PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, TED Talks, Scientific America, The New York Times, DailyTop10s and Dominique Lalonde Films Naturemes, Inhabitat,

PBS News: May 4 – 8, 2020, and Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Scientific America: Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

TED Talks: Dianna Cohen Tough truths about plastic pollution, and Melati and Isabel Wijsen Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The New York Times: The Morning

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

DailyTop10s: This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

 Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 8, 2020

May 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, as U.S. unemployment rises to its highest level since the Great Depression, more states let businesses reopen. Plus: How the government can address the economic crisis, COVID-19 in the American West, Pulitzer honors for local news, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the pandemic, the 75th anniversary of VE-Day and flowers for the sick. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Can states reopen their economies safely? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycq4J… Why U.S. economic crisis is even worse than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6O8E… News Wrap: Suspects in Ahmaud Arbery killing appear in court https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oysat… The western U.S. counties COVID-19 has barely reached https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_ZKk… 2 Pulitzer winners on the changing landscape of local news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyhS1… Shields and Brooks on DOJ politics, Trump’s economic hopes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITSQU… Remembering Americans lost to the coronavirus pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzKKN… What these World War II veterans remember most about VE-Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ4Rl… How this Calif. artist is sharing ‘Flowers for Sick People’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMjO1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 7, 2020

May 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, facing lost tax revenue and budget shortfalls, more U.S. states start to reopen. Plus: The Justice Department wants to drop the case against Michael Flynn, a public health expert on U.S. testing for COVID-19, Americans lose health insurance along with their jobs, pandemic in India, outcry over Ahmaud Arbery’s death and Ask Us questions about working during the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Pandemic’s economic damage spreads to all corners of U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-ZK6… Why does DOJ want to drop its case against Michael Flynn? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMBqP… News Wrap: Supreme Court overturns ‘Bridgegate’ convictions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szGZi… Public health expert fears states are reopening too soon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dj1hZ… For many Americans, layoff means loss of health insurance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw1vx… How COVID-19 is inflaming India’s religious tensions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Q3i… Ahmaud Arbery’s shooting a ‘hate crime,’ says his father https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3STD… Viewer questions about workplace safety during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaCWf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 6, 2020

May 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, more countries lift pandemic restrictions in the face of historic economic loss. Plus: Outcry over a black man’s shooting death in Georgia, the Supreme Court hears major cases remotely, the political battle over funding states and cities, South Dakota Sen. John Thune on pandemic response, new rules around campus sexual assault, COVID-19 in conflict zones and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The new life emerging after pandemic restrictions expire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XG2R… News Wrap: New reports of pandemic fallout in North Korea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=866PE… Video appearing to show Ahmaud Arbery killing sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFmsd… 2 major cases come before a Supreme Court operating remotely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsX2p… State, local workers: Federal aid not ‘a red or blue issue’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XEB-… Sen. Thune on funding states, PPP and safety in the Senate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8y0h… What Trump’s Title IX rules mean for survivors, the accused https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooa3… Are people in medical crisis avoiding ER due to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7y0z… In Libya and Yemen war zones, COVID-19 adds a 2nd front https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwPsE… Southwest Airlines CEO on ‘worst economic environment’ ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01M7E… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 5, 2020

May 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump makes his first cross-country trip since the pandemic took hold of American life. Plus: Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on reopening his state, when critical COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter, the global competition for scarce protective medical gear, what the pandemic means for mental health, high mortality for British people of color and quarantine DIY. Correction: Due to an editing error in Malcolm Brabant’s segment on the United Kingdom, we incorrectly said that country was now second to the United States in per capita rate of deaths due to COVID-19. The UK is second in total deaths to the United States, per official counts. The NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Traveling to Arizona, Trump dismisses new death projections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXe0x… News Wrap: DNI pick Ratcliffe vows to avoid political bias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lra6W… Gov. Asa Hutchinson on he’s ready to reopen Arkansas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Bx8F… When lifesaving COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vCuA… Why the U.S. has struggled to source enough PPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0Dh7… The ominous impact of COVID-19 on American mental health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLYiM… An intimate portrait of a British family’s COVID-19 loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rJdU… Stuck at home, some Americans are mastering new skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deZal… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Apr 21, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

An investigation into the U.S. response to COVID-19, from Washington State to Washington, D.C. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate How did the U.S. become the country with the worst known coronavirus outbreak in the world? FRONTLINE and veteran science reporter Miles O’Brien investigate the American response to COVID-19, and examine what happens when politics and science collide. #Coronavirus #Documentary #COVID-19 Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,955,984 509 1,319,306 275,188
United States 1,318,289 4,000 182,930 78,244
Spain 223,578 4,747 133,952 26,478
Italy 217,185 3,605 99,023 30,201
United Kingdom 211,364 3,181 31,241
Russia 198,676 1,354 31,916 1,827
Germany 170,588 2,052 138,214 7,510
Brazil 145,894 690 59,297 10,017
France 138,421 2,064 55,782 26,230
Turkey 135,569 1,630 86,396 3,689
Iran 104,691 1,256 83,837 6,541
China 82,887 59 78,046 4,633
Canada 66,434 1,749 30,226 4,569
Peru 61,847 1,925 19,012 1,714
India 59,662 44 17,847 1,981

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/stopping-deforestation-can-prevent-pandemics/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=earth&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-05-06_top-stories&spMailingID=64678544&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1880744581&spReportId=MTg4MDc0NDU4MQS2

Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

By THE EDITORS on May 1, 2020

Credit: Taylor Callery

SARS, Ebola and now SARS-CoV-2: all three of these highly infectious viruses have caused global panic since 2002—and all three of them jumped to humans from wild animals that live in dense tropical forests.

Three quarters of the emerging pathogens that infect humans leaped from animals, many of them creatures in the forest habitats that we are slashing and burning to create land for crops, including biofuel plants, and for mining and housing. The more we clear, the more we come into contact with wildlife that carries microbes well suited to kill us—and the more we concentrate those animals in smaller areas where they can swap infectious microbes, raising the chances of novel strains. Clearing land also reduces biodiversity, and the species that survive are more likely to host illnesses that can be transferred to humans. All these factors will lead to more spillover of animal pathogens into people.

Stopping deforestation will not only reduce our exposure to new disasters but also tamp down the spread of a long list of other vicious diseases that have come from rain forest habitats—Zika, Nipah, malaria, cholera and HIV among them. A 2019 study found that a 10 percent increase in deforestation would raise malaria cases by 3.3 percent; that would be 7.4 million people worldwide. Yet despite years of global outcry, deforestation still runs rampant. An average of 28 million hectares of forest have been cut down annually since 2016, and there is no sign of a slowdown.

Societies can take numerous steps to prevent the destruction. Eating less meat, which physicians say will improve our health anyway, will lessen demand for crops and pastures. Eating fewer processed foods will reduce the demand for palm oil—also a major feedstock for biofuels—much of which is grown on land clear-cut from tropical rain forests. The need for land also will ease if nations slow population growth—something that can happen in developing nations only if women are given better education, equal social status with men and easy access to affordable contraceptives.

Producing more food per hectare can boost supply without the need to clear more land. Developing crops that better resist drought will help, especially as climate change brings longer, deeper droughts. In dry regions of Africa and elsewhere, agroforestry techniques such as planting trees among farm fields can increase crop yields. Reducing food waste could also vastly lessen the pressure to grow more; 30 to 40 percent of all food produced is wasted.

As we implement these solutions, we can also find new outbreaks earlier. Epidemiologists want to tiptoe into wild habitats and test mammals known to carry coronaviruses—bats, rodents, badgers, civets, pangolins and monkeys—to map how the germs are moving. Public health officials could then test nearby humans. To be effective, though, this surveillance must be widespread and well funded. In September 2019, just months before the COVID-19 pandemic began, the U.S. Agency for International Development announced it would end funding for PREDICT, a 10-year effort to hunt for threatening microbes that found more than 1,100 unique viruses. USAID says it will launch a new surveillance program; we urge it to supply enough money this time to cast a wider and stronger net.

In the meantime, governments should prohibit the sale of live wild animals in so-called wet markets, where pathogens have repeatedly crossed over into humans. The markets may be culturally important, but the risk is too great. Governments must also crack down on illegal wildlife trade, which can spread infectious agents far and wide. In addition, we have to examine factory farms that pack thousands of animals together—the source of the 2009 swine flu outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people in the U.S. and multitudes worldwide.

Ending deforestation and thwarting pandemics would address six of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals: the guarantee of healthy lives, zero hunger, gender equality, responsible consumption and production, sustainably managed land, and climate action (intact tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide, whereas burning them sends more CO2 into the atmosphere).

The COVID-19 pandemic is a catastrophe, but it can rivet our attention on the enormous payoffs that humanity can achieve by not overexploiting the natural world. Pandemic solutions are sustainability solutions.

Read more about the coronavirus outbreak here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

THE EDITORS

Recent Articles

Artist Dianna Cohen shares some tough truths about plastic pollution in the ocean and in our lives — and some thoughts on how to free ourselves from the plastic gyre.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dianna Cohen · Artist and activist

Dianna Cohen co-founded the Plastic Pollution Coalition, which is working to help end our cycle of plastics use.

Mission Blue Voyage | April 2010

Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they’re used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts — including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike — paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. “Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’re too young or you won’t understand,” Isabel says to other aspiring activists. “We’re not telling you it’s going to be easy. We’re telling you it’s going to be worth it.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melati and Isabel Wijsen · Activists

Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to ban plastic bags in Bali.

TEDGlobal>London | September 2015

The New York Times    The Morning      May 7, 2020

By David Leonhardt

Good morning. We’ve made some changes to this newsletter, and we welcome any feedback you have.
More kids are going hungry. States are reopening without a declining number of coronavirus cases. And mom and dad disagree about who’s doing the home schooling. Let’s start with President Trump’s climate agenda.
Dismantling the rules

A coal-fired generating station in Sidney, Mont. Janie Osborne for The New York Times

This newsletter will often start with coronavirus news. And you’ll always find plenty of news about it below. But the virus isn’t the only story we’re going to cover in depth.
Today, we’re going to start with another one of the world’s vital stories: the battle over climate policy.
Shortly after taking office, President Trump and congressional Republicans found an innovative way to reduce business regulations, one of their top policy priorities. They began using a 1996 law — called the Congressional Review Act, and rarely used before — that allowed them to reverse rules enacted by the Obama administration in its final few months.
Now that Trump’s first term is winding down, administration officials realize that the same law could undo some of their policies — if the Democrats win in November. So the administration has been hurrying to finish as many regulations as possible this spring, to make sure they are not vulnerable to reversal under the Review Act.
And the administration has been particularly focused on the environment. As Nadja Popovich, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Kendra Pierre-Louis of The Times report: Trump’s drive to dismantle major climate and environmental policies is now mostly complete.
This agenda, Trump and his aides say, helped to speed up economic growth (before the coronavirus lockdown) by giving companies more flexibility to behave as they want. Many climate and health experts counter that the rule changes are leading to more pollution-related illnesses and are accelerating climate change.
The Times, working with academic researchers, has created a graphic with all 64 of Trump’s environmental rollbacks, as well as an additional 34 in progress. Among the areas where rules have been loosened:
  • vehicle pollution
  • power-plant emissions
  • braking systems on trains hauling flammable liquids
  • dumping of coal-mining debris into streams
  • chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to developmental disabilities in children
  • species endangered by climate change
The larger debate: The Times editorial board has argued that Trump’s policy “imperils the planet,” while National Review has praised Trump for pursuing “American dominance in energy production.”
1. More kids are going hungry
A food distribution center in Queens.Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
The coronavirus pandemic is creating a hunger crisis: More than 17 percent of young children in the United States lack sufficient food, according to research — a rate three times higher than during the worst of the Great Recession.
The most likely explanations are the rise in unemployment and the interruption in school meal programs. “I’ve eaten a lot less just to make sure they get what they need,” said one Ohio woman, who is trying to make $170 in monthly food stamps go far enough to feed her grandchildren.
Here’s what else is happening

Ian Prasad Philbrick, Lara Takenaga, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com.

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

https://inhabitat.com/inspiring-rammed-earth-hospital-brings-affordable-care-to-rural-nepal/

written by Lucy Wang  on April 28,2020

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

An inspiring beacon of humanitarian architecture has arrived to one of the poorest and most remote regions of Nepal — the new Bayalpata Hospital in Accham. Opened earlier this month to replace an aged and overrun clinic, the new hospital is a model of sustainable rural health made possible through a collaboration between the government of Nepal and NGO Possible Health. New York City-based Sharon Davis Design crafted the 7.5-acre campus, which is built primarily from locally sourced rammed earth and powered by rooftop solar panels. oearth and powered by rooftop solar panels.

Located on a hilltop surrounded by the terraced slopes of the Seti River Valley, the new Bayalpata Hospital is expected to provide low-cost, high-quality care to more than 100,000 patients a year from Accham and its six surrounding districts — a number that’s more than eight times its original capacity. The hospital comprises five medical buildings with outpatient, inpatient, surgery, antenatal and emergency facilities for 70 beds as well as clinical functions such as pharmacy, radiology and laboratory spaces. The campus also includes an administration block for offices, a 60-seat cafeteria and 10 single-family houses plus an eight-bedroom dormitory to house the hospital staff and their families.

Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal”

Because of the site’s remote and mountainous location, the hospital is primarily built from rammed earth using a low-tech construction method and local labor. Soil from the site was mixed with 6% cement content for stabilization and seismic resistance. This mixture was then formed into blocks with reusable plastic formwork and set atop foundations constructed from local stone, which was also used for pathways and retaining walls.

Local Sal wood was used for built-in furniture, exterior doors and louvers. In addition to the thermal mass of the massive rammed earth walls, passive heating and cooling design strategies were used to keep the hospital comfortable year-round. The campus also includes a new water supply and storage, wastewater treatment facilities and bioswales to manage monsoon-driven erosion. The hospital’s south-facing roofs are topped with a grid-connected 100 kW photovoltaic array that is powerful enough to generate all of the campus’ electricity needs.

“We see this project as a model of how rammed earth, and other vernacular materials, can be utilized to create modern architecture,” said Sharon Davis, principal of Sharon Davis Design. “Without local materials, this project may not have been possible because of its incredibly remote location — a 10-hour drive from the nearest regional airport and a three-day drive on narrow, mountainous roads from the nearest manufacturing centers around Kathmandu.”

+ Sharon Davis Design

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

Aug 6, 2019  DailyTop10s

The world is home to thousands of species of caterpillars, and some of them are very unique indeed. These are the strangest caterpillars on the planet! DailyTop10s brings you fun and informative top ten lists in a variety of different topics. Join us and sub for regular posts. If you have a top ten topic you’d like us to do make a video on, let us know in the comments! We usually focus on top tens that bring educational / informational value to the viewer. Thanks for watching DailyTop10s!

Category  Entertainment

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015  Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Copyright Dominique Lalonde Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, TED Talks, BBC Click, DW Documentary, Dominique Lalonde Films Nature, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Photographs

 PBS News: 9.30-10.5.2019, The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film)  FRONTLINE,

TED Talks:  Tim Flannery Can seaweed help curb global warming?,  Safeena Husain A bold plan to empower 1 6 million out of school girls in india?, Ashweetha  Shetty H ow Education helped  me rewrite my life, How trees talk to each other- Suzanne Simard

BBC Click: Can Tech Solve the Opioid Crisis?

DW Documentary: By train across Sri Lanka,

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

Thisiscolossal: Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

Ing’s Photographs: Monarch Butterflies at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 5, 2019

Oct 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 5, the latest on the impeachment inquiry and the months-long battle between Beijing and protestors over the future of Hong Kong. Also, tourists flock to King’s Landing as “Game of Thrones” lives on in Croatia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live show October 4, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 3, 2019

Oct 3, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Donald Trump reiterates his desire for foreign involvement in investigating the Biden family, saying he might ask China about the idea. Plus: The implications of Trump’s recent actions, problematic water in Flint five years after the lead crisis, what’s at stake in the General Motors strike, a book on U.S. border policy and China’s booming art market. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 2, 2019

Oct 2, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Democrats threaten the White House with subpoenas if they don’t turn over documents related to the Ukrainian affair. Also: Former Sen. Jeff Flake on the GOP’s future, 2020 Democrats on addressing gun violence, China’s electric car market transforms the auto industry, wheelchair tennis players blaze a trail and a Brief but Spectacular take on picturing the possibilities. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Democrats to White House: Time is up to produce documents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFsNM… News Wrap: Sanders cancels events after heart procedure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=103G7… How Republicans see the impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb7uQ… Where 2020 Democrats stand on gun violence policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5317-… How China is driving the future of electric cars https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdQmi… How wheelchair tennis models success for adaptive sports https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhsra… Why seeing a role model who looks like you is so powerful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cqf5… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode October 1, 2019

Oct 1, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the president, attorney general and secretary of state are now at the heart of the impeachment inquiry that questions contacts with foreign leaders. Also: Officers in Hong Kong open fire on a young activist, fears of global surveillance as China exports its technology, an explosion of images of child sex abuse and what we’ve learned about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Pompeo, Democrats clash over whistleblower inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4ukc… News Wrap: Iraqi forces fire on protesters in Baghdad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VIhv… Report: Barr asked foreign leaders to help in probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPbQA… Hong Kong violence contrasts China’s anniversary pomp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JX0LS… Critics say this Chinese tech spreads authoritarianism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPV-h… Why it’s so hard to stop images of child sex abuse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L75D… How Khashoggi’s murder ‘haunts’ Saudi Arabia’s crown prince https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4z59… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 30, 2019

Sep 30, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump lashes out as the impeachment inquiry moves forward and his former Homeland Security adviser raises concerns. Also: Presidential candidate Cory Booker on his self-imposed fundraising deadline, analysis from Politics Monday, questions of a Chinese surveillance state amid a rapid tech boom, and author Sally Rooney answers readers’ questions. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump focuses on whistleblower as inquiry deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFrcs… News Wrap: Kremlin says it must O.K. Putin-Trump transcript https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOTYU… 2020 Democrats talk impeachment on the campaign trail https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRKkI… Booker: Impeachment inquiry ‘not about popularity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZgyv… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Democrats’ impeachment path https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pWSj… How China’s high-tech ‘eyes’ monitor behavior and dissent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bae3X… ‘Conversations with Friends’ author answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIGSM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film) | FRONTLINE

Sep 28, 2019

FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Note from FRONTLINE: This version of “The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia” has sporadic technical glitches with the audio. We have corrected the problem and posted a new version here: https://youtu.be/SVa2xqeIbkg One year after the murder of columnist Jamal Khashoggi, FRONTLINE investigates the rise and rule of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) of Saudi Arabia. In a never before seen or heard conversation featured in the documentary, the Saudi Crown Prince addresses his role in Khashoggi’s murder exclusively to FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith. Smith, who has covered the Middle East for FRONTLINE for 20 years, examines MBS’s vision for the future, his handling of dissent, and his relationship with the United States. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: https://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE films available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/1BycsJW #MBS #SaudiArabia #Khashoggi Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: https://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category   News & Politics

It’s time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work that’s still needed to get there.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Tim Flannery · Environmentalist

Explorer and professor Tim Flannery seeks to grasp the big picture of planetary evolution and how humans can affect it — for better or for worse.

“Girls’ education is the closest thing we have to a silver bullet to help solve some of the world’s most difficult problems,” says social entrepreneur Safeena Husain. In a visionary talk, she shares her plan to enroll a staggering 1.6 million girls in school over the next five years — combining advanced analytics with door-to-door community engagement to create new educational pathways for girls in India. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Safeena Husain · Social entrepreneur

Safeena Husain has worked extensively with rural and urban underserved communities in South America, Africa and Asia. After returning to India, she chose the agenda closest to her heart — girls’ education — and founded Educate Girls.

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A new model to inspire change at scale

The Audacious Project

Learn more about The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to fund ambitious ideas for social good.

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learn

Learn more about how Educate Girls mobilizes communities for girls’ education in India.

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TED2019 | April 2019

There’s no greater freedom than finding your purpose, says education advocate Ashweetha Shetty. Born to a poor family in rural India, Shetty didn’t let the social norms of her community stifle her dreams and silence her voice. In this personal talk, she shares how she found self-worth through education — and how she’s working to empower other rural youth to explore their potential. “All of us are born into a reality that we blindly accept — until something awakens us and a new world opens up,” Shetty says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Ashweetha Shetty · Rural social worker

Through her nonprofit, Bodhi Tree Foundation, Ashweetha Shetty supports first-generation college students in rural India to explore their potential through education, life skills and opportunities.

Can Tech Solve The Opioid Crisis? – BBC Click

Sep 30, 2019  BBC Click

Seventy thousand Americans are dying each year from drug overdoses. Two-thirds are the result of opioid addiction. Technology companies have been accused of helping facilitate the illicit sale of drugs online, but are they really to blame? Warning: This programme contains people affected by drug abuse. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

By train across Sri Lanka | DW Documentary

Sep 20, 2017  DW Documentary

Asia’s most beautiful railway line? The “Main Line” cuts through tea plantations and jungle, then passes Buddhist temples and relicts of the British Empire. In the 19th century the British built a railway in what was then their colony of Ceylon. Their idea was to transport goods such as tea from the highlands to the port of Colombo. Today it’s mainly only locals and tourists who use the so-called “Main Line.” The route is considered one of the most picturesque in the whole of Asia. Our trip takes us from the capital, Colombo, to Ella in the highlands. Our first stop is one of the country’s largest elephant orphanages. And then on to Kandy, the former capital of the Singhalese kingdom. The city is home to the famous Temple of the Tooth, which is said to house the Buddha’s top left canine. The train then winds its way further up into the highlands. We watch tea pickers at work and go to a tea factory to discover where the aroma comes from. Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s highest town at an altitude of almost 1900 meters, where a racecourse still brings the colonial era back to life. The stations have also retained their own colonial charm: in 1901, a signaling system was set up to make the long journey safer. And those suffering from the altitude can catch their breath at the final stop, the spa in Ella. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

How trees talk to each other | Suzanne Simard

Aug 30, 2016 

“A forest is much more than what you see,” says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at https://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category  Science & Technology

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category   Pets & Animals

Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

June 8, 2013  Christopher Jobson

It is almost impossible these days to click around the web without running into the work of filmmaker and architectural photographer Rob Whitworth who spends months at a time filming immersive time-lapse videos in some of Asia’s largest cities. Whitworth is currently based in Shanghai where he recently completed his latest film, This is Shangai in conjunction with JT Singh. While often extremely fast-paced it’s amazing to see the filmmaker’s camera move so effortlessly through space, a trick he achieves with the use of extremely high-powered telephoto lenses and other filming techniques. I’ve included two additional videos above which you many have seen elsewhere but are certainly worth another view.

Update: You can read a great interview with Rob over at Asia Blog.

Ing’s Photographs: I captured these Monarch Butterflies with my camcorder at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019.  I saw four Monarch Butterflies this day.

If you have more time please visit the following link:

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PBS News, CNA 24/7 LIVE, DW Documentary, Thisiscolossal, TED Talks, ArranEve, my thought spot, Mother and Baby Care, How Possible, NASA Live, BBC Click, Ing’s Garden and Video, Dominique Lalonde Films Nature,

PBS News:  September 12 – 15, 2019, Climate activist Greta Thunberg on the power of a movement and How blockchain technology could revolutionize the art market

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

DW Documentary: Turning toxic – The Bayer-Monsanto merger

 Thisiscolossal: Splash and Burn: An Artist-Led Initiative Raising Awareness About the Negative Effects of Palm Oil Production in South Asia and REWILD: A Short Film by Splash and Burn and ESCIF Chronicles Rainforest Restoration Efforts in Sumatra

ArranEve: Naked Raku ~ The Full Monty

TED Talks: Jochen Wegner What happened when we paired up thousands of strangers to talk politics?

my thought spot: A Brief Thought Experiment ~ The Island

Mother and Baby Care: Foods to Eat During Pregnancy for Intelligent Baby

How Possible: Fetal development month by month: Stages of Baby Growth in the Womb

NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV

BBC Click: Will Space Tourism Take Off?

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: Ing’s Garden:  Monarch Butterfly and Butterflies & Bees Backyard Garden Newark-Video on YouTube, www.ingpeaceproject.com

 Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 15, 2019

•Published on Sep 15, 2019

PBS NewsHour   1.38M subscribers

On this edition for Sunday, September 15, a look ahead to this week’s election in Israel, the author and physicist Sean Carroll on the existence of parallel lives, and do the recent presidential debates show a growing rift between moderates and progressives in the Democratic Party? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 14, 2019

Published on Sep 14, 2019

PBS NewsHour   1.38M subscribers

On this edition for Saturday, September 14, the Bahamas brace as another tropical storm heads their way, the Trump administration announces federal changes to the Clean Water Act, and a legal rule that allows someone to be put away for murder even if they weren’t the one who committed it. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

Climate activist Greta Thunberg on the power of a movement

PBS NewsHour   1.38M subscribers

Although more Americans than ever are worried about climate change, less than 40 percent expect to make “major sacrifices” to tackle the problem. But according to Greta Thunberg, a Swedish teenager and climate activist, drastic action is exactly what’s needed to address the problem. William Brangham sits down with Thunberg to discuss galvanizing young people across the globe to the climate cause.

PBS NewsHour full episode September 12, 2019

PBS NewsHour

1.37M subscribers

Thursday on the NewsHour, the leading 10 Democratic presidential candidates face off on the debate stage for the first time. Plus: Impeachment momentum in the House, CEOs of major U.S. companies pressure the Senate on gun legislation, ongoing conflict in Syria, why the Federal Election Commission’s operations are limited, the pinch of tariffs on the lobster industry and an oral history of 9/11. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 14, 2019

CNA   378K subscribers

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our news service: WhatsApp: https://cna.asia/whatsapp Telegram: https://t.me/cnalatest Follow CNA on the following platforms: https://www.cna.asia https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia https://t.me/cnalatest

Category   News & Politics

Turning toxic – The Bayer-Monsanto merger | DW Documentary

•Published on Sep 11, 2019

DW Documentary

912K subscribers

A year after Germany’s Bayer Group took over Monsanto, and it’s struggling to deal with the US seed giant’s controversial reputation. Now Bayer is also liable for Monsanto’s legal bills – which are starting to mount alarmingly. Roundup, a herbicide containing glyphosate sold worldwide by Monsanto has long been suspected of causing cancer. A California court has just awarded more than $2 billion in damages to a couple who had claimed that their use of the pesticide caused them to develop non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma . Bayer’s share price halved last year, and the consequences are already making themselves felt in the company itself: Around 12,000 jobs worldwide are to be cut in the next few years, a considerable proportion of them in Germany. CEO Werner Baumann, who pushed for the merger, is coming under increasing pressure. Voicing criticism, a majority of shareholders voted against absolving Baumann and other managers of their responsibility in the merger. Bayer is in the midst of its greatest crisis. The film traces the effects of the merger and investigates potential new health hazards emanating from glyphosate. How has Monsanto tried in the past to influence politicians, scientists and public opinion? Did the Americans actually play down or ignore the dangers? And does Bayer really distance itself from these practices? ——————————————————————– Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… Our other YouTube channels: DW Documental (in spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (in arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more documentaries visit also: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

Splash and Burn: An Artist-Led Initiative Raising Awareness About the Negative Effects of Palm Oil Production in South Asia

May 4, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Drone footage still of “Save Our Souls” by Ernest Zacharevic. All images provided by Splash and Burn.

Indonesia is the world’s largest exporter of palm oil, the harvesting of which has been shown to have extremely adverse effects on wildlife and natural resources, including deforestation, fires, and the displacement of people and animals. Lithuanian artist Ernest Zacharevic (previously) witnessed this devastation during his time spent photographing and traveling throughout the country, and decided to found the initiative Splash and Burn to spread public awareness about the resource’s inhumane production.

“A state of global environmental crisis is defining our generation,” Zacharevic tells Colossal. “As consumers, we are so disconnected from the source of our commodities that we do not recognize the impact of our daily choices. This project is an effort to bridge that gap.”

“Save Our Souls” (2018) by Ernest Zacharevic

The organization’s name comes from slash-and-burn, the cheap practice of burning land to clear the way for new plantations, a method that releases toxic smoke, and has been linked to more than 500,000 respiratory infections. For two years Zacharevic researched these issues effecting Indonesia’s population, meeting with NGOs, locals, and wildlife sites to educate himself on the organizations fighting against the practices and attempting to heal from their destruction.

After researching the area and its local organizations, like the Orangutan Information Centre, the Lithuanian artist invited several fellow creatives to respond to the native landscape and the palm oil crisis through art installations. Since February, international artists have created murals, sculptures, and other works throughout Sumatra. Pieces include an orangutan mural painted by VHILS, Isaac Cordal’s miniature hazmat suit installation, and Zacharevic’s plantation intervention in which he inserted the message SOS into the landscape’s trees.

Mural by Alexandre Farto aka VHILS, image credit: Ernest Zacharevic

“I wanted to communicate the magnitude of the problem to a wider audience, as well as provide creative outlook, hope, and inspiration to local communities and conservationists,” says Zacharevic in a press release about the work. “From the ground, you would not suspect anything more than just another palm oil plantation, the aerial view however reveals an SOS distress signal. ‘Save our Souls’ is a message communicated to those at a distance, a reminder of the connectedness we share with nature. As more of the forests are lost, we lose a little bit of ourselves in the process.”

So far Splash and Burn has worked with Anders Gjennestad aka Strøk, Axel Void, Bibichun, Gabriel Pitcher, Isaac Cordal, Mark Jenkins, and Pixel Pancho. The ongoing initiative is curated by Zacharevic and coordinated by Charlotte Pyatt. To follow upcoming installations or support the project’s efforts visit the Sumatran Orangutan Society website or Splash and Burn’s Instagram.

Work by Strøk aka Anders Gjennestad (2017), image credit: Anders Gjennestad

Work by Ernest Zacharevic (2017), photo credit: Ernest Zacharevic

Work by Isaac Cordal (2017), photo credit: Isaac Cordal

Work by Ernest Zacharevic , photo credit: Tan Wei Ming

REWILD: A Short Film by Splash and Burn and ESCIF Chronicles Rainforest Restoration Efforts in Sumatra

September 10, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

To draw attention to the ecological devastation wrought by palm oil farming in Southeast Asia, the Splash and Burn project (previously) creates and documents large and small-scale art activations. The initiative’s most recent endeavor, titled REWILD and executed with Spanish artist ESCIF, involved carving a rewind symbol into a palm oil plantation in Sumatra, Indonesia, and creating a short film documenting the effort. ESCIF explains, “the idea of going back, of rewinding, is an invitation to reconnect with ourselves; to recover awareness and respect for the earth, which is the ecosystem of which we are a part.”

The land art intervention took place on an acquired plantation within a new forest restoration site made possible by the Sumatran Orangutan Society. After clearing the palms, diverse vegetation has been re-planted. In a release about the project, Splash and Burn explains that the restoration site is located on the borders of the Leuser Ecosystem, one of the most biodiverse places on earth. Sumatra’s forests—and the wildlife populations within—have shrunk by 40% in the past two decades, replaced by palm oil, paper pulp, and rubber plantations. Though not commonly known in the U.S. as a cooking oil, palm oil is the most widely consumed oil on the planet, found in everything from chocolate and instant noodles to lipstick and laundry detergent.

You can watch the trailer of REWILD below. It features an abstract soundscape by Indonesian composer Nursalim Yadi Anugerah. If you are interested in contributing, head to moretrees.info, and follow Splash and Burn (comprised of Ernest Zacharevic and Charlotte Pyatt) on Instagram.

How blockchain technology could revolutionize the art market

PBS NewsHour   Published on Sep 11, 2019

The technology underpinning blockchain is a powerful decentralizing network architecture that could revolutionize many industries. Now, some artists are leveraging blockchain to help guarantee the authenticity of their work — and ensure that they get paid. Miles O’Brien reports on how digital documentation is putting power back into artists’ hands, even when no tangible object exists. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Naked Raku ~ The Full Monty

ArranEye  Published on Jan 11, 2017

Potter Simon Thorborn shows every step involved in this process. Simon has been perfecting his art on the Scottish Isle of Arran since 1986.

Category   Howto & Style

In spring 2019, more than 17,000 Europeans from 33 countries signed up to have a political argument with a complete stranger. They were part of “Europe Talks,” a project that organizes one-on-one conversations between people who disagree — sort of like a Tinder for politics. Editor Jochen Wegner shares the unexpected things that happened when people met up to talk — and shows how face-to-face discussions could get a divided world to rethink itself.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jochen Wegner · Journalist

Jochen Wegner edits Zeit Online, the website of German weekly “Die Zeit,” which prizes deep dives into cultural issues.

Todd William: A Brief Thought Experiment ~ The Island

What would you do to Survive?

If you found yourself on a deserted island, with no hope of being found, what might be your biggest priorities. If you chose to live, it would no doubt be water and food, followed by some sort of shelter.

Once you’ve established these, ensuring your safety and health would soon follow. And should those needs be met, you could then get to work on improving the quality of your life, for starters, making all the prior efforts as minimal as possible.

The less time you have to waste gathering food, repairing your shelter, or running from danger, the more time you have to spend doing whatever you would like to do.

Reality

But this is considerably different than ordinary life. For one, we have different objectives. We don’t merely eat food to live, we live to eat good foods. We don’t just care about shelter, we care about curb appeal

Our everyday needs are so easily met that almost all our focus and concerns are directed toward things that are not essential to life, they are just creature comforts. We are very fortunate to live in a time period when we can concern ourselves mostly with how we want to improve our lives, not with merely maintaining that life.

We have no reason to apologize for this. We don’t live on a deserted island, and improving our quality of life has value. That we’ve reached a point where most of our daily efforts are put towards creature comforts rather than necessities is a fine tribute to human ingenuity. Yet the implications of this are easily overlooked.

Jobs

Most jobs are about the icing on the cake. Once you move beyond things that involve food, water, housing, safety, and health, the necessity of any job begins to quickly fall into the that grey area where usefulness is purely subjective.

The point isn’t that these jobs aren’t worthwhile, its that we’re addicted to the icing, and we should be. Why not improve our lives. But this addiction keeps us blind to the possibilities. 

Technology

We’ve reached a point when we can realistically discus the possibility that technology may be able to replace most jobs. This is a scary notion. Yet maybe it shouldn’t be. 

If the use of technology permits us to produce all of life’s essentials with negligible manual effort, then all jobs would be related to icing. Any job losses related to technology would merely determine the amount of icing any of us would share.

There would no doubt be disparity, but in exchange, the notion of working to “get by” would be gone. Life would suddenly be merely a matter of how you decide to use your time – and that has more to do with imagination than circumstance.

This is a hard concept to fathom because we’re so accustomed to assessing the value of our lives by comparing what we possess relative to those around us.

But isn’t more appealing to judge the value of life by the amount of quality time we have as our disposal? That is the great equalizer. No matter how much power, wealth, or influence you have, you’re still getting the same 24 hours a day that we all get.

The Island

We don’t live on an isolated island, but we do live on an isolated planet. Maybe its not so different after all, we just need to get over our addiction.

Consider for a moment what it would mean if you no longer felt compelled to always have more . If food, water, shelter, health, and safety we’re all guaranteed to you, might you look at your job differently? Would you feel a bit more selective on how you use your time??

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.my-thought-spot.com/2017/01/a-brief-thought-experiment-island_12.html

Foods to Eat During Pregnancy for Intelligent Baby

Published on Dec 16, 2017

Mother and Baby Care

As an expectant mother, you need to ensure that your diet has all the nutrients and energy needed for your baby to develop properly. You also must ensure that your baby’s body is healthy as this will enable him or her to deal with the different developmental changes. What women eat during pregnancy affects the physical and mental development of their child. You can have some foods that will increase the brain power of your child. Not only during pregnancy, you must start eating these foods at the time when you decide to conceive. Have a look at some foods that you can eat during pregnancy to get intelligent baby.

Category   People & Blogs

Fetal development month by month: Stages of Baby Growth in the Womb

•Published on Jul 13, 2017

How Possible

66.8K subscribers

You’re pregnant. Congratulations! Are you curious how big your developing baby is, what your baby looks like as it grows inside you, and when you’ll feel it move? Take a peek inside the womb to see how a baby develops from month to month without any medical ultrasound or appointment with women’s health doctor. Month 1: (Weeks 4) 00:16 Month 2: (Weeks 8) 01:05 Month 3: (Weeks 12) 01:56 Month 4: (Weeks 16) 02:51 Month 5: (Weeks 20) 03:31 Month 6: (Weeks 24) 04:18 Month 7: (Weeks 28) 04:58 Month 8: (Weeks 32) 05:32 Month 9: (Weeks 36) 05:57 Visit these links for more videos related this! Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/howpossible Twitter: https://twitter.com/howpossiible Google plus: https://plus.google.com/1040794440430… Can this video is help? Please leave your answer in comment Thank you! for watching Fetal development month by month: Stages of Baby Growth in the Womb during pregnancy.

Category   People & Blogs

NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV

•Started streaming on Dec 28, 2018

NASA

Direct from America’s space program to YouTube, watch NASA TV live streaming here to get the latest from our exploration of the universe and learn how we discover our home planet. NASA TV airs a variety of regularly scheduled, pre-recorded educational and public relations programming 24 hours a day on its various channels. The network also provides an array of live programming, such as coverage of missions, events (spacewalks, media interviews, educational broadcasts), press conferences and rocket launches. In the United States, NASA Television’s Public and Media channels are MPEG-2 digital C-band signals carried by QPSK/DVB-S modulation on satellite AMC-3, transponder 15C, at 87 degrees west longitude. Downlink frequency is 4000 MHz, horizontal polarization, with a data rate of 38.86 Mhz, symbol rate of 28.1115 Ms/s, and ¾ FEC. A Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) compliant Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD) is needed for reception.

Category   Science & Technology

Will Space Tourism Take Off? – BBC Click

•Published on Sep 15, 2019

BBC Click

Click travels to Spaceport USA in New Mexico to speak to the team behind Virgin Galactic and learn more about their plans to put tourists into space. We also test out a new virtual reality experience and celebrate the 20th anniversary of the cubesat. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

Ing’s Garden:  Monarch Butterfly

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Sunday, September 8, 2019 at our backyard garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey

       Ing’s Garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey     Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Butterflies & Bees Backyard Garden Newark

naahblubiv

Published on Aug 21, 2012

In downtown Newark, New Jersey, surrounded by walls of brick and concrete buildings there is a small plot of land. This peaceful garden is cultivated to create a little heaven on earth for a simple person who loves nature. In this garden red, pink, orange, yellow, purple, and other colors of beautiful flowers contrast with varying shades of green creating a palette of color reminiscent of a Monet artwork. There is a little table and a few chairs for one or more company to relax in the evening with a gentle breeze bringing the fragrance of Jasmine and other flowers mesmerizing us with peace and tranquility in a moment of utopia on earth. Oh look, Monarch, swallowtail, and other butterflies are dancing around the flowers tasting the sweetness of nectar! A bee is hovering nearby cleverly drinking the nectar from a butterfly bush flower, for the first time teaching me how this is done. At the same time butterflies are using their long proboscis to pierce deep into the center of the flowers drinking up the nectar as though through a straw. For many moons and many summers, I have enjoyed my little plot of heaven on earth. Now it is a time for me to share this with others to help them calm down and enjoy nature before we leave this earth for good.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Category   Education

Music in this video  

Learn more   Listen ad-free with YouTube Premium

Song   String Quartet No. 1 in B-Flat Major, Op. 1 No. 1, Hob. III:1 “L

Artist   Caspar da Salo Quartet

Album    Haydn: Strings Quartets Nos. 1, 63 & 77

The life of Monarch Butterfly

•Published on Sep 12, 2015

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category   Pets & Animals

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