Mike Allen mike@axios.com

Why gas is so high
 A bunch of you asked: Why are gas prices going up if the U.S. barely relies on Russian oil?
The answer: You’ll pay a lot more for gas for three big reasons, Axios energy experts Ben Geman and Andrew Freedman tell us.

1.      Supply: Less oil sloshing around in an already-tight market, thanks to Russia.

2.     Demand: Driving and energy use is surging back post-COVID.

3.     Risk: War.

Be prepared: It‘s hard to see any of these trends getting better fast. Expect high gas prices for at least the next few months.

Be aware: Oil makes up about 45% of gas prices, which is why President Biden is playing footsie with the Iranians, Saudis and Venezuelans.  They have oil. Biden wants cheaper gas.

Be savvy: We only get 3% of our oil from Russia. BUT Europe gets 27% … and we all tap the same global oil pool. Hence, your pain at the pump.

·  Go deeper with our explainer.

 4. Catch up quick

Aftermath of Mariupol Hospital after a Russian attack severely damaged the children’s hospital and maternity ward. Photo: Mariupol City Council via AP

  1. Russian shelling in the Ukrainian port city of Mariupolhas killed at least 1,170 people and destroyed a children’s hospital that also housed a maternity ward, Deputy Mayor Sergiy Orlov said today. Go deeper.
  2. The Chernobyl nuclear power plantthat’s now controlled by Russian forces no longer has electricity, threatening efforts to safely store radioactive material, the Ukrainian government warned. Go deeper.
  3. A grand jury indicted Colorado election official Tina Peters on seven felony counts as part of an investigation into tampering with the results of the 2020 election. Peters is a Republican candidate for secretary of state. Go deeper.

Volkswagen is reviving the microbus as an electric vehicle, scheduled to release in the U.S. in 2024.

AXIOS AM: Mar 9, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

 Breaking: Congressional leaders reached a bipartisan deal early today to provide $13.6 billion to help Ukraine, as part of a $1.5 trillion measure funding the government. Party leaders hoped to whip the 2,741-page measure through the House today and the Senate (perhaps) by week’s end. AP

1 big thing: Putin’s failure

A charred Russian tank is seen Monday in Ukraine’s Sumy region. Photo: Irina Rybakova for the press service of the Ukrainian Ground Forces via Reuters

Vladimir Putin’s plan to seize Ukraine’s capital in the first two days of Russia’s invasion has been a complete failure, Axios’ Zachary Basu writes.

  • It’s been thrown off courseby a fierce Ukrainian resistance, poor planning and a series of profound miscalculations, top U.S. intelligence officials say.

Why it matters: An isolated and angry Putin is expected to double down on his brutality as the war in Ukraine drags on for weeks, months or even years. It could be his undoing.

 Reality check: A devastating punch that levels Ukrainian cities is more likely than ever. It’ll be less targeted … more indiscriminate.

State of play: CIA Director Bill Burns testified at a House hearing yesterday that Putin “has no sustainable political end game in the face of what’s going to continue to be fierce resistance from the Ukrainians.”

  • Even if Russia eventually captures Kyiv, the U.S. intelligence community doesn’t see a way that a pro-Russian puppet regime can stay in power given the Ukrainian people’s absolute refusal to capitulate.
  • Ukraine’s Armed Forces say this is a downed Russian jet crashing in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Sunday. Image from video released by Ukrainian Ground Forces via Reuters

The U.S. estimates between 2,000 and 4,000 Russian troops have already been killed, “far in excess” of what Putin anticipated or has admitted, Burns said.

  • Putin was readyfor sanctions, but not the speed and unity with which the Western world brought the hammer down — especially private companies. McDonald’s, Starbucks and Coca-Cola all halted Russian sales yesterday.

 What we’re watching: Despite the setbacks, Putin is “unlikely to be deterred,” Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines testified.

  • The people who will suffer most are Ukrainian civilians, who are already beginning to see the vicious tactics Putin adopted to achieve his military aims in Syria and Chechnya.
  • The upside is that what Putin “might be willing to accept as a victory may change over time, given the significant costs he is incurring,” Haines predicted.

Share this story … Axios Ukraine dashboard.

  1. Cascading crises swamp globe

Data: UNHCR; Map: Jared Whalen and Will Chase/Axios

 Stunning stat: At the end of 2021, before the invasion of Ukraine, 1 in 29 people worldwide needed humanitarian assistance, according to the U.N.

After a pandemic, multiple food shortages, the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan — and now an exodus of Ukrainians fleeing the Russian military — global aid groups tell Axios’ Stef Kight they can barely keep up.

  • Why it matters: “The world’s humanitarian funding machine just doesn’t have enough money to face all of the people in need this year,” Bob Kitchen, the International Rescue Committee’s director of emergencies, tells Axios.

What’s happening: Aid groups are scrambling to help Ukraine, as well as the surrounding nations welcoming 2 million+ refugees — the world’s fastest population movement since at least World War II, experts say.

  • Many of the same agencies sprang into action as refugees poured out of Afghanistan last year.

At the same time, West Africa is headed toward devastating drought and food insecurity: Over 38 million people will likely experience a severe food emergency this summer.

  • Separately, the Horn of Africa is facing what could be the worst food crisis in 30 years .
  • Conflict and other disasterscontinue in Yemen, Syria, Myanmar and elsewhere.

 How you can help: International Rescue Committee … Save the Children … Mercy Corps.

In photos: Ukraine’s growing humanitarian crisis … Share this story.

AXIOS PM: Mar 8, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

  • Helping Ukraine

 “I would love to know the top 3 or 5 ways that I can help Ukraine besides donating money to charity,” Stephanie Worthington, a Finish Line reader and tech marketer in Shingle Springs, California, emailed last night.

  • “I’ve given to charity, but there must be more ways to help that I just don’t know about.”

Here ya go:

  1. Give critical supplies: Meest, a Ukrainian logistics company with warehouses in several states, is accepting humanitarian aid packages for Ukraine. The urgent needis for medical and tactical supplies, including backpacks, Tylenol and bandages. Here’s how to drop off or ship packages to a Meest warehouse.
  2. Give your time: You can sign upto volunteer with Nova Ukraine, and help organize fundraisers and spread awareness.
  3. Attend a peaceful protest: Here’s a live logof upcoming demonstrations, including events all over the U.S. (h/t The Guardian)
  4. Support on-the-ground journalism: The Kyiv Independent, an English language news site that has been reporting the facts in real time, is raising money via GoFundMe.

Share this story.

AXIOS AM: Mar 8, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: China censors Ukraine

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
The Chinese government is scrubbing the country’s internet of sympathetic or accurate coverage of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and systematically amplifying pro-Putin talking points, Axios China author Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian writes.

·  Why it matters: China’s use of its propaganda and censorship muscle helps insulate Beijing from domestic backlash against its support for Putin — and leaves its citizens with an airbrushed, false version of events, similar to what’s seen in Putin’s state-controlled Russia.

What’s happening: Chinese media outlets were told to avoid posting “anything unfavorable to Russia or pro-Western” on their social media accounts, and to only use hashtags started by Chinese state media outlets, according to a leaked censorship directive.

·  Online comments expressing sympathy for Ukraine have been deleted — even the anti-war speech given by the Paralympic Committee president during the opening ceremony was censored on Chinese TV.

·  Pro-Putin social media posts on Chinese social media were allowed to proliferate, as were posts blaming the U.S. and NATO for the conflict.

·  Chinese state media have widely aggregated content from Russian outlets.

Keep reading.

  1. Zelensky: “I’m not hiding”

Photo from Ukrainian Presidency video

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky posted a video of himself in his presidential office in Kyiv last night, declaring in the face of multiple alleged assassination attempts: “I’m not hiding. And I’m not afraid of anyone.”

  • Why it matters: Zelensky’s nightly addresses, in which he details Russian attacks and honors fallen heroes, have become appointment viewing for news and inspiration, Axios’ Zachary Basu writes.

“You know, we used to say: Monday is a hard day,” Zelensky said as he filmed out his window on Bankova Street on the 12th day of the invasion.

  • “Now there is a war in the country, so every day is Monday.”
  • Zelensky entered selfie-style, then sat at his desk. Photo from Ukrainian Presidency video

More than 2 million refugeehave now fled Ukraine.

  • Russia claimsit is allowing “humanitarian corridors” for the safe passage of civilians, but Ukrainian officials have reported multiple instances of shelling along those routes in the last 24 hours.
  • Ukraine’s infrastructure minister said the country has sufferedabout $10 billion in damage since Russia’s invasion began.
  • Zelensky pledgedto continue peace talks until the war ends — and to rebuild Ukraine until there is “no trace” of the “hatred that the enemy brought to our cities with shelling and bombing.”

Axios Ukraine dashboard.

AXIOS PM: Mar 7, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Food supply alarm

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is threatening the global food supply.

The big picture: The two countries combine for nearly 1/3 of global wheat and barley exports, AP reports. Ukraine is a major exporter of corn.

  • Lebanon, Egypt and Syria are among the countries most dependent on affordable wheat. “Any [price] hikes will be catastrophic not only for me, but for the majority of the people,” Ahmed Salah, an Egyptian father of seven, told AP.
  • Supplies were already tight because of droughts hitting the wheat belts of North America, NPR notes.

 European livestock farmers are heavily reliant on Ukraine for corn and other grain additives for animal feed.

Between the lines: This also threatens efforts to help famine-stricken countries like Afghanistan, Yemen and Ethiopia, the Financial Times reports (paywall).

The bottom line: Ukraine and Russia “account for about 12% of the calories the world trades,” NPR reports.

Go deeper: Tomorrow’s Axios Markets will dive into what the war means for global wheat markets.

  1. Russia “nearly 100%” deployed

A woman arrives at the border crossing in Medyka, Poland. Photo: Visar Kryeziu/AP

Russia has now deployed “nearly 100%” of the combat power that it had massed on Ukraine’s borders, a senior U.S. defense official told reporters today.

The World Health Organization confirmed at least 14 attacks on Ukrainian health facilities since the start of Russia’s invasion, reports Axios’ Oriana Gonzalez.

?The U.S. is deploying another 500 troops to Europe in response to the invasion, a senior defense official said today, “pushing the total number of American forces in the region to 100,000.”  The Wall Street Journal

AXIOS AM: Mar 7, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

  1. 15 Running for their lives

Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters

Above, residents flee the town of Irpin, outside Kyiv, after heavy shelling landed on the only escape route used by locals, with Russian troops advancing towards the capital.

At least four civilians killed: The top of the front page of today’s New York Times includes a photo of a family lying on the ground in Irpin after being hit by a Russian mortar shell. Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky said they were killed.

“When the family — a mother, her teenage son and a daughter who appeared to be about 8 — was spotted sprawled on the ground, soldiers rushed to help, but could do little for them or a man described as a family friend who had been helping them escape,” Addario reports.

  • Read the story(subscription). Caution: Graphic photo.
  • Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP

A factory and a store burn after being bombarded in Irpin.

AXIOS AM: Mar 6, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Blinken sees evidence of war crimes

Screenshot: CNN

Secretary of State Tony Blinken told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” from Moldova this morning: “[W]e’ve seen very credible reports of deliberate attacks on civilians, which would constitute a war crime.”

  • “And what we’re doingright now is documenting all of this, putting it all together, looking at it, and making sure that as people and the appropriate organizations and institutions investigate whether war crimes have been or are being committed, that we can support whatever they’re doing,” Blinken added.
  • “They’re very credible. And we’re documenting everything.”
  • Video.

 Breaking: The Ukraine exodus is the fastest-growing refugee crisis in Europe since World War II, topping 1.5 million in 10 days, the UN refugee agency said today.

  • “In the coming days,millions more lives will be uprooted, unless there is an immediate end to this senseless conflict,” the UNHCR said. Go deeper.

Pope Francis said today in his weekly address to crowds gathered in St. Peter’s Square: “In Ukraine, rivers of blood and tears are flowing. This is not just a military operation [as Putin described it], but a war which sows death, destruction and misery.” (Reuters)

Axios Ukraine dashboard.

  1. 1,000 words

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP

Ukrainians crowd under a bridge destroyed by a Russian airstrike, as they wait to flee across the Irpin River on the outskirts of Kyiv yesterday.

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP

Assisted by Ukrainian soldiers, they lugged pets, infants, purses and flimsy bags stuffed with minimal possessions, AP reports.

Photo: Vadim Ghirda/AP

Some of the weak and elderly were carried along the makeshift path in blankets, carts — and even a wheelbarrow.

 AXIOS AM: Mar 5, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Zelensky’s Zoom plea

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Ukraine leaders appreciate the worldwide solidarity, but are frustrated by how far the talk exceeds the action, Axios’ Sophia Cai writes.

  • Why it matters:The survival of some cities could come down to hours or days. While missiles are arriving in Ukraine and crushing sanctions are being felt in Moscow, neither is stopping the invasion.

 This morning, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said after senators held a Zoom call with President Volodymyr Zelensky that the Ukrainian leader “made a desperate plea for Eastern European countries to provide Russian-made planes to Ukraine.”

  • “These planesare very much needed,” Schumer said. “I will do all I can to help the administration to facilitate their transfer.”

Andriy Yermak, a longtime top aide to Zelensky, wrote in a New York Times op-ed under the headline, “I’m Writing From a Bunker With President Zelensky Beside Me. We Will Fight to the Last Breath”:

We need more — and, please, stop telling us military aid is on the way. … We need antitank and antiaircraft weapons and other ammunition delivered to our brave soldiers right now.

Many countries promised aid to Ukraine to help repel the invasion. But the strongest declarations from the West and elsewhere haven’t fully materialized.

  • The UN General Assemblyvoted 141-5 to demand Vladimir Putin withdraw forces, but there’s no mechanism for enforcement.
  • The European Union promised to send fighter jets. But that never happened, after three nations with Russian-made aircraft refused.
  • About 20 countries— mostly NATO and EU members — pledged to send weapons. But the arms have been slow to reach Ukraine, and it’s unclear whether they’ll arrive in time to make a difference.
  • TIME’s new coverfeatures President Zelensky’s words to the European Parliament on March 1: “Life will win over death, and light will win over darkness.” Cover stor

The U.S. has also been heavy on symbolism over substance:

  • First lady Jill Bidenhosted Ukraine’s ambassador to the U.S. at the State of the Union address. Many senators and representatives wore Ukrainian blue and yellow.
  • Congress left for the weekend,though, without passing a multibillion-dollar aid package.
  • Schumer told Zelensky today, according to a source on the call: “Senator McConnell and I — along with the other members on this Zoom — are working very hard in a bipartisan fashion to get all the assistance the administration has requested for the Ukrainian people. Together we will get that assistance of over $10 billion in economic, humanitarian, and security assistance to the Ukrainian people quickly.”

Alexander Vindman, the Ukraine-born, retired Army officer and former National Security Council director for Europe, called for $35 billion in reconstruction aid — what’s been dubbed a “Marshall Plan for Ukraine.”

 Go deeper … Axios explains: Why Ukraine isn’t getting a no-fly zone.

  1. White House open to cutting Russian oil

Cecilia Rouse, chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, joins Jen Psaki’s briefing yesterday. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

The White House signaled openness yesterday to reducing imports of Russian oil — without saying exactly how, Axios’ Hans Nichols reports.

  • Why it matters:A ban could translate to higher prices at the pump in parts of the U.S. and increase inflation, a key concern for Biden.

Michael McFaul, U.S. ambassador to Russia under President Barack Obama, said yesterday that he expects the practice of importing Russian oil to “change soon.”

  • “The United States should not be importing Russian oil. Period,” McFaul said during an onlinepanel discussion about the Russian invasion of Ukraine moderated by Axios’ Jonathan Swan.
  • “I understand inflation.I understand the arguments. But there’s no ethical or moral reason that we should be doing that, and I expect that to change soon.”

The context: Oil from Russia accounted for roughly 3% of U.S. crude imports in 2021.

  • It’s mostly importedin Hawaii and the coasts, where refiners don’t have access to the pipelines connecting the big domestic oil fields in places like the Southwest’s Permian Basin.
  • Energy analysts and economists disagree about how much of a price spike an import ban would generate.

State of play: Cecilia Rouse, chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, told reporters yesterday: “[W]e are looking at options that we can take right now if we were to cut the U.S. consumption of Russian energy. But what’s really most important is we — that we maintain a steady supply of global energy.”

Between the lines: That appears to be a shift from the White House’s initial dismissal of the congressional effort to effectively impose an embargo on Russian oil for U.S. refiners.

  • Speaker Pelositold reporters on Thursday about a ban: “I’m all for that. Ban it. … Ban the oil coming from Russia. Yeah.”

Drill deeper: Hans’ behind-the-scenes reporting.

  1. Russia’s war on information
CNN’s Matthew Chance on Monday. Screenshot: CNN

New efforts by the Kremlin to bully the press and silence dissent are forcing independent media and social networks out of the country, Axios’ Sara Fischer writes:

  • The BBC and Bloomberg said they’re suspending operationsin Russia, and CNN will stop broadcasting there, following a new law threatening to imprison journalists for up to 15 years if they publish what Moscow deems to be “fake” information about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.
  • ABC and CBS saidthey’ll temporarily stop broadcasting from Russia.

Russia’s communications regulator Roskomnadzor (Russianyesterday blocked the websites of several outlets, including U.S. government-funded VOA and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, for spreading what it called fake news on the “special operation in Ukraine.”

  • High-quality Russian independent news agenciesare being yanked off the air, forcing journalists to flee the country.

Russia also blocked Facebook entirely yesterday, after partially restricting the social network last week.

Zoom out: Putin’s propaganda push has intensified as protests erupt at home. The Kremlin is relying on state media to sell the war as a success domestically.

Share this story.

  1. 1,000 words

Photo: Sergei Chuzavkov/AFP via Getty Images

A traumatic farewell at an evacuation train at Kyiv’s central train station yesterday.

Ukrainian women and children by the hundreds of thousands are saying goodbye to men staying to fight.

AXIOS PM: Mar 4, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

  1. Russian slowdown

Davide Martello, 40, an Italian man living in Germany, plays the piano at the border checkpoint in Medyka, Poland. Photo: Yara Nardi/Reuters

Russia has failed to gain air superiority despite launching an estimated 500 missiles over the past nine days, the Pentagon told reporters today.

  • A large Russian forceis about 15 miles from Kyiv but has not advanced significantly in the past few days, reports Axios’ Zachary Basu.
  • Ukraine and Russia planto hold a third round of peace talks this weekend.
  • Russia has now blocked accessto Facebook.

What they’re saying: Ukraine Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba thanked NATO allies for their support but called on them to do more.

  • “Russia tries to turn Ukraine into Syria, and the tactics they deploy are very similar to the ones they excelled at in Syria.”

Go deeper.

AXIOS AM: Mar 4, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Russia seizes reactor

This image, made from a video released by the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, shows a bright, flaring object landing at the plant in Enerhodar, Ukraine, today. Photo via AP

As the Ukraine invasion enters Week 2, Russian shelling ignited a fire at Europe’s biggest nuclear plant. That led to global alarm about a meltdown, as the world watched ghostly nighttime video of the complex.

  • But the fire is out.Russian forces took control of the site.

Why it matters: Ukraine’s state nuclear regulator said losing the ability to cool nuclear fuel at the plant could lead to an accident even worse than the 1986 Chernobyl accident — the world’s worst nuclear disaster — or the 2011 Fukushima meltdowns in Japan, AP reports.

The assault led to a phone call between President Biden and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. The U.S. Energy Department activated its nuclear incident response team as a precaution.

  • Ukraine saidno changes in radiation levels have been recorded.

In an emotional speech in the middle of the night, Zelensky accused Russia of “nuclear terrorism” and said he feared an explosion that would be “the end for everyone. The end for Europe. The evacuation of Europe.”

Photo: Maksim Levin/Reuters

This is a drone’s-eye view of a residential building destroyed by shelling, in the settlement of Borodyanka, about 35 miles outside

Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

A family of Ukrainian refugees in Lonya, Hungary, yesterday after walking across the border. Long queues are forming at border crossings.

·  Axios Ukraine dashboard.

   2. Putin faces danger at home

Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting yesterday at his Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow. Photo: Andrei Gorshkov/Sputnik/Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Thousands of Russians are rushing to flee the country ahead of this weekend, as rumors swirl that Vladimir Putin could soon declare martial law, close the borders and crack down even harder on domestic dissent, Axios’ Zachary Basu reports.

  • Why it matters: For as devastating as the humanitarian situation in Ukraine has become, widespread suffering is rapidly arriving at Russia’s own doorstep.

More than 8,000 people have already been detained at anti-war protests since Feb. 24, according to the independent monitor OVD-Info.

  • Russia’s Duma has passeda law making the spread of “fake news” about the Russian military punishable by up to 15 years in prison.
  • The last pillarsof Russia’s already-limited independent press were forced to close under pressure from the Kremlin this week.
  • Russia’s state communications watchdog blocked the websitesof the BBC, Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Deutsche Welle and other foreign media outlets for spreading “fake” information.

 What to watch: Russia’s second-largest airline announced it will cease all international flights from tomorrow, as Russia’s upper house of parliament meets for an emergency session that many fear could mark the descent of a new Iron Curtain.

  1. Invasion’s economic dominoes
Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios
Ripping Russia, the world’s 11th largest economy, out of the global financial system is already causing collateral damage around the world, Axios Markets author Emily Peck writes.

Oil and gas prices have skyrocketed, even though energy was purposefully carved out of sanctions.

Internal conflicts could erupt elsewhere due to food insecurity.

Catch up quick: Since Russia invaded Ukraine last week, the U.S. and its European allies moved fast to levy some of the harshest sanctions ever imposed.

The strikes were targeted. The West tried to keep the energy sector — a massive part of the Russian economy — out of the most severe penalties, so European countries could continue to buy oil and gas.

Reality check: Russia will start to operate in different ways, carving out an alternate financial system — much like Iran has done after being cut off from SWIFT by the Trump administration.

·  Keep reading.

  1. Axios explains: Why Ukraine isn’t getting a no-fly zone
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky has repeatedly urged Western leaders to impose a “no-fly zone” over Ukraine. But establishing one appears unlikely any time soon, Axios’ Laurin-Whitney Gottbrath writes.

  • Why it matters:Imposing a no-fly zone (NFZ) would mark a significant escalation in the war — potentially bringing NATO directly into a conventional conflict with a nuclear power.

A no-fly zone is airspace where certain aircraft aren’t allowed to enter.

  • In a war, no-fly zones must be enforced militarily — which can include shooting down banned aircraft.
  • The U.S. and other major powers have so far ruled out establishing a NFZ over Ukraine.
  • Keep reading.

New on Axios: Ukraine explainers.

 AXIOS PM: Mar 3, 2022

  Mike Allen mike@axios.com

1 big thing: Biden to sign landmark #MeToo bill

Former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson joins Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer at a press conference today following the passage of the Ending Forced Arbitration Act. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images
President Biden today will sign landmark workplace legislation that forbids companies from forcing sexual harassment and assault claims into arbitration, Axios’ Emily Peck reports.

Why it matters: The law, the Ending Forced Arbitration Act, is the first major piece of legislation to come out of the upheaval of the #MeToo era.

·  Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.) told Axios it was “the most significant piece of labor legislation passed in this century.”

·  It’s a huge win for former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson, credited with bringing together diverse supporters, including Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.).

Workers will no longer be forced to take claims of sexual harassment or assault to private arbitration.

·  But employers can still force workers to take all kinds of other complaints to private dispute resolution — including pay inequality and civil rights claims over race.

Share this story.

   2. Photo of the day: Refugees expected

Photo: Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images

Spotted today at the Frankfurt (Oder) rail station.

  • Why it matters:Trains from Poland with war refugees are expected at the station.

Context: 1 million people have fled Ukraine in seven days, UN high commissioner for refugees Filippo Grandi said today.

  1. Catch up quick
The 190-foot Amore Vero (True Love), linked to a close ally of Vladimir Putin, was seized today in a French Riviera port. Photo: Nicholas Tucat/AFP via Getty Images
  1. France seized a mega yacht belonging to a Russian oligarch, CNN reports.
  2. The Sackler family reacheda deal to pay as much as $6 billion to end litigation against the OxyContin Go deeper.
  3. Ukrainian and Russian delegationsagreed to organize humanitarian corridors to allow civilians to flee, but made no other progress.

Russian businesses in the U.S. are facing threats and vandalism, Axios’ Erin Doherty reports.

AXIOS AM: Mar 3, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Putin’s CEO crisis

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Giant global businesses in every sector are abandoning Russia following the invasion of Ukraine.

  • Why it matters:In addition to condemning the invasion, the companies see an impossible environment — from worker safety … to the logistics of getting supplies … financial and sales disruption … and the complexity of complying with sanctions, Axios’ Hope King writes.

State of play: Financial sanctions have isolated Russia from the rest of the world. Businesses operating in Russia have an increasingly limited ability to collect revenue or pay workers and suppliers.

  • Economic sanctions, including export controls, have curtailed imports.
  • Some workers are being moved out of Russia.
  • Restricted airspace and travelare preventing companies from getting the equipment they need to continue to operate.

Between the lines: Some companies that have very little physical presence in Russia — including many in techretail and media — are limiting how products are used in the country or have pulled them.

Flashback: Since the Soviet Union’s collapse three decades ago, Russia had been seen as an emerging market with long-term growth potential.

In the seven days since the invasion began:

  • Boeingsuspended major operations in Moscow, as well as maintenance and technical support for Russian airlines.
  • Shellwill sever ties with Russian gas giant Gazprom and end its roughly $1 billion financing of the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline.
  • Exxon Mobil saysit will exit Russia oil and gas operations valued at more than $4 billion and cease new investment.
  • GM, which sells only about 3,000 cars a year in Russia, saysit will suspend exporting vehicles.
  • Fordsuspended
  • BMW stoppedshipments and will stop production in Russia.
  • VWpaused delivery of Audis already in Russia so it can adjust car prices to reflect the decline in value of the ruble.
  • Harley-Davidson suspendedshipments to Russia.
  • Adidassuspended its partnership with the Russian Football Union.
  • Nikeceased online sales because it can’t guarantee delivery.
  • FedEx and UPS suspended shipments.
  • Yoox Net-A-Porter Groupand Farfetch, luxury e-commerce platforms, are suspending deliveries in Russia.
  • Applepaused product sales and limited services (including Apple Pay), on top of ceasing exports to Russia and restricting features in Apple Maps in Ukraine to safeguard civilian safety.
  • Dell stopped selling products.
  • Walt Disney is pausingfilm debuts in Russia. Warner Bros., Sony, Paramount and Universal say they won’t release films in the country.
  1. Invasion forces 1 million from homes

A woman cries outside houses damaged by a Russian airstrike, according to locals, in Gorenka, outside Kyiv yesterday. Photo: Vadim Ghirda/AP

Bulletin: Russia’s foreign minister says Moscow is ready for peace talks but will continue destroying Ukraine’s military infrastructure.

  • Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Russia has no thoughts of nuclear war, Reuters reports.

More than 1 million people have fled Ukraine following Russia’s invasion, the UN refugee agency told AP.

  • That amountsto more than 2% of Ukraine’s population being forced out of the country in less than a week.

Go deeper: Axios Ukraine dashboard.

AXIOS PM: Mar 2, 2022

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: The anti-Putin coalition

Data: United Nations; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Only four countries — Belarus, North Korea, Eritrea and Syria — joined Russia today in voting against a non-binding UN resolution that condemned the invasion of Ukraine.

Another 35 abstained, including India and China, Axios’ Ivana Saric and Zachary Basu report.

  • Between the lines:India has military ties with Russia from the Soviet era, causing headaches for the U.S. as it seeks to integrate India into an alliance to counter China in the Indo-Pacific.

141 countries voted in favor of the resolution.

AXIOS AM: Mar 2, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Ukraine splinters internet

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Moves to restrict Kremlin disinformation after the Ukraine invasion are further splintering the global internet.

  • Why it matters:A universal internet — where everyone can access the same messages and services — is slipping out of reach as democracies falter and governments limit usage, Axios’ Ashley Gold writes.

Zoom out: Social media execs have warned against the dangers of a Balkanized internet for years as many nations — including Russia, China, India, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Ethiopia and Turkey — limited access.

  • In China, American apps like Facebook and Twitter are blocked.

Between the lines: Cutting countries off can help dictators win.

  • In democracies, including the U.S., it’s easy to focus on the harms of Big Tech and look to the government for answers, Kate Klonick, an assistant law professor at St. John’s University, told Axios.
  • But “what we’re seeing with Russia and Ukraine is a return to some of the formative ideas around the power that the internet brings to individuals.”

Reality check: Authoritarian countries plow ahead with their own visions for the internet as the U.S. and Europe search for alignment on privacy, AI, competition, content moderation and cybersecurity regulations.

  1. Biden: “I get it”

What President Biden sees. Photo: Shawn Thew/EPA/Pool via AP

President Biden said in his State of the Union address that getting inflation under control is his “top priority,” while warning Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could lead to higher costs for American consumers.

  • Why it matters:The White House knows the country is frustrated with price hikes. But officials also want credit for strong GDP growth, job creation and low unemployment, Axios’ Hans Nichols writes.

“With all the bright spots in our economy, record job growth and higher wages, too many families are struggling to keep up with the bills,” the president said.

  • “Inflation is robbing themof the gains they might otherwise feel. I get it.”
  • Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Above: An old-fashioned scrum greets President Biden after the speech.

  • Secretary of State Tony Blinkentalked with House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith (D-Wash.).

Go deeper: Read Biden’s vow to seize yachts and jets of Russian oligarchs, from the Axios AM Thought Bubble that dropped in your inbox late last night ET.

  1. Zelensky: “The best people on Earth”
Cover: The Times of London

Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky posted a video on Facebook today in which he praised Ukrainians as “a symbol of invincibility,” as the Russian invasion entered a seventh day.

  • “Another night of Russia’s full-scale war against us, against the people, has passed,” Zelensky said. “We’ve hardly slept for seven nights.”

Zelensky said invading forces “know nothing about our capital,” Kyiv, or Ukrainian history: “But they have an order to erase our history … Erase our country. Erase us all.”

  • “Today you,Ukrainians, are the symbol of invincibility, a symbol that people in any country can become the best people on Earth at any moment.”
  • A member of the Ukrainian Emergency Service beholds Kharkiv City Hall following shelling yesterday. Photo: Pavel Dorogoy/AP

Explosions rang out in Kyiv and Kharkiv as Russian forces intensified their bombing campaign on Ukraine today.

Axios Ukraine dashboard.

AXIOS PM: Mar 1, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Holocaust site hit

Photo: CNN

A Russian missile hit the Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial site in Kyiv today, killing at least five people, Ukrainian officials said.

  • President Volodymyr Zelensky tweeted:“[W]hat is the point of saying ‘never again’ for 80 years, if the world stays silent when a bomb drops on the same site of Babyn Yar?”
  • “Between 1941 and 1943,the Nazis shot between 70,000 and 100,000 people at Babyn Yar, including almost the entire Jewish population of Kyiv,” according to the Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial Center.
  • The Russians were targetingthe nearby Kyiv TV tower, saying it was among the infrastructure used for “information attacks” from Ukraine’s security services.

A blast is seen in the TV tower, amid Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, in Kyiv, today. Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters

The bottom line: A senior U.S. defense official told reporters that Russia’s advance on Kyiv had stalled and that there were signs of flagging Russian morale, Axios’ Zachary Basu and Dave Lawler report.

  1. State of the Union spoiler

The House chamber yesterday. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Look for President Biden to be very tough on Vladimir Putin in tonight’s State of the Union address (9 p.m. ET).

Why it matters: The White House has scrambled to be sure he meets the moment.

  • The president will point to the U.S. role in protecting democracy, before moving on to Americans’ pocketbooks — how to grow the economy from the “bottom up and the middle out,” as he puts it.

The speech is built around four buckets:

  1. World stage:Biden will say “democracy will prevail” in Ukraine.
  2. Economy:He’ll call for lowering costs for working families.
  3. COVID:He’ll stress the U.S. is “in a new moment” of the pandemic and has the tools to contain the virus.
  4. The future of America:He’ll point to Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, his nominee for the Supreme Court, and vow to make inroads on immigration and climate.
  5. Catch up quick

Photo: Emilio Morenatti/AP

  1. Above: Animal keeper Kirilo Trantin comforts an elephant at the Kyiv Zoo.
  2. “Europe’s largest refugee crisis this century”:About 677,000 Ukrainian refugees have arrived in neighboring countries. Go deeper.
  3. The U.S. will release 30 million barrelsfrom the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as part of international plans to release 60 million barrels. Go deeper.
  4. The ACLU is suing to block aTexas directive that would have a state agency investigate parents for child abuse if they seek gender-affirming care for their children. Go deeper.

Exclusive: A small group of Latino U.S. House members recently expressed “extreme concern” about a plan to potentially dispatch robot dogs along the U.S.-Mexico border, Axios’ Russell Contreras reports.

Share this story.

AXIOS AM: Mar 1, 2022

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com>

1 big thing: Biden’s new targets

Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

President Biden set his sights on Russian oligarchs, COVID fraudsters, social media platforms and even defund-the-police efforts tonight — populist targets in a broader speech about national and global unity.

  • Biden’s anti-Russia,pro-Ukraine passages inspired the only real partisan unity in the chamber:

The U.S. Department of Justice is assembling a dedicated task force to go after the crimes of Russian oligarchs.

We are joining with our European allies to find and seize your yachts, your luxury apartments, your private jets. We are coming for your ill-begotten gains.

On Vladimir Putin, Biden ad-libbed: “He has no idea what’s coming.”

Ukrainian Ambassador Oksana Markarova is applauded by first lady Jill Biden. Photo: ABC News

 Twitter erupted when Biden accidentally said Putin would never gain the hearts and souls of the “Iranian” people, instead of Ukrainian.

Biden’s other targets:

  • He announced that the Justice Department will appoint a chief prosecutor to go after pandemic fraud.
  • He bluntly distanced himselffrom the defund-the-police movement: “The answer is not to defund the police. The answer is to fund the police with the resources and training they need to protect our communities.”

With Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen in the audience, Biden framed social media as part of a larger mental health crisis and urged Congress to “strengthen privacy protections” and ban targeted advertising to children.

  • Reality check:Privacy legislation has been stalled for years, notes Axios managing editor Scott Rosenberg.
  • Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) sat with Republican senators. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite/AP

What we were watching, from Axios’ Sophia Cai, in the House chamber:

  • Fellow Supreme Court justicesstanding to applaud retiring Stephen Breyer — but careful to avoid politics by sitting when Biden mentioned his nominee to replace Breyer, Ketanji Brown Jackson.
  • Joe Manchin(D-W.Va.) sitting with Republicans — but rising for most of the Democrats’ applause lines.
  • Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.) shouting “13 of them!” as Biden spoke, referring to Americans killed at Kabul airport during the frantic evacuation from Afghanistan. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.) shouted: “Stay out of women’s sports!”

 Axios.com has the latest reaction, including the Republican response.

1 big thing — Biden’s dilemma: Putin off-ramp

Vladimir Putin chairs a meeting on economic issues at the Kremlin yesterday. Photo: Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

With Ukraine holding Russia off longer than many U.S. officials had expected, President Biden now faces a great unanswered question — how to give Vladimir Putin an off-ramp to avoid even greater calamity.

  • Why it matters: A cornered, humiliated Putin could unleash untold pain on the world, from cyberattacks to nuclear threats. After enacting brutal sanctions, the White House now must consider how the invasion can end without a new catastrophe, Axios’ Jonathan Swan and Zachary Basu report.

Between the lines: Nobody knows what Putin would accept.

  • Many officials fear that we are heading into a very dangerous period — the punishing Western sanctions pushing an autocrat into a corner.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), vice chair of the Senate intelligence committee, has hinted Putin could be addled.

  • “This is the most dangerous moment in 60 years,” Rubio tweetedSunday night. Putin, he said, “is facing a humiliating military fiasco & he has triggered extraordinary consequences on #Russia’s economy & people that will not be easy to reverse … And his only options to reset this imbalance are catastrophic ones.”

A European diplomat told reporters at a briefing yesterday: “It’s like the Sun Tzu thing of giving someone a golden bridge to retreat across. How do you get him to go in a different direction?”

  • “I think the door to diplomacy remains open,” the diplomat continued. “Putin … doesn’t normally back down. But he also controls the information environment in his own country to such an extent that if he does, he can cover his tracks. … So I think there is room for him to de-escalate — and that’s certainly what we’re pressing for.”

The diplomat pointed to yesterday’s Russia-Ukraine peace talks in Belarus as the most viable off-ramp in a sea of bad options, noting that negotiations lasted for four hours and appear headed for a second round.

  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskysaid before the talks that he was willing to discuss “neutral status” for Ukraine — one of Putin’s three demands.
  • But the other two— demilitarization and “denazification” of Ukraine, and recognition of Russia’s claim to Crimea — suggest Putin will never accept a deal in which Zelensky remains in power.

The bottom line: The West’s response to Putin — for so long, uncertain and halting — has moved at astonishing speed and ferocity over the past week. How Putin will respond — and whether de-escalation is even possible — is keeping national-security leaders up at night.

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  1. West squeezes oligarchs
Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg, Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images
 
The West is ratcheting up economic pressure on Russia’s oligarchs — known for splashy yachts and piles of dark money squirreled away around the globe, Axios Markets co-author Emily Peck writes.

·  Why it matters: Some of these wealthy Russians may have a measure of influence over Vladimir Putin. The U.S. and Europe are hoping that if they squeeze the oligarchs, the oligarchs may pressure Putin. In the longer term, going after hidden Russian wealth could curtail the power of Putin and his circle.

The EU yesterday banned travel and froze assets of 26 businessmen, government officials and even journalists with longstanding ties to Putin, the Financial Times first reported (subscription).

·  On the list: Igor Sechin, CEO of Rosneft, Russia’s state oil company, “considered to be one of the most powerful members of the Russian Political elite,” the EU said in its statement.

·  Nikolay Tokarev, CEO of Transneft, a major oil and gas company, is also among the West’s specific targets. He served with Putin in the KGB in the 1980s and is one of the oligarchs who took control of state assets in the 2000s, the EU said.

Reality check: There’s a lot of Russian money hidden around the globe, including in the U.S. and U.K. — and it’s not always clear where it is.

·  Recent laws passed in the U.S. and EU are intensifying efforts to untangle this dark web, but they’re just at the start.

  1. Uglier phase: 40 miles of tanks

Satellite image: ©2022 Maxar Technologies

Maxar Technologies says the Russian convoy converging on Kyiv stretches 40 miles — up from the 17 miles we told you about in Axios PM.

  • The tanks, self-propelled artillery and armored vehiclesare spaced fairly far apart in some stretches. In others, the military equipment is traveling two or three vehicles abreast, Maxar says.

“The Russian advance on Kyiv has made little progress over the past 24 hours probably as a result of continuing logistical difficulties,” the British defense ministry said in a military intelligence update quoted by Reuters.

  • But the war entered a new, uglier phase:70 Ukrainian servicemen were killed by a Russian rocket attack, and dozens of civilians have died in “barbaric” shelling, Ukrainian officials said.

Axios Ukraine dashboard.

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode, March 13, 2022

Mar 13, 2022  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 13, Russian forces attack a military training center in western Ukraine. American journalist and documentarian Brent Renaud, who reported for PBS in the past, is killed outside of Kyiv. And in our signature segment, the challenges of tackling drug smuggling in Antwerp, Belgium, a key entry point into Europe. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Ukraine Russia conflict: Russia threatens Western weapons supplies as missiles hit near Nato border

Mar 13, 2022  Channel 4 News

It’s day 18 of the war in Ukraine and there has been no let up in the fighting. (Subscribe: https://bit.ly/C4_News_Subscribe) Russian forces have continued their operation all over the country. There was more heavy shelling of Chernihiv and an American journalist was shot dead near Irpin. The attack on the Yavoriv base near the Polish border is the furthest west the Russians have attacked since the invasion started. Ukrainians have also been protesting against the Russian occupation in Kherson. But there have been hopeful messages from both sides over negotiations, although it is too early to tell whether that will lead to anything. ——- Watch more of our explainer series here – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Get more news at our site – https://www.channel4.com/news/ Follow us: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Channel4News/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/Channel4News

#NBCNews #Russia #Ukraine

Nightly News Full Broadcast – March 13

Mar 13, 2022  NBC News

35 killed after Russian attack on Ukrainian military base, Ukrainian refugees begin to spread into neighboring countries, and new wrestling champion breaking down barriers. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #Russia #Ukraine

Ukraine War: Sky News Special Programme

Mar 12, 2022  Sky News

Sky’s Jonathan Samuels presents a special programme about the changing situation in Ukraine – as the country’s president Volodymr Zelenskyy said the conflict has reached a strategic turning point. Including reports from Kyiv, Odesa and Lviv in Ukraine, Warsaw, Moscow, Washington and London. For the latest developments: https://qrcode.skynews.com/skynews/uk… SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Follow us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de… Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/channel/skyne… Sky News videos are also available in German here/Hier können Sie außerdem Sky News-Videos auf Deutsch finden: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHYg… To enquire about licensing Sky News content, you can find more information here: https://news.sky.com/info/library-sales

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Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

Mercury News: Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

AXIOS AM: Mike Allen Jan 1, 2022, Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood. Parting shot: Ball drop, behind the scenes

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021, by Ian Prasad Philbrick, Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show,

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Global News Dec 31, 2021 

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines, Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy New Year Live! ? London Fireworks 2022, Streamed live 3 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  BBC

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022, Started streaming 2 hours ago,

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE, Started streaming 14 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  MH Noticias,

Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video, Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Countdown to 2022 from all over the world, Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022, Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show, Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

New Year’s celebrations around the world

Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sat January 1, 2022

With the rapid spread of the new Omicron coronavirus variant, many cities across the world scaled back their New Year’s celebrations.

In New York City, for example, the traditional event in Times Square allowed fewer revelers and everyone was required to wear a mask.

Some major cities canceled their events altogether, while others moved forward with their plans.

People observe candles lit to bring luck in the upcoming New Year at the Hasedera Buddhist temple in Kamakura, Japan, south of Tokyo.  Hoon/Reuters Kim Kyung

People watch the light show by St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Millennium Bridge in London.

Matt Dunham/AP                       

People gather to welcome the new year in Chongqing, China.

Li Xiaoxiang/VCG/Getty Images

Fireworks explode over the the St. Basil’s Cathedral and the Kremlin with Red Square sitting empty due to pandemic restrictions during New Year’s celebrations in Moscow.

Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/AP

Berlin has no live audience during its televised New Year’s Eve display at the Brandenburg Gate. Adam Berry/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt at Expo 2020 as part of the New Year’s festivities in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

AFP/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt over the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand.

Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

A light show illuminates the Sky Tower and Harbour Bridge in Auckland, New Zealand. The light show, “Auckland Is Calling,” replaced the city’s traditional fireworks show this year.

Dave Rowland/Getty Images for Auckland Unlimited

Fireworks explode over Sydney Harbour during New Year’s celebrations in Australia.

Jaimi Joy/Reuters

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/31/world/gallery/2022-new-year-celebrations/index.html

Mercury News:

Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

The world says goodbye to 2021, a year where the pandemic still lingered impacting all aspects of life

By GIESON CACHO | gcacho@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group

PUBLISHED: December 31, 2021 at 4:58 p.m. | UPDATED: January 1, 2022 at 4:36 p.m.

Fireworks explode at the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, during the New Year’s Eve celebration in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

The world said goodbye to 2021, a year that was hamstrung by the lingering COVID-19 pandemic, and welcomed 2022 with high hopes. Celebrations around some areas were scaled back because of the rising number of cases blamed on the spread of the omicron variant.

In places in Serbia and France, revelers stood shoulder to shoulder awaiting festivities. Other places such as India had more subdued festivities. In New York, the annual Times Square celebration was scaled back but still welcomed celebrants unlike last year, which had no public event.

According to the Associated Press, “The city said it would limit the number of people it lets into Times Square to witness a 6-ton ball, encrusted with nearly 2,700 Waterford crystals, descend above a crowd of about 15,000 in-person spectators.”

Here are images from around the world:

CHINA

Artiste Kong Ning wears her latest work entitled “Earth’s Snowflake” to usher in 2022 on the eve of the New Year in Beijing, China, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) 

INDIA

Laser lights are seen at the Bandra Worli sea link on New year in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool) 

Indians, wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus, hold the cutouts to welcome 2022 on New Year’s Eve in Ahmedabad, India, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki) 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Ras Al Khaimah New Year’s Eve dazzled with a never seen before fireworks display that smashed two Guiness World Records at Al Marjan Island on Jan. 1, 2022, in Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. (Cedric Ribeiro/Getty Images for Marjan) 

TURKEY

Fireworks explode over the Ottoman-era Mecidiye mosque in Ortakoy square next to ‘July 15th Martyrs’ bridge, known as Bosphorus bridge, during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, early Saturday, Jan 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel) 

UNITED KINGDOM

Drones create a lion in the sky above the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich to bring in the New Year on Jan. 1, 2022, in London. The countries that make up the U.K. have differing COVID measures in place over the festive period. In Scotland, a maximum of 500 people can attend outdoor events where physical distancing of one meter is in place meaning the traditional Edinburgh Hogmanay celebrations have been canceled. In England, the government has not introduced any new measures. (Rob Pinney/Getty Images) 

SPAIN

Fireworks explode during New Year’s celebrations at the Madrid’s Puerta del Sol in downtown Madrid, Spain, early Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez) 

BRAZIL

People bring in the New Year as they watch fireworks explode over Copacabana Beach, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Bruna Prado) 

Revelers enjoy the fireworks and celebrate the New Years on Copacabana beach on Jan. 01, 2022, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Due to the spread of the Omicron variant and the surge of cases, Mayor Eduardo Paes announced cancellation of massive and traditional celebration in the beach of Copacabana known as Reveillon. The event that every New Year’s Eve gathers hundreds of thousands of locals and tourists will consist of only a 16 minute fireworks display, with no live music shows nor massive gatherings. (Photo by Wagner Meier/Getty Images)

NEW YORK

The New Year’s Eve Ball touches down to mark the beginning of the new year on January 1, 2022 in New York City. People began celebrating New Year’s Eve at Times Square in 1904, in 1907 the New Year’s Eve Ball made its first descent from the flagpole at One Times Square. (David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/12/31/photos-new-years-eve-celebrations-welcome-2022-around-the-world/

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Revelers around the world bid farewell to another year marred by the pandemic.

/ Updated Dec. 31, 2021 / 8:47 PM EST20 PHOTOS

New York City

Revelers gather ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations in Times Square. Despite record numbers of Covid-19 cases across the city and nationwide, New York City moved forward with New Year’s Eve celebrations.

— Dieu-Nalio Chery / Reuters

Switzerland

Revelers use lights to paint “2022” for a long-exposure photograph in Arolla, Switzerland.

— Jean-Christophe Bott / EPA

Athens

Fireworks explode over the ancient Parthenon temple at the Acropolis in Athens.

— Yorgos Karahalis / AP

Paris

A couple looks out at the Eiffel Tower lit up in blue to mark France hosting the rotating presidency of the European Union.

Paris canceled its annual New Year’s Eve fireworks display.

— Julien De Rosa / AFP – Getty Images

Australia

A girl watches the family fireworks with her mother at Alexandra Garden during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Melbourne.

— Diego Fedele / Getty Images

Philippines

Fireworks explode over Quezon Memorial Circle in Metro Manila, Philippines. Large celebrations to ring in the new year were staged in Metro Manila despite Covid cases surging over the Christmas week.

— Ezra Acayan / Getty Images

Taiwan

Fireworks light up the Taipei skyline.

— Gene Wang / Getty Images

Sydney

Fireworks light up the sky over Sydney Harbor as the clock strikes midnight.

— Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/hello-2022-muted-celebrations-ring-new-year-around-world-n1286814

 

AXIOS AM:

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> Jan 1, 2022

  1. Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood

Photo: Stefano Mazzola/Awakening/Getty Images

This violin-shaped boat — “Violin of Noah,” built during the pandemic — paraded in Venice, Italy, in September with a string quartet aboard.

Why it matters: The zen of the standing instrumentalists, the glee of the spectators, the whimsy of the design, the supportive fleet — all captured a joyful resilience that I pray propels you into ’22.

  1. COVID New Year II

Photo: Kiichiro Sato/AP

Despite COVID cutbacks around the globe, including this one in Tokyo …

Photo: Craig Ruttle/AP

… Times Square still put on a show, with about 15,000 revelers — about a quarter of the usual 58,000.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/ Getty Images

Above, a sanitation worker takes on his first job of ’22.

  1. New York’s new Hizzoner

Photo: Ben Hider/Invision/AP

Eric Adams holds a framed photo of his mother at his swearing-in as New York mayor during the Times Square New Year’s celebration.

  • Adams made no remarksbut told Ryan Seacrest on “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve”: “We’re ready for a major comeback because this is New York.”

AXIOS PM: by Mike Allen ·Dec 31, 2021

  1. Parting shots: Ball drop, behind the scenes

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

With his inauguration postponed due to COVID, Eric Adams will be sworn in as New York mayor in Times Square in the wee hours, shortly after the midnight ball drop.

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Fun facts: The ball is actually a geodesic sphere — 12 feet in diameter, and weighs 11,875 pounds (6 tons), according to a Times Square fact sheet.

  • 2,688 Waterford Crystal triangles are bolted to 672 LED modules, attached to the aluminum frame.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021

   
By Ian Prasad Philbrick

Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

Ringing in 1973 in Times Square.Michael Evans/The New York Times

New Year’s Eve

David Carr, the late Times columnist and media critic, starred in videos years ago that were shot in Times Square. At the end of them, he cheerily said: “They call it Times Square for a reason.”
Carr’s point was that many people don’t know that the square is named for the newspaper. New York City changed the name from Longacre Square in 1904, in honor of The Times moving its offices there.
Adolph Ochs, who was the publisher of The Times at the time, celebrated the move by staging a New Year’s Eve fireworks display in the square. He organized the first midnight ball drop three years later, a tradition that continues even though The Times no longer occupies the building at the center of the square.
This year’s celebrations will be muted as coronavirus cases surge. Attendance will be limited to 15,000 people instead of the usual 58,000. Paris, Los Angeles and other cities are also downsizing their celebrations.
Today, we’re looking back. We focused on past New Year’s events that resonated in this unusual year.

The Times’s first New Year’s: The newspaper, founded in September 1851, covered its first New Year’s Eve less than four months later. It advertised religious ceremonies “appropriate to the close of the year” and stores selling New Year’s presents. On Jan. 1, the paper listed the past year’s notable deaths and “principal events,” including a gale that struck Massachusetts, a world’s fair in London and a coup in France.

The Civil War: On Dec. 30, 1862, Union troops near Murfreesboro, Tenn., played “Yankee Doodle” and “Hail Columbia.” Their Confederate foes answered with “Dixie,” and the two sides ended the night playing “Home, Sweet Home” together. The battle that followed, fought between New Year’s Eve and Jan. 2, 1863, was among the war’s deadliest.

Also on New Year’s Eve 1862, abolitionists held vigils as they waited for President Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. He did so the next day, freeing enslaved people in the states that had seceded from the Union. The vigils became the origin of the New Year’s Eve services that some African American churches still hold.

World War I: America entered World War I in 1917, and Times Square on New Year’s Eve that year was “thoroughly sedate and solemn,” The Times reported. Soldiers and sailors, forbidden to drink, sat in restaurants and hotels. Sugar was rationed, and dinner at the Waldorf Astoria was meatless. Broadway, “ankle-deep in confetti” a year before, was “gloomy, deserted and silent.”

Flu pandemic: New Year’s Eve 1918 also took place during a pandemic. A brutal fall and winter wave had killed tens of thousands of Americans. By Dec. 31, some cities had loosened their public health measures, inviting a more joyous holiday. “Hotels and clubs and other places where revelers congregate to greet the new year are overdoing themselves in the way of entertainment,” The Chicago Daily News reported.

And an image that may resonate in 2021: At a Milwaukee hotel ball, dancers wore masks as prescribed by the health department.
World War II: New Year’s Eve 1941 — less than a month after the U.S. joined World War II — found Times Square upbeat and patriotic. More than half a million people cheered and sang the national anthem under Broadway’s neon lights. “If Axis ears did not hear last night’s revelry in Times Square it was not that New Yorkers didn’t try,” The Times reported the next day.

Still, the square featured a robust police presence, street signs with evacuation instructions and loudspeakers in the event of an air raid. And later wartime holidays were less festive. Because of the “dim outs” meant to conceal the city from a possible attack, 1942 and 1943 were the only New Year’s Eves since 1907 that did not feature Times Square ball drops.

Transition to television: Today, most people experience New Year’s Eve in Times Square as a television show with musical interludes. The Canadian-born musician Guy Lombardo and his band, the Royal Canadians, were early pioneers. They broadcast over the radio starting in the 1920s and, in later decades, on television, an example Dick Clark, Carson Daly and others built on. This year, too, live television will be flush with celebrity-driven countdowns. If you’ll be ringing in the New Year from home, here’s what to watch.

Related:
·         Eric Adams postponed his indoor inauguration ceremony, and will instead be sworn in as New York City’s mayor after midnight in Times Square.

·         Follow along as the world enters 2022.

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Once again Sydney, Australia went all out with their famous fireworks show over the harbour and Opera House, ringing New Year’s 2022 with music, lights and a full display for over 8 minutes after midnight. For the second year in a row, crowds around Sydney harbour were limited in an effort to keep them safe amid COVID-19. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Hong Kong rings in the New Year with a light show and fireworks, a countdown display on a 65.8-metre-tall LED facade, and to the classical music from a live orchestra performance. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

 

#GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Thailand ushered in the New Year with a 6-minute long fireworks display, spanning across the Chao Phraya River bend in Bangkok. Here’s just one of the raw angles from the show. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global Nws on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Dubai, United Arab Emirates welcomed the new year with a mesmerizing display of fireworks from the world’s tallest building, the iconic Burj Khalifa. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines

Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy new year everyone! Thank you for supporting my Youtube channel in 2021. Wishing you health, wealth, and happiness in the New Year ahead. 00:00 Fireworks shots from IP 12 Pro Max 17:16 Fireworks shots from Osmo Pocket 2 – Walk with me and enjoy the city/nature atmosphere! [no talking, no bgm] – Walking Route Map: http://bit.ly/3qWWlUN Time: Jan, 2022 12AM – Camera Setting: 4K 60fps – Feel free to comment which place that you like me to walk next 🙂 SUPPORT ME: – Patreon : https://www.patreon.com/slowwalks – Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/slowwalks or Click “Join” or https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7GC… at my youtube home page to support me with just 1usd/month Thanks and enjoy the video! FOLLOW ME: – Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/slow_walks/

#BBC #BBCiPlayer #NewYearsEve

Happy New Year Live! ? London Fireworks 2022 ? BBC

Streamed live 3 hours ago  BBC

Subscribe and ? to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube ? https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Big Ben rings in the new year. New Year’s Eve 2022 | BBC #BBC #BBCiPlayer #NewYearsEve #HappyNewYear2022 #2022 #Fireworks All our TV channels and S4C are available to watch live through BBC iPlayer, although some programmes may not be available to stream online due to rights. If you would like to read more on what types of programmes are available to watch live, check the ‘Are all programmes that are broadcast available on BBC iPlayer?’ FAQ ? https://bbc.in/2m8ks6v.

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022

Started streaming 2 hours ago  MH Noticias

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022 Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022 Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE

Started streaming 14 hours ago   MH Noticias

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE

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SPACE NEEDLE

Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

The Seattle Space Needle New Year’s 2022 fireworks and Augmented Reality Show! Brought to you by T-Mobile. ?Don’t forget to hit that like button and to subscribe! https://bit.ly/3pDbMQX ?https://linktr.ee/EmilioExploring?? #Seattle #NewYears #SpaceNeedle

Suggested by SME   Beyoncé – Halo

Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video

Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Though with a smaller crowd this time, confetti and fireworks still popped at midnight to ring in another year from the heart of New York City’s Times Square.

#HappyNewYear #Fireworks #NewYearsEve

Countdown to 2022 from all over the world

Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Highlights from New Year’s Eve celebrations around the globe. Watch Brazil’s dazzling firework show by the water to bring in 2022. WATCH the ABC News Livestream: https://bit.ly/3rzBHum SUBSCRIBE to ABC News: https://bit.ly/2vZb6yP WATCH MORE on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc #HappyNewYear #Fireworks #NewYearsEve #World #Countdown #2022

#NYE #Fireworks #NewYear

Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022

Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

From Australia to New York City, onlookers around the globe gathered to celebrate the New Year with fireworks and dazzling light shows. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NYE #Fireworks #NewYear

#HappyNewYear #NewYearsFireworks #NewYearsEve

LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show

Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

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20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 9, 10, 11 and 12, 2021

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world, Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour,

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

How 9/11 Changed American Life, Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

America After 9/11 (full documentary), Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9, 10 and 11th, 2021

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021 NBC News

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN, Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary, Sep 10, 2021 

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight, Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero, Sep 9, 2021 

The New York Times:  By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

AXIOS AM: By Mike Allen, Sep 12, 2021, 20 years ago this morning

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty,  In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

Press-Telegram: Never Forgotten, Southern California, remember Sept. 11, 2001, 20 Years Since 9/11, Sep 11, 2021, Enduring images of 9/11, By MICHELE CARDON  and PAUL BERSEBACH 

Encyclopedia Britannica: September 11 attacks 

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 12, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, September 12, President Joe Biden’s latest vaccine mandate fuels political division, the Taliban takes initial steps in forming their government, and a 9/11 survivor continues to fight for healthcare for other victims of the tragedy. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 11, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, September 11, the nation commemorates the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks as President Biden, Vice President Harris, and others including former presidents Obama, Clinton and Bush attend memorial events at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Jersey City, New Jersey. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour Full Episode, Sept. 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, how President Biden’s inoculation requirements for millions of Americans might be enforced in the workplace, a look at the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart discuss the anniversary of 9/11 and the politics of vaccinations. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: 19 Americans among group allowed to leave Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCjhV… What Biden’s vaccine mandates mean for companies, workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my263… How the 9/11 attacks changed America’s role in the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXYdL… Brooks and Capehart on 9/11 anniversary, Biden’s mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhi_c… Smithsonian Institution pieces together history of 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BYrJ… Educators reflect on the significance of teaching about 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35I1J… Teens facing off at U.S. Open create ‘fairy tale moment’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKjbj… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Sept. 9, 2021

Sep 9, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Taliban orders an end to all protests as they finally allow the departure of some 200 American citizens from Afghanistan. Then, we talk with Dr. Anthony Fauci about the difficult path ahead in navigating the pandemic. And, 9/11 first responders reflect on the trauma of that day and how it compares to the stresses of the current pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ sues Texas over 6-week abortion ban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmHQU… How Taliban rule triggered Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeuJp… Scattered thunderstorms complicate Louisiana’s recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXRRP… Why the ATF is often leaderless and how that affects it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFrUS… Dr. Fauci on vaccine mandates, reopening schools, boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-V5Q… NYC’s first responders reflect on trauma of 9/11, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRD1n… Robert Hogue reflects on surviving 9/11 Pentagon attack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTDvG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

This week PBS NewsHour has been marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by exploring how they have impacted the U.S. at home and abroad. Judy Woodruff leads our latest conversation on the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report

Premiered 5 hours ago, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

Two decades after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, PBS NewsHour explores how the world has changed since that day. This documentary compiles a series of special reports to help viewers understand how the attacks on the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon and Flight 93 have left a lasting mark on victim’s families, first responders, survivors and the nation as a whole. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How 9/11 Changed American Life | Washington Week | September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel continues the conversation, reflecting on the 20 year anniversary of 9/11. The panel also discussed how the attacks shifted American life, politics, and the impact the event had on Muslim Americans. Panel: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Asma Khalid of NPR, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Vivian Salama of The Wall Street Journal, Pierre Thomas of ABC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

America After 9/11 (full documentary) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

FRONTLINE traces the U.S. response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the devastating consequences that unfolded across four presidencies. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker and chronicler of U.S. politics Michael Kirk, this feature-length documentary draws on both new interviews and those from the dozens of documentaries Kirk and his award-winning team have made in the years since 9/11. “America After 9/11” offers an epic, two-hour re-examination of the decisions that changed the world and transformed America — from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol — and the ongoing challenges that legacy poses for the U.S. president and the country. #AmericaAfter911 #January6th For more reporting in connection with this investigation, visit FRONTLINE’s website: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/fi… Find FRONTLINE on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation; the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Park Foundation; and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen.

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 11th, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  NBC News

U.S. remembers the lives lost on 9/11, families of 9/11 victims honor their loved ones, and tribute paid to heroes of Flight 93. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11th

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 10th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden responds to Republican pushback over vaccine mandate, Los Angeles school district approves Covid vaccine mandate for eligible students, and how September 11 changed security in America. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:14 Biden On Vaccine Mandate Lawsuits 04:54 Back To School Battle 07:23 America Remembers: 9/11 15:38 Afghan Refugee Flights Halted » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11 #Biden

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden announces new vaccine mandates for millions of Americans, DOJ announces lawsuit over Texas abortion law, and 9/11 survivors and first responders ‘forgotten’ by health program, employees say. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:11 Biden’s Covid Strategy 8:44 DOJ Taking On Texas 10:25 American Evacuated From Afghanistan 12:57 9/11 Survivors: Broken Promises 17:19 Missing Airline Funds » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #VaccineMandates #Texas

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

Reflecting on 9/11 20 years after the attacks, GOP outraged over Biden vaccine mandates, Jan. 6 committee receives first set of documents.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #GOP #September11

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  NBC News

Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy breaks down Biden’s shift in Covid strategy. Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ark.) discusses the GOP response to vaccine and mask mandates. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) talks all things infrastructure. Doris Kearns Goodwin, Hallie Jackson, Kimberly Atkins Stohr and George Will join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #FullEpisode #MTP #Politics Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN

Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

President Biden visited all three sites where planes crashed on September 11, 2001 and cities held ceremonies to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. We followed all of these events and more starting with a CBS News Special Report anchored by Norah O’Donnell. #livenews #livestream CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary

Sep 10, 2021  DW Documentary

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 sent the world into a state of shock. Yet some had been loudly and publicly warning of the dangers posed by terrorism. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan Mujahideen commander, was among them. It’s September 9, 2001, two days before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan commander fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, is assassinated. Who ordered his murder? The same man who masterminded the attacks on the US two days later: Osama Bin Laden. For months, Massoud had tried to make his voice heard, warning about the global dangers posed by an ascendant Taliban in Afghanistan. But Europe and the United States weren’t listening. Why not? Would heeding his warnings have affected lucrative arms deals with Pakistan? Did economic interests take precedence over security? This little-known story is told firsthand by diplomats, political leaders and military officials. It sheds new light on the events leading up to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Above all, it’s the story of a man who could have changed the fate of the world if his warnings had been heeded sooner. #documentary #dwdocumentary #September11 #USA #WorldTradeCenter ______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: ? DW Documentary (English): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary ? DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental ? DW Documentary (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia ? DW Doku (German): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH1k… ? DW Documentary (Hindi): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC46c… For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Follow DW Documentary on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Follow DW Documental on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dwdocumental We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight

Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

Twenty years on from 9/11 and we reflect on the evolving nature of terrorism and how the attack changed the world through the transformation of US foreign policy, global security and geopolitics. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Twenty years ago, on 11 September 2001, Al-Qaeda began four coordinated terrorist attacks on the US, lasting one hour and seventeen minutes. The world watched as nineteen terrorists crashed four planes – two into the World Trade Centre, one into the Pentagon, the very symbol of American might, and the fourth into a field in Pennsylvania. To this day, Al-Qaeda’s attack 9/11 remains the deadliest terror attack in history. It was the audacity of the attack that was so shocking. The idea that in a little over an hour the United States of America – the leader of the free world – could be shown to be utterly vulnerable, not invincible. That terrible day arguably has impacted every American psyche to this day, the way America sees its place in the world and the way we see America. Newsnight’s David Grossman reports on how September 11th changed the world

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero

Sep 9, 2021  60 Minutes

60 Minutes went beneath ground zero, where an underground city had become a 16-acre burial ground and an exhausting and dangerous cleanup job was taking place. “60 Minutes” is the most successful television broadcast in history. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 and is still a hit, over 50 seasons later, regularly making Nielsen’s Top 10. Subscribe to the “60 Minutes” YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu Watch full episodes: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F Get more “60 Minutes” from “60 Minutes: Overtime”: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr Follow “60 Minutes” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry Like “60 Minutes” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao Follow “60 Minutes” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX Subscribe to our newsletter: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

The New York Times

By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

A second plane approaching the World Trade Center before hitting the South Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. Kelly Guenther for The New York Times

A missing legacy

The great crises in U.S. history have often inspired the country to great accomplishments.
The Civil War led to the emancipation of Black Americans and a sprawling program of domestic investment in railroads, colleges and more. World War II helped spark the creation of the modern middle class and cemented the so-called American Century. The Cold War caused its own investment boom, in the space program, computer technology and science education.

The attacks of Sept. 11 — which occurred on a sparkling late-summer morning 20 years ago tomorrow — had the potential to leave their own legacy of recovery. In sorrow and anger, Americans were more united in the weeks after the attacks than they had been in years. President George W. Bush’s approval rating exceeded 85 percent.

It isn’t hard to imagine how Bush might have responded to Sept. 11 with the kind of domestic mobilization of previous wars. He could have rallied the country to end its reliance on Middle Eastern oil, a reliance that both financed radical American enemies and kept the U.S. enmeshed in the region. While attacking Al Qaeda militarily, Bush also could have called for enormous investments in solar energy, wind energy, nuclear power and natural gas. It could have been transformative, for the economy, the climate and Bush’s historical standing.

Bush chose a different path, one that was ambitious in its own right: the “freedom agenda.” He hoped that his toppling of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Saddam Hussein in Iraq would inspire people around the world to rise up for democracy and defeat autocracy. For a brief period — the Arab Spring, starting in 2010 — his vision almost seemed to be playing out.

Today, though, we know it did not. Bush and his team bungled Iraq’s postwar reconstruction. In Afghanistan, the U.S. rejected a Taliban surrender offer, and the Taliban recovered to win the war. In Egypt and Syria, autocrats remain in power.

Some wars have left clear legacies of progress toward freedom — like the anti-colonization movement and the flowering of European democracy that followed World War II. The post-9/11 wars have not. If anything, the world has arguably become less democratic in recent years.

Twenty years after Sept. 11, the attacks seem likely to be remembered as a double tragedy. There were the tangible horrors: The attacks on that day killed almost 3,000 people, and the ensuing wars killed hundreds of thousands more. And there is the haunting question that lingers: Out of the trauma, did the country manage to create a better future?

A police officer covered in ash after the first building collapsed at the World Trade Center.Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Radical pessimism is a mistake,” David Ignatius argues in The Post. “These two decades witnessed many American blunders but also lessons learned.”

Twenty Years Gone”: The Atlantic’s Jennifer Senior on one family’s heartbreaking loss and struggle to move on.

“The fact that the United States itself went on to attack, and wreak even greater violence against innocent civilians around the world, was largely omitted from official narratives,” the novelist Laila Lalami writes for Times Opinion.

“The twin towers still stand because we saw them, moved in and out of their long shadows, were lucky enough to know them for a time.” Colson Whitehead wrote this essay shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Many people revisit it.

Michele Defazio on Sept. 11, holding up a poster of her missing husband, Jason Defazio, who worked in One World Trade Center.Krista Niles/The New York Times

From The Times
Dan Barry asks what it means to “never forget” given the inevitable fallibility of human memory.

Jennifer Steinhauer speaks to veterans of two wars that followed the attacks. “I am still fighting a little bit of that war, inside,” one said.

Elizabeth Dias reports that the deluge of anti-Muslim hate that followed the attacks has forged a new generation of Muslim Americans determined to define their place in the country.

The site of the World Trade Center “still feels like an alien zone,” Michael Kimmelman, The Times’s architecture critic, writes. But the rest of Lower Manhattan has bloomed.

The remains of more than 1,100 victims have never been identified. But New York City continues to search for DNA matches, Corey Kilgannon writes — a task the chief medical examiner called “a sacred obligation.”

AXIOS AM

by Mike Allen mike@axios.com   Sep 12, 2021

  1. 20 years ago this morning

An 18-page special section in today’s New York Times includes, in tiny black type, the names of all 2,977 victims at the three 9/11 attack sites.

  1. Top talker: Blazing SigAlerts

Photo: L.A. County Fire Air Operations via AP

A wildfire — the Route fire, “0% contained” — broke out yesterday in mountainous terrain near Castaic in L.A. County, prompting the CHP to close a stretch of the 5 Freeway in both directions. (L.A. Times)

7.  Salesforce offers to relocate workers with abortion concerns
After Texas’ anti-abortion law was upheld, Salesforce told employees via Slack that the company will help them relocate “if you have concerns about access to reproductive healthcare in your state,” CNBC reports.

·  The company didn’t take a stand on the Texas law, but said: “We recognize and respect that we all have deeply held and different perspectives. … [W]e stand with all of our women at Salesforce and everywhere.”

With Florida legislators planning to take up new abortion restrictions in January, Gov. Ron DeSantis is backing away from the Texas law’s bounty provision, BuzzFeed’s Kadia Goba reports.

·  DeSantis press secretary Christina Pushaw told BuzzFeed: “Gov. DeSantis doesn’t want to turn private citizens against each other.”

  1. The Boss: ” I remember you, my friend”

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen sang “I’ll See You in My Dreams” at the 9/11 Memorial, on the site of the Twin Towers:

I got your guitar here by the bed

All your favorite records and all the books that you read

And though my soul feels like it’s been split at the seams

I’ll see you in my dreams.

Watch it on YouTube.

  1. College games honor the lost

Photo: Ryan M. Kelly/Getty Images

Above, members of the U.Va. Cavaliers marching band — most not born on 9/11 — perform a memorial salute at halftime at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville.

  • College football teamsacross the country unveiled tributes, including special uniforms.

Photo: Joann Muller/Axios

  • Axios’ Joann Mullersent me this evening shot from the Big House at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.
  • Attendance: 108,345. Michigan says that’s “the 295th consecutive game with more than 100,000 fans at Michigan Stadium.”

More photos, videos 

  1. America on pause

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

An unfurled American flag greets the day at the Pentagon.

Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden greeted families and laid a wreath at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa.

  • This native, 17½ ton sandstone boulderwas placed in 2011 to show the edge of the impact site in an open field, next to a hemlock grove.

More photos from Shanksville … Read Biden’s remarks.

Photo: Brittainy Newman/AP

The “Tribute in Light” beams in Lower Manhattan consist of 88 xenon light bulbs, each 7,000 watts, positioned in two 48-foot squares on the roof of the Battery Parking Garage, south of the 9/11 Memorial.

  • They can be seenfor 60 miles.

More photos from Ground Zero.

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty

Remembrances of lives lost are plentiful as New York commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Lower Manhattan near Ground Zero. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden on Saturday were joined by former presidents, family members of victims and first responders at Ground Zero in New York City to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Driving the news: The ceremony at Ground Zero began with a moment of silence at 8:46am, when Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center, followed by a reading of the victims’ names who died in New York from the attack.

  • “Joe, we love and miss you more than you can ever imagine,” said Lisa Reina, who was eight months pregnant when her husband, Joseph Reina Jr., died on the deadly day, per the Washington Post.
  • “[While] 20 years feels like an eternity … it still feels like yesterday,” Reina said.
  • Bruce Springsteen also performed his song, “I’ll See You Ii My Dreams,” following the second moment of silence.
In photos:

Family members and loved ones of victims attend the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum on Sept. 11 in New York. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

NYPD and FDNY Memorial Ceremony at FDNY Engine 8, Ladder 2, Battalion 8 on Sept. 11 in New York City. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

A member of the FDNY visits the reflecting pool. Photo: Mike Segar-Pool/Getty Images

Katie Mascali is comforted by her fiance Andre Jabban as they stand near the name of her father, Joseph Mascali, at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Photo: Craig Ruttle/PoolAFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen performs during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden are joined by former presidents and others at the 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

People embrace during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Go deeper: Biden attends ceremony at Ground Zero on 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks

 AXIOS  Erin Doherty

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Biden attends wreath-laying ceremony at Pentagon

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Axios

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Harris, Bush preach unity at Flight 93 memorial, 20 years on from attacks

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during a 9/11 commemoration at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Kamala Harris joined former President George W. Bush at a ceremony on Saturday to honor the lives lost 20 years ago on United Airlines Flight 93.

Driving the news: The vice president and the 43rd president devoted much of their remarks to remembering the unity that brought Americans together after the 9/11 attacks.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

For more information, please visit the following link:

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Never Forgotten | Southern California remembers

Sept. 11, 2001

Press-Telegram <email@newsletters.presstelegram.com>   Sep 11, 2021

20 Years Since 9/11
Twenty years ago, we were rocked when terrorists attacked the United States and killed nearly 3,000 people. In addition to so many innocent lives, we lost our vital belief that we were safe, just as Americans had with the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

In our local coverage of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, we examine how we have changed since 9/11 and how lessons we learned have surfaced again in a new crisis. Finally, we honor those who lost their lives, including the many heroes who ran toward danger to help when they were needed most.

Enduring images of 9/11

By MICHELE CARDON | mcardon@scng.com and PAUL BERSEBACH | pbersebach@scng.com | Orange County Register

PUBLISHED: September 7, 2021 at 3:37 p.m. | UPDATED: September 10, 2021 at 1:06 p.m.

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Sept, 11, 2001 began like any other Tuesday. School kids ate breakfast before heading to class, and parents prepared for their workday. Terrorism, especially on American soil, was the farthest thought from most people’s minds. But before many could walk out their front door, events were unfolding on the East Coast that would change America, and the world, forever.

At 8:46 a.m. EDT, a jetliner carrying thousands of gallons of fuel slammed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. What began with confusion as to what could have gone wrong quickly turned to the realization of a planned attack as a second plane hit the South Tower 17 minutes later.

Within two hours, two other planes had crashed into the Pentagon and in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And the twin towers fell. The attacks 20 years ago killed nearly 3,000 people, in the hijacked planes and on the ground, and injured thousands. The attacks forever changed the world.

A plane approaches New York’s World Trade Center moments before it struck the tower at left, as seen from downtown Brooklyn, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In an unprecedented show of terrorist horror, the 110 story towers collapsed in a shower of rubble and dust after 2 hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into them. (AP Photo/ William Kratzke)

The south tower begins to collapse as smoke billows from both towers of the World Trade Center, in New York.  (AP Photo/Jim Collins/FILE)

Two women embrace each other as they watch the World Trade Center burn following a terrorist attack on the twin skyscrapers in New York. (AP Photo/Ernesto Mora)

Chief of Staff Andy Card whispers into the ear of President George W. Bush to give him word of the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, during a visit to the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Fla. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Smoke billows from one of the towers of the World Trade Center and flames and debris explode from the second tower, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

People run from the collapse of one of the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo. (AP Photo/FILE/Suzanne Plunkett)

A person falls from the north tower of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File

A fiery blast rocks the World Trade Center after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

A man with a fire extinguisher walks through rubble after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on September 11, 2001, in New York. The man was shouting as he walked looking for victims who needed assistance. Both towers collapsed after being hit by hijacked passengers planes. (Photo by DOUG KANTER/AFP via Getty Images)

People flee lower Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, following a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)

A jet airliner heads into one of the World Trade Center towers for the second attack in New York.  (AP Photo/Carmen Taylor/File)

The south side of the Pentagon burns after it took a direct, devastating hit from an aircraft Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Tom Horan)

Emergency workers look at the crater created when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville, Pa., in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Julie McDermott, center, walks with other victims as they make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Pedestrians on Beekman St. flee the area of the collapsed World Trade Center in lower Manhattan following a terrorist attack on the New York landmark Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York, Sept. 11, 2001. In a horrific sequence of destruction, terrorists crashed two planes into the World Trade Center causing the twin 110-story towers to collapse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

A helicopter flies over the Pentagon in Washington as smoke billows over the building. The terrorist-hijacked airliner that slammed into the west side of the Pentagon killed 184 people. (AP Photo/Heesoon Yim, File)

With the skeleton of the World Trade Center twin towers in the background, New York City firefighters work amid debris on Cortlandt St. after the terrorist attacks of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

As rescue efforts continue in the rubble of the World Trade Center, President George W. Bush puts his arms around firefighter Bob Beckwith while standing in front of the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)

A woman looks at missing person posters of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 14, 2001. (AP Photo/Robert Spencer)

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Michele Cardon | Director of Photography

Orange County Register Director of Photography Michele Cardon has worked at The Register for more than 25 years. Her editing skills have been honored by the National Press Photographer Association, Society of News Design and Pictures of the Year. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Journalism. As a Register photo editor, Michele has covered events such as the World Series, Stanley Cup Finals, NBA Championship, Oscars, Emmys, Los Angeles riots, and the Laguna Beach firestorm.

mcardon@scng.com

 Follow Michele Cardon @ocrphotoed

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.presstelegram.com/2021/09/07/enduring-images-of-9-11/?utm_email=643944CEB487A5407435944139&g2i_eui=bogqR9ZyO1C5yUk5USoN618ndaZJqwBHiiYAAoY8WkA%3d&g2i_source=newsletter&utm_source=listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=https%3a%2f%2fwww.presstelegram.com%2f2021%2f09%2f07%2fenduring-images-of-9-11%2f&utm_campaign=lbpt-special-sept11 

September 11 attacks 

Encyclopedia Britannica

September 11 attacks, also called 9/11 attacks, series of airline hijackings and suicide attacks committed in 2001 by 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda against targets in the United States, the deadliest terrorist attacks on American soil in U.S. history. The attacks against New York City and Washington, D.C., caused extensive death and destruction and triggered an enormous U.S. effort to combat terrorism. Some 2,750 people were killed in New York, 184 at the Pentagon, and 40 in Pennsylvania (where one of the hijacked planes crashed after the passengers attempted to retake the plane); all 19 terrorists died (see Researcher’s Note: September 11 attacks). Police and fire departments in New York were especially hard-hit: hundreds had rushed to the scene of the attacks, and more than 400 police officers and firefighters were killed.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8JMajU52Us

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Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone, Greeting from Kai and Bodhi with the blooming flowers in our garden, Washington Post, NASA, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, NASA Johnson, AXIOS, Google Doodles, BBC News, and The New York Times

Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone, Greeting from Kai and Bodhi with the blooming flowers in our garden, Washington Post, NASA, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, NASA Johnson, AXIOS, Google Doodles, BBC News, and The New York Times

Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live on Apr 22, 2021  Washington Post, 8:20:10, 1st Day

Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live 17 hours ago, 4.23.2021  Washington Post , 3:36:35, 2nd Day

Climate change: Wikipedia

NASA Science Live: Connected by Earth

Streamed live 9 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

Our Planet, Our Home? An Earth Day Perspective

Apr 22, 2021  NASA

Earth Day Q&A with Astronauts in Space | Hosted by Shawn Mendes

Streamed live 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 22 &23, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 22nd, 2021

What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition, Premiered 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NBC News

Derek Chauvin Verdict, Biden’s Climate Summit, and More | KnowThis

Premiered 10 hours ago, 4.23.2021, NowThis News

4K Earth Views Extended Cut for Earth Day 2021

Apr 22, 2021  NASA Johnson

Axios PM: 5 new climate pledges

Greta Thunberg, climate experts testify before House on fossil fuel subsidies

Streamed live 16 hours ago, 4.22.2021  PBS NewsHour

Earth Day 2021 Doodle: Apr 21, 2021, GoogleDoodles

President Biden pledges 50% cut in US carbon emissions at global climate summit – BBC News

Apr 22, 2021  BBC News, 5:39

It’s time to ‘get serious’ about climate change, Boris Johnson @BBC News? live ? BBC

Apr 22, 2021  BBC, 10:49

The New York Times: Biden’s Intelligence Director Vows to Put Climate at ‘Center’ of Foreign Policy, April 22, 2021

🙂 Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone 🙂

Greetings from our two grandsons, five-year-old Kai, and, one-year-old Bodhi, with the flowers blooming in our garden.

Kai, our 5-year-old Grandson brought the tangerine plant outdoors to the garden on Thursday, April 19, 2021.  We keep our plants inside the apartment during winter.    Now that the weather is about 55 – 60-degree Fahrenheit, I decide to move some of the plants outdoors to the garden. 

Kai was surprised to see the Bleeding-Heat plant brooming.  Daffodils are the first flowers blooming in our garden.  The Bleeding-Heart Plant produced the second blooming of flowers.

This is the first time that Bodhi sees the flowers bloom.  He was very excited to see new things in his one-year-old life.  He wanted to pull the flowers as a young baby accustom to do.  This Bleeding-Heart Plant is a gift from his mother to us many years ago.  We always enjoy to see these beautiful flowers blooming in the early spring.  Because of staying so long inside during winter and the COVID-19 lockdown, we are eager to be outdoor in our garden.  It is really such a pleasure for us to see our daughter’s plant blooming into beautiful flowers.

WATCH: Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live on Apr 22, 2021  Washington Post, 8:20:10, 1st Day

President Biden is convening world leaders for a two-day virtual climate summit to urge the world’s major economies to strengthen their climate ambitions. Read more: https://wapo.st/3gAg2zx?. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK? Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/?

WATCH: Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live 17 hours ago, 4.23.2021  Washington Post , 3:36:35, 2nd Day

President Biden is convening world leaders for a climate summit to urge the world’s major economies to strengthen their climate ambitions. Read more: https://wapo.st/3tLAscI?. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK? Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/?

Daffodils, the first flowers to bloom in our garden. I took photo of these flowers on Friday, April 2, 2021

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Climate change : Wikipedia

Climate change includes both global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.

#ConnectedByEarth

NASA Science Live: Connected by Earth

Streamed live 9 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

This year at NASA, EarthDay is about connections—to our planet and to each other. Our planet is home to over 7 billion people of diverse backgrounds and experiences, but we are all #ConnectedByEarth?. Join NASA climate experts to learn about the connections between human activity and climate change. Dr. Kimberley R. Miner will host this episode and is a climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). While she’s been at JPL since July 2020, she has been studying and exploring the Earth since…forever! Dr. Miner loves working outside, asking questions about nature and protecting the animals and plants all around us. She loves that being an Earth Scientist lets her do all these things. Dr. Lesley Ott is a climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center where she’s worked since getting her PhD 15 years ago. She studies the processes that control greenhouse gas concentrations and always loves seeing the ways that springtime changes in vegetation show up in satellite data. Ms. Equisha Glenn is a graduate student research assistant at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA GISS) and is finishing her PhD in Civil Engineering. Growing up, Ms. Glenn used to watch TV shows about the environment and loves how diverse Earth is, yet everything works together. Ms. Glenn is passionate about bridging the gap between data, climate and end users to help build a more resilient future for cities and society.

AllNational Aeronautics and Space Administration, U.S.A.PlanetsScienceRelatedFrom NASALiveRecently uploadedWatched

Our Planet, Our Home? An Earth Day Perspective

Apr 22, 2021  NASA

We are all connected to and by Earth — whether it’s the trees and plants that give us the oxygen we breathe, the snow-capped mountains that provide the water we drink, or the breathtaking geophysical forces that shape the land beneath our feet. NASA has over 20 satellites measuring the height of oceans and inland water, clouds and precipitation, carbon dioxide and much more. By understanding our changing world, we improve lives and safeguard our future. https://images.nasa.gov/details-Our%2…? Video Credits: Producer/Editor: Amy Leniart Writer: Jim Wilson Co-Writers: Karen Fox, Amy Leniart, Tylar Greene

Our backyard garden is small.  We have only few daffodils.  But I am happy to see the flowers bloom.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Earth Day Q&A with Astronauts in Space | Hosted by Shawn Mendes

Streamed live 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

Need Earth Day plans? ? We’ve got you covered. On April 22 at 11 a.m. EDT, NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mark Vandehei, and Soichi Noguchi of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will go LIVE from space for a special Earth focused Q&A with guest host Shawn Mendes! The International Space Station live stream will feature your questions sent in from around the world! Don’t miss this opportunity to hear how NASA Earth and astronauts use space to monitor the health of our planet, what life is like on the orbiting lab, and more!

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 23, 2021

Apr 23, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Dr. Anthony Fauci discusses the latest on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and U.S. inoculations. Then, the many obstacles to the Biden administration’s major push for a transition to electric vehicles. A potential lifeline of federal funding for healthcare and infrastructure is within reach for tribal lands. And, political insight from David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: CDC lifts pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f68Jr…? Fauci on brief J&J pause, ‘breakthrough’ infections and more https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkCpj…? Why an electric future may be hard to achieve https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsOHs…? Why Native Americans are excited about the future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhJ0i…? Brooks and Capehart on Chauvin verdict, Biden climate plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTu94…? 5 wonderful people lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJomc…? Plans to create a ‘Super League’ in soccer backfire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8HSP…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 22, 2021

Apr 22, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Joe Biden announces ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions as part of the fight against climate change. Then, India records the highest one day number of new COVID-19 infections of any nation since the pandemic began. And, how single-use items like masks, and gloves, are piling up in landfills, wreaking havoc on the environment. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. seeks to lead by example during global climate summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CcnF…? News Wrap: Senate passes bipartisan hate crimes bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mplhk…? India records highest global single day COVID infections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwf1D…? Has the U.S. set realistic goals to combat climate change? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uX3X…? Pandemic pollution: Disposable masks are hurting the earth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0iUC…? Examining the history of police shootings of Black Americans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXDp5…? How a camp for disabled children changed lives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWKgq…? A Brief But Spectacular take on chronic fatigue syndrome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6QEF…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 22nd, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 23, 2021  NBC News

Growing debate over CDC guidance on wearing masks outdoors, Daunte Wright remembered in emotional Minneapolis funeral service, and alternate juror in Chauvin case speaks out after guilty verdict. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:09? CDC ‘Looking’ At Revising Outdoor Mask Guidance 02:53? U.S Vaccine Supply Beginning To Outpace Demand 03:24? MLB Team Opening Fully Vaccinated Section At Stadium 03:36? 22 Fully Vaccinated People Infected At Nursing Home 04:00? CDC Panel Meets Tomorrow To Discuss J&J Vaccine Pause 04:30? India Hits World Record 314,000+ Daily Covid Cases 04:56? Daunte Wright Remembered At Emotional Funeral Service 06:39? Alternate Chauvin Juror: ‘I Would Have’ Voted Guilty 08:47? New Fallout After Police Shoot Black Teen Holding Knife 11:10? Biden Pledges To Cut U.S. Carbon Emissions In Half By 2030 12:42? Americans Flee Extreme Weather Amid Climate Change 14:46? Russian Military Plane’s Close Encounter With U.S. Boats 17:08? Inside Covid Vaccine Trials In Young Children » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition, Premiered 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NBC News

Ask The Doc: Dr. John Torres answers viewers’ weekly questions. Lift off: NASA launches tiny Mars chopper ‘Ingenuity’ on a historic flight. We introduce you to Blizzard the polar bear and share fun facts about the fuzzy guy! Inspiring Kids series continues: We give you an update on twins Max and Miles who are planting seeds of kindness this spring. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC? Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC? Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC? Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC? What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition

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Derek Chauvin Verdict, Biden’s Climate Summit, and More | KnowThis

Premiered 10 hours ago, 4.23.2021, NowThis News

After a year of racial reckoning sparked by George Floyd’s murder, the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict flooded the nation with an emotional sense of relief. We’re covering this story and more on this week’s segment with Zinhle Essamuah. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? 0:00? Intro 0:20? Helicopter Makes Historic Landing 1:38? Rescue Mission Underway 2:30? Surpassing 200M Vaccines Administered 3:44? Biden Hosts Climate Summit 5:40? Derek Chauvin Found Guilty Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. This week, Derek Chauvin was led out of the courtroom in handcuffs after the jury laid down his guilty verdict. President Joe Biden is hosting a two-day Earth Day climate summit with 40 world leaders. The U.S. surpassed 200 million COVID-19 vaccine shots. Rescuers are scrambling to find an Indonesian submarine and its 53 crew members lost at sea. And, the tiny Ingenuity helicopter made history on Mars, flying over the planet for 39 seconds before nailing the perfect landing. #DerekChauvin? #ClimateChange? #COVID19? #KnowThis? #News? #NowThis?

4K Earth Views Extended Cut for Earth Day 2021

Apr 22, 2021  NASA Johnson

Everything that happens on the International Space Station revolves around one thing: Earth, sixteen times a day! So for Earth Day 2021, NASA offers a gift you can’t get anywhere else with this leisurely view of our home planet, from 250 miles up, rendered in extraordinary ultra-high definition video. Hit play, relax and enjoy. This 4K footage was recorded between 2019 and 2020. _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS? Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/? HD Download: https://archive.org/details/jsc2021m0…? 2021_210422-

Axios PM: 5 new climate pledges

By Mike Allen ·Apr 22, 2021

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

Good afternoon: Today’s PM — edited by Justin Green — is 497 words, a 2-minute read.

·  Stocks fell modestly today after reports that President Biden wants to nearly double the capital gains tax paid by wealthy Americans.

·  Sen. Tim Scott will deliver the GOP’s rebuttal to Biden’s joint address to Congress.

Please join Axios’ Joann Muller and Erica Pandey tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. ET for conversations about electric and autonomous vehicles with Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and San Francisco-Marin Food Bank executive director Tanis Crosby. Sign up here.

  1. 5 new climate pledges, 4.22.2021

German Chancellor Angela Merkel takes part in the virtual international climate summit with President Biden. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/Pool via Getty Images
1.      Canada: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada would increase its target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from 40% to 45% of its 2005 levels by 2030.

2.     Japan: Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said Japan would cut its emissions by 46% from 2013 levels by 2030.

3.     South Korea: President Moon Jae-in pledged to end all new public financing for overseas coal projects, and will submit new emissions targets later this year.

4.     Brazil: President Jair Bolsonaro pledged to end illegal deforestation by 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

5.     China: President Xi Jinping said his country — the world’s largest consumer of coal — will attempt to “strictly limit increasing coal consumption” over the next five years.

Go deeper: More details on the pledges, via Axios’ Jacob Knutson.

WATCH LIVE: Greta Thunberg, climate experts testify before House on fossil fuel subsidies

Streamed live 16 hours ago, 4.22.2021  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

Earth Day 2021 Doodle

Apr 21, 2021, GoogleDoodles

This year’s annual Earth Day Doodle highlights how everyone can plant the seed to a brighter future—one sapling at a time. Happy Earth Day 2021! Learn more: http://www.google.com/doodles/earth-d…? ——- To follow Google Doodles on YouTube, subscribe to: @GoogleDoodles? Follow Google Doodles on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/GoogleDoodles?

President Biden pledges 50% cut in US carbon emissions at global climate summit – BBC News

Apr 22, 2021  BBC News, 5:39

President Biden has opened a major global climate summit with a call to other world leaders to step up to the challenge. Joe Biden pledged to cut US emissions by at least half from 2005 levels by the end of this decade but he warned that his country couldn’t take action alone. He told world leaders that scientists were calling this the “decisive decade” for tackling climate change and action was needed now. The latest data shows China is the world’s biggest producer of carbon dioxide, emitting 28% of global output. China is second biggest, producing 15% with India producing 7%. Sophie Raworth presents BBC News at Ten reporting by science editor David Shukman and North America editor Jon Sopel. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog? #BBCNews?

It’s time to ‘get serious’ about climate change, Boris Johnson @BBC News? live ? BBC

Apr 22, 2021  BBC, 10:49

Subscribe and ? to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube ? https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn? Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ? ? Subscribe and ? @BBC News ? https://bit.ly/3a1zyip? ? Stream BBC News live on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/3b64IVP? ? Coronavirus / Covid-19 ? https://bbc.in/3luQp33? ? Follow BBC News live updates here ? https://bbc.in/2JmUswL? It’s Thurdsday 22 April. Our top stories this morning 0:00? The US will attempt to re-assert its global leadership on climate change as President Joe Biden hosts 40 leaders at a virtual summit in the White House. Get the full story ? https://bbc.in/3ekUuEk? Get the latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC’s Breakfast team live on iPlayer daily from 6am. BBC Breakfast | BBC News | BBC #BBC? #BBCiPlayer? #BBCNews? #BBCNewsLive? #BBCCoronavirus? #Coronavirus? #Covid?-19 #CoronavirusOutbreak? #Corona? #CoronavirusUK?

The New York Times: Biden’s Intelligence Director Vows to Put Climate at ‘Center’ of Foreign Policy,

Last Updated 

April 22, 2021, 10:01 p.m. ET 5 hours ago

Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, struck a note of urgency in telling world leaders that climate change must be “fully integrated” with national security. President Biden committed the United States to cutting emissions by half by the end of the decade at a virtual Earth Day summit.

President Biden speaking on Thursday during a virtual summit on climate change from the East Room of the White House.Credit…Pool photo by Al Drago

Here’s what you need to know:

Biden’s intelligence director tells world leaders climate is now ‘at the center’ of U.S. foreign policy.·

Biden wants to slash emissions. Success would mean a very different America.·

China’s leader, Xi Jinping, promises to ‘strictly limit’ coal.·

Here’s what Canada, Russia and other countries have committed to so far today.·

The virtual summit makes history, but proves even world leaders aren’t immune to tech issues.·

Fossil fuel industries react carefully to Biden’s emissions pledge.·

Biden plans to nominate ocean scientist Rick Spinrad to head NOAA, the country’s premier climate science agency.

Biden’s intelligence director tells world leaders climate is now ‘at the center’ of U.S. foreign policy. 

Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, speaking on Capitol Hill last week.Credit…Pool photo by Graeme Jennings

Avril Haines, President Biden’s director of national intelligence, told world leaders on Thursday that climate change was no longer a peripheral issue but now “at the center” of U.S. foreign policy, with far-reaching impacts on force deployments and the stability of hard-hit regions.

Ms. Haines, speaking at this week’s virtual global climate conference, struck a tone of urgency at variance with the attitudes of many of her predecessors, who downplayed the role of rising sea levels, droughts, crop failures, fires, diseases and more frequent severe weather events.

“To address climate change properly it must be at the center of a country’s national security and foreign policy,” she said, echoing the words of Lloyd J. Austin III, the defense secretary, who addressed the conference a few minutes earlier.

“It needs to be fully integrated with every aspect of our analysis in order to allow us not only to monitor the threat but also, critically, to ensure that policymakers understand the importance of climate change on seemingly unrelated policies,” Ms. Haines said.

Her comments came after NATO officials announced they would likely agree on a climate “action plan” to reduce emissions by military units and conduct an alliance-wide assessment of the potential threats arising from climate disruptions.

On Thursday, the C.I.A. announced it was adding a new category covering the environment to its World Factbook. The agency’s unclassified guide will now provide the latest country data on climate, air pollutants, infectious diseases, food security, waste and other environmental topics.

Ms. Haines began by saying that the intelligence services had long recognized the importance of climate change — and praised efforts by the C.I.A. over the last three decades to identify the geopolitical impact of climate-based changes in Russia, Asia, Africa and the Arctic.

“We have not always made it a key priority,” she added.

The Biden administration has promised to put a new focus on climate change at the nation’s intelligence agencies. Top intelligence officials all pledged in their confirmation hearings to increase their agencies’ focus on climate.

A pair of recent intelligence reports have presented a grim picture of climate change. The annual worldwide threat assessment, which looks at short-term challenges, said extreme weather caused by climate change would increase the potential for surges in migration and cause instability around the globe.

The changes will “exacerbate political instability and humanitarian crises,” the annual threat report said.

The intelligence agencies issued even more dire warnings with the quadrennial Global Trends report issued on April 8, which argued that climate change would contribute to instability, strain military readiness and encourage new political movements. It said that all societies would be forced to adapt to a warmer planet through changes both small and complex, including the building of massive new sea walls and the relocation of cities and towns.

The report said the physical effects of climate change would intensify over the next 20 years, particularly in the 2030s, and the impact would fall disproportionately on poor parts of the world.

Some Republicans have expressed reservations at expanding the intelligence community’s focus on climate change. At a hearing last week, Ms. Haines argued that while there was partisan division over the issue, intelligence analysts have been examining the issue for decades during administrations of both parties.

“It’s just become increasingly accepted as something that is part of the national security landscape,” she said.

— Glenn Thrush and Julian E. Barnes

U.S. says it will sharply cut emissions and increase funds to vulnerable countries to fight climate change.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel takes part in the virtual international climate summit with President Biden on Thursday.Credit…Pool photo by Kay Nietfeld

President Biden on Thursday declared America “has resolved to take action” on climate change, and the White House said it would substantially increase the money it offers to developing countries to address the issue.

In a show of renewed resolve after four years of the Trump administration’s unvarnished climate denial, Mr. Biden formally pledged that the United States would cut its emissions at least in half from 2005 levels by 2030. His administration also announced it intends to double by 2024 the amount of money it offers to help developing countries, compared with what the United States spent annually in the second half of the Obama administration.

Barely three months into Mr. Biden’s presidency, the contrast with his science-denying predecessor, President Donald J. Trump, could not have been more striking.

“The signs are unmistakable, the science is undeniable and the cost of inaction keeps mounting,” Mr. Biden said.

John Kerry, President Biden’s global climate change envoy, said he believes the United States will meet and possibly even surpass the new goal.

Speaking at the conclusion of the first day of the summit, Mr. Kerry called the goal “ambitious but appropriate and achievable” and said the market is moving faster than expected in creating renewable energy and new breakthroughs are likely on the horizon in battery storage and other areas.

“Is it doable? Will we probably exceed it? I expect yes,” Mr. Kerry said.

Asked what the Biden administration can do now to prevent a future president from gutting the climate plans as President Trump did to the Obama administration, Mr. Kerry noted that he fielded that question in virtually every diplomatic discussion over the past three months.

“You destroyed your credibility, you left the Paris Agreement, how can we trust you?” Mr. Kerry said other leaders asked him. He insisted the private sector will cement clean energy policies into reality even if Mr. Bidens’ policies stall or are someday overturned.,

“No politician, I think, can change what is now happening in the marketplace.”

The Biden administration said it plans to offer an estimated $5.7 billion a year by 2024. In a statement, the White House said that it would “work closely with Congress to meet these goals.”

Between 2013 and 2016, U.S. international climate finance was around $2.5 billion a year, including in the form of export credit and loans, based on government data from that time.

Joe Thwaites from the World Resources Institute said the foreign aid pledges were not especially ambitious. “The climate finance plan the Biden administration launched today starts to play catch up after the U.S. was largely absent for the last four years — when many other developed countries already doubled their climate finance, and some committed to doubling again before 2025,” he said.

The two-day summit comes at a time when scientists are warning that governments must take decisive action to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels. The consequences of exceeding that threshold includes mass species extinctions, water shortages and extreme weather events that will be most devastating to the poorest countries least responsible for causing global warming.

Officially, nations that are party to the Paris agreement are obligated to announce their new targets for emissions cuts in time for a United Nations conference in Scotland in November.

In an executive order announced late Thursday morning, the White House also said it would “seek to” end investments in “carbon-intensive” fossil fuel projects abroad. It was also not clear if that referred to money for gas pipelines and terminals. The United States is a leading exporter of gas, and development aid has been used to promote the expansion of gas, including in Africa.

Mr. Kerry said in his remarks that no country alone would be able to finance the transition to a green economy, adding that private banks and asset managers would have to align their investments accordingly.

The summit is the first of its kind to be convened by a United States president, and Mr. Biden is joined by other world leaders like Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada.

While the summit is an international one, Mr. Biden’s speech was also aimed at a domestic audience, focusing not just on America’s obligation to help cut its global emissions but on the jobs he believes are available in greening the U.S. economy.

“The countries that take decisive actions now” to tackle climate change, Mr. Biden said, “will be the ones that reap the clean energy benefits of the boom that’s coming.”

Mr. Biden’s target of 50 percent to 52 percent by the end of the decade calls for a steep and rapid decline of fossil fuel use in virtually every sector of the American economy and marks the start of what is sure to be a bitter partisan fight over achieving it.

One of Mr. Biden’s biggest political obstacles is international: Republicans say the United States should not be asked to sacrifice if the world’s largest emitters will swallow U.S. efforts in their pollution.

Christopher Flavelle contributed reporting.

Biden wants to slash emissions. Success would mean a very different America.

By 2030, half of the country’s electricity would come from renewable sources such as wind.Credit…Bing Guan/Reuters

President Biden’s new pledge to slash the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decade is long on ambition and short on specifics, but experts say that success would require rapid and sweeping changes to virtually every corner of the nation’s economy, transforming the way Americans drive to work, heat their homes and operate their factories.

In several recent studies, researchers have explored what a future America might look like if it wants to achieve Mr. Biden’s goal: cutting the nation’s planet-warming emissions at least 50 percent below 2005 levels by the year 2030.

By the end of the decade, those studies suggest, more than half of the new cars and S.U.V.s sold at dealerships would need to be powered by electricity, not gasoline. Nearly all coal-fired power plants would need to be shut down. Forests would need to expand. The number of wind turbines and solar panels dotting the nation’s landscape could quadruple.

It’s achievable in theory, researchers say, but it’s an enormous challenge. To get there, the Biden administration would probably need to put in place a vast array of new federal policies, many of which could face obstacles in Congress or the courts. And policymakers would have to take care in crafting measures that do not cause serious economic harm, such as widespread job losses or spikes in energy prices, that could lead to blowback.

“It’s not an easy task,” said Nathan Hultman, the director of the University of Maryland’s Center on Global Sustainability. “We won’t be able to sit back and hope that market forces alone will do the job.”

In two recent studies, Mr. Hultman and his colleagues modeled possible paths to achieving at least a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030. The changes would be far-reaching:

·         By 2030, half of the country’s electricity would come from renewable sources such as wind, solar or hydropower, up from one-fifth today.

·         New natural gas plants would be built largely with technology that can capture carbon dioxide instead of releasing it into the atmosphere — technology that is still in its infancy.

·         Virtually all of the 200 remaining coal plants in the U.S. would shut down unless they, too, can capture their emissions and bury them underground.

·         By 2030, two-thirds of new cars and S.U.V.s sold would be battery-powered, up from roughly 2 percent today.

·         All new buildings would be heated by electricity rather than natural gas.

·         The nation’s cement, steel and chemical industries would adopt stringent new energy-efficiency targets.

·         Oil and gas producers would slash emissions of methane, a potent heat-trapping gas, by 60 percent.

·         The nation’s forests would expand, and farming practices would be reworked, so that they pull 20 percent more carbon dioxide out of the air than they do today.

— Brad Plumer

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Biden Wants to Slash Emissions. Success Would Mean a Very Different America.

Hitting the targets could require a rapid shift to electric vehicles, the expansion of forests nationwide, development of complex new carbon-capture technology and many other changes, researchers said.

April 22, 2021

China’s leader, Xi Jinping, promises to ‘strictly limit’ coal.

China’s president, Xi Jinping, delivered a speech during the opening of the Boao Forum for Asia on Tuesday. Mr. Xi promised Thursday that China would limit coal consumption.Credit…Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

President Xi Jinping of China said his country would “strictly limit increasing coal consumption” in the next five years and phase it down in the following five years.

That’s significant because China is, by far, the world’s largest coal consumer and is continuing to expand its fleet of coal-fired power plants. Coal is the dirtiest fossil fuel.

Mr. Xi repeated his pledge from last year to draw down carbon emissions to net zero by 2060. And, in a pointed reminder to his host, President Biden, he said that the industrialized countries of the West had a historic responsibility to act faster to reduce emissions.

The United States is history’s largest emitter. China is today’s largest emitter.

Mr. Xi added a conciliatory note by saying “China looks forward to working with the international community, including with the United States” on addressing climate change.

Neither China nor India, whose prime minister, Narendra Modi, spoke after Mr. Xi, made any new commitments to ramp up their climate ambitions. Mr. Modi repeated India’s pledge to expand its fleet of renewable energy projects, urged people to make lifestyle changes to address climate change, and announced a vague new partnership with the United States on green energy projects.

India’s once-galloping economy has slowed sharply and the country is currently in the throes of a deadly coronavirus surge.

— Somini Sengupta

Here’s what Canada, Russia and other countries have committed to so far today.

A video monitor in the East Room of the White House showed the heads of state participating in the virtual climate summit on Thursday.Credit…Al Drago for The New York Times

Beyond the big two of the United States and China, here’s an overview of what some American allies and adversaries have said so far at President Biden’s virtual climate summit with world leaders on Thursday.

·         Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged that Canada would reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent to 45 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, a step up from its previous target of a 30 percent reduction in the same time frame. This is a significant increase in ambition for an economy that is still highly dependent on oil extraction, and a sign that Mr. Biden’s decision to increase the United States’ target is having an influence on his closest allies.

·         Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India reiterated his country’s promise to install 450 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030, but made no new commitments. He argued that India’s per capita emissions were far smaller than those of other major emitters and said, “We, in India, are doing our part.”

·         Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga announced that Japan would cut emissions 46 percent below 2013 levels by the end of the decade, a significant show of solidarity with the United States.

·         President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, the world’s fourth largest greenhouse gas polluter, made only a vague pledge to “significantly reduce the net accumulated emissions in our country by 2050.” He highlighted a carbon pricing pilot program that he said would allow the Sakhalin region to become carbon neutral by 2025, but he said nothing about construction of the Nord Stream 2, a major natural gas pipeline that is opposed by both climate advocates and United States national security advisers.

·         President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil pledged to eliminate illegal deforestation by 2030, a promise that was met with extreme skepticism by those in the environmental community who have seen the destruction of the Amazon skyrocket under his watch. Mr. Bolsonaro also vowed that Brazil would become carbon neutral by 2050, a decade earlier than it had previously said it would. Ending deforestation by 2030, he claimed, would cut Brazil’s emissions 50 percent.

Coral Davenport, Lisa Friedman and Somini Sengupta contributed reporting.

— Maggie Astor

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/04/22/us/biden-earth-day-climate-summit

My two grandsons, Bodhi and Kai enjoyed to be in the garden. That make me very happy. I wish children all over the world would be able to enjoy nature.  Parents and other adults should cultivate and take care of nature for younger generations to have a chance to appreciate a beautiful and peaceful world.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, April 24, 2021

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A Minneapolis jury convicts Derek Chauvin on all counts for the murder of George Floyd, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News and The New York Times

A Minneapolis jury convicts Derek Chauvin on all counts for the murder of George Floyd, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News and The New York Times

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 20 & 21, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 20th &  21st, 2021

George Floyd’s Family Receives Call From Biden

Apr 20, 2021  NowThis News

The New York Times – In Photos: America Reacts to the Derek Chauvin Verdict – Scenes from around the country after Mr. Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 21, 2021

Apr 21, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, we talk with George Floyd’s family a day after Derek Chauvin’s conviction for his murder. Then, the latest from Russia where support for a jailed opposition leader has sparked calls for change. And, we discuss the Biden administration’s efforts to combat climate change with new EPA administrator, Michael Regan. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS New federal action follows Chauvin trial, conviction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdkqY…? Philonise Floyd calls for end to police’s qualified immunity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-YEO…? What police reform could look like after Chauvin trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kS48o…? What is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCqNU…? News Wrap: India sets grim new records for COVID deaths https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbfrk…? Why Navalny poses a special challenge to Putin’s leadership https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IIsZ9…? New climate summit to show U.S. “back in the driver’s seat’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXb3t…? Why health care inequities persist in the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-C8E…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 20, 2021

Apr 20, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, we get national reactions as a Minneapolis jury convicts Derek Chauvin on all counts for the murder of George Floyd. Then, efforts to create electric planes and cleaner jet fuel become more urgent as the climate emergency intensifies. And, former vice president Al Gore remembers the late Walter Mondale and how he helped transform the highest level of American government. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Jubilant crowds celebrate guilty verdict in Chauvin trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KNaC…? Saint Paul Mayor says Chauvin verdict shows accountability https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anHss…? How the Chauvin verdict is a ‘defining moment’ in policing  https://youtu.be/BMtNK39bwEA? Floyd’s supporters want systemic change after guilty verdict https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35CcZ…? News Wrap: Democrats block effort to censure Maxine Waters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0W7yf…? How sustainable aviation fuel could help stem emissions  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVkds…? How Walter Mondale transformed the office of vice president https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emXnl…? Al Gore reflects on Walter Mondale’s vice presidency https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkOyX…? Floyd’s family vows to ‘keep fighting’ for just policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV3W8…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6? Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour? Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour? Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour? Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts? Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 21st, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 21, 2021  NBC News

DOJ launches investigation into Minneapolis Police Department, U.S. hits 200 million vaccine milestone as pace slows and Arizona governor sends National Guard to Southern border. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:06? Justice Department Launches Probe Into Minneapolis Police 02:54? George Floyd’s Brother Says Verdict A ‘Pivotal Moment’ 03:02? Chauvin In Maximun Security Prison Awaiting Sentencing 03:27? Three Other Ex-Officers To Stand Trial In The Summer 03:35? Trial Witness Hails Chauvin Verdict As ‘New Begining’ 04:29? National Guard Reducing Presence In Minneapolis 05:01? Activists Hope Chauvin Verdict Inspires Police Reform 06:59? Police Fatally Shoot 16-Year-Old Black Girl Holding Knife 08:51? Family: Unarmed Black Man Fatally Shot By Police 09:25? Biden: Congress Must Pass George Floyd Police Reform Law 11:23? Biden: U.S. Has Met 200 Million Shots In 100 Days Goal 11:49? Biden Calls For Paid Time Off To Get Vaccinated 12:07? Poll: 20 Percent ‘Not At All Likely’ To Get Vaccinated 12:21? FDA Finds Violations At Plant That Ruined J&J Doses 12:47? Critical CDC Panel Meeting On J&J Vaccine Friday 13:21? Arizona Deploys National Guard Amid Migrant Surge 14:31? Abandoned Migrant Boys Rescued From Rio Grande 15:06? Syria’s Decade-Long War Causes Environmental Disaster 17:36? Queen’s Message Of Gratitude On Her 95th Birthday 17:51? Surging Costs On Household Staples Like Tiolet Paper » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 20th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 20, 2021  NBC News

Full coverage after Derek Chauvin convicted of murder, manslaughter in George Floyd’s death. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:03? Derek Chauvin Guilty Of Murder In Death Of George Floyd 05:09? Chauvin Guilty Verdict Sparks Reaction Across Nation 07:04? Biden Calls Chauvin Verdict ‘Step Forward’ 07:40? Derek Chauvin Guilty Of Murder In Death Of George Floyd 08:34? Chauvin Guilty On All Three Counts In George Floyd Death 12:34? Chauvin Guilty On All Three Counts In George Floyd Killing 14:03? Deadly Suspect Shooting Near Nyc, Suspect Caught 15:31? E.U. Regulator: J&J Vaccine Benefits Outweigh Clot Risks 16:40? New COVID Cases Rise By At Least 25 Percent In 9 States 17:38? Apple Unveils New IPADS, IMACS & AIRTAGS 18:55? George W. Bush Presides Over Naturalization Ceremony 19:13? Former Vice President Walter Mondale Dies At 93 » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

 

George Floyd’s Family Receives Call From Biden

Apr 20, 2021  NowThis News

‘Nothing is gonna make it all better but at least, God, now there’s some justice’ — Pres. Biden and VP Harris called the Floyd family and offered supportive words following the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder trial For more Derek Chauvin murder trial coverage and world news, subscribe to NowThis News. #GeorgeFloyd? #DerekChauvin? #Biden? #BLM? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

The New York Times April 21, 2021

By David Leonhardt

 

Good morning. Derek Chauvin, convicted of second-degree murder, is the exception of exceptions. 

Reactions to the guilty verdict at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis.Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

One in 2,000 The murder conviction of a police officer is an exceedingly rare event.
There have been only seven murder convictions of officers for fatal police shootings since 2005, according to Philip Stinson of Bowling Green State University. That suggests the chances of a killing by the police leading to a murder conviction are about one in 2,000.
Yet a jury in Minneapolis yesterday convicted Derek Chauvin of second-degree murder (as well as two other charges) for killing George Floyd last May. A typical sentence for that felony in Minneapolis is 12½ years in prison, although prosecutors have asked for more and the maximum is 40 years. A judge will sentence Chauvin in about eight weeks.
Floyd’s relatives said they felt relieved by the verdict. “I finally have the opportunity to hopefully get some sleep,” Philonise Floyd, George’s brother, said.
Chauvin’s conviction does not automatically signal a new era of police accountability. The Floyd case was the exception of all exceptions. A video, watched around the world, showed Chauvin pressing his knee onto Floyd for more than nine minutes. That footage led to weeks of protests that were among the largest in U.S. history. And at the trial, the so-called blue wall of silence — that is, many officers’ willingness to protect colleagues, regardless of their misbehavior — crumbled. “For so many, it feels like it took all of that for the judicial system to deliver just basic accountability,” President Biden said late yesterday.
Most of those factors will not apply to future police killings. Those cases will instead be more likely to resemble the deaths of Michael Brown, Philando Castile, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, Daniel Prude, Tamir Rice, Breonna Taylor and hundreds of other cases that have not lead to a murder or manslaughter conviction.

Still, the Chauvin trial is not guaranteed to be simply a one-off event, either. Some of the same factors that make it distinct could also cause it to have a wider impact. Before Floyd’s death, it was hard to think of a signature trial of an American police officer, one that received sustained national attention, as the trial of a celebrity might.

This trial, of course, did receive such attention. Television networks halted their normal coverage yesterday to broadcast the verdict, and the president of the United States organized his schedule around it.
That attention has made it clear that a police officer can be charged with murder and convicted of it. It’s an idea that will linger in the minds of prosecutors and future jurors. Perhaps most important, it may affect the thinking of other officers, when they find themselves considering whether to use physical force when it is not necessary.
Commentary roundup
  • Barack Obama: “True justice requires that we come to terms with the fact that Black Americans are treated differently, every day. … And it requires us to do the sometimes thankless, often difficult, but always necessary work of making the America we know more like the America we believe in.”
  • Rosa Brooks, in Politico: “While the national media understandably puts a spotlight on Chauvin, we should not forget that three other Minneapolis police officers were also on the scene that day last May: Officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng. Their sheer passivity was, in some ways, more stunning than Chauvin’s casual cruelty.”
  • Quin Hillyer of The Washington Examiner: “The judicial system worked. It usually does. It won’t bring George Floyd back, or eliminate all bad policing — but police are now on notice.”
  • Michele Norris: “Can we all sing a praise song for Darnella Frazier who had the presence of mind to film that video that made such a difference.”
  • Many police shootings are justified, German Lopez of Vox has written. But Stinson, the Bowling Green professor of criminal justice, told Lopez that the number of officers charged with wrongdoing “seems extremely low.”
  • Rodney Floyd, George Floyd’s younger brother, called for the passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which would make it easier to prosecute police officers for misconduct. The House has passed it, and Biden favors it.
  • In Times Opinion, Esau McCaulley writes about the verdict.
More Times coverage
  • Minneapolis residents greeted the verdict with joy and relief. “We matter,” one woman said outside the convenience store where Floyd was killed.
  • Racial justice activists saw the trial as a step toward a larger goal. “We have not yet dealt with the disease,” a pastor in Chicago said.
  • These photos show reactions to the verdict around the country.
  • An officer fatally shot a 16-year-old girl in Columbus, Ohio, yesterday. The police said she had threatened two other girls with a knife.

The New York Times

In Photos: America Reacts to the Derek Chauvin Verdict

Scenes from around the country after Mr. Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd.

Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

Cheers erupted in Minneapolis on Tuesday after a jury found the former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty on all counts in the murder of George Floyd last May.

The verdict capped a three-week trial that captivated America. With often-emotional testimony, prosecutors sought to highlight who Mr. Floyd was, repeatedly playing the widely viewed bystander footage of his death and arguing that Mr. Chauvin knew he was harming the man whose neck he was kneeling on, but did not stop.

During a news conference after the decision was announced, Mr. Floyd’s family and supporters celebrated but noted how rarely officers are convicted after using lethal force. Many mentioned Daunte Wright, a Black man who was fatally shot by a white officer during Mr. Chauvin’s trial.

“He should still be here,” Mr. Floyd’s brother Philonise Floyd said of Mr. Wright. “We have to march. We will have to do this for life. We have to protest because it seems like this is a never-ending cycle.”

The Times positioned photographers around the country to capture reactions to the verdict. Here’s what they saw.

— Aidan Gardiner

Latest Updates

More live coverage of the Derek Chauvin trial and reactions from around the country.

Awaiting the Verdict

Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, people watched a live feed of the courtroom on a phone.

Credit…Amr Alfiky/The New York Times

In Minneapolis, demonstrators gathered outside the Hennepin Country Government Center, where the trial was held.

Credit…Godofredo A. Vásquez/Houston Chronicle, via Associated Press

In Houston, where George Floyd grew up, television coverage of the trial drew viewers.

Hearing the News

Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, the crowd outside the Hennepin County Government Center erupted with joy.

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

At George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, a sign was updated near the memorial at 38th Street and Chicago Avenue where Mr. Floyd was killed.

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, protesters celebrated the guilty verdict.

Credit…Annie Mulligan for The New York Times

In Houston, Dennis Glenn and Greg Brown, alumni of Jack Yates High School, Mr. Floyd’s alma mater, comforted Ceci Munoz in front of the school.

Credit…Amr Alfiky/The New York Times

In Minneapolis, Courteney Ross, Mr. Floyd’s girlfriend, cheered outside the Hennepin County Government Center after the verdict.

Officials Speak

Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

In Washington, members of the Congressional Black Caucus walked down the Capitol steps to address reporters.

Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, Philonise Floyd, left, a brother of George Floyd, wiped a tear. At right, Benjamin Crump, a lawyer for the Floyd family, held the hand of Donald Williams, who witnessed the episode last May.

Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

In Washington, Vice President Kamala Harris and President Biden addressed the nation from the White House.

Streets Filled With Relief and Joy

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, a band played at George Floyd Square.

Credit…Allison Zaucha for The New York Times

In Los Angeles, demonstrators celebrated from a street corner.

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

Credit…Amr Alfiky/The New York Times

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, onlookers embraced.

Credit…Kenny Holston for The New York Times

In Washington, the guilty verdict prompted dancing.

Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, a demonstrator stood on top of a vehicle.

Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, even grills were taken to the area near George Floyd Square.

Credit…Carlos Javier Ortiz for The New York Times

In Chicago, where last week officials released video of Officer Eric Stillman fatally shooting 13-year-old Adam Toledo, a small group protested at the Richard J. Daley Center.

Credit…Earl Wilson/The New York Times

In New York, people consoled each other outside Barclays Center in Brooklyn.

Credit…Allison Zaucha for The New York Times

In Los Angeles, demonstrators chanted and danced.

Credit…Aaron Nesheim for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, George Floyd Square was filled to the brim by those who had come to celebrate and pay their respects to Mr. Floyd.

Credit…Xavier Burrell for The New York Times

In Louisville, protesters gathered outside of the Jefferson County Hall of Justice.

Credit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, a visitor photographed Mr. Floyd’s memorial tombstone in the “Say Their Names” cemetery.

Credit…Joshua Rashaad McFadden for The New York Times

In Minneapolis, demonstrators held picket signs with Mr. Floyd’s face outside the Hennepin County Government Center.

Credit…Jim Wilson/The New York Times

In San Francisco, protesters gathered at the 24th and Mission BART station to celebrate the verdict and protest police brutality.

Credit…Simbarashe Cha for The New York Times

In New York, demonstrators knelt in solidarity with Mr. Floyd near Penn Station.

Credit…Annie Mulligan for The New York Times

In Houston, Ashton P. Woods, a founder of Black Lives Matter Houston, spoke to those gathered for a vigil at dusk at MacGregor Park.

Credit…Gabriela Bhaskar for The New York Times

In New York, demonstrators joined hands as they marched through Brooklyn.

Credit…Hilary Swift for The New York Times

In New York, protesters chanted as they walked across the Manhattan Bridge.

Produced by Heather Casey, Sarah Eckinger, Rebecca Halleck and Jennifer Mosbrucker

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/20/us/chauvin-verdict-photos-usa.html

Correction: April 21, 2021

An earlier version of this article misidentified the location of a demonstration in New York City. It was near Penn Station, not Times Square.

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Biden gun control executive actions, Biden delivers remarks on American Jobs Plan, WTHR, PBS News, NBC Nightly News, NowThis News, The Daily Show, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and Reuters

Biden gun control executive actions, Biden delivers remarks on American Jobs Plan, WTHR, PBS News, NBC Nightly News, NowThis News, The Daily Show, The Washington Post, The New York Times, and Reuters

WTHR: Biden gun control executive actions 

Breaking down Biden’s plan to curb ‘blemish’ of gun violence in America

Apr 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour, and Read the Full Transcript

Biden delivers remarks on American Jobs Plan

Streamed live on Apr 7, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Pentagon officials brief public on artificial intelligence

Streamed live 18 hours ago, 4.9.2021  PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 8 & 9, 2021

Full Episode: Corporate Backlash on Voting Rights, Apr 9, 2021,  Washington Week PBS

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 8th & 9th, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 10, 2021

Biden’s 11th Week in Office, Apr 9, 2021  NowThis News

Top 5 Politics: April 4-9, 2021, Apr 9, 2021.  NowThis News

Jordan Klepper Debunks The “Good Guy with a Gun” Argument | The Daily Show, Apr 5, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Jordan Klepper Sees It All at The Capitol Insurrection | The Daily Social Distancing Show, Jan 12, 2021 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Unpacking the Capitol Riot & Four Years of Trump’s Bulls**t | The Daily Social Distancing Show, Jan 19, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Biden’s Inauguration & Trump’s Pardon Spree | The Daily Social Distancing Show, Fundraiser, Jan 20, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

The Washington Post: U.S. Capitol Police Officer William ‘Billy’ Evans killed in the line of duty

The New York Times: Supporters of Donald Trump who thought they were sending a single donation were charged over and over by his campaign operation.

Reuters: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. reach peak bloom

Biden gun control executive actions (38:24)

Streamed live on Apr 8, 2021  WTHR

President Joe Biden is announcing gun control plans including “ghost guns,” red flag laws and more thorough applications for some guns.

Breaking down Biden’s plan to curb ‘blemish’ of gun violence in America

Apr 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour

President Joe Biden on Thursday unveiled executive actions to curb gun violence, which he described as an “epidemic” and an “international embarrassment.” Nearly 20,000 people died of gun violence last year, and another 24,000 died by suicide. Adam Winkler of the UCLA School of Law is an expert on gun policy and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Biden’s measures. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/breaking-down-bidens-plan-to-curb-blemish-of-gun-violence-in-america

President Joe Biden on Thursday unveiled executive actions to curb gun violence, which he described as an “epidemic” and an “international embarrassment.” Nearly 20,000 people died of gun violence last year, and another 24,000 died by suicide. Adam Winkler of the UCLA School of Law is an expert on gun policy and joins Judy Woodruff to discuss Biden’s measures.

Read the Full Transcript

  • Judy Woodruff:

Recent mass shootings in Georgia and Colorado have once again put gun reform in the national spotlight.

Nearly 20,000 people died of gun violence last year, and another 24,000 from suicide.

Today, President Biden unveiled steps he is taking to curb what he calls an epidemic and an international embarrassment.

  • Pres. Joe Biden:

The idea that we have so many people dying every single day from gun violence in America is a blemish on our character as nation.

Whether Congress acts or not, I’m going to use all the resources at my disposal as president to keep the American people safe from gun violence. But there’s much more that Congress can do to help that effort.

  • Judy Woodruff:

Some of the actions the president announced today include curbing so-called ghost guns, which are home-assembled firearms that often lack serial numbers and don’t require background checks, tightening regulations on stabilizing braces, which can turn an AR-style semi automatic pistol into a rifle.

The Justice Department will create a model for states to enact what are called red flag laws, which allows judges to seize firearms from people deemed dangerous. And the department will also release a report on firearms trafficking.

In addition, President Biden nominated David Chipman, an adviser at the gun control group Giffords, to head the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

We turn to Adam Winkler of the UCLA School of Law, an expert on gun policy.

Adam Winkler, thank you so much for being here.

As we were saying, gun deaths off the charts, mass shootings happening every day. There was one in South Carolina yesterday, another one today in the state of Texas. How much difference can these steps President Biden is announcing make?

  • Adam Winkler:

Well, these steps are modest steps. They certainly don’t tackle all of the major issues in America’s gun violence problem.

However, they’re not insignificant steps. Take, for instance, the rule regulating ghost guns. These are do-it-yourself, homemade gun kit that have become increasingly popular and, with the advance of technology, increasingly easy to use. Anyone can buy one of these kits, even if they are prohibited from buying a firearm, and make their own gun.

And we know that these guns are being used more frequently in crime. In California, for instance, one in three guns recovered from crime scenes are do-it-yourself guns without serial numbers.

  • Judy Woodruff:

And we also mentioned making it easier for states to enact these so-called red flag laws.

And you were telling us investing in communities, trying to discourage gun violence can make a difference, too.

  • Adam Winkler:

Well, that’s right. These red flag laws have become popular. And there’s even some bipartisan support for red flag laws.

They enable family members or law enforcement to temporarily take away someone’s firearms when they’re going through some kind of crisis that poses a threat to themselves or to others.

And what the Biden administration is proposing to do is come up with some models, some guidelines, best practices, if you will, for how to do this right. And so that could be an effective tool that some family members who see another family member in crisis can use to prevent the next mass shooting.

  • Judy Woodruff:

And, Adam Winkler, we know that this all reminds us that President Biden is not pushing legislation through Congress right now. It’s a reminder of how difficult that is.

How much influence does the gun rights lobby have, organizations like the NRA, right now with American lawmakers, vs. the influence of groups that want to see gun reform?

  • Adam Winkler:

Well, ironically, we’re seeing both sides very strong in America.

No doubt, the NRA is suffering from a major financial setback. They’re in bankruptcy. They’re being investigated and prosecuted by the New York attorney general. They have got major lawsuits on their hands. But the power of the NRA has always been about the power to influence the single-issue pro-gun voters there are out there, and they’re still out there, regardless of what happens to the NRA.

At the same time, the gun control movement in the last 10 years has been really reinvigorated. We see new organizations that have arisen, a lot more money being spent on gun safety reform, and it’s become an issue that’s really at the top of the Democratic Party agenda, some place it was not 10 years ago.

  • Judy Woodruff:

But still uphill to try to get meaningful legislation passed?

  • Adam Winkler:

Well, right now, it’s not just a gun issue.

(CROSSTALK)

  • Adam Winkler:

Meaningful legislation in the Senate requires 60 votes, and it’s hard to imagine 60 votes for almost any controversial issue these days.

Certainly going to be difficult to get 60 votes on significant gun reform.

  • Judy Woodruff:

And what about the views of the American people? What do we know about that?

  • Adam Winkler:

Well, there’s a huge difference between the views of the members of Congress and the views of the American people.

We see things like universal background checks having over 80 percent support. The restriction on ghost guns, we see polls show about 75 percent support. And yet these laws can’t get adopted through Congress itself, because, let’s face it, the Republican Caucus is 100 percent opposed to gun control, and there’s probably even some swing state Democrats who would vote against significant gun reform, too.

  • Judy Woodruff:

We heard President Biden say today, if he had one thing he could get done, it would be the ability to sue gun manufacturers over gun deaths.

Would that make a big difference?

  • Adam Winkler:

It could make a difference in the long run.

The gun makers were able to get a law passed by Congress back in the second Bush administration to restrict the ability of people to sue gun makers when their guns are used in crime. As a general matter, a gun maker is not going to be liable if a criminal misuses their firearms.

But we have seen in other industries that these kinds of lawsuits can open the door and open the window to see how these gun makers are operating, how they’re marketing their weapons. And it may be that they’re marketing them in ways designed to appeal to people who have violent desire to use guns offensively.

It would be a tough road, but it’s certainly possible.

  • Judy Woodruff:

Adam Winkler with the UCLA School of Law, thank you so much.

  • Adam Winkler:

Thank you.

Watch

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Streamed live on Apr 7, 2021  PBS NewsHour

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 9, 2021

Apr 9, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the Newshour, the United Kingdom mourns as Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth’s husband, dies at 99. Then, medical officials testify about the cause of George Floyd’s death in the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. We look at the inoculation effort for high-risk meatpacking plant workers, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart join us to discuss this week’s politics. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: U.S. to see sharp drop in Johnson & Johnson shots  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyvhW…? Medical examiner says Floyd’s death was a homicide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AA_bc…? What the end of unionization efforts at Amazon tells us https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF1ya…? Examining ‘building blocks to extremism’ within the military https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSNWS…? The push to vaccinate meat-packing plants workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Py2I3…? The long and often turbulent life of Prince Philip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fq1za…? Brooks and Capehart on the filibuster, reconciliation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8l3Sf…? The stories behind 5 wonderful lives cut short by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOcrO…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 8, 2021

Apr 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Biden administration announces new initiatives to curb gun violence. Then, many Evangelical leaders work to overcome reluctance to receive inoculations among their followers. The under told story of Jewish women’s resistance movement within Nazi run ghettos, the Auschwitz death camp. And a day with Gabby Giffords — grit, joy, music, and a drive to end gun violence. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Breaking down Biden’s plan to curb ‘blemish’ of gun violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVhzN…? News Wrap: Record number of minors arrive at southern border https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK02A…? Medical expert says lack of oxygen caused Floyd’s death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2AXQ…? How Biden’s infrastructure plan aims to tax offshore profits https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yf7O7…? One pastor reveals why evangelicals are COVID vaccine wary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpFXL…? The health care workers that lost their lives to COVID https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFCN9…? The heroic women-run resistance inside Nazi death camps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRW_K…? How music is helping Gabby Giffords rewire her brain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5br4C…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

Full Episode: Corporate Backlash on Voting Rights

Apr 9, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The battle over voting rights continues as big businesses criticize Georgia’s new voting laws. The panel discussed House Democrats’ voting rights bill H.R.1 and a new tape shedding light on dark money. Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report guest moderates. Panel: Errin Haines of The 19th, Eamon Javers of CNBC, Jane Mayer of The New Yorker Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek?? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs?? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek?? Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 10, 2021

Apr 10, 2021  NBC News

Prince Philip gets worldwide royal salute, outbreak of severe weather in the south, and U.S. braces for significant slowdown in Johnson & Johnson vaccine rollout. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 9th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 9, 2021  NBC News

Remembering Britain’s Prince Philip, medical examiner testifies on George Floyd’s cause of death, and how the pandemic impacted American workers’ wages. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:02? Prince Philip, Husband Of Queen Elizabeth, Dies At 99 04:52? Queen Elizabeth Mourning Her Husband Of 73 Years 05:52? Pathologist: George Floyd’s Death Caused By Asphyxia 06:12? Medical Examiner Who Conducted Floyd Autopsy Testifies 06:33? Medical Examiner: Heart Disease Factored In Floyd’s Death 07:04? Defense Argues Drugs & Heart Conditions Killed Floyd 07:35? Harrowing Week Of Testimony For George Floyd’s Family 08:31? J&J Vaccine Adverse Reactions Reported In Three States 09:16? J&J Shipments Expected To Plunge 80 Percent Next Week 09:32? New Covid Cases & Hospitalizations Rising Across U.S. 10:01? Pfizer Asks FDA To Authorize Vaccine For Children 12 To 15 10:21? Biden Forms Commisison To Study Expanding Supreme Court 11:09? House Ethics Panel Opens Investigations Into Matt Gaetz 11:32? New Images Of Migrants Crossing U.S. Border 11:42? Texas Governor Alleges Abuse At Migrant Child Shelter 12:22? 20,000+ Migrant Children Held In U.S. Custody 12:42? Migrant Families Reunited After Dangerous Journey 13:13? Media Denied Access To Texas Migrant Child Shelter 13:26? NBC News Joint Investigations Into Capitol Attack 14:56? Casino Gives Workers Permanent Raise Amid Pandmeic 16:53? Valcano Eruption Forces Evacuation On Caribbean Island 17:11? Rap Star DMX Dies After Heart Attack At 50 17:34? FBI Warns Fake Vaccination Cards Being Sold Online » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 8th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 8, 2021  NBC News

At least 1 killed, multiple injured in Texas workplace shooting, medical expert testifies George Floyd died from ‘low level of oxygen’, and new Covid infections rising in younger people. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:05? Sheriff: Deadly Mass Shooting At Texas Workplace 03:18? Sheriff: EX-NFL Player Killed 5 In Mass Shooting 04:54? Biden Announces Executive Actions On Gun Violence 07:22? Medical Expert: George Floyd Died From “Low” Oxygen 09:05? Toxicologist: Low Amount Of Meth In Floyd’s Blood 09:12? Medical Examiner Expected To Testify Tomorrow 09:58? New COVID Infections Rising Among Ages 10 TO 19 10:25? Alarming Surge In New COVID Cases In Midwest 10:45? Rare COVID ‘Breakthrough Investigations’ After Vaccination 11:19? Colorado & North Carolina Sites Halt Use Of J&J Vaccine 11:43? Reduced Testing May Hide True Number Of Infections 12:10? Experts: Suicidal Thoughts On The Rise In Young Children 15:33? What Will Officers Look Like After The Pandemic? 17:47? Holocaust Remembrance Day Observed As Hate Crimes Surge » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

Biden’s 11th Week in Office

Apr 9, 2021  NowThis News

‘We still have a lot of work to do’ — Biden celebrated 150M vaccine shots, pushed for his ‘once-in-a-generation’ $2T American Jobs Plan, and announced six executive actions to curb gun violence. Here’s what week 11 of the Biden administration looked like. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more Biden news and U.S. politics, subscribe to NowThis News. #Biden? #AmericanJobsPlan? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? #NowThisNews? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories,

Top 5 Politics: April 4-9, 2021

Apr 9, 2021  NowThis News

WEEKLY TOP 5: White House press sec Jen Psaki faced off with a Fox News reporter, the Derek Chauvin murder trial continued, and Trump might have broken his own Coke boycott. Here are 5 must-see stories from the week. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more U.S. politics and world news, subscribe to NowThis News. #JenPsaki? #DerekChauvin? #Trump? #Politics? #News? #NowThis?

Jordan Klepper Debunks The “Good Guy with a Gun” Argument | The Daily Show

Apr 5, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

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Jordan Klepper Sees It All at The Capitol Insurrection | The Daily Social Distancing Show

Jan 12, 2021 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

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Unpacking the Capitol Riot & Four Years of Trump’s Bulls**t | The Daily Social Distancing Show

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Jan 19, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

New information comes out about the Capitol riot, Fox News pundits defend the rioters, Lindsey Graham takes a stand against President Trump but then backtracks, and Republicans call for unity. #DailyShow? #TrevorNoah? #DonaldTrump? Please visit https://www.dailyshow.com/FirstRespon…? to help provide medical and psychological treatment for first responders on the front lines of fighting COVID. Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh…?

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Jan 20, 2021  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

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The Washington Post

U.S. Capitol Police Officer William ‘Billy’ Evans killed in the line of duty

Officer William “Billy” Evans, who had served 18 years in the department. Evans was killed when a man rammed a car into two officers at a barricade outside the U.S. Capitol on April 2. (U.S. Capitol Police/AP)

By Michael Brice-Saddler,

Hannah Natanson and

Julie Tate

April 2, 2021 at 10:09 p.m. EDT

On Friday afternoon, hours after U.S. Capitol police officer William “Billy” Evans, was killed in the line of duty, two of his fellow officers pulled into the quiet suburban Virginia neighborhood where he was often seen with his children.

They began unloading several plastic bags of supplies — including snacks and a rack of blue Gatorade — from the back of their black SUV and carrying the haul into Evans’s house, stepping across a tidy, grassy garden with two turquoise lawn chairs, angled slightly toward each other. Neighbors stepped from an adjacent home conferred in soft voices with the officers, asking what else was needed and how they could help.

Evans was among two officers injured when a vehicle rammed into them outside the U.S. Capitol, according to acting U.S. Capitol Police chief Yogananda Pittman.

His death comes less than three months after the agency’s officers fought to protect lawmakers by clashing with a riotous mob that descended on the Capitol building in January, leaving one officer dead and scores of others injured.

On Friday, Pittman was forced to address yet another deadly attack at the Capitol complex — this one resulting in the death of Evans, who joined the force in 2003 and was a member of the first-responder unit.

The assailant, identified by several people familiar with the investigation as Noah Green, was shot and killed by police.

“It is with profound sadness that I share the news of the passing of Officer William ‘Billy’ Evans this afternoon from injuries he sustained following an attack at the North Barricade by a lone assailant,” Pittman said in a statement.

Evans was the sixth member of the Capitol Police force to die in the line of duty, according to the department. The casualties include Officer Brian D. Sicknick, who died Jan. 7, one day after the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/william-evans-death-us-capitol-police/2021/04/02/d5718bf0-93f7-11eb-a74e-1f4cf89fd948_story.html?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most&carta-url=https%3A%2F%2Fs2.washingtonpost.com%2Fcar-ln-tr%2F319d876%2F60688c819d2fda1e56e0880f%2F5e7c4651ade4e21f59dc566e%2F12%2F70%2F60688c819d2fda1e56e0880f

The New York Times:

By Remy Tumin and Sarah Hughes  April 4, 2021
Doug Mills/The New York Times

3. Supporters of Donald Trump who thought they were sending a single donation were charged over and over by his campaign operation.

A Times investigation found that the charges were part of an intentional scheme to boost revenue to Mr. Trump’s struggling presidential campaign. Recurring online donations were set up by default, and a fine-print disclaimer and opt-out language became increasingly hard to find.

Demands for refunds spiked, and complaints to banks and credit card companies soared. The magnitude of the money involved is staggering for politics: All told, the Trump campaign and the Republican Party raised $1.2 billion with WinRed, a for-profit donation processing service, and refunded roughly 10 percent of it.

In effect, the overcharges were an interest-free loan — eventually paid off with some of the tens of millions of dollars Mr. Trump raised after the election under the guise of pursuing his unfounded claims of election fraud.

Reuters: Cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. reach peak bloom  25 Photos

Blooming cherry blossoms near the Washington Monument, March 28. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Priyanka Kaswan poses for a photo while sitting on a cherry tree at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 31. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Margarita Pineda throws flower petals over Amancio Pineda while taking a selfie at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 31. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

The U.S. Capitol Building is seen through a pair of cherry trees at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 31. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A woman enjoys the warm weather and blooming cherry blossoms by the Tidal Basin, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

Visitors walk along the Tidal Basin while observing the annual cherry blossoms near the National Mall, March 29. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A couple kisses for a camera as people observe the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Flower petals from cherry trees rest over muddy footprints from passing visitors at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 31. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A person runs through the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Paco Lane paints blooming cherry blossoms by the Tidal Basin, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

People enjoy the warm weather and blooming cherry blossoms by the Tidal Basin, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

People observe the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

A couple enjoys the warm weather under blooming cherry blossom trees by the Tidal Basin, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

People observe the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Moses Choy takes a picture of a distinguished cherry tree at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 29. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

A tree is illuminated by a camera flash as visitors observe the annual cherry blossoms at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 29. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial is surrounded by blooming cherry blossoms at the Tidal Basin, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

Visitors sit along a tidal wall while observing the annual cherry blossoms at the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, March 29. REUTERS/Tom Brenner

People enjoy the warm weather and blooming cherry blossoms by the Tidal Basin near the Washington Monument, March 27. REUTERS/Cheriss May

People observe the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Allie Provost poses for photographs amongst the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis

Local residents stand near quotes from Martin Luther King, Jr. at his memorial, while surrounded by blooming cherry blossoms, March 28. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Ashley Buchanan poses for photographs amongst the annual cherry blossoms in Washington, March 29. REUTERS/Leah Millis