Ing & John’s & The International Street Art Part 11 & 12

Ing & John’s Street Art and The International Street Art-Part 11

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 11

Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

September 9 – 13, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Left:        Midnight – John Watts’ Artwork

Middle: Vincent van Gogh’s Broken Frames– Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ Artwork

Right:    Homage to the Dragon – John Watts’ Artwork

John Watts’ Sculptures

Kai, The Artist, our grandson, who just turned four years old.

Kai’s Painting on Friday, September 13, 2019

John and our old friend and neighbor, Trifon

After working very hard with his painting, the artist spends time to exam the flowers.

We are happy to display our artworks in public.  There seems to be a positive reaction from the people who view them.  People comment about the beautiful plants and unique artwork.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Monday, January 10, 2020,

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 11

Ing & John’s Street Art and The International Street Art-Part 12

The International Street Art-Part 12

PangeaSeed’s Sea Walls Program Works to Save Earth’s Oceans One Mural at a Time

June 2, 2019  Andrew LaSane

NYCHOS

Combining art and activism, the PangeaSeed Foundation is a Hawaii-based nonprofit organization tha is doing its part to help save Earth’s waters with its “Sea Walls: Artists For Oceans” international mural program. Since its inception in 2014, over 350 ocean-themed murals have been painted in 15 countries by the organization’s network of over 300 artists. With activations in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Mexico, and several other locations around the globe, the initiative engages the public and educates the world about critical environmental issues threatening our most precious resources through art, film screenings, and discussions.

PangeaSeed founder and executive director Tré Packard tells Colossal that when it comes to choosing which artists to work with and what they should paint, balance and community are key. “We always aim to create a balance between international, national and local artists,” he said. “Over the years, with the Sea Walls: Artists for Oceans program being nomadic, we’ve learned the importance of community ownership of the murals once we’ve packed up and left town. There tends to be so many incredible local creatives in the areas we host projects, so we work hand in hand with the local project director to help identify local artists who we invite to participate in the project.” Artists are given a list of topics to choose from and together with the team narrow it down to one. The murals are site-specific in that they address issues relevant to the places where they are painted. Some artists have even connected with local scientists and activists during the planning stage to better inform their designs.

Aaron Glasson and Jason Botkin

“The beauty of public art lies in the fact that it is a public good where even ‘non-artsy’ folks can be touched and empowered by experiencing the process or the finished product,” Packard said about the mural  program. “In addition to encouraging other artists to create for a purpose, our chief goal is to effect positive behavioral change at the individual and community level, so we’re thrilled when fans who aren’t artistically inclined are moved.” As for ways that people can get involved and help, he suggests finding ways to use less plastic, eating sustainable seafood, and voting for politicians with ocean-minded ideas.

Packard says that there are some dream projects on the horizon for Sea Walls, but those details are still under wraps for now. To learn more about the foundation and its upcoming activations, follow @pangeaseed and @Seawalls_ on social media.

Seth Globepainter

Onur

Spok

Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

June 7, 2019Kate Sierzputowski

Baltimore-based artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, known as Jessie and Katey, started creating murals because of the sheer accessibility of public art. The pair have always created work with a big visual impact, but as their designs grew they began to consider the possibility of working on the ground in addition to large-scale walls. Their site-specific floor works combine inspirations from both textiles and board games to create interactive walkways that encourage play and exploration. Jessie and Katey explain to Colossal that “the compositions are inspired by the viewer and how they might travel through the work. It’s really fun watching little kids interact with the floor murals—they always know what to do.”

The math behind both textile design and quilting is an aspect that the pair must consider when painting their large-scale works, and have started to inform how the pair begins each piece’s early designs. “We approach our large-scale work a bit like screen printers, even though we don’t screen print,” the pair explains. “Our process of execution is very methodical and we tend to think in planes or layers. This is probably a result of having to develop concepts and adapt them to larger spaces in a short amount of time. It’s interesting that painting murals has informed how we paint murals.”

This summer Jessie and Katey are working with the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore to create a site-specific mural for the Foundation’s new community space. The artists will also be painting a piece in Sacramento in collaboration with Wide Open Walls and later this fall will be working on an immersive installation incorporating recycled materials at Baltimore’s Goucher College, a rare opportunity for the pair to work in three dimensions. You can view more of Jessie and Katey’s work on their website and Instagram

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Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art – Part 12

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PBS News, TED Talks, Washington Post, Best Documentary, Global News, ABC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: December 31, 2019 and January 1 – 7, 2020, Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many, Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

TED Talks: The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live – David Brooks, How to escape education’s death valley, Bring on the learning revolution!,   Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit,  – Sir Ken Robinson, Guy Winch How to turn off work thoughts during your free time,

Washington Post: On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.,

Best Documentary: A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Global News: In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

ABC News: The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost

Thisiscolossal: VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside, The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

PBS NewsHour live episode, Jan 7, 2020

Started streaming 42 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 6, 2020

Jan 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Iran mourns Gen. Qassem Soleimani, killed by the U.S. in an airstrike on Friday. Plus: Possible political and military repercussions of the Soleimani killing, a Senate impeachment trial in limbo, 2020 Democrats focus on foreign policy amid Iran tensions, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer, political upheaval in Venezuela and refugee artists in exile in France. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Iranians unite to mourn military giant Qassem Soleimani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Srd… Iranian ambassador on revenge for Soleimani’s death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4TE-… News Wrap: Pelosi to introduce war powers resolution on Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjMS7… What killing of Iranian general means for U.S., nuclear deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBQPB… What Pelosi, McConnell are saying about impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdGje… Iran tensions put foreign policy in focus for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_nxV… Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer on Soleimani death, Iowa polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Wku… Venezuela’s political crisis roiled by chaos in parliament https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKBXl… In Europe, can art change the conversation around refugees? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlIm2… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 5, 2020

Jan 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 5, tensions escalate in the Middle East amid an outpouring of grief over the killing of Iran’s top military leader by a U.S. airstrike. Also, our ongoing series “Peril & Promise” examines the impact of climate change on communities along the Mississippi River in Louisiana and Missouri. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode January 4, 2020

Jan 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 4, the diplomatic fallout over the killing of Iranian military leader Qassim Suleimani, wildfires rage out of control in Australia, and the first part of our ongoing Peril and Promise series explores how climate change is impacting communities along the Mississippi River. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode Jan. 3, 2020

Jan 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a targeted U.S. attack in Baghdad kills a top Iranian general, raising ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Iran to new heights. Plus: American lawmakers respond to the killing of Qassam Soleimani, what’s next for the U.S. and Iran after Soleimani’s death, disinformation on the 2020 campaign trail and Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the week’s political news. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Who was Qassam Soleimani, and what does his death mean? https://youtu.be/Y1Ih9abqb6w Kaine says Trump’s Iran policy is hurting U.S. allies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8zyB… Risch says Soleimani was ‘ratcheting up’ attacks on the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhHJF… Why the U.S. targeted Soleimani — and how Iran might react https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1u2f7… News Wrap: Senate still divided on impeachment trial process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejXH-… How 2020 candidates are grappling with online disinformation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syCEN… Shields and Brooks on Soleimani’s death, 2020 fundraising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX5ID… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 2, 2020

Jan 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Australia is still burning amid a record fire season that has destroyed millions of acres and killed 17 people. Plus: Financing the 2020 presidential race, President Trump’s support among evangelical Christians, why millennials are leaving organized religion, what’s in the huge 2020 federal spending bill, Carlos Ghosn flees Japan and psycholinguist Jean Berko Gleason. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 1, 2020

Jan 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a standoff outside the U.S. Embassy in Iraq ends — but tensions over American involvement in the country remain high. Plus: What North Korea’s nuclear decision means for relations with the U.S., new laws go into effect as 2020 begins, Antarctic penguins warn of climate change consequences, the decline of local newspapers and harvesting water from fog. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Death in Australian wildfires rises to 17 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LE2U… Crisis at Baghdad embassy is over, but tensions remain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vl9wR… Amid stalled U.S. talks, Kim Jong Un’s ‘major policy shift’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ocQU… How state laws are changing in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAtFe… What America is losing as local newsrooms shutter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSVIX… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 31, 2019

Streamed live on Dec 31, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, 2020

Dec 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week’s political news, including the battle between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over rules for a Senate impeachment trial, how the presidential primary race is shaping up among 2020 Democrats and the year’s most surprising political developments. Sream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many

Dec 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

British painter J.M.W. Turner was both prolific and peripatetic, producing more than 30,000 watercolors during a lifetime in which he traveled throughout Europe. But these works are extremely susceptible to light damage and can be shown only once in a generation. Now, they’re on view at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut — their only North American stop. Jared Bowen of WGBH reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

Dec 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

By almost any measure, 2019 was a year of especially sobering news on climate change, with grim warnings about what could happen in the future along with extreme weather events occurring now. The year also saw a global protest movement, initiated by young people, arise to try to tackle the problem. But as Miles O’Brien reports, the call for action was often divorced from political reality. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live | David Brooks

Jul 3, 2019   TED

Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy. Get TED Talks recommended just for you! Learn more at https://www.ted.com/signup. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here: https://media-requests.ted.com/ Follow TED on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category   People & Blogs

How to escape education’s death valley | Sir Ken Robinson

May 10, 2013  TED

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at https://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category   Education

Bring on the learning revolution! | Sir Ken Robinson

May 24, 2010  TED

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at https://www.ted.com/translate. Follow us on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/tednews Checkout our Facebook page for TED exclusives https://www.facebook.com/TED

Category   Education

Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit

Aug 13, 2018   Better Together: California Teachers Summit

At the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit, Sir Ken Robinson, a leading education and creativity expert, delivered the keynote address from the Summit’s headquarters at Cal State Fullerton. Sir Ken’s thought-provoking speech challenged California’s teachers to transform our education system by building personal relationships and developing the appetite and curiosity of learners. Because, as he put it, “when the conditions are right, miracles happen everywhere.”

Category   Education

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Guy Winch · Psychologist, author

Guy Winch asks us to take our emotional health as seriously as we take our physical health — and explores how to heal from common heartaches.

More Resources

How to Fix a Broken Heart

Guy Winch

TED Books (2018)

Emotional First Aid

Guy Winch

Plume (2014)

Buy now ?

About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | November 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

2°C: Beyond the limit

On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.

By Darryl Fears  Photos by Bonnie Jo Mount
Graphics by John Muyskens and Harry Stevens Dec. 27, 2019

BRUNY ISLAND, Tasmania — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia’s ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Rodney Dillon noticed the day he squeezed into a wet suit several years ago and dove into Trumpeter Bay to catch his favorite food, a big sea snail called abalone. As he swam amid the towering kelp forest, he saw that “it had gone slimy.” He scrambled out of the water and called a scientist at the University of Tasmania in nearby Hobart. “I said, ‘Mate, all our kelp’s dying, and you need to come down here and have a look.’

“But no one could do anything about it.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/img/1800/ECE6XKHZEMI6THQCDVC4WPP2R4.jpg

Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined. Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making.

Climate change had arrived at this island near the bottom of the world, and the giant kelp that flourished in its cold waters was among the first things to go.

Over recent decades, the rate of ocean warming off Tasmania, Australia’s southernmost state and a gateway to the South Pole, has climbed to nearly four times the global average, oceanographers say.

More than 95 percent of the giant kelp — a living high-rise of 30-foot stalks that served as a habitat for some of the rarest marine creatures in the world — died.

Giant kelp had stretched the length of Tasmania’s rocky east coast throughout recorded history. Now it clings to a tiny patch near Southport, the island’s southern tip, where the water is colder.

“This is a hot spot,” said Neil Holbrook, a professor who researches ocean warming at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “And it’s one of the big ones.”

Click any temperature underlined in the story to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit

Climate scientists say it’s essential to hold global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times to avoid irreversible damage from warming.

The Tasman Sea is already well above that threshold.

The Washington Post’s examination of accelerated warming in the waters off Tasmania marks this year’s final installment of its global series “2C: Beyond the Limit,” which identified hot spots around the world. The investigation has shown that disastrous impacts from climate change aren’t a problem lurking in the distant future: They are here now.

Nearly a tenth of the planet has already warmed 2 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century, and the abrupt rise in temperature related to human activity has transformed parts of the Earth in radical ways.

In the United States, New Jersey is among the fastest-warming states, and its average winter has grown so warm that lakes no longer freeze as they once did. Canadian islands are crumbling into the sea because a blanket of sea ice no longer protects them from crashing waves. Fisheries from Japan to Angola to Uruguay are collapsing as their waters warm. Arctic tundra is melting away in Siberia and Alaska, exposing the remains of woolly mammoths buried for thousands of years and flooding the gravesites of indigenous people who have lived in an icy world for centuries.

Australia is a poster child for climate change. Wildfires are currently raging on the outskirtsof itsmost iconic city and drought is choking a significant portion of the country.

Nearly 100 fires are burning in New South Wales, nearly half of them out of control. Residents of the state, where Sydney sits, wear breathing masks to tolerate the heavy smoke, which has drifted more than 500 miles south to the outskirts of Melbourne.

This is happening even though average atmospheric temperatures in Australia have yet to increase by 2 degrees Celsius.

The ocean is another story.

A stretch of the Tasman Sea right along Tasmania’s eastern coast has already warmed by just a fraction below 2 degrees Celsius, according to ocean temperature data from the Hadley Center, the U.K. government research agency on climate change.

Sea surface temperature change in a region off the coast of Tasmania

Trend

1900195019802018-202ºF above 1900-2018average-101ºC above 1900-2018average

+1.9ºCAnnual average for the region

Source: Met Office Hadley Center for Climate Science and Services

As the marine heat rises and the kelp simmers into goo, Dillon and other descendants of Tasmania’s first people are losing a connection to the ocean that has defined their culture for millennia.

Aboriginals walked to present-day Tasmania 40,000 years ago during the Stone Age, long before rising sea levels turned the former peninsula into an island.

Cut off from Aboriginals on the mainland, about a dozen nomadic tribes were the first humans to live so close to the end of the Earth, fishing amid the giant kelp for abalone, hunting kangaroo and mutton birds, turning bull kelp into tools, and fashioning pearlescent snail shells into jewelry for hundreds of generations.

But that was before British colonizers took their land and deployed an apartheid-like system to wipe them out.

Now, as descendants try to finally get full recognition as the first people and original owners of Tasmania, climate change is threatening to remove the marine life that makes so much of their culture special.

Two of the most severe marine heat waves ever recorded struck back to back in recent years.

In the first, starting in 2015, ocean temperatures peaked at nearly 3 degrees Celsius above normal in the waters between Tasmania and New Zealand. A blob of heat that reached 2 degrees Celsius was more than seven times the size of Tasmania, an island the size of Ireland.

The region’s past heat waves normally lasted as long as two months. The 2015-2016 heat wave persisted for eight months. Alistair Hobday, who studied the event, compared it to the deadly 2003 European heat wave that led to the deaths of thousands of people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/heat-wave-map-2-medium.jpg?v=5

Marine heat waves, Feb. 1, 2016

MAINLAND

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

Mild heat wave

Moderate

TASMANIA

Severe

Extreme

100 MILES

Source: Robert Schlegel, Ocean Frontier Institute

“Except in this case, it’s the animals that are suffering,” said Hobday, a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, a government agency.

South of the equator, Australia’s summer stretches from December to February — and soaring temperatures turned the mainland deadly this year. An estimated 23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of that species’s population in Australia — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April.

The bats, called flying foxes, cannot survive temperatures above 42 degrees Celsius. Another 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into meadows, backyard gardens and swimming pools.

A month later, more than 100 ringtail possums fell dead in Victoria when temperatures topped 35 degrees Celsius for four consecutive days.

The warming waters off Tasmania are not just killing the giant kelp, but transforming life for marine animals.

Warm-water species are swimming south to places where they could not have survived a few years ago. Kingfish, sea urchins, zooplankton and even microbes from the warmer north near the mainland now occupy waters closer to the South Pole.

“There’s about 60 or 70 species of fish that now have established populations in Tasmania that used not to be here,” said Craig Johnson, who leads the ecology and biodiversity center at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “You might see them occasionally as sort of vagrants, but they certainly did not have established populations.”

But the region’s indigenous cold-water species have no place to go. Animals such as the prehistoric-looking red handfish are accustomed to the frigid water closer to the shore. They cannot live in the deep-water abyss between the bottom tip of Tasmania and Antarctica.

“It’s a geographic climate trap,” Johnson said. Marine animals unique to Australia — the wallabies and koalas of the deep — could easily vanish. “So there’s going to be a whole bunch of species here that we expect will just go extinct.

“You know, it’s not a happy story.”

Genocide

Every time he dives for abalone, Rodney Dillon plays his part in what is arguably Tasmania’s saddest story of all.

At 63, he’s getting too old for the occasional plunge. Before a dive on a windy day in September, two people had to wrestle his wet suit over a thick athlete’s body softened by time.

Dillon persists because diving puts a favorite food on the family table, and, more important, it carries on a dying Aboriginal custom nearly ended by the British crown and the Australian governors it appointed.

A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Jun 3, 2017  Best Documentary

Enduring raging winds and icy waters with minimal protection, he enters the intimacy of elephant seals and orcas using clever ethological analyses and gets them used to his presence. Then comes the extraordinary: meet a man who communicates with penguins with body language, calms young seals and turns them into live pillows, lies underwater with 8 ton orcas or mature male seals…

Category   Pets & Animals

In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

Dec 31, 2019  Global News

Global News looks back at the exceptional individuals we said goodbye to in 2019, with a retrospective produced by Global National’s Eric Sorensen and videographer Trevor Owens. For more info, please go to https://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: https://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: https://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: https://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #2019PeopleWeLost #GlobalNews #2019InMemoriam

Category   News & Politics

The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost l ABC News

Dec 23, 2019  ABC News

We lost many legends this year, from actress Valerie Harper to “Beverly Hills 90210” star Luke Perry, fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt and ABC News’ own Cokie Roberts. #ABCNews #ValerieHarper #BH90210 #LukePerry #CokieRoberts #GloriaVanderbilt

Category News & Politics

VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside

March 24, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects / Hiroyuki Oki

Blurring the line between the interior and exterior, Vo Trong Nghia Architects designed and built a three-level residential home in Ho Chi Minh City that is overflowing from within with fiddle leaf fig plants, various palms, and winding vines. Going beyond arrangements of potted house plants, the architects integrated the flora into the physical structure. Corridors, staircases, and rooms are lined with natural dividers that add color, block sunlight, and ventilate the space.

The latest project in the firm’s “House for Trees” series, the Stepping Park House is a commentary on environmental issues in Vietnam caused by a lack of green spaces. Views of the exterior show that the driveway, balconies, and perimeter fence have also sprouted leaves. The top floor of the building has an open slatted design with spaces that are filled with even more greenery, which further connects the home with the surrounding environment, and in particular to the rare park nearby. (via Jeroen Apers)

The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

September 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

A sinuous new gallery and bridge reaches across the Randselva River in Jevnaker, Norway. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the aluminum-clad structure joins north and south river fronts on the campus of Kistefos Sculpture Park. 15,000 square feet of space allows visitors to explore Kistefos’s large art collection while also taking in the surrounding landscape through floor-to-ceiling windows. The Twist opened to the public on September 18th, with an exhibition featuring the work of conceptual artist Martin Creed and painter Howard Hodgkin. Kistefos Sculpture Park has  ticketed admission, which includes entry to The Twist, and is open seasonally from the end of May to mid-November. (via Design Milk)

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PBS News, TED Talks, WIRED UK, Scientific American, NASA, EcoFarmVideo and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: December 25 – 30, 2019, Mysterious death of White Helmets co-founder spotlights toxic propaganda, China: Power and Prosperity — Watch the full documentary

TED Talks: Cara E Yar Khan The beautiful balance between courage and fear, Katie Hinde What we don’t know about mother’s milk and  Kate Slabosky The three different  ways mammals give birth

WIRED UK: Shenzhen – The Silicon Valley of Hardware (Full Documentary)

Scientific American: A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing–It Could Be a Warning

NASA’s Giant Leaps, Past and Future: Saluting Apollo Heroes and Looking Forward to Artemis Missions, SpaceX #CrewDragon Demonstration Flight Return to Earth

Thisiscolossal: Radically Diverse Australian Fungi Photographed by Steve Axford, Wildlife Intertwine in Finely Rendered Mythological Worlds by Lauren Marx, Unsettling Illustrations of Tangled Flora and Fauna Beings by Alex Kuno, and Wildlife Intertwine in Finely Rendered Mythological Worlds by Lauren Marx

EcoFarmVideo: Mushrooms, Mycology of Consciousness – Paul Stamets, EcoFarm Conference Keynote 2017,

PBS NewsHour full episode, Dec 30. 2019

Dec 30, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, weekend attacks on Jewish and Christian congregations send shockwaves nationwide, reiterating fears of violence toward religious groups. Plus: The fallout from U.S. airstrikes on an Iran-backed militia group in Iraq, 2020 Democrats campaign in Iowa and New Hampshire, Politics Monday with Susan Page and Domenico Montanaro and our Now Read This book club for December. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 29, 2019

Dec 29, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, December 2019, a suspect was arraigned in the stabbing attack that injured five people during a Hanukkah celebration at a rabbi’s home in New York. Also, NewsHour Weekend producers and reporters discuss some of their biggest stories in 2019. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 28, 2019

Dec 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, December 28, a truck bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia, killed at least 78 people and injured more than 120 others, and how winter storms across the southeast and plains are affecting travel this holiday weekend. Also, NewsHour Weekend producers and reporters reflect on some of their favorite stories from 2019. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Dec 27, 2019

Dec 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, how Iran is responding to internal pressure from mass protests and external pressure from U.S. sanctions. Plus: What the outcry over a new Indian citizenship law says about the country’s secular values, Mark Shields and David Brooks review the politics of 2019 and preview 2020 and a new film imagines the interactions between Popes Benedict and Francis. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Dec 26, 2019

Dec 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, how months of mass protest have contributed to political gridlock in Iraq. Plus: Why U.S. territories in the Caribbean are still recovering from 2017 hurricanes, Zimbabwe’s worsening food crisis, experimentation in the economics of development, a critically acclaimed memoir, rare J.M.W. Turner watercolors on display and a Brief But Spectacular take on Beach Boy life. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Hong Kong protesters target shopping malls again https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kgbx2… Why Iraq has been unable to find a new prime minister https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHLX_… Why hurricane recovery in U.S. islands remains underfunded https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGPco… In Zimbabwe, 60 percent of the population is food insecure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rufQk… How these 2 Nobel winners are challenging popular economics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXFiT… Sarah Broom on ‘The Yellow House’ and New Orleans East https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtdAI… Watercolors of J.M.W. Turner make rare appearance in U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3_J5… Mike Love’s Brief But Spectacular take on Beach Boy life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xoHa… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode December 25, 2019

Dec 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, as the year concludes, we examine what it told us about the problem of climate change — and how to address it. Plus: How foreign policy has evolved over the past decade, repairing Notre Dame Cathedral after a devastating fire, late night TV with Lilly Singh, a conversation with “The Other Americans” author Laila Lalami and military musicians sing “Carol of the Bells.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Mysterious death of White Helmets co-founder spotlights toxic propaganda

Dec 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

A month after the suspicious death of White Helmets co-founder James Le Mesurier in Turkey, British officials are being urged to conduct a thorough investigation of the incident. Friends and colleagues fear Le Mesurier may have been murdered or driven to suicide by a relentless campaign of character assassination. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on how propaganda maligned him. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

After being diagnosed with a rare genetic condition that deteriorates muscle, Cara E. Yar Khan was told she’d have to limit her career ambitions and dial down her dreams. She ignored that advice and instead continued to pursue her biggest ambitions. In this powerful, moving talk, she shares her philosophy for working on the projects that matter to her most — while letting courage and fear coexist. Watch for heart-stopping, vertigo-inducing footage of a trip that shows her living her theory to the full.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Cara E. Yar Khan · Human rights and disability activist

Cara E. Yar Khan is an international human rights advocate promoting the inclusion of people with disabilities within all facets of society.

Breast milk grows babies’ bodies, fuels neurodevelopment, provides essential immunofactors and safeguards against famine and disease — why, then, does science know more about tomatoes than mother’s milk? Katie Hinde shares insights into this complex, life-giving substance and discusses the major gaps scientific research still needs to fill so we can better understand it.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Katie Hinde · Lactation researcher

Katie Hinde is studying breast milk’s status as the first superfood, providing babies with invaluable microbes custom-tailored to their individual needs, via an incredible and unlikely dialogue between the mother’s enzymes and the baby’s saliva.

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All mammals share certain characteristics, like warm blood and backbones. But despite their similarities, these creatures also have many biological differences — and one of the most remarkable differences is how they give birth. Kate Slabosky details the placental, marsupial, and monotreme methods of giving birth. [Directed by Compote Collective, narrated by Julianna Zarzycki, music by Big Banda Soundscapers].

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TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

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Shenzhen: The Silicon Valley of Hardware (Full Documentary) | Future Cities | WIRED

Jul 5, 2016  WIRED UK

Future Cities, a full-length documentary strand from WIRED Video, takes us inside the bustling Chinese city of Shenzhen. Subscribe to WIRED?? https://po.st/SubscribeWired We examine the unique manufacturing ecosystem that has emerged, gaining access to the world’s leading hardware-prototyping culture whilst challenging misconceptions from the west. The film looks at how the evolution of “Shanzhai” – or copycat manufacturing – has transformed traditional models of business, distribution and innovation, and asks what the rest of the world can learn from this so-called “Silicon Valley of hardware”. ABOUT FUTURE CITIES Future Cities is part of a new flagship documentary strand from WIRED Video that explores the technologies, trends and ideas that are changing our world. Subscribe to the WIRED YouTube channel to ensure you never miss an episode. HOLY LAND: STARTUP NATIONS (SERIES 2) Premiering in February, the second season of WIRED’s Future Cities series takes us inside one of the world’s biggest startup nations. With the most tech startups and venture capital per capita in the world, Israel has long been hailed as The Startup Nation. WIRED’s four-part series will look beyond Tel Aviv’s vibrant, liberal tech epicentre to the wider Holy Land region – the Palestinian territories, where a parallel Startup Nation story is emerging in East Jerusalem, Ramallah and the West Bank, as well as in the Israeli cybersecurity hub of Beersheba. And we will learn how the fertile innovation ecosystem of Silicon Wadi has evolved as a result of its unique political, geographical and cultural situation and explore the future challenges – and solutions – these nations are facing. CONNECT WITH WIRED Web: https://po.st/WiredVideo Twitter: https://po.st/TwitterWired Facebook: https://po.st/FacebookWired Google+: https://po.st/GoogleWired Instagram: https://po.st/InstagramWired Magazine: https://po.st/MagazineWired Newsletter: https://po.st/NewslettersWired ABOUT WIRED WIRED brings you the future as it happens – the people, the trends, the big ideas that will change our lives. An award-winning printed monthly and online publication. WIRED is an agenda-setting magazine offering brain food on a wide range of topics, from science, technology and business to pop-culture and politics.

Category   Science & Technology

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-russian-ice-cap-is-collapsing-it-could-be-a-warning/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily-digest&utm_content=link&utm_term=2019-12-23_top-stories&spMailingID=62377528&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1783775009&spReportId=MTc4Mzc3NTAwOQS2

A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing–It Could Be a Warning

A surge in glacial ice flow that created an “ice stream” is a concern for Greenland and Antarctica as well

By Chelsea Harvey, E&E News on December 23, 2019

A Russian Ice Cap Is Collapsing--It Could Be a Warning

Vavilov ice cap, June 24, 2018. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

High in the Russian Arctic, in the chilly waters straddling the Kara and Laptev, an 84-billion-ton island ice cap is projectile vomiting into the sea. Scientists say it could hold useful clues about what to expect as the world continues to warm.

The Vavilov Ice Cap, nestled in Russia’s Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, suddenly started to surge forward in 2013. This is not an uncommon event for glaciers — every so often, pressure will build up behind the ice and cause it to temporarily slip forward. These surge events can last anywhere from a few months to a year or more, and they’ll typically stabilize on their own.

But in 2015 — two years after the surge started — the Vavilov Ice Cap was still going. By then, it was moving faster than ever, flowing forward at a rate of about 26 meters per day and dumping 4.5 billion tons of ice into the sea over the course of a single year.

In total, Vavilov has lost about 9.5 billion tons of ice in the last six years.

Scientists monitoring the ice cap’s progress say it’s moved beyond a simple glacial surge. The rush of ice seems to have transitioned into a phenomenon known as an “ice stream,” a long-lasting, fast-moving flow of ice out of the glacier and into the surrounding landscape — or, in this case, the sea.

Scientists know ice streams exist in frozen places around the world, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. But according to a new paper describing the events at Vavilov, this is the first time researchers have documented an ice stream’s formation from the very beginning.

Now that they’ve seen how it happens, the researchers say their observations may hold clues about the future of the world’s glaciers as global temperatures rise.

“Now we know these ice caps could be more unstable” than previously believed, said lead study author Whyjay Zheng, a doctoral student at Cornell University. “We may possibly have to revise our future sea-level rise, considering this.”

Even when they appear to be stationary, glaciers are typically flowing forward — just so slowly it’s barely noticeable. There’s a reason for the phrase “moving at a glacial pace.” Until 2013, Vavilov Ice Cap was likely inching forward at an imperceptible rate.

The researchers believe the ice first began to surge when it pushed past a mound of sediment on the landscape that had previously served as a barrier holding it back. When this happened, it slid onto a smoother patch of bedrock and slipped forward.

“You used to have a gate that constrained the ice, and then you lose this gate,” Zheng said. “So all of this ice at a higher place just collapsed down into the ocean.”

The Vavilov ice cap is on a Russian island in the Arctic Ocean. Photo credit: NASA

Over time, as the movement of the ice accelerated, the scientists began to observe physical features that suggested the flow had morphed into an ice stream. Rifts and crevasses began to appear on the landscape around the moving ice, which showed up as dark stripes on satellite images. These cracks are typical features of ice streams.

While warming didn’t necessarily cause the initial surge, the researchers believe rising temperatures may be partly influencing the flow of ice, now that it’s on the move. During hotter summers — including unusually warm years in 2015 and 2018 — the researchers observed that the ice tended to flow even faster, slowing down again when the temperatures cool.

The scientists haven’t proved the temperatures are causing the faster ice flow, but they suspect there’s a connection. If so, it could mean even faster losses at Vavilov Ice Cap as the region warms.

Perhaps more importantly, the ice cap’s behavior has given scientists useful insight into the factors that cause ice streams to form in the first place. In Vavilov’s case, a shift in the bedrock beneath the ice seems to have been a key component. Afterward, faster ice flow seems to have helped the initial surge transform into a long-lasting, possibly permanent ice stream.

Scientists believe the much larger Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets may be vulnerable to these kinds of processes as temperatures rise.

Ocean-facing glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica are often stabilized by thick ledges of ice, or ice shelves, jutting out into the sea. A theory known as “marine ice sheet instability” suggests that as ice shelves melt and weaken, glaciers may begin to slip backward along the bedrock beneath them, pouring ice into the ocean at faster speeds. Eventually, they may give way to unstoppable losses, which may empty entire glaciers into the sea.

While Vavilov is a comparatively tiny patch of ice, it’s demonstrated similar processes in action, the researchers say. A stabilizing barrier broke down and allowed the ice to surge forward. The ice never stabilized, and it’s now become a fast-flowing ice stream.

What this means for the future of the Vavilov Ice Cap remains uncertain. It’s still too early to tell whether the stream will slow down again — or, in a worst case scenario, eventually drain the ice cap from the face of the island.

“One thing we have to do is to continue to monitor this place,” Zheng said. “Maybe for 10 more years or so.”


Reprinted from ClimateWire with permission from E&E News. E&E provides daily coverage of essential energy and environmental news at www.eenews.net.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Chelsea Harvey

Recent Articles

China: Power and Prosperity — Watch the full documentary

Nov 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

As China has risen in prosperity, influence and military strength, what are the social, economic and political forces at play? Come along with PBS NewsHour as we travel around the globe to explore the emerging superpower and its relationship with the United States. “China: Power and Prosperity” covers the country’s powerful leader, his signature foreign policy, U.S.-China trade and technology wars, how Chinese technology helps stifle dissent, and more. A collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, PBS NewsHour conducted more than 70 on-camera interviews in eight Chinese cities and across eight countries. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NASA’s Giant Leaps, Past and Future: Saluting Apollo Heroes and Looking Forward to Artemis Missions,

Streamed live on Jul 19, 2019  NASA

Fifty years ago, humans took their first steps on the Moon and the world watched as we made history. On July 19, 2019, we broadcast this live salute to our #Apollo50th heroes and looked forward to our next giant leap for future #Artemis missions to the Moon and Mars.

Category   Science & Technology

SpaceX #CrewDragon Demonstration Flight Return to Earth

Streamed live on Mar 8, 2019  NASA

Join us starting at 7:30 a.m. EST to see SpaceX’s #CrewDragon on its journey back to Earth, including its deorbit burn and splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean.

Category   Science & Technology

Radically Diverse Australian Fungi Photographed by Steve Axford

May 27, 2015  Christopher Jobson

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Photographer Steve Axford (previously) continues his quest to document some of the world’s most obscure fungi found in locations around Australia. Axford lives and works in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia where he often has to travel no further than his own back yard to make some of the discoveries you see here. The forms of fungi, slime molds, and lichens he prefers to document seem to have no limit in their diverse characteristics. Axford explained when we first featured his work last year that he suspects many of the tropical species he stumbles onto are often completely undocumented. You can follow more of Axford’s discoveries on Flickr and SmugMug.

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Mushrooms, Mycology of Consciousness – Paul Stamets, EcoFarm Conference Keynote 2017

Feb 16, 2017  EcoFarmVideo

EcoFarm Conference “Mycodiversity is our biosecurity. Let’s celebrate decomposition. Let’s let it rot.” Paul Stamets, speaker, author, mycologist, medical researcher and entrepreneur, is considered an intellectual and industry leader in fungi habitat, medicinal use, and production. He lectures extensively to deepen your understanding and respect for the organisms that literally exist under every footstep you take on this path of life. His presentations cover a range of mushroom species and research showing how mushrooms can help the health of people and planet. His central premise is that habitats have immune systems, just like people, and mushrooms are cellular bridges between the two. Our close evolutionary relationship to fungi can be the basis for novel pairings in the microbiome that lead to greater sustainability and immune enhancement. www.eco-farm.org

Category  Nonprofits & Activism

Unsettling Illustrations of Tangled Flora and Fauna Beings by Alex Kuno

March 8, 2017  Christopher Jobson

Minneapolis-based artist Alex Kuno imagines a world of twisted organic beings that borrow elements of plant life, anatomy, and the natural world. The artist admits that his illustrations are likely to creep some people out, but purposefully includes ideas that highlight life and growth, creating a dichotomy of revulsion and delight as the viewer carefully untangles each artwork. The mixed-media drawings are made primarily using ink, watercolor, graphite and chalk. You can see more of Kuno’s artwork on Instagram and limited edition prints are available in his shop. (via Booooooom)

Wildlife Intertwine in Finely Rendered Mythological Worlds by Lauren Marx

December 11, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

“Offerings” (2019), Pen, watercolor, ink, gel pen and colored pencil on paper. 26.75 x 42.5 inches

Sinuous, intertwined wildlife bridge worlds of the living and the dead in Lauren Marx’s intricate multi- media work. Twisting fox heads, disemboweled deer, and lambs bursting with flowers and birds are rendered with watercolor, ink, pen, and colored pencil. Marx often places her animal compositions on semi-abstract backgrounds, awash with grey tones that give a sense of weightlessness to the dense drawings by evoking fog or clouds.

The artist, who resides in her hometown of Saint Louis, Missouri, cites frequent trips to the Saint Louis Zoo, biology classes, and National Geographic television shows as cultivating her lifelong interest in animals. Her latest body of work debuts December 14, 2019, at Corey Helford Gallery. The show, titled Chimera, is an evolution from her previous pieces, combining multiple animals into each artwork to combine their symbolic meanings.

“From Our Flesh” diptych (2015), Pen, ink, colored pencil, graphite, and gel pen, 17.75 x 10 inches

Chimera further explores my concepts of fauna representations of emotions, personal mental health, family, and self,” Marx shares in a statement. “I am creating a mythological world, centered around North American flora and fauna, to better expresses my image of who I am, how I am perceived, my struggles with mental health, and to explore self-healing.”

Marx studied Fine Art at Webster University and draws inspiration from zoology, mythology, scientific illustration, and Northern Renaissance themes. The artist shares with Colossal that in 2020 she wants to continue to challenge herself technically and conceptually, and that works in the Chimera show brought her practice to new levels in terms of scale and complexity.

See Chimera through January 18, 2020, at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, and explore more of Marx’s intricate illustrative artwork on Instagram. The artist also offers prints and stickers on Etsy.

“Honey” (2019) Pen, watercolor, ink gel pen, gouache and colored pencil on mixed media paper, 31 x 37.25 inches

“Self-inflicted” (2016), Pen, ink, graphite, colored pencil, and gel pen on paper, 20 x 20 inches

“Nested Fawn” (2019), Pen, watercolor, ink, gel pen, gouache, and colored pencil on mixed media paper, 25.75 x 40 inches

“The First” (2016), Pen, ink, graphite, colored pencil, and gel pen on paper, 20 x 24 inches

“Snake-Bird” (2019), Pen, watercolor, ink, gel pen and colored pencil on mixed media paper 20 x 38 inches

“The Second” (2016), Pen, ink, graphite, colored pencil, gel pen, and acrylic on paper, 20 x 24 inches

“Lovely” (2018), Pen, watercolor, ink, colored pencil, gel pen, and graphite on paper, 17.5 x 22 inches 

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PBS News, Kaizen Habits, TED Talks, SciShow, Thisiscolossal, and mindsof ldaniels

PBS News: December 20 – 24, 2019

Kaizen Habits: 5 Habits That Will Help Your Brain Stay in Peak Condition

TED Talks: Jane Fonda Why I protest for climate justice, Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin a hilarious celebration of lifelong femalefriendship, Greta Thunberg The disarming case to act right now on climate change and 6 ways mushrooms can save the world by Paul Stamets

SciShow: What Really Killed the Dinosaurs?

Thisiscolossal: Blooms of Insect Wings Created by Photographer Seb Janiak, New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin, and New Ornate Ink Portraits of Lovable Dogs, and Fantastic Fungi: A New Film Explores Earth’s Vast Network of Mycelium and Mushrooms

mindsofldaniels: Snippet Series The Inevitable Intermission

PBS NewsHour full episode December 24, 2019

Dec 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, thousands of Syrian civilians are caught in the crossfire as forces loyal to the Assad regime advance on Idlib province. Plus: British officials investigate the mysterious death of White Helmets co-founder James Le Mesurier, how President Trump is rolling back energy-efficiency standards for household goods, the decade in entertainment and a festive song from U.S. troops. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 23, 2019

Streamed live 8 hours ago

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 22, 2019

Dec 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, December 22, both parties weigh in on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to delay submitting articles of impeachment to the Senate, and Democratic outsiders Andrew Yang and Tom Steyer discuss their campaign promises. Also, new details emerge on the freezing of aid to Ukraine. Yamiche Alcindor anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 21, 2019

Dec 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, December 21, the historic impeachment of Donald Trump, a government shutdown is averted, and Democratic presidential candidates Julian Castro and Deval Patrick join NewsHour Weekend from the campaign trail to discuss the 2020 race. Also, nationwide protests against a controversial citizenship law grip India. Yamiche Alcindor anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Dec 20, 2019

Dec 20, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, seven leading 2020 Democrats face off at the year’s final debate. Plus: Immigrants temporarily held in for-profit prisons complain of abuse, what happens to U.S. asylum seekers forced to remain in Mexico while their cases are processed, Shields and Brooks on politics, a new film version of the classic “Little Women” and two songwriters rediscover their passion for music. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS 2020 Democrats go from civil to combative in 6th debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEo9M… News Wrap: House of Commons approves Johnson’s Brexit plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSp0T… Why ICE is relying on for-profit prisons to house immigrants https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDUQ5… Asylum seekers waiting in Mexico face threat of violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejqfv… Shields and Brooks on impeachment fallout, Democratic debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jwTG… Greta Gerwig’s fresh take on the old favorite ‘Little Women’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kQuf… Songwriting duo Louis York on rediscovering musical passion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3ClX… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://medium.com/kaizen-habits/5-habits-that-will-help-your-brain-stay-in-peak-condition-7f830d7ae0b9?

5 Habits That Will Help Your Brain Stay in Peak Condition

Train your brain, change your brain

Thomas Oppong    Dec 12 · 5 min read

Image from rawpixel.com

Nothing about our brains is set in stone. Our brains are surprisingly dynamic. It can adapt, heal, renew or rewire itself.

What you do or don’t do daily is literally changing your brain for better or worse. But it’s not too late rejuvenate, remodel, and reshape your brain to stay in peak condition.

Experiments in neuroplasticity (the brain’s ability to change in response to experience) have proven that the brain is capable of modifying itself, either by changing its structure, increasing and reducing its size or altering its biochemistry.

Can you physically change your brain at any age? The answer is: yes, within limits. You can start with these science-backed activities and habits.

1. Juggling improves the brain’s grey matter

Yes, the simple act of juggling has recently been linked with better brain function. A new study reveals that learning to juggle may cause certain areas of your brain to grow.

The study found that volunteers who participated in a juggling exercise improved white matter in two areas of their brains involved in visual and motor activity.

‘We have demonstrated that there are changes in the white matter of the brain — the bundles of nerve fibres that connect different parts of the brain — as a result of learning an entirely new skill,’ explains Dr Heidi Johansen-Berg of the Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, who led the work.

‘In fact, we find the structure of the brain is ripe for change. We’ve shown that it is possible for the brain to condition its own wiring system to operate more efficiently,’ she added.

Four weeks after the study, the researchers found that new white matter in the jugglers’ brains had stayed put and the amount of grey matter had even increased.

The researchers chose juggling as a complex new skill for people to learn. Juggling is one of the many activities you can choose to help your brain improve its grey matter.

2. Never go to bed without learning one new thing, your brain will notice: stretch your brain muscles

It’s a Spanish saying. It’s profound and so true.

Juggling is not the only activity you can use to build white matter.

You can learn a variety of new things that are unrelated to what you normally do. Variety is key.. meet new people, learn a new skill, learn to dance, take up drawing, design, etc. Do something every day that stretches you and makes you somewhat uncomfortable.

Norman Doidge, explains in his book, “The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science”, “Not all activities are equal in this regard. Those that involve genuine concentration — studying a musical instrument, playing board games, reading, and dancing — are associated with a lower risk for dementia. Dancing, which requires learning new moves, is both physically and mentally challenging and requires much concentration.”

Learning a new language makes the brain grow by increasing grey matter in the areas related to the use of language, according to research. The study revealed that “The right hippocampus and the left superior temporal gyrus were structurally more malleable in interpreters acquiring higher proficiency in the foreign language.”

Leaning at least one new thing not only improves your brain, but it also helps you focus by ignoring irrelevant information.

Don’t do what you’ve always done.

3. Sleeping poorly is linked to rapid reductions in brain volume

Many people don’t take good sleep seriously. The bad news is that if you sleep poorly, your brain shrinks.

That was the surprising conclusion reached by Claire E. Sexton, DPhil, Andreas B. Storsve, MSc, Kristine B. Walhovd, PhD, Heidi Johansen-Berg, DPhil, and Anders M. Fjell, PhD in their study to examine the relationship between sleep quality and cortical and hippocampal volume.

The findings showed that having trouble sleeping, or not getting enough sleep is linked to rapid reductions in brain volume. The decline can affect important areas of the brain where language, touch, balance and the ability to calculate mathematically or make decisions reside.

“Studies have shown poor sleep can cause protein buildup in the brain that attacks brain cells. So we’re still trying to put the puzzle together,” says Dr Neal Maru, a neurologist and sleep specialist with Integrated Sleep Services in Alexandria, Virginia, who is not associated with the study.

Sleep repair and restore the brain. Improving your sleep habits could be an important way to improve brain health. 7–8 hours/night of good sleep is essential for stimulating new connections and brain growth.

4. Any form of exercise rewires the brain: keep your body active

You already know that physical activity is important for your better health. Exercise also helps your cerebral quality that affects memory, motor skills, and the ability to learn.

In fact, just pedalling on a stationary bike for 30 minutes can do wonders for your brain. In a study to determine whether hippocampal volume would increase with exercise in humans, the researchers discovered an increase in hippocampal size.

“Following exercise training, relative hippocampal volume increased significantly in patients (12%) and healthy subjects (16%), with no change in the nonexercise group of patients (-1%),” they revealed.

Exercise the brain in many areas. It increases your heart rate, which pumps more oxygen to the brain. It also helps release body hormones, which provide a nourishing environment for the growth of brain cells.

Indirectly, it also improves mood, sleep and reduces stress and anxiety.

In another study, Dr Scott McGinnis, a neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an instructor in neurology at Harvard Medical School said, “Even more exciting is the finding that engaging in a program of regular exercise of moderate intensity over six months or a year is associated with an increase in the volume of selected brain regions.”

Any form of aerobic exercise that gets your heart pumping is a great start. Apart from hitting the gym, you can also consider adding walking to your daily routine. Other moderate-intensity exercises, such as swimming, stair climbing, tennis, or dancing can also help.

5. Mindfulness is becoming a global phenomenon for a good reason

People have sworn by meditation for millennia. It’s now supported by rigorous scientific research, driven in part by a desire for new practices to improve our mental health.

The simple idea of being present throughout your day, being more conscious of life as it happens, and noticing any tension or preoccupations of the mind, without judging or analysing can improve your mental health. It’s highly effective in combating stress.

Studies report that meditation can “permanently rewire” your brain to raise levels of happiness. “In the past decade, research has shown that the benefits of mindfulness include: stress reduction, improved concentration, boosts to working memory, reduced rumination, less emotional reactivity, more cognitive flexibility, a higher level of relationship satisfaction, etc.” writes Christopher Bergland of Psychology Today.

Our brains are on auto-pilot most of the time. Begin to notice the world around you. Awaken your senses to the world around you.

You can upgrade our brain in many different ways. Adopting better habits will not only increase your brain’s grey matter, but it will also slow cognitive decline, speed up your memory recall and improve your mental health.

Written by   Thomas Oppong

Founder at AllTopStartups | Author | Creator of Thinking in Models and Kaizen Habits | Featured at Inc. Magazine, Business Insider, Forbes, Entrepreneur, etc.

At age 81, actor and activist Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line for the planet — literally. In a video interview with TEDWomen curator Pat Mitchell, Fonda speaks about getting arrested multiple times during Fire Drill Fridays, the weekly climate demonstrations she leads in Washington, DC — and discusses why civil disobedience is becoming a new normal in the age of climate change.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jane Fonda · Actor and activist

Jane Fonda has had four extraordinary careers (so far): Oscar-winning actor, author, fitness guru and impassioned activist.

Take Action

participate

Our house is on fire. Join us in the streets for Fire Drill Fridays.

Learn more ?

TEDWomen 2019 | December 2019

Legendary duo Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin have been friends for decades. In a raw, tender and wide-ranging conversation hosted by Pat Mitchell, the three discuss longevity, feminism, the differences between male and female friendship, what it means to live well and women’s role in future of our planet. “I don’t even know what I would do without my women friends,” Fonda says. “I exist because I have my women friends.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Jane Fonda · Actor and activist

Jane Fonda has had four extraordinary careers (so far): Oscar-winning actor, author, fitness guru and impassioned activist.

Lily Tomlin · Comedian and actor

Lily Tomlin has been honored by the Kennedy Center and awarded the Mark Twain Prize — and she’s still making vital, hilarious comedy.

TEDWomen 2015 | May 2015

In this passionate call to action, 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg explains why, in August 2018, she walked out of school and organized a strike to raise awareness of global warming, protesting outside the Swedish parliament and grabbing the world’s attention. “The climate crisis has already been solved. We already have all the facts and solutions,” Thunberg says. “All we have to do is to wake up and change.”

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxStockholm, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Greta Thunberg · Climate activist

Greta Thunberg is a Swedish climate activist.

Take Action

participate

Wherever you are, no matter your age, join me in my climate strike. Sit outside your parliament or local government building every Friday until your country is on a safe pathway to being well below the two-degree Celsius warming target.

Learn more ?

follow

Follow Greta Thunberg on Twitter.

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

TEDxStockholm | November 2018

What Really Killed the Dinosaurs?

Aug 16, 2014  SciShow

What wiped out the dinosaurs? Most of us were taught it was a killer asteroid—which is true. But it turns out there was more than one disaster movie playing at the cineplex that was Earth 66 million years ago. If you liked this video, check out more videos about natural history and paleontology on SciShow’s sister channel, Eons: https://www.youtube.com/eons Hosted by: Hank Green ———- Messages from our Subbable subscribers: Wanna read comics by a nerdfighter? Check out www.LonnieComics.com! DFTBA! – Lonnie Comics Science for life! And corn dogs. DFTBA – William Brehm ———- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: https://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ———- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: https://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: https://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: https://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids… https://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne… https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/… https://web.mit.edu/nchat/www/research… https://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs… https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_r… https://www.bio.sdsu.edu/faculty/archi… https://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/G204/… https://paleobiology.si.edu/geotime/ma… https://studentresearch.wcp.muohio.edu… https://geology.gsapubs.org/content/ea… https://www.academia.edu/7040995/Rapi…

Category   Education

Blooms of Insect Wings Created by Photographer Seb Janiak

November 11, 2015  Christopher Jobson

Mimesis – Fecunditatis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis is an ongoing photomontage project by Paris-based photographer Seb Janiak that depicts the wings of insects as the petals of flowers. Janiak is deeply interested in the mechanisms behind mimicry in nature, where an organism develops appendages, textures, and colors that directly mirror its surroundings. This process involves a strange interaction between different organisms he describes as “a complex co-evolutionary mechanism involving three species: the model, the imitator and the dupe.”

To create each artwork Janiak scours antique stores and taxidermist shops to find examples of wings which he then photographs at extremely high resolution. The pieces are digitally edited and pieced together into flower-like forms (a sort of meta mimic of a mimic) which are then output as chromogenic prints measuring nearly 6 feet square.

The Mimesis series, which now comprises 22 pieces, was shown for the first time at the Photo Shanghai art fair last September. The series also won an IPA Lucy award earlier this year. All images courtesy the artist. (via My Modern Met)

Mimesis – Lubon Tranquillitatis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Lubhyati Solitudinis, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Lacus Luxuriae, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Hibiscus Trinium, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Aphyllae Maleakht, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Precognitus Christium, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Tradescantia Ganymedia, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Precognitus Christium, 2014. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

Mimesis – Ornithogale Venusiaïs, 2012. Chromogenic print. Format 180 x 180cm (70.9 x 70.9 in)

New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin,

November 29, 2013  Christopher Jobson

Latvia-based graphic artist and illustrator Alex Konahin (previously) recently completed work on a new series of ornate insect drawings titled Little Wings. The illustrations were made using pens and india ink in his distinctive style that makes used of ornate scrolls and intricate floral designs. If this is the first time you’ve seen Konahin’s work, be sure to check out his amazing Anatomy drawings, and you can also see lots more on Facebook and Tumblr. (via Faith is Torment)

? New Ornate Ink Portraits of Lovable Dogs by Alex Konahin

April 6, 2016  Kate Sierzputowski

Graphic artist and illustrator Alex Konahin (previously here and here) has just finished a new illustration-based project centered around the subject of seriously detailed dogs. The Latvia-based artist is known for his highly decorative style which he illustrates in each of his drawn subjects, a trait that is exemplified in the ornate fur of the included animals.

Konahin’s series was inspired by no inspiration at all, the works coming from a time when Konahin was going through an intense creative block after a long break from his personal creative work. Konahin’s first portrait in the series was of an English Bulldog, and after liking the result, followed that piece up with a German Shepherd and Pit Bull Terrier. You can see more of Konahin’s work on his Behance, Instagram, and Facebook.

All images courtesy of Alex Konahin

Fantastic Fungi: A New Film Explores Earth’s Vast Network of Mycelium and Mushrooms

December 17, 2019  Grace Ebert

A new film considers how mycelium and mushrooms have created an often-unseen network, similar to an underground internet, that has connected all living beings for the last 3.5 billion years. Featuring conversations with food journalist Eugenia Bone, mycologist Paul Stamets, and writer Michael Pollan, Fantastic Fungi: The Magic Beneath Us dives into how the diverse underground web creates the soil necessary for plants and trees to root. “It’s amazing what we don’t know about mushrooms. They really are a frontier of knowledge,” Pollan says in the film.

Fantastic Fungi explores seven benefits of the organisms, including those dealing with biodiversity, innovation, food, arts, and mental, physical, and spiritual health. Screenings are scheduled worldwide through February 2020. Follow updates on the film directed by Louie Schwartzberg and the broader fungi movement on Instagram. (Thnx, Laura!)

Fantastic Fungi, Official Film Trailer | Moving Art by Louie Schwartzberg

Aug 14, 2019  Louie Schwartzberg

When so many are struggling for connection, inspiration and hope, Fantastic Fungi brings us together as interconnected creators of our world. Fantastic Fungi, directed by Louie Schwartzberg, is a consciousness-shifting film that takes us on an immersive journey through time and scale into the magical earth beneath our feet, an underground network that can heal and save our planet. Through the eyes of renowned scientists and mycologists like Paul Stamets, best-selling authors Michael Pollan, Eugenia Bone, Andrew Weil and others, we become aware of the beauty, intelligence and solutions the fungi kingdom offers us in response to some of our most pressing medical, therapeutic, and environmental challenges. Official Website: https://fantasticfungi.com Showtimes & Tickets: https://fantasticfungi.com/screenings Take Action: https://fantasticfungi.com/action Help Spread the Word: https://fantasticfungi.com/participate Saw the film? Leave a Review: https://fantasticfungi.com/reviews Join the Conversation Instagram: @fantasticfungi Facebook: @FungiFilm Twitter: @FantasticFungi Saw the film? Tell us about it! Text “FUNGI” to #38470 to record a video review now Take action now and get ready to feel hope, resilience and connection. Mycelium is a life preserver not only for our species but for so many species on this Earth that we love. We’re asking you to start this revolution in the ecology of consciousness. Please help us. We can save this planet with your help and the help of Mycelium. How can you help? Watch the film. Grab as many people as you can and watch the film together. Discuss the subject matter with each other. Tell others to do the same. Follow the mycelium network’s guidance and example. Spread the word and pass it forward. https://fantasticfungi.com

Category   Entertainment

6 ways mushrooms can save the world | Paul Stamets

May 8, 2008  TED

https://www.ted.com Mycologist Paul Stamets studies the mycelium — and lists 6 ways that this astonishing fungus can help save the world. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at https://www.ted.com/translate. Follow us on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/tednews Checkout our Facebook page for TED exclusives https://www.facebook.com/TED

Category   Science & Technology

fractal poem ebook blackartists poetsofig kindle darkpoetry writersofig blackauthors apophysis bookstagram fractalart art contemporarypoetry poetry book tii digitalart blackwriters theinevitableintermission writersofinstagram

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PBS News, TED Talks, Dailymail, Thisiscolossal, and Adam Grochowalski

PBS News: December 16-19, 2019, Riace was once a beacon for immigrants, now it’s a ghost town, Shields and Brooks on impeachment evidence, Pelosi’s powerful moment, Shields and Brooks on articles of impeachment, FBI’s Russia mistakes, Americans are drowning in medical debt, so this nonprofit is buying — and forgiving — it, Are social media giants doing enough to prevent the spread of misinformation?, How this nomadic music group is bridging cultural divides,

TED Talks: Shilpa Ravella How the food you eat affects your gut, Mia Nacamulli_How the food you eat affects your brain, and Paul S Kindstedt A brief history of cheese,

Dailymail: Meet China’s ‘Basketball Girl’ – An incredible story of how a young woman who lost her legs in a traffic accident fought against the odds to become champion swimmer

Thisiscolossal: Fantastical Worlds Created with Dappled Brush Strokes by Illustrator James R. Eads and Vimeo: Love in Sixty Seconds

Adam Grochowalski:  Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 19, 2019

Streamed live 4 hours ago   PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full 9:00pm episode Dec 18, 2019

Dec 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the House of Representatives impeaches President Trump. Plus: Our panel of experts analyzes Trump’s impeachment and what could come next in the Senate, historical context for impeachment, how an earlier California primary could affect the 2020 Democratic race, cutting-edge research on treating spinal cord injuries and Democratic debate questions from student reporters. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Grave reality of impeachment strikes House ahead of vote https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuCsx… How the 2 parties are framing impeachment deliberation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJhWP… How this impeachment compares to its historical predecessors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pY8zg… News Wrap: Appeals court strikes down ACA individual mandate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_GlK… How earlier California primary could affect 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uvtI… New spinal cord research gives the severely injured hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lqq–… Young voters on the political issues they care about most https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57vWG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Dec 17, 2019

Dec 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the House Rules Committee considers procedures for Wednesday’s impeachment proceedings, as President Trump unleashes outrage to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Plus: Rep. Jason Crow on impeachment, the latest in Boeing’s 737 Max saga, the Sackler family and opioids, refugees in Kentucky, how maternal stress can affect unborn babies and children’s author Mo Willems. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour West live episode, Dec 16, 2019

Streamed live on Dec 16, 2019   PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Riace was once a beacon for immigrants, now it’s a ghost town

Dec 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The southern Italian town of Riace was once a beacon for immigrants from around the world, but three years after NewsHour Weekend first reported on how it had welcomed immigrants, a political shift has turned it into a relative ghost town. The change took place when a political party known for its anti-immigration stance swept into power. Special correspondent Christopher Livesay reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on impeachment evidence, Pelosi’s powerful moment

Dec 6, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including how the first House Judiciary Committee hearing on impeachment affected the case against President Trump, what Trump’s contentious visit to a NATO summit means for U.S. foreign policy and the fallout from Sen. Kamala Harris’ withdrawal from the 2020 race. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Shields and Brooks on articles of impeachment, FBI’s Russia mistakes

Dec 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the House Judiciary Committee’s passage of articles of impeachment along party lines, Republicans’ defense of President Trump, how impeachment affects Trump politically, what the Horowitz report says about the FBI and a bombshell report on the Afghan war. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Americans are drowning in medical debt, so this nonprofit is buying — and forgiving — it

Dec 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Collectively, Americans owe nearly a trillion dollars of medical debt, and Congress is trying to figure out a policy response. But in the meantime, economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on an unusual non-profit’s effort to relieve the burden of medical debt for those in need. Transcript: Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Are social media giants doing enough to prevent the spread of misinformation?

Dec 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Social media has revolutionized the way we connect and communicate — and certainly not all for the better. In his new book, “Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation,” Andrew Marantz explores how digital platforms full of unforeseen vulnerabilities have been exploited by racists and vandals. William Brangham sits down with Marantz to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How this nomadic music group is bridging cultural divides

Dec 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tinariwen’s members are Tuaregs, an ethnic group from all across the Sahara desert. They’re nomads who lay down musical rather than physical roots, and their music follows a rich Tuareg lyrical tradition — gone electric. But although the Tinariwen feel at home wherever they are on stage, some of the communities in which they perform extend hostility rather than hospitality. Ali Rogin reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The bacteria in our guts can break down food the body can’t digest, produce important nutrients, regulate the immune system, and protect against harmful germs. And while we can’t control all the factors that go into maintaining a healthy gut microbiome, we can manipulate the balance of our microbes by paying attention to what we eat. Shilpa Ravella shares the best foods for a healthy gut. [Directed by Andrew Foerster, narrated by Julianna Zarzycki].

Meet the educator

Shilpa Ravella · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

TED-Ed | March 2017

When it comes to what you bite, chew and swallow, your choices have a direct and long-lasting effect on the most powerful organ in your body: your brain. So which foods cause you to feel so tired after lunch? Or so restless at night? Mia Nacamulli takes you into the brain to find out. [Directed by Private Island, narrated by Addison Anderson].

Meet the educator

Mia Nacamulli · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

TED-Ed | June 2016

When you take a bite of a hot pepper, your body reacts as if your mouth is on fire — because that’s essentially what you’ve told your brain! Rose Eveleth details the science and history behind spicy foods, giving insights into why some people continue to pay the painful price for a little spice. [Directed by Flaming Medusa Studios Inc., narrated by Rose Eveleth].

Meet the educator

Rose Eveleth · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

TED-Ed | March 2014

Before empires and royalty, before pottery and writing, before metal tools and weapons – there was cheese. As early as 8000 BCE, Neolithic farmers began a legacy of cheesemaking almost as old as civilization. Today, the world produces roughly 22 billion kilograms of cheese a year, shipped and consumed around the globe. Paul S. Kindstedt shares the history of one of our oldest and most beloved foods. [Directed by Charlotte Cambon, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Jarrett Farkas].

Meet the educator

Paul Kindstedt · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

TED-Ed | December 2018

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/peoplesdaily/article-3246327/Meet-China-s-Basketball-Girl-incredible-story-young-woman-lost-legs-traffic-accident-fought-against-odds-champion-swimmer.html?ito=social-facebook

Meet China’s ‘Basketball Girl’: An incredible story of how a young woman who lost her legs in a traffic accident fought against the odds to become champion swimmer

  • Qian Hongyan from Yunnan became the face of disability in China in 2005
  • She lost both legs in 2000 aged just four and had to walk with a basketball 
  • With no future in education, she started swimming and became a champion
  • Determined Qian has won a number of gold medals in China in recent years
  • Her inspirational story made her a young role model for China’s disabled

By Qin Xie For Mailonline

Published: 13:44 EST, 23 September 2015 | Updated: 02:47 EST, 24 September 2015

A young Chinese girl’s journey to create a future for herself, despite losing both legs in a tragic accident, has become the story that inspired thousands of disable people in China.

Qian Hongyan, from Yunnan, south west China, made the headlines in 2005 when she was photographed ‘walking’ with the help of a basketball.

Today, that same young woman is a champion swimmer with Paralympic dreams. In 2009, the determined girl became a national champion in the Chinese National Paralympics Swimming Competition.

Last September, she won another gold medal in the 100m breaststroke final in the Yunnan Provincial Paralympic Games.

Scroll down for video 

Qian Hongyan from Yunnan, pictured aged 10, lost her legs in 2000 after a car accident that nearly took her life

Qian Hongyan from Yunnan, pictured aged 10, lost her legs in 2000 after a car accident that nearly took her life

She became the face of disability after a series of images captured her walking with a basketball support

She became the face of disability after a series of images captured her walking with a basketball support

Above, she is aged 16, at the Yunzhinan Swimming Club where she trains daily in different swimming styles

Above, she is aged 16, at the Yunzhinan Swimming Club where she trains daily in different swimming styles

At 11, the girl talks to a doctor at China Rehabilitation Center in Beijing in 2007 after receiving her new legs

At 11, the girl talks to a doctor at China Rehabilitation Center in Beijing in 2007 after receiving her new legs

In 2013, Qian Hongyan, 18, prepares for a new set of prosthesis at China Rehabilitation Centre in Beijing

In 2013, Qian Hongyan, 18, prepares for a new set of prosthesis at China Rehabilitation Centre in Beijing

Fantastical Worlds Created with Dappled Brush Strokes by Illustrator James R. Eads and Vimeo: Love in Sixty Seconds

December 6, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Illustrator James R. Eads (previously) incorporates elements of Impressionism and fantasy in his colorful landscapes. The Los Angeles-based artist builds imagined worlds with vibrant, short brush strokes, often featuring exotic birds, half-sunken boats, and swirling star-filled skies. Eads shares with Colossal that he is deeply connected to music, which consistently influences his work. His personal passion translates to client commissions, as he has created imagery for dozens of bands ranging from The Black Keys and Leon Bridges to Jerry Garcia and Iggy Pop.

“I’ve been really inspired by a lot of different things lately, including many worlds theory—the idea of multiple universes and timelines existing simultaneously,” Eads tells Colossal. “I’ve been working on a series of pastel paintings called Many, Many Paths that explores this idea through meandering paths in otherworldly gardens.” The artist shares that his most recent undertaking is a series called Cosma Visions, “which explores the idea of past lives and reincarnation reimagined on the traditional tarot. It takes the reader through the journey of the soul in the spirit plane after death.”

Eads also experiments with Virtual Reality artwork, an example of which you can see below, and runs a screen-printing studio in Los Angeles. He produces a range of limited edition prints and other buyable items that incorporate his colorful illustrations. The artist also recently successfully crowdfunded a Lenormand deck called Green Glyphs. Shop Eads’s online store and follow along with new work on Instagram and Facebook.

Love in Sixty Seconds

ColossalPlus 

By: James R. Eads
Music by: Sean Eads

Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Oct 26, 2014  Adam Grochowalski

Pa? królowej, Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Vidlochvost fenyklový. I present here the full development of this beautiful butterfly.

Category   Pets & Animals

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Ing & John’s and International Street Art – Part 9 & 10 and Thisiscolossal,

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 9: Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

International Street Art – Part 10 – Thisiscolossal: Giant Starling Mural in Berlin by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A, Guerilla Murals by Fintan Magee, Timeless Murals by MonkeyBird Are Inspired by Mythology and Alchemy

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 9

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 9

Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

September 5 & 6, 2019

Photographs and Poems by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Left:        Midnight – John Watts’ Artwork

Middle: Vincent van Gogh and his letters to his brother – Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ Artwork

Right:    Homage to the Dragon – John Watts’ Artwork

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Saturday, November 30, 2019

Kai, The Artist our grandson, who just turned four years old.

I have a better chance to learn human behavior and development from our grandson than our only daughter when she was young.  This was because we were so busy with working and now, we have more time to observe our grandson’s interaction with other children, including his behavior as a baby and his progress up to now.

I am done, Grandma!

Time to run

And have fun

Catch me

If you can

Run Grandma run

Fun, fun, fun

You can’t catch me!

It’s great fun to

Run, run, run

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Once upon a time!!!

The cat in the hat!!!

Micky & Mini!!!

Bert and Ernie!!!

Cookie monster!!!

No!  No!  No! Grandpa!!!

I want the other one!

Which one do you want my grandson?

Do you want green eggs and ham?

No!  No!  No! Grandpa!!!

I want the Rubert and the Magic Dragon

O.K.  O.K.!!!

That is my favorite too!!!

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Hi! Mr. Kai!

How are you?

Hello Mr. Snake!

I am fine

Thank you

How are you, Mr. Snake?

I miss you Kai

I was alone in the box last night!

Can I kiss you?

No! You might bite me!

I am not going to bite you

See! I have no teeth

I only have long tongue to smell you

OK! You can kiss me

And you are going to sleep with me tonight

Can I hug you Kai?

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Swing, Swing!!!

Grandma!!!  See!!!  My snake is flying!!!

Swing, Swing!!!

I better swing it back on my shoulder

Come on Snake!!!

You are my best friend now

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Emerging Cinderella from pink flower     Modified Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Vincent van Gogh admiring  flowers Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 9

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 10

International Street Art – Part 10

Giant Starling Mural in Berlin by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A

August 14, 2016  Christopher Jobson

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All photos © Nika Kramer/Urban Nation

Netherlands-based artists Super A (previously) and Collin van der Sluijs (previously) teamed up earlier this year to paint this phenomenal mural titled Starling on the side of a residential building in Berlin. The 137-foot-tall mural piece depicts a large bird whose ornate chest is comprised of a dense patchwork of glistening jewels and plants. Starling was created at the invitation of Urban Nation as part of the One Wall Mural Project. All photos by Nika Kramer. (via StreetArtNews, BerlijnBlog.nl, Urban Nation)

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berlin-8

? Guerilla Murals by Fintan Magee

February 25, 2014  Christopher Jobson

fintan-1
fintan-5
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When looking at these murals by Brisbane artist Fintan Magee they seem almost impossible to contain. Literally dripping with color, his bold images often bleed off the canvas and spill onto the street or sidewalk, fully utilizing every available surface, as if maybe even that isn’t enough. Via Analogue/Digital:

Moving away from traditional graffiti in recent years his guerilla murals often inhabit the isolated, abandoned and broken corners of the city. Mixing surreal and figurative imagery his paintings are deeply integrated with the urban environment and explore themes of waste, consumption, loss and transition and contain a sentimentality and softness influenced by children’s books.

His most recent piece (top) was just completed in Toowoomba, a city in South-East Queensland, Australia. You can see much more of his work on his website, and on Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

Timeless Murals by MonkeyBird Are Inspired by Mythology and Alchemy

October 1, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

The anonymous artist duo MonkeyBird creates large-scale paintings of black-and-white cross contour depictions of mythical animals accented in gold. Most MonkeyBird artworks incorporate a humanoid monkey and bird, which represent “the two faces of humankind, the monkey being the realist, and the bird being a dreamer,” according to Paris-based 5Art Gallery. Old-world details like classical architecture, timekeeping devices, and weight scales add to the timeless look of the pair’s paintings. MonkeyBird’s members bring training in graphic design, as well as object and industrial design to their artistic aesthetic, which can be seen in their clean, technique-driven stenciling.

Based in Bordeaux, France, MonkeyBird travels widely to create outdoor murals as well as indoor installations. They’ll be working in Moscow from October 2 to the 11th. Follow along with MonkeyBird’s newest projects on Instagram, and pick up a limited edition print in their online store. (via Hi-Fructose)

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 10

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PBS News, TED Talks, The Atlantic, Thisiscolossal, and Ing Peace Project

PBS News: Hour full episode December 6 – 9, 2019, and How cuts to food stamp program could increase ‘poor outcomes’ for the food insecure

TED Talks: Eve Ensler- The profound power of an authentic apology? And Hawa Abdi Deqo Mohamed  Mother and daughter doctor heroes

The Atlantic: The Battle for the Constitution – Five Common Misconceptions About the Electoral College, and Top 25 News Photos of 2019

Thisiscolossal: Elaborate Chiaroscuro Tattoos by Makkala Rose Burst With Ripe Fruit and Blossoming Flowers

Ing Peace Project: Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”

PBS News: Hour full episode December 9, 2019

Dec 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, a long-awaited report on the origins of the FBI’s Russia probe finds errors but no evidence of a political conspiracy against President Trump. Plus: The latest on impeachment, an economic giant passes away, the truth about the war in Afghanistan, friction between Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg, Politics Monday and Broadway features the music of Alanis Morissette. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS: DOJ report finds Russia probe was appropriately opened https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_rW_… Counsels testify in fiery House Judiciary Committee hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQhFj… News Wrap: Putin and Zelenskiy have 1st one-on-one meeting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vnkb0… Remembering former Fed chair and economic giant Paul Volcker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTxEC… Report shows how U.S. officials misled public on Afghan war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jPbi… 2020 Democrats compete over transparency as 6th debate nears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_MKk… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Warren vs. Buttigieg in Iowa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTd_J… ‘Jagged Little Pill’ becomes a musical — and a metaphor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m809y… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 8, 2019

Dec 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, December 8, the U.S. Navy releases names of the three sailors killed in the Pensacola rampage, House Democrats to present their case for impeaching President Trump, and Ukraine and Russia prepare for peace talks after nearly six years of conflict. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 7, 2019

Dec 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, December 7, a U.S. official says a Saudi officer watched mass shooting videos before his deadly rampage at Pensacola’s naval base, and Scotland eyes an opportunity for independence as Great Britain gets ready to head to the polls. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode December 6, 2019

Dec 6, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, much of France is at a standstill amid mass protests of President Emmanuel Macron’s proposed pension reforms. Plus: The truth behind the conspiracy theory of Ukrainian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, analysis of political news with Mark Shields and David Brooks, a Van Gogh exhibition and the challenge of getting farmers the medical care they require. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Gunman kills 3 at Naval Air Station Pensacola https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0088C… How French pension protests could threaten Macron’s agenda https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4MOx… The facts behind Trump’s claims about Ukraine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCN8t… Shields and Brooks on impeachment evidence, Pelosi’s power https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XMD7… New show presents Van Gogh next to artists who inspired him https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKqij… How a community of care can improve farmworkers’ health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geSw1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

How cuts to food stamp program could increase ‘poor outcomes’ for the food insecure

Dec 4, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The Trump administration is making some major changes to the food stamp program, known as SNAP. On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture finalized a new rule expected to end access to the benefit for nearly 700,000 people by enforcing tougher work standards and limiting exemptions. The Urban Institute’s Elaine Waxman joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Genuine apology goes beyond remorse, says legendary playwright Eve Ensler. In this frank, wrenching talk, she shares how she transformed her own experience of abuse into wisdom on what wrongdoers can do and say to truly repent — and offers a four-step roadmap to help begin the process. (This talk contains mature content.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Eve Ensler · Playwright, activist

Eve Ensler created the groundbreaking “Vagina Monologues,” whose success propelled her to found V-Day — a movement to end violence against women and girls everywhere.

They’ve been called the “saints of Somalia.” Doctor Hawa Abdi and her daughter Deqo Mohamed discuss their medical clinic in Somalia, where — in the face of civil war and open oppression of women — they’ve built a hospital, a school and a community of peace.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Dr. Hawa Abdi + Dr. Deqo Mohamed · Somali doctors who treat women refugees

Dr. Hawa Abdi and her daughters, Dr. Deqo Mohamed and Dr. Amina Mohamed, treat Somali refugee women and children, often for free.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-world-will-finally-have-to-confront-its-massive-plastic-problem-now-that-china-won-t-handle-it?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy  Stories to fuel your mind.

The World Will Finally Have to Confront Its Massive Plastic Problem Now That China Won’t Handle It

Now that China won’t take it, the world will have an extra 111 million metric tons of its plastic waste to deal with by 2030.

Quartz   Zoë Schlanger

Photo by Jenna Jambeck, University of Georgia.

Since the 1950s, when the world was first introduced to the flexible, durable wonder of plastic, 8.3 billion metric tons of it has been produced. Plastic doesn’t biodegrade, so technically, all of that tonnage is still sitting someplace on the planet. And a lot of it is in China.

That’s because when hundreds of countries around the world said they were “recycling” their plastic over the past few decades, half the time what they really meant was they were exporting it to another country. And most of the time, that meant they were exporting it to China. Since 1992, China (and Hong Kong, which acts as an entry port into mainland China) have imported 72 percent of all plastic waste.

But China has had enough. In 2017, China announced it was permanently banning the import of nonindustrial plastic waste. According to a paper published in June 2018 in the journal Science Advances, that will leave the world—mostly high-income countries—with an additional 111 million metric tons of plastic to deal with by 2030. And right now, those countries have no good way to handle it.

As of 2016, the top five countries exporting their plastic to China were the US, the UK, Mexico, Japan, and Germany.

For example, that year, the US exported 56 percent of its plastic waste to China, with another 32 percent going to Hong Kong (of which most is then exported to China). The US exported its remaining 12 percent to Mexico, Canada, and India. Germany, meanwhile, exports 69 percent of its plastic to China.

Screenshot_2019-11-26 A new Chinese rule means the biggest global plastic recycling strategy just backfired.png

But because flows of plastic are convoluted, it’s possible these numbers don’t tell the whole story. For example, the researchers note that the UK exports 51 percent of its plastic to Germany, but given how much plastic Germany exports to China, it’s seems plausible that much of the UK’s plastic ultimately ends up in China. The same goes for Mexico, which exports 55 percent of its plastic to the US. The US, in turn, exports most of its plastic to China. But the researchers write the United Nations trade data on which they based their research does not monitor flows of plastic between countries, so “we do not know whether that waste is then processed domestically or exported to Hong Kong or China,” they write.

China has in the past tried to limit plastic imports. In 2013, the country implemented a “Green Fence” policy of restricting the types of plastic waste it would accept, with the goal of reducing contamination. The policy lasted only a year, but it was enough to rattle the waste industry. “As a result, plastic recycling industries experienced a globally cascading effect since little infrastructure exists elsewhere to manage the rejected waste,” the researchers write.

That’s already happening again, and now the ban is permanent.

The rule went into effect on January 1, 2018, and plastic immediately began piling up in several European countries, the port of Hong Kong, and the US. “My inventory is out of control,” Steve Frank, who owns recycling plants in Oregon, which up until then had exported most of its materials to China, told the New York Times at the time. He hoped he’d be able to start exporting more waste to countries like Indonesia, India, Vietnam, Malaysia—“anywhere we can”—but “they can’t make up the difference,” he said.

At the end of the day, even the 111 million metric tons of plastic that the researchers found would be back in the laps of countries who used to export to China is still a fraction of all the plastic that gets produced.

Screenshot_2019-11-26 A new Chinese rule means the biggest global plastic recycling strategy just backfired(1).png

“We know from our previous studies that only 9 percent of all plastic ever produced has been recycled, and the majority of it ends up in landfills or the natural environment,” Jenna Jambeck, an associate professor at the University of Georgia’s college of engineering who co-authored the study, said in a statement.  ”Without bold new ideas and system-wide changes, even the relatively low current recycling rates will no longer be met, and our previously recycled materials could now end up in landfills.”

Screenshot_2019-11-26 A new Chinese rule means the biggest global plastic recycling strategy just backfired(2).png

For more information please visit the following link:

ttps://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-world-will-finally-have-to-confront-its-massive-plastic-problem-now-that-china-won-t-handle-it?utm_source=pocket-newtab

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/five-common-misconceptions-about-electoral-college/602596/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

The Battle for the Constitution

Five Common Misconceptions About the Electoral College

Defenders of the Electoral College argue that it was created to combat majority tyranny and support federalism, and that it continues to serve those purposes. This stance depends on a profound misunderstanding of the history of the institution.

history of the institution.

November 29, 2019

G. Alan Tarr

Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers University-Camden

North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after they all cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016.
North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after they all cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake – RC12F8CC65F0

North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after they all cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016.Jonathan Drake / Reuters

Two of the nation’s last three presidents won the presidency in the Electoral College, even though they lost the popular vote nationwide. In 2000, Al Gore outpolled George W. Bush by more than 540,000 votes but lost in the Electoral College, 271–266. Sixteen years later, Hillary Clinton tallied almost 3 million more votes than Donald Trump but lost decisively in the Electoral College, 306–232. And, as a recent New York Times poll suggested, the 2020 election could very well again deliver the presidency to the loser of the popular vote.

Despite this, defenders of the Electoral College argue that it was created to combat majority tyranny and support federalism, and that it continues to serve those purposes. For example, Representative Dan Crenshaw of Texas, responding to Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s recent criticism of the Electoral College, tweeted that “we live in a republic, which means 51% of the population doesn’t get to boss around the other 49%,” and that the Electoral College “promotes more equal regional representation and protects the interests of sparsely populated states.”

But arguments like these are flawed, misunderstanding the pertinent history. Below, I identify five common mistakes made in arguing for the preservation of the Electoral College.

More in this series

A special project on the constitutional debates in American life, in partnership with the National Constitution Center

How to Revive Madison’s Constitution

Michael Gerhardt Jeffrey Rosen

The Obscure—But Crucial—Rules the Trump Administration Has Sought to Corrupt

Peter M. Shane

I Know What It’s Like to Carry Out Executions

S. Frank Thompson

Mistake Number 1: Many supporters of the Electoral College assume that the debate about presidential selection at the Constitutional Convention, like the debate today, focused on whether the president should be chosen by the Electoral College or by a nationwide popular vote.

But as tempting as it is to read history in the light of contemporary concerns, the debate at the convention focused on a different issue: Should Congress choose the president? Both the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan, the two primary alternatives at the Convention, proposed that Congress select the president. This was unsurprising because in most states at the time, the legislature chose the governor. On June 1, the convention voted 8–2 that Congress should elect the president, and the delegates would affirm that decision on three other occasions.

The frequency with which the delegates revisited the issue reveals not their confidence but their dissatisfaction. Most delegates wanted the executive to check legislative usurpations and block unjust or unwise laws, but they feared that dependence on the legislature for election—and possible reelection—would compromise the executive’s independence. Some delegates hoped to avoid this danger by limiting the president to a single term, but as Gouverneur Morris of Pennsylvania observed, this could deprive the nation of a highly qualified executive, eliminate the hope of continuation in office as a spur to good behavior, and encourage the executive to “make hay while the sun shines.” James Madison added that election by the legislature would “agitate and divide the legislature so much that the public interest would materially suffer” and might invite the intervention of foreign powers seeking to influence the choice.  

The difficulty lay in finding an alternative to legislative selection, and the delegates considered and rejected various possibilities, including popular election. Ultimately, perhaps in desperation, they referred the issue to the Committee on Unfinished Parts. On September 4, less than two weeks before the convention ended, the committee proposed the Electoral College. Its proposal mirrored the states’ distribution of power in Congress; each state had as many electoral votes as it had members of Congress. But because the electors dispersed after voting for the president, the Electoral College did not threaten the independence of the executive. With only minor adjustments—most notably, the House replaced the Senate as the body that would select the president if a majority of electors failed to agree on a candidate—the convention endorsed the proposal.

The point of all this is, the Electoral College did not emerge because of opposition to popular election of the president.

Wilfred Codrington III: The Electoral College’s racist origins

Mistake Number 2: Another common belief is that the convention rejected popular election of the president because the delegates feared majority tyranny. People make this claim as though to say that because the Framers were skittish of a national popular election, so should we be today.

But, once again, this interpretation of history is wrong. The convention did twice reject popular election of the president. But the delegates who rejected it did not object to popular elections per se—they had no problem with popular election of the House of Representatives or state legislatures. Rather, they were skeptical of a national popular election, primarily for reasons that are no longer relevant today.

First, they feared that people would lack the information to make an informed choice as to who might be an appropriate candidate for the presidency or who might be the best choice among candidates. Thus George Mason of Virginia claimed, “It would be as unnatural to refer the choice of a proper candidate for chief Magistrate to the people, as it would be to refer a trial of colours to a blind man.”

But his reason was that “the extent of the Country renders it impossible that the people can have the requisite capacity to judge of the respective pretensions of the Candidates.” In such circumstances, he thought, voters would naturally gravitate to candidates from their own state. Delegates who favored popular election replied that “the increasing intercourse among the people of the states would render important characters less and less unknown,” and that “continental characters will multiply as we more or more coalesce,” reducing state parochialism. Today, with mass communication and interminable campaigns, lack of information is no longer a problem.

Second, some southern delegates feared that popular election of the president would disadvantage their states. James Madison noted that, given less restrictive voting laws, “the right of suffrage was much more diffusive in the Northern than the Southern states,” which would give them an advantage in a popular election. Beyond that, a popular vote would not count the disenfranchised enslaved population, reducing southern influence.

The Electoral College solved both those problems, awarding electoral votes based on a state’s population, not its electorate, and importing the three-fifths compromise into presidential elections. The effects were immediate and dramatic—in 1800 John Adams would have defeated Thomas Jefferson had only free persons been counted in awarding electoral votes. Obviously, these concerns no longer apply, although popular election would encourage states to increase their influence by expanding their electorate, while the Electoral College offers no such incentive.

Read: The Electoral College was meant to stop men like Trump from being president

Third, some small-state delegates opposed popular election because they feared that larger states, with their greater voting power, would dominate. Yet these same delegates also objected to the Electoral College, insisting it too gave excessive power to the large states. Their concerns were addressed by stipulating that should no candidate receive a majority of the electoral vote, the selection would devolve on the House of Representatives, with each state casting a single vote.

What is striking about the convention’s debate on popular election of the president is that its opponents did not claim it would encourage majority tyranny. Doubtless the delegates were aware of the danger of such a tyranny—Madison first presented his famous discussion of “majority faction” at the convention—but no delegate objected to popular election on that basis, and Madison himself supported popular election of the president.

Mistake Number 3: Similarly, some defenders of the Electoral College have argued that the delegates who favored the Electoral College opposed popular election of the president.

Given the current debate on presidential selection, this might seem obvious, but the deliberations at the convention were much more fluid. James Wilson of Pennsylvania first proposed popular election of the president, but when his motion failed, he immediately raised the possibility of a mediated popular election: electors chosen by the people who would select the executive. All the other leading advocates of popular election—Morris, Madison, and Alexander Hamilton—also supported the Electoral College, primarily as an alternative to congressional selection. In defending the Electoral College, Madison and Hamilton emphasized its popular character. Madison in “Federalist No. 39” noted that “the President is indirectly derived from the choice of the people,” and Hamilton in “Federalist No. 68” concurred: “The sense of the people should operate in the choice of the person to whom so important a trust was to be confided,” and reelection should depend on “the people themselves.”

Mistake Number 4: Many people also believe that the Electoral College was designed to preserve federalism and states’ rights.

The Constitution was, in James Madison’s words, “in strictness neither a national nor a federal Constitution, but a composition of both.” It empowered state legislatures to determine how the presidential electors were to be chosen, and if the Electoral College failed to select a president, the House of Representatives would, with each state casting a single vote. However, the debates during the Constitutional Convention make clear that the Electoral College was not intended to protect the states or enhance the influence of state governments and state perspectives.

The convention delegates sought to safeguard the independence of the national executive from state governments. They overwhelmingly rejected proposals that the executive be selected by state legislatures or by state governors. They also rejected a proposal that the president be removable upon request by a majority of state legislatures and did not even consider the New Jersey Plan’s provision that the president “be recalled by Congress when requested by the majority of executive of the states.” This was hardly surprising. Most delegates were sharply critical of state legislatures and wanted to ensure that the president had the independence necessary to oppose their schemes. Madison summarized the prevailing sentiment: “The President is to act for the people, not the States.”

Although the Electoral College allowed state legislatures to determine how electors would be chosen, it was expected that once selected, the electors would operate independently of their state governments. The constitutional ban on senators serving as electors and the choice of the House to resolve deadlocks in the Electoral College ensured that those selected by (and perhaps influenced by) state legislatures would not play a role in selecting the president. Beyond that, the delegates expected that the electors’ deliberations would remain secret, that they would be free to choose the candidates they believed most qualified, and that their votes would be tabulated and transmitted to the president of the Senate without any indication as to who voted for which candidate, so that no political retribution could be exacted. The Constitution’s requirement that electors vote for two candidates, at least one of whom was not from their state, served to reduce state parochialism and encourage a national perspective.

In sum, the Electoral College was not designed to promote federalism—Martin Diamond, one of the most thoughtful proponents of the Electoral College, accurately described the design as “an anti-states-rights device, a way of keeping the election from state politicians and giving it to the people.” The core protections of federalism, today as in the past, are the vitality of state governments, the division of powers between nation and state, and representation in Congress along state lines. The replacement of the Electoral College by a nationwide popular vote would threaten none of these. Voting procedures would remain the same, the only difference being that votes would be tabulated nationwide rather than state by state.

Read: The Electoral College wasn’t meant to overturn elections

Mistake Number 5: And finally, perhaps the most widely believed and, at the same time, most incorrect of the arguments for the Electoral College is that it has vindicated the hopes and expectations of its creators.

To begin with, to some extent those expectations were unclear. For example, after the Electoral College was proposed, some delegates claimed that in most elections—George Mason predicted “nineteen times in twenty”—no candidate would get a majority of the electoral votes, and so the House of Representatives would elect the president. This of course would compromise the independence of the executive, and both Madison and Hamilton unsuccessfully proposed that the House’s role be eliminated, with the candidate winning a plurality of the electoral vote becoming president. Other delegates expected that a majority of the electors would coalesce around a single candidate. In “Federalist No. 39,” Madison presumed that “the eventual election” would be made by the House, but this was mere speculation and quickly disproved.

Even when the delegates’ hopes and expectations were clear, constitutional amendments have altered the operation of the Electoral College. The Twelfth Amendment, adopted after the contested election of 1800, requires electors to specify for whom they are voting for president and vice president. The Twentieth Amendment, by shifting the date congressional terms begin to January 3, ensures that the newly elected House of Representatives, rather than the previous House, would elect the president if no candidate received an electoral-vote majority. And the Twenty-Third Amendment extends the right to vote in presidential elections to U.S. citizens residing in the District of Columbia, awarding the District three electoral votes, though the Electoral College continues to deny American citizens living in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories any role in choosing the president.

Even more important have been changes in political practice. In “Federalist No. 64,” John Jay maintained that the Electoral College “will in general be composed of the most enlightened and respectable citizens,” and in “Federalist No. 68,” Alexander Hamilton described the electors as “most likely to possess the information and discernment” necessary to choose the chief executive. But by 1800 political parties had developed, and elector discretion was replaced by elector commitment to the parties’ candidates. Today many states do not even bother to list the electors’ names on the ballot. Interestingly, Hamilton and Madison as party leaders played a crucial role in this transformation.

Read: The Electoral College conundrum

The Constitution authorized state legislatures to determine how electors were to be selected, but by 1828 every state but South Carolina chose its electors by popular vote, and today all states do. Moreover, despite the initial expectation that electors would be chosen in districts, by 1836 party competition had promoted a winner-take-all allocation of electors in all the states. (Maine and Nebraska have since bucked that trend.) This in turn has affected presidential campaigns, as more and more candidates target their speeches, campaign appearances, and ads at “swing states” and largely ignore states they confidently expect to carry or to lose.

Meanwhile, the proliferation of primary elections, the nationalization of the choice of presidential candidates, the move toward candidate-based campaigns, and the reduced importance of state party organizations have fundamentally transformed presidential selection, without changing how votes are awarded under the Electoral College.

In “Federalist No. 68,” Alexander Hamilton contended that the Electoral College would frustrate “the desire in foreign powers to gain an improper ascendant in our councils.” It would also “afford a moral certainty that the office of President [would] seldom fall to the lot of any man who is not in an eminent degree endowed with the requisite qualifications.” In addition, it would keep from the office candidates with “talents for low intrigue, and the little arts of popularity.” In evaluating the Electoral College today, one must judge whether Hamilton’s hopes have been vindicated.

This story is part of the project “The Battle for the Constitution,” in partnership with the National Constitution Center.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.

G. Alan Tarr is professor emeritus at Rutgers University-Camden. He is the author of Without Fear or Favor and Understanding State Constitutions.

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https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/11/five-common-misconceptions-about-electoral-college/602596/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2019/12/top-25-news-photos-2019/602848/

Top 25 News Photos of 2019

Alan Taylor  December 2, 2019

25 Photos   In Focus

As we approach the end of a year of unrest, here is a look back at some of the major news events and moments of 2019. Massive protests were staged against existing governments in Hong Kong, Chile, Iraq, Iran, Venezuela, Haiti, Algeria, Sudan, and Bolivia, while climate-change demonstrations and strikes took place worldwide. An impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump was started, conflict in Syria continued, the United States won the Women’s World Cup, Hurricane Dorian lashed the Bahamas, and so much more. Here, we present the Top 25 news photos of 2019. Be sure to also see these more comprehensive stories—2019: The Year in Photos, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

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Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern hugs a mosque-goer at the Kilbirnie mosque in Wellington, New Zealand, on March 17, 2019. 50 people are confirmed dead and 36 are injured still in hospital following shooting attacks on two mosques in Christchurch on Friday, 15 March. The attack is the worst mass shooting in New Zealand’s history. (Hagen Hopkins / Getty)

Jacinda Ardern, prime minister of New Zealand, hugs a mosque-goer at the Kilbirnie mosque in Wellington, on March 17, 2019. Earlier that day, 51 people were killed and another 49 were injured in shooting attacks on two mosques in Christchurch—the worst mass shooting and terror attack in New Zealand’s history. #

Hagen Hopkins / Getty

The steeple of Notre-Dame Cathedral collapses as the cathedral is engulfed in flames in central Paris on April 15, 2019. (Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP / Getty)

The spire of Notre-Dame collapses as the cathedral is engulfed in flames in central Paris on April 15, 2019. Much of the roof collapsed in the fire, which ignited during renovations. President Emmanuel Macron immediately indicated that the cathedral would be rebuilt, but the method and form of the reconstruction became a political battle, with one side favoring modern redesigns, and the other advocating for an exact replica of the previous structure. #

Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP / Getty

Spike Lee, winner of the Best Adapted Screenplay award for BlacKkKlansman, attends the 91st annual Academy Awards Governors Ball at the Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, California, on February 24, 2019. (Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty)

Spike Lee, winner of the Best Adapted Screenplay award for BlacKkKlansman, attends the 91st annual Academy Awards Governors Ball at the Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, California, on February 24, 2019. Although Lee had been awarded an honorary Oscar in 2015, this was his first competitive Academy Award. #

Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty

TOPSHOT – People raise their hands during a mass opposition rally against President Nicolas Maduro in which Venezuela’s National Assembly head Juan Guaido (out of frame) declared himself the country’s “acting president”, on the anniversary of a 1958 uprising that overthrew a military dictatorship, in Caracas on January 23, 2019. – “I swear to formally assume the national executive powers as acting president of Venezuela to end the usurpation, (install) a transitional government and hold free elections,” said Guaido as thousands of supporters cheered. Moments earlier, the loyalist-dominated Supreme Court ordered a criminal investigation of the opposition-controlled legislature. (Photo by Federico PARRA / AFP) (Photo credit should read FEDERICO PARRA/AFP via Getty Images)

People raise their hands during a mass opposition rally against President Nicolás Maduro, in which Venezuela’s National Assembly head, Juan Guaidó, declared himself the country’s “acting president” on the anniversary of a 1958 uprising that overthrew a military dictatorship, in Caracas, Venezuela, on January 23, 2019. The movement, sparked by disputed election results, led to a presidential crisis in Venezuela that continued throughout the year. #

Federico Parra / AFP / Getty

President Donald Trump turns to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California as he delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., as Vice President Mike Pence watches on February 5, 2019. (Doug Mills / The New York Times via AP)

President Donald Trump turns to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California as he delivers his State of the Union address to a Joint Session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., as Vice President Mike Pence watches, on February 5, 2019. #

Doug Mills / The New York Times via AP

People are evacuated by a member of security forces at the scene of a terror attack at the Dusit Hotel compound in Nairobi, Kenya, on January 15, 2019. (Baz Ratner / Reuters)

People are evacuated by a member of security forces at the scene of a terror attack at the Dusit Hotel compound in Nairobi, Kenya, on January 15, 2019. The attack, carried out by members of the jihadist militant group Al-Shabaab, left 21 civilians dead. #

Baz Ratner / Reuters

TOPSHOT – EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content / A wounded Syrian girl awaits rescue from under the rubble next to the body of her sister (hands seen-R) who did not survive regime bombardment in Khan Sheikhun in the southern countryside of the rebel-held Idlib province, on February 26, 2019. – Regime bombardment near Khan Sheikhun, in Idlib province, killed two civilians on Tuesday, raising the civilian death toll to 42 since February 9, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. (Photo by Anas AL-DYAB / AFP) (Photo by ANAS AL-DYAB/AFP via Getty Images)

A wounded Syrian girl awaits rescue from under the rubble next to the body of her sister (hands visible at right), who did not survive a regime bombardment in Khan Sheikhun in the southern countryside of the rebel-held Idlib province, on February 26, 2019. Five months after this photo, the Syrian photographer who took it, Anas Al-Dyab, was killed in an air strike in Khan Sheikhun. Al-Dyab was also a member of the “White Helmets,” a group of volunteers carrying out search-and-rescue efforts in Syria. #

Anas Al-Dyab / AFP / Getty

Dogs pull a sled on water-covered sea ice near Qaanaaq, Greenland, on June 13, 2019. An abundance of water from a rapid summer melt had pooled on top of a wide swath of solid sea ice. (Steffen Olsen / Danish Meteorological Institute via Reuters)

Dogs pull a sled on water-covered sea ice near Qaanaaq, Greenland, on June 13, 2019. The dogs were forced to wade after an abundance of water from a rapid summer melt had pooled on top of a wide swath of solid sea ice. #

Steffen Olsen / Danish Meteorological Institute via Reuters

TOPSHOT – A boy walks out of the sea while removing oil spilled on Itapuama beach located in the city of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on October 21, 2019. – Large blobs of oil staining more than 130 beaches in northeastern Brazil began appearing in early September and have now turned up along a 2,000km stretch of the Atlantic coastline. The source of the patches remain a mystery despite President Jair Bolsonaro’s assertions they came from outside the country and were possibly the work of criminals. (Photo by LEO MALAFAIA / AFP) (Photo by LEO MALAFAIA/AFP via Getty Images)

A boy walks out of the sea while removing oil spilled on Itapuama beach, located in the city of Cabo de Santo Agostinho in Pernambuco state, Brazil, on October 21, 2019. Large blobs of oil staining more than 130 beaches in northeastern Brazil began appearing in early September and have now turned up along a 2,000-kilometer stretch of the Atlantic coastline. The source of the patches remains a mystery despite President Jair Bolsonaro’s assertions they came from outside the country and were possibly the work of criminals. #

Leo Malafaia / AFP / Getty

HONG KONG – AUGUST 18: Thousands of anti-government protesters march on a street after leaving a rally in Victoria Park on August 18, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued rallies on the streets of Hong Kong against a controversial extradition bill since 9 June as the city plunged into crisis after waves of demonstrations and several violent clashes. Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam apologized for introducing the bill and declared it “dead”, however protesters have continued to draw large crowds with demands for Lam’s resignation and completely withdraw the bill. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters march on a street after leaving a rally in Victoria Park on August 18, 2019, in Hong Kong. Demonstrations have taken place on the streets of Hong Kong since June 9, beginning as a reaction to a controversial extradition bill, and evolving into broader demands for democracy and investigations into police brutality, challenging Beijing’s authority. #

Chris McGrath / Getty

Police detain pro-democracy demonstrators during a demonstration in Hong Kong on September 29, 2019. (Kin Cheung / AP)

Police detain pro-democracy demonstrators during a demonstration in Hong Kong on September 29, 2019. #

Kin Cheung / AP

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as they meet at the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom, South Korea, June 30, 2019. KCNA via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS – THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THIS IMAGE. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA. – RC1849E5AB80

U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as they meet at the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom, South Korea, on June 30, 2019, in this image provided by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA). During the meeting, Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to cross the border and enter North Korea. #

KCNA via Reuters

Students take part in a march for the environment and the climate in Brussels, Belgium, on February 21, 2019. (Emmanuel Dunand / AFP / Getty)

Students take part in a march for the environment and the climate in Brussels, Belgium, on February 21, 2019. Environmental protests and strikes, most led by students, took place around the world multiple times throughout the year. #

Emmanuel Dunand / AFP / Getty

Guatemalan migrant Lety Perez embraces her son Anthony while praying to ask a member of the Mexican National Guard to let them cross into the United States, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, July 22, 2019. Lety Perez fell to her haunches, a clenched hand covering her face as she wept, an arm clutching her small 6-year old son, who glared defiantly at the Mexican National Guard soldier blocking them from crossing into the United States. The plight of this mother and son who had traveled some 1,500 miles (2,410 km) from their home country of Guatemala to the border city of Ciudad Juarez, only to be stopped mere feet from the United States, was captured by Reuters photographer Jose Luis Gonzalez as twilight approached on Monday. “The woman begged and pleaded with the National Guard to let them cross … she wanted to cross to give a better future” to her young son Anthony Diaz, Gonzalez said. The soldier, dressed in desert fatigues, an assault rifle slung over his shoulder, said he was only following orders, according to Gonzalez. The soldier did not disclose his name. (Jose Luis Gonzalez / Reuters)

Lety Perez, a Guatemalan migrant, embraces her son Anthony while praying to ask a member of the Mexican National Guard to let them cross into the United States, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, on July 22, 2019. Perez and her 6-year-old son had traveled some 1,500 miles from their home country, only to be stopped mere feet from the United States. #

Jose Luis Gonzalez / Reuters

A long-exposure photograph shows a tree burning during the Kincade fire off Highway 128, east of Healdsburg, California, on October 29, 2019. (Philip Pacheco / AFP / Getty)

A long-exposure photograph shows a tree burning during the Kincade fire off Highway 128, east of Healdsburg, California, on October 29, 2019. This year’s fire season in California, which lasts through December, has seen more than 6,400 reported fires, including the largest, the Kincade fire, which burned more than 77,000 acres alone. #

Philip Pacheco / AFP / Getty

United States’ forward Megan Rapinoe celebrates scoring her team’s first goal during the France 2019 Women’s World Cup quarter-final football match between France and United States, on June 28, 2019, at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris. (Photo by FRANCK FIFE / AFP) (Photo by FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images)

The United States forward Megan Rapinoe celebrates scoring her team’s first goal during the Women’s World Cup France 2019 quarter-final soccer match between France and the United States, on June 28, 2019, at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris. The U.S. advanced to the final and won the championship on July 7 in a match against the Netherlands. #

Franck Fife / AFP / Getty

An aerial view of damage caused by Hurricane Dorian is seen in Marsh Harbour on Great Abaco Island on September 4, 2019, in Great Abaco, Bahamas. (Scott Olson / Getty)

An aerial view of damage caused by Hurricane Dorian is seen in Marsh Harbour on Great Abaco Island on September 4, 2019, in Great Abaco, Bahamas. Dorian struck the islands as a Category 5 storm, and was responsible for at least 60 deaths and more than $3 billion in damages—the worst natural disaster to ever hit the Bahamas. #

Scott Olson / Getty

A young Rohingya is seen during a rainstorm at the Nayapara refugee camp on August 21, 2019, in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Rohingya refugees said on August 21 that they did not want to return to Myanmar without their rights and citizenship, with repatriation set to start on August 22. August 25 marked the second anniversary of the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh after Myanmar’s military crackdown on the ethnic Muslim minority forced over 700,000 to flee to Bangladesh from violence and torture. The United Nations has stated that it was a textbook example of ethnic cleansing. (Allison Joyce / Getty)

A young Rohingya refugee is seen during a rainstorm at the Nayapara refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, on August 21, 2019. Rohingya refugees said on August 21 that they did not want to return to Myanmar (also called Burma) without their rights and citizenship, with repatriation set to start on August 22. August 25 marked the second anniversary of the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh after Myanmar’s military crackdown on the ethnic Muslim minority forced more than 700,000 to flee to Bangladesh from violence and torture. The United Nations has stated that it was a textbook example of ethnic cleansing. #

Allison Joyce / Getty

A huge plume of ash rises from Raikoke Volcano on the Kuril Islands, as viewed from the International Space Station on June 22, 2019. The small, oval-shaped island most recently exploded in 1924, and before that in 1778. Astronauts shot this photograph of the eruption as the column of ash spread out in a part of the plume known as the umbrella region—the area where the density of the plume and the surrounding air equalize and the plume stops rising. The ring of clouds at the base of the column appears to be water vapor. (NASA Earth Observatory)

A huge plume of ash rises from Raikoke volcano in the Kuril Islands, as viewed from the International Space Station on June 22, 2019. The small, oval-shaped island most recently exploded in 1924, and before that in 1778. Astronauts shot this photograph of the eruption as the column of ash spread out in a part of the plume known as the umbrella region—the area where the density of the plume and the surrounding air equalize and the plume stops rising. The ring of clouds at the base of the column appears to be water vapor. #

NASA Earth Observatory

TOPSHOT – A demonstrator wearing Guy Fawkes mask gestures during a protest against the government, in Santiago on November 18, 2019. – President Sebastian Pinera condemned on Sunday for the first time what he called abuses committed by police in dealing with four weeks of violent unrest that have rocked Chile and which has left 22 people dead and more than 2,000 injured. Chileans have been protesting social and economic inequality, and against an entrenched political elite that comes from a small number of the wealthiest families in the country, among other issues. (Photo by CLAUDIO REYES / AFP) (Photo by CLAUDIO REYES/AFP via Getty Images)

A demonstrator wearing a Guy Fawkes mask gestures in front of others shining green lasers, during a protest against the government in Santiago, Chile, on November 18, 2019. Weeks of violent unrest have rocked Chile, leaving at least 22 people dead and more than 2,000 injured. Chileans are protesting social and economic inequality, and against an entrenched political elite. #

Claudio Reyes / AFP / Getty

ATTENTION EDITORS – SENSITIVE MATERIAL. THIS IMAGE MAY OFFEND OR DISTURB A riot police officer on fire reacts during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago, Chile November 4, 2019. REUTERS/Jorge Silva TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY – RC13D207B4A0

A riot-police officer reacts after a Molotov cocktail landed nearby, splashing fire onto several officers during a protest against Chile’s government in Santiago, Chile, on November 4, 2019. #

Jorge Silva / Reuters

22-year-old Alaa Salah stands on a car leading chants during a protest demanding that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir step down in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 8, 2019, in this still image taken from a social-media video obtained on April 9. (Lana H. Haroun via Reuters)

Alaa Salah, 22, stands on a car leading chants during a protest demanding that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir step down, in Khartoum, Sudan, on April 8, 2019, in this still image taken from a social-media video obtained on April 9. Months of demonstrations and civil disobedience led up to the Sudanese Armed Forces staging a coup on April 11, removing the dictator Bashir from power after 30 years. #

Lana H. Haroun / Social Media

TOPSHOT – A Syrian boy on his bicycle looks at a convoy of US armoured vehicles patrolling fields near the northeastern town of Qahtaniyah at the border with Turkey, on October 31, 2019. – US forces accompanied by Kurdish fighters of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) patrolled part of Syria’s border with Turkey, in the first such move since Washington withdrew troops from the area earlier this month, an AFP correspondent reported. (Photo by Delil SOULEIMAN / AFP) (Photo by DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

A Syrian boy on his bicycle looks at a convoy of U.S. armored vehicles patrolling fields near the northeastern town of Qahtaniyah at the border with Turkey, on October 31, 2019. U.S. forces accompanied by Kurdish fighters of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) patrolled part of Syria’s border with Turkey, in the first such move since Washington withdrew troops from the area earlier in October, an AFP correspondent reported. #

Delil Souleiman / AFP / Getty

Democratic Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Adam Schiff awaits charge d’Affaires at the U.S. embassy in Ukraine Bill Taylor and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia George Kent to testify before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald J. Trump, on Capitol Hill, on November 13, 2019. (Jim Lo Scalzo / Pool via Reuters)

Democratic Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff awaits Bill Taylor, charge d’affaires at the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, and George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of state for Europe and Eurasia, to testify during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill, November 13, 2019. #

Jim Lo Scalzo / Pool via Reuters

An Iraqi demonstrator takes part in ongoing anti-government protests in Baghdad on November 1, 2019. (Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters)

An Iraqi demonstrator takes part in ongoing anti-government protests in Baghdad on November 1, 2019. Beginning in October, frustrated Iraqis took to the streets to voice their anger at years of government corruption, high rates of unemployment, poor services, and economic stagnation. The response from Iraqi authorities was particularly violent, resulting in more than 400 deaths. The demonstrations continue, despite the announced resignation of Prime Minister Adil Abdul-Mahdi. #

Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters

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Elaborate Chiaroscuro Tattoos by Makkala Rose Burst With Ripe Fruit and Blossoming Flowers

November 15, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Tattoo artist Makkala Rose creates dramatic botanical designs on her clients’ skin, incorporating richly toned flower blossoms, unctuous fruits, and life-like animal portraits. One recent commission involved completely covering a client’s back with a chiaroscuro “painting” featuring three burning candles, reflective glass and crystals, piles of ripe fruit, and a hanging bat on an inky black background.

Rose’s first love was painting, the artist tells Colossal. “One of my first memories was smearing bright purple paint from the pot onto a fresh sheet of paper stuck to an easel, and my love and fascination with art and creating has never ended.” Now that Rose spends most of her time tattooing, her background as a painter has come into dialogue with her ink work. “The feel and the mood brought through by my color palette and my style of tattooing is influenced by the way I like to paint and now vice versa as I spend a lot more time tattooing, they lend interestingly to each other,” says Rose.

The artist also has a strong personal connection to flowers and gardens (Rose tells Colossal that floristry would be her backup career), and she seeks to imbue her tattoo work with the joy that blossoms bring her. She spends time perusing different bouquet designs, photographing flowers in public gardens, and researching new plants and flowers to expand her repertoire, though peonies and blackberries are perennial favorites.

To create her most recent backpiece, shown above, Rose explains that she personally collected all the materials for the composition, from individual flowers to pitchers and crystals. She then arranged everything in a composition (minus the bat) and worked with a friend to take documentation photos in preparation for the tattoo design.

Rose hails from New Zealand, and travels frequently for her tattoo work, most often across the U.S., U.K., and New Zealand. See more of her designs on Instagram. Rose is usually booked several months out, but you can find out where she’ll be next on her website. If you enjoy Rose’s designs, also check out Esther Garcia’s inkwork.

 Finished “Peace” artwork 15

 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”

Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, and Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015) Newark, New Jersey, December 2014

 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Friday, January 30, 2015

Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:

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PBS News, The California Sunday Magazine, TED Talks, Lily R., Digital Photography School, Thisiscolossal, and Ing Peace Project

PBS News: November 26 – December 1, 2019, How innovation and small steps can help us solve The Plastic Problem, and Largest slave revolt in U.S. history lives on in reenactment,

The California Sunday Magazine: 3 kids. 2 paychecks. No home.

TED Talks: Cathy Mulzer –  The incredible chemistry powering your smart phone? and Kim Preshoff –  What’s a smartphone madeof#t-286167

Lily R. : 500 + Fish Identification Documentary by Pano4life

Digital Photography School: How to Get Super Sharp Landscape Photography Images

Thisiscolossal: 120,000 Ribbons Wave Across the Former Footprint of the Berlin Wall in an Installation Marking 30 Years Since the Peaceful Revolution

Ing Peace Project: 6th Annual Art and Music Fair, Elwood Park 1

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode December 1, 2019

Dec 1, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, December 1, severe weather disrupts holiday travel across the U.S., and on World AIDS Day, how inequality impacts those living with HIV. Also, how Mac DeMarco is harnessing the internet to thrive as an indie artist. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 30, 2019

Nov 30, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 30, the latest on the London Bridge attack, Illinois schools placed thousands of children in isolation rooms, and New York’s Mohawk tribe and their fight to restore their endangered language. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 29, 2019

Nov 29, 2019 PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the prime minister of Iraq announces his resignation after weeks of protests that have left hundreds dead. Plus: What Afghan women stand to lose if the Taliban return to power, questions about a fatal accident at an Amazon warehouse, turning food waste into electricity, analyzing the week’s political news with Shields and Brooks and a preview of the new film “The Report.” WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: After months of deadly protest, Iraq’s government in chaos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMWKJ… News Wrap: Stabbing attacks jolt London, the Netherlands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuYGx… What peace talks with the Taliban mean for Afghan women https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hu_9I… Fatality at Amazon warehouse raises questions about safety https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU0v2… How these farmers are turning manure and food waste to power https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmX1s… Shields and Brooks on impeachment politics, 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_fYq… What ‘The Report’ says about the CIA and post-9/11 torture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCo1t… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour full episode November 28, 2019

Nov 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump made a Thanksgiving trip to Afghanistan, where he served troops a holiday dinner and met with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Plus: The history of impeachment in America, how to reduce food waste, a crackdown on protests in Iran, the outlook for long-haul truckers and former students of viral sensation Flossie Lewis express their thanks to her. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: In Afghanistan, Trump says Taliban talks have restarted https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv2j-… News Wrap: Dozens more protesters killed in Iraqi violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjwrr… A look back at presidential impeachment in U.S. history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2pRV… How Americans can change their mindset about wasting food https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxl0u… Behind the protests and brutal government crackdown in Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOhYJ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 27, 2019

Nov 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, another set of revelations in the inquiry into President Trump’s Ukraine dealings. Plus: How Americans across the country feel about impeachment, shipping speed vs. employee safety at Amazon warehouses, how food growers are striving to reduce wasted product, rising sea levels threaten a small Alaskan town and actress Adrienne C. Moore on her life’s characters. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Major storms disrupt Thanksgiving travel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYvlz… What were Rudy Giuliani’s business dealings in Ukraine? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YAME… What voters across America are saying about impeachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JjSt… An inside look at injury rates in Amazon warehouses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dce_A… How California is fighting the problem of food waste https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFmot… As water levels rise, an Alaska town flees to higher ground https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vMZs… Actress Adrienne C. Moore on owning her characters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAfei… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

How innovation and small steps can help us solve The Plastic Problem

Nov 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On Wednesday night, PBS will air a one-hour special report, “The Plastic Problem,” that examines how our global dependence on plastic has created one of the biggest environmental threats to our planet. Amna Nawaz hosts the program, and she joins Judy Woodruff to discuss how we consume and discard plastic, where it is ending up and what corporations and consumers are doing to address the problem. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 26, 2019

Nov 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the UN has an alarming assessment of the impact of climate change — and why we’re not doing enough to stop it. Plus: Court decisions and public hearings in the impeachment inquiry, the rise and fall of WeWork, Italian houses selling for cheap, the problem of global plastic use, Karine Jean-Pierre on her immigrant upbringing, found art and the presidential turkey pardon. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How ‘climate procrastination’ has put the planet in peril https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoBR4… News Wrap: Iraq hit with bombings, deadly protest violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOcHP… Legal experts to testify at 1st Judiciary Committee hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vMWw… WeWork’s rise and fall provide cautionary tale for startups https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_xC1… What 1 euro can buy you in Sicilian real estate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p16p7… How our dependence on plastic threatens the planet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJbWM… Karine Jean-Pierre on perseverance and political activism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGFtx… How this San Diego artist recreates our treasured objects https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfK5n… Trump serves up double helping of presidential turkey pardon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCUuL… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

Largest slave revolt in U.S. history lives on in reenactment

Nov 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

In 1811, more than 200 enslaved people in present-day Louisiana launched the largest insurgency of people in bondage in U.S. history. The revolt lasted only a few days before the poorly armed rebels were crushed by a militia and U.S. troops. But more than two centuries later, their story is living on in a performance called “Slave Rebellion Reenactment.” Special Correspondent Brian Palmer reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

The California Sunday Magazine

https://story.californiasunday.com/homeless-families?utm_source=pocket-newtab

From left to right: Adelene, Frankie, Josephat, Brenda, and Candido in the 2007 Toyota Sienna that they lived in for close to a year

November 26, 2019

3 kids. 2 paychecks. No home.

South of San Francisco, in a fertile corner of California that feeds much of the country, working families are sleeping in shelters and parking lots.

By Brian Goldstone

Photographs by Alessandra Sanguinetti

Frankie’s morning started before the sun came up, as the steadily increasing volume of his parents’ phone alarm, coming from somewhere near the dashboard, jolted the 8-year-old awake. His dad, Candido, and 6-year-old brother, Josephat, had begun to stir in the cramped rear of the minivan, emerging from a tangle of blankets, towels, pillows, and stuffed animals. His mom, Brenda, was in the driver’s seat, which was reclined as far back as it could go; his baby sister, Adelene, who was 3, was splayed out awkwardly on the seat beside her. As for Frankie, he was in his usual spot: nestled on the floorboard between the front seats and middle row, his skinny 4-foot frame hidden in a furry green-and-brown sleeping bag meant to look like a grizzly bear.

For almost nine months, the family had been living out of their Toyota Sienna in various fields and parking lots throughout Salinas, the industrial and economic center of Monterey County. In this part of the country, there was nothing especially dramatic or exceptional about their plight, or the circumstances that led them to be without a roof over their heads. Frankie’s parents were well aware of the worsening housing crisis that had dragged tens of thousands of Californians into a similar fate. But still, Candido said, it sometimes felt as though they were the only ones out there.

Finding a place to park the van was harder than expected. At first, the family tried the parking lot of a Food 4 Less grocery store. But the following morning, an employee warned them not to return; a neighborhood gang, he explained, controlled the area and had been threatening homeless people. He said they’d recently slashed someone’s tires. The family drove to a nearby strawberry farm, which proved more hospitable. In exchange for doing chores around the property, such as cleaning the bathrooms and emptying the trash, the farm’s owner would fill up their gas tank. But eventually other families, in their own cars and SUVs, began showing up, and it became too much. They’d have to go somewhere else, the owner said.

Now they were in the parking lot of Natividad Medical Center, just outside the emergency room. The lot was well lit, and there were bathrooms in the ER waiting room, open 24 hours. The hospital staff was mostly welcoming. At night, however, after everyone fell asleep, Candido had been noticing the tiny flicker of a lighter in a nearby pickup truck and the profile of an older man. Candido kept the van’s dome light on and made sure its doors were locked.

As parents, Candido and Brenda believed the most important thing was to project confidence; their kids needed to see that they had a plan. The couple tried to avoid worrying about how long they’d be in the van, or where they might go next, but it was impossible to think about anything else. There were bouts of cursing and storming off and feeling that one more minute in the vehicle, packed with the entirety of their possessions, would drive them all insane. There were weekend excursions to Target for little toys and treats, bought with money they couldn’t spare. When temperatures dropped, it was a terrible calculus: bundle up as best they could, the kids shivering and complaining, or run the van’s heat all night and use up precious gas. Or, if there were any rooms available, they could spend up to a couple hundred dollars a night at the Best 5 Motel or Good Nite Inn?—?making it that much less likely that they’d save enough to get out of the van entirely. 

Mornings were the hardest. Everyone was achy, tired from a bad night’s sleep, and on this morning, too, it was all they could do to keep to their routine. Brenda and Candido insisted on maintaining a semblance of order. “We’re not like some people,” Candido would tell the kids. “We wash our clothes. We don’t pee outside. We keep ourselves clean.” In the hospital bathroom, while Candido got ready to go to work and Brenda stayed behind with Adelene, Frankie helped wash and dress Josephat, brushing his brother’s teeth, then his own. Breakfast was whatever Pop-Tarts or granola bars were left over from the food bank. Finally, they straightened up the van, pulled the seats back into position, and put on their seat belts, Adelene in her car seat, Frankie and Josephat in their boosters. They drove the 15 or so minutes into town, fusing with the early traffic, indistinguishable from all the other families starting their day.

When the van stopped, the boys hopped out. They went around to the trunk, grabbed their backpacks off the built-in clothing hooks, hugged their parents, and walked through the front gate of their elementary school.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://story.californiasunday.com/homeless-families?utm_source=pocket-newtab

TED Talks: Cathy Mulzer – The incredible chemistry powering your smart phone

Ever wondered how your smartphone works? Take a journey down to the atomic level with scientist Cathy Mulzer, who reveals how almost every component of our high-powered devices exists thanks to chemists — and not the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs that come to most people’s minds. As she puts it: “Chemistry is the hero of electronic communications.”

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with DuPont. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

About the speaker

Cathy Mulzer · Electrochemist

Cathy Mulzer works on the next generation of materials for all those electronic devices you love: your phone, your TV, your electric car.

About TED Institute

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

TED@DuPont | September 2019

TED Talks: Kim Preshoff – What’s a smartphone madeof#t-286167

As of 2018, there are around 2.5 billion smartphone users in the world. If we broke open all the newest phones and split them into their component parts, that would produce around 85,000 kg of gold, 875,000 of silver, and 40,000,000 of copper. How did this precious cache get into our phones–and can we reclaim it? Kim Preshoff investigates the sustainability of phone production. [TED-Ed Animation by Compote Collective].

Meet the educator

Kim Preshoff · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

500 + Fish Identification Documentary by Pano4life

Oct 29, 2017  Lily R.

A few years ago I was stung by the “Diving” virus. I quickly became an instructor and over time I was able to accumulate more than 6000 dives mainly in Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines and Malaysia. During these dives, I noticed how fragile the ecosystems are. I came up with the idea of ??filming everything I could for fear of not seeing it again one day. Of course, I could not take my camera for each of these dives but I do it whenever I have the opportunity. Today we were able to identify and filmed in full HD 500 different underwater species. This documentary of 60 minutes retraces these different species with the scientific description and the Latin name of each species. Our goal is to show the world how precious the oceans are and full of life that unfortunately the humanity is likely to endanger … We sometimes forget that the oceans provide us with more than 60% of the oxygen we we need to live. Half of the photosynthesis and removal of carbon dioxide takes place in the oceans. Marine species play a key role in this regulation. It is therefore important to identify and protect them. Unfortunately for humans, this protection is not a priority. On the contrary, the human pressures on the oceans are increasing every day, the impact is irreversible! Through this documentary, we hope to be able to arouse interest on the various underwater species and their protection. We also say to ourself that if our future generations also want to be able to contemplate the beauty of our planet, we have to act quickly! If we continue like this, our grandchildren will not even see a quarter of what you see in this documentary. I would especially like to thank my partner and dive Buddy Lily Romero who filmed and helped me editing this amazing video. As well as laurent Minsart for some macro shots in Lembeh, Indonesia. Special Big Up to all those who participated by loan or by far at this documentary, Dive Guide Local Boat Captain. More Info or collab Lily Romero & Pierre Bijloos www.lilyromero.com IG: LILYRYOGA IG: PANO4LIFE

Category   Travel & Events

A Post By: Gavin Hardcastle

The most common question I get asked by my workshop students is ‘how do you get such sharp images?’. It’s actually really simple. Basically, avoid movement of any kind while the shutter is open, focus well and choose the right aperture for your creative vision. Mostly it’s just plain old common sense with a couple of technical elements thrown in, so if you want to learn how to get super sharp landscape photography images, here’s my list of top tips.

Top tips for sharper landscape photography

1 – Use a good tripod with a sturdy ball head and make sure everything is TIGHT

Seems obvious, but time and time again I see students using decent tripods and they often don’t have everything clamped down tightly. For example, the attachment that is screwed to the underside of your camera should be as tight as you can get it, eventually it’ll work its way loose. Make sure that ball head is completely locked down once you’ve composed your shot.

2 – While taking the shot, don’t place your hands on your tripod

The vibrations of your hands will blur the shot. When that shutter opens, your hands should be nowhere near the camera.

3 – Use the 2 second timer or a remote shutter release

This insures that the shutter won’t open until you are completely hands free.

4 – Cheap lenses will defocus while you rotate your circular polarizer

This is another one that seems obvious but I’ve seen it happen a lot. Let’s say you’ve achieved perfect focus on your landscape composition and now you’d like to rotate the polarizer which is attached to your perfectly focused lens. Guess what, as you rotate that filter, the lens is now losing its focus because of the movement and pressure you’re exerting on the filter. This rarely happens with high end lenses but I’ve seen it happen a lot with cheaper kit lenses that are poorly engineered. When this happens simply remember to refocus before hitting the shutter.

5 – Enable the mirror lock-up if you have a DLSR

Using mirror lock-up ensures that the mechanical shock induced by the cameras mirror mechanism has dissipated by the time the shutter opens.

6 – Remove your camera strap

In windy situations it will act like a sail and induce vibration.

7 – Add some weight to your tripod’s central column

If the conditions are windy, it will also help reduce vibration.

8 – Place a small but heavy bean bag on your camera and lens

Do this just before taking the shot to further eliminate movement from shutter shock.

9 – Choose a Mid-range to Narrow Aperture

This one should be an article in itself but for now it’s important to understand that if you want corner to corner focus in your landscape images you’ll need to select an aperture that gives you a wide depth of field. Using f/2.8 is pointless, so pick an aperture like f/11 or f/16 depending on how close you are to your foreground subjects. Be aware however that the narrower the aperture (larger number like f/22) the less sharp your image will be due to light diffraction so experiment with your lenses to discover their sweet spot for wide depth of field.

Side Note: Shallow depth of field in landscapes can be beautiful when done well, in which case you’ll need a wide aperture like f/2.8 and ideally a lens that delivers beautiful bokeh – most super wide angle lenses don’t do bokeh well.

10 – Focus In the Distance

Don’t focus on the object closest to you. Pick an object in the middle distance that has a clear contrasting line and focus on that. You could focus to infinity but beware that most of the wide angle lenses I’ve used actually focus beyond infinity so I often have to focus to infinity and then carefully rotate the focus wheel back so that it’s just slightly before the ‘infinity’ mark.

11 – Put Your Glasses On

If you need glasses in order to see clearly and focus on things, it should go without saying that you might need to put on your stylish and expensive bifocals in order to achieve clear focus in your photography. Besides, everyone knows that glasses make you look cool and more intelligent, so why not put them on?

12 – Use Live View or EVF magnification

If you have a DLSR with an optical viewfinder I highly recommend that you use your cameras ‘Live View’ mode and then magnify it to your point of interest and use your manual focus ring to achieve sharp focus  If your camera has an EVF (Electronic View Finder)  you can do the same thing while looking in the EVF. I actually prefer this because you don’t get distracted by glare on the LCD or external light sources. Either way, remember to disable auto focus if you decide to focus manually with Live View.

I use every single one of these techniques in my Vancouver Island photo workshops and I teach them to all of my students. If you follow these tips every time you shoot landscapes, you’ll be sure to get much sharper images. If you’ve got some of your own tricks and tips for getting super sharp landscape images please leave a comment below and share your knowledge.

PS: Want to learn more about Landscape Photography? Check out our brand new eBook launched today – Loving Landscapes: A Guide to Landscape Photography Workflow and Post Processing.

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category

  Gavin Hardcastle is a fine art photographer, writer and instructor from BC, Canada. Become a better photographer today with his free photography guides and photography tutorials. You can learn from Gavin directly at his global photography workshops in some of the worlds most spectacular locations. Upgrade your post processing skills with his online video tutorials for Photoshop and Lightroom.

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Weekly Photography Challenge – Reading

120,000 Ribbons Wave Across the Former Footprint of the Berlin Wall in an Installation Marking 30 Years Since the Peaceful Revolution

November 13, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

On November 9, 1989, German officials decided to allow residents of Communist East Germany to cross over and visit the Western, democratic half of the divided country. Though the complex process of physically and ideologically reunifying the country took about a year in total, November 9th is considered a landmark day. To celebrate 30 years since the Berlin Wall began to break down, artist Patrick Shearn (previously) was commissioned to create a large-scale installation that integrated the reflections and hopes of 30,000 people.

Visions in Motion was on view November 4th through 10th in front of Berlin’s Brandenburg Gate, a location that had previously been a demarcation of division. A statement from Poetic Kinetics explained, “the artwork’s rectangular shape conjures the form of the wall; but instead of a heavy, impenetrable border, the form takes flight.” The massive installation spanned 20,000 square feet and was comprised of 120,000 fabric streamers, a quarter of which featured hand-written messages that were collected in the months leading up to the display.

Shearn is a resident of Los Angeles, Berlin’s sister city, and is renowned for his large-scale kinetic installations, which he calls “Skynets”. Tying the German installation to its sister city, the Los Angeles-area Wende Museum, which houses Cold War artifacts, invited Los Angelenos to contribute messages to Visions in Motion as well.

Shearn and his team at Poetic Kinetics are prolific creators. You can explore much more of their archive on the Poetic Kinetics website, and follow them on Instagram to keep up with their latest projects around the world.

Finished “Peace” artwork 9

Shadow of Peace and La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ Inc., Puerto Rican Festival in Newark on August 11, 2012, organized by Carlos Maldonado Pastrana, President of La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to 6th Annual Art and Music Fair Elwood Park Page:

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Ing & John’s and International Street Art – Part 7 & 8 – Thisiscolossal, and Digital Photography School

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 7: Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

Ing & John’s and International Street Art – Part 8 – Thisiscolossal: Murals of Greek Gods Rendered Against a Chaotic Backdrop of Graffiti by Pichi & Avo, and Crumbling Buildings and Graffiti-Covered Walls Are Meticulously Documented in Oil Paintings by Jessica Hess

Digital Photography School: A Quick Guide to Amazing Bird Photography Compositions

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 7

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 7

Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

September 3 & 4, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Left:        Midnight – John Watts’ Artwork

Middle: Vincent van Gogh and his letters to his brother – Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ Artwork

Right:    Homage to the Dragon – John Watts’ Artwork

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Saturday, November 30, 2019

Kai, The Artist our grandson, who just turned four years old.

Kai, the Jackson Pollock wanna be.

It was time for the four-year-old artist to relax and play.

I have a better chance to learn human behavior and development from our grandson than our only daughter when she was young.  This was because we were so busy with working and now we have more time to observe our grandson’s interaction with other children, including his behavior as a baby and his progress up to now.

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 7

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 8

International Street Art – Part 8

Murals of Greek Gods Rendered Against a Chaotic Backdrop of Graffiti by Pichi & Avo, and Crumbling Buildings and Graffiti-Covered Walls Are Meticulously Documented in Oil Paintings by Jessica Hess

Murals of Greek Gods Rendered Against a Chaotic Backdrop of Graffiti by Pichi & Avo

March 4, 2015  Christopher Jobson

Since first collaborating in 2007, Spanish street art duo Pichi & Avo (previously) have created an intriguing blend of traditional graffiti and renderings of mythological figures influenced by ancient Greek sculpture. The precision, shading, and use of color is all that more impressive considering each piece is painted only with spray paint. Pichi & Avo open their first exhibition in Italy titled Urban IconoMythology later this week at Basement Project Room. You can see more of their work here. (via Illusion, Graff Crew, UrbaNNerding, I Support Street Art)

Crumbling Buildings and Graffiti-Covered Walls Are Meticulously Documented in Oil Paintings by Jessica Hess

May 10, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Oakland-based painter Jessica Hess documents landscapes and built environments in moments of transition. Combining open skies and lush plant life with crumbling walls and frayed rebar, Hess finds equivalency in growth and decay. The artist, who works in oil paint, shoots photos while exploring abandoned locales, and uses these real-life references to build her carefully framed worlds on canvas.

Hess graduated from Rhode Island School of Design and has been exhibiting nationally for over 15 years. Her solo show, The Chaos Aesthetic, is currently on view at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco, and runs through May 25, 2019. You can keep up with Hess’s impressive exhibition schedule, which includes four additional shows this year on her website, and see more of her work on Instagram.

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 8

A Quick Guide to Amazing Bird Photography Compositions

A Post By: Jaymes Dempsey

Do you want to capture amazing photos of birds? If so, you have to master bird photography compositions.

Composition refers to the arrangement of elements within the photo. And it’s often the difference between a creative, compelling image, and an image that just falls flat.

In this article, I’m going to share with you everything you need to know about bird photography composition. I’m going to give you several tips that ensure you capture beautiful bird photography compositions, without fail.

Sound good?

Let’s dive right in.

The composition basics: Capturing a gorgeous bird photo

When you take a bird photo, everything in the frame matters.

The bird. The position of the bird. The position of the bird’s head. The background. Any elements behind the bird. Any elements in front of the bird.

It’s all important.

Because the key to a gorgeous bird photography compositions is keeping the shot focused on your main subject.

You want to make sure that the bird stands out in the frame. You want to make sure everything else in the photo emphasizes and enhances the bird.

So how do you do that?

A few simple ways, starting with:

Simplify the entire composition to make the bird stand out

If your composition is chaotic, then the viewer is going to get lost.

And that’s absolutely not what you want.

Instead, you should aim to simplify the composition as much as possible. The best compositions tend to include a bird and a background. That’s it.

While it’s possible to create beautiful shots by including additional birds or interesting features (e.g., shells, flowers), I recommend avoiding that as much as possible. These mess up compositions more often than they enhance them.

Also, in the interest of simplicity: If there’s anything in the frame that’s distracting, get rid of it. So make sure there are no branches behind the bird. Make sure there’s nothing in the background that dominates the frame or draws the eye.

That’s how you’ll keep your bird photography compositions beautiful.

And speaking of backgrounds:

Aim for a uniform, simple background that makes the bird pop

If you want a beautiful bird photography compositions, then you need a beautiful background.

What does this involve?

First, the best bird photography backgrounds are simple. They’re also uniform.

Like this:

Notice how the background is a nice uniform color.

It keeps the attention on the bird. It doesn’t distract.

To create a background like this, you want to start by ensuring a large separation between the bird and the background. One trick is to get down low, on the bird’s level; this will cause the ground behind the bird to fall away, creating a more distant background.

You should also make sure you use a decently wide aperture, such as f/5.6 or f/6.3 (the particulars depend on the size of your bird, because you don’t want to accidentally make parts of the bird soft!).

Finally, you should ensure that the background doesn’t include colorful elements that catch the eye. Before you take a shot, look behind your bird, and ask yourself: Will anything in the background dominate the frame? Will anything pull the viewer away from the bird?

If the answer is “Yes,” then you should consider moving slightly to the left or right so that you’re no longer stuck with a distracting background.

Use the rule of thirds to position the bird’s eye

Now that you know how to capture beautiful backgrounds, it’s time to look at your main subject and how to position it.

Generally speaking, you’ll have a single bird in your photos. And you need to position this bird carefully.

You don’t want to put it smack-dab in the middle of the frame. That’s a recipe for a boring, static composition.

Instead, I recommend you place the bird so that its eye falls along a rule of thirds power point.

What is the rule of thirds power points?

They’re simply points that are a third of the way into the frame, both vertically and horizontally.

The eye in this photo, for instance, falls along a power point:

It’s a third of the way down, and a third of the way from the left.

Now, the rule of thirds is misnamed; it’s a guideline, not a hard-and-fast rule. But it is a great way to position your bird and will ensure that the shot feels a lot more interesting.

So use the rule of thirds whenever you can to position your bird within the frame.

Point the bird into the frame to add movement

I’ve talked about positioning your main subject using the rule of thirds, but there’s another aspect to positioning that you should always, always consider:

The direction the bird is pointing.

You see, most bird photos have some empty space in the frame.

And when they do…

…you want to point the bird into the empty space, rather than away from it.

You see, by making sure the bird is looking into the empty space, it adds a sense of completeness and a sense of motion to the frame. The viewer’s eye follows the birds line of sight, and everything feels satisfying.

Whereas if you point the bird out of the frame, the whole shot feels tense. The viewer wants to know what’s outside the frame, with no resolution in sight.

That’s why bird photographers love to point the bird into the frame. It’s far more satisfying, and can turn the shot into something powerful.

Capture the bird in a creative pose for increased interest

Now, when it comes to bird photography, you can capture birds in a normal standing pose.

And that’ll get you some nice photos.

But sometimes…

This isn’t enough.

If you want to create truly creative bird photography, you need to go beyond the simple standing pose. And capture the bird doing something interesting.

What counts as interesting?

For one, preening birds look really interesting. They appear wonderfully tranquil as they clean their feathers.

And birds that are sleeping also give off a sense of peace that I love.

You can also go for action shots: Birds feeding, for instance, can create a lot of interest. You can capture photos of birds that are about to catch food, are currently catching food, or have just caught food. Think of a bird with a huge fish in its mouth.

It’s guaranteed to add interest.

Cool, right?

You can also go for shots of birds fighting or, as is a common bird photography practice, shots of birds flying. Photographing birds in flight can be a challenge, but a really rewarding one.

So whenever you’re able, don’t just take a standard bird photo. Go beyond this.

Make something unique!

A quick guide to amazing bird photography compositions: Conclusion

You should now have a sense of the best ways to capture beautiful bird photography compositions.

And remember:

Getting amazing compositions isn’t hard. You just have to use the tips that I’ve given you, and you’ll be taking stunning photos in no time.

Have other tips for gorgeous bird photography compositions? Share them in the comments!

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PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 27 – 28 2019, This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization, Why does almost half of America’s food go to waste?

TED Talks: Claire Wardle how you can help transform the internet into a place of trust? and Yasmin Green How technology can fight extremism and online harassment

Project Unity: Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

BBC News: Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC?, and Homeless in spite of full-time job

The Secrets of Nature: Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat

Thisiscolossal: Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

PBS NewsHour full episode October 28, 2019

Oct 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi dies during a U.S. special forces raid in northwestern Syria. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on President Trump and impeachment, what al-Baghdadi’s death means for the threat of ISIS, California endures new wildfires and power outages, and our Politics Monday team, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter, analyzes the latest political news. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 27, 2019

Oct 27, 2019 PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 27, analysis on the death of the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and a look at what that may mean for the region, and a return to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania one year after 11 people were killed at the Tree of Life synagogue in the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Detroit is home to an unusual museum that draws on African history and customs, filling an entire city block with installations and sculptures. The MBAD African Bead Museum also allows visitors hands-on experiences — and acts as a stabilizing force in a distressed area of the city. Special correspondent Mary Ellen Geist reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jun 16, 2015  PBS NewsHour

Watch more from Making Sen$e: https://bit.ly/2D8w9kc Read more economic news: https://to.pbs.org/2PNUx19 Roughly 40 percent of food produced in America never makes it to the table. Whether it rots in the field, is trashed at the supermarket, or thrown out at home, NPR’s Allison Aubrey looks at why good food is being discarded, and what can be done to prevent it.

Category   News & Politics

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. “If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong,” Green says. “We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yasmin Green · Geopolitical technologist

Yasmin Green is the director of research and development for Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet Inc. focused on solving global security challenges through technology.

Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

Oct 7, 2014  Project Unity

Homelessness in society needs urgent action. This video documents the homeless people of mid-town New York to find out more about their world and what struggles and hardships they face. More and more people are facing homelessness and housing problems so we are putting out a call to action to stand for some of our most vulnerable members of society. Winter is approaching and without your help, many people who are homeless will die over the winter months in New York City. It is important that we unit to provide whats needed for people who are homeless to have the necessities, such as clothing, blankets, warm food, shelter and the support every human being deserves. Summary Project Unity, a non-profit organisation is committed to unifying communities for good causes. Finding out from grassroots what are the most effective ways to assist people in need, we empower communities with direct action to have a positive effect on the issues facing us. Unity overcomes everything, so transform your environment with the strength of unity.

Category   People & Blogs

Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC? – BBC News

Mar 9, 2015   BBC News

Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It has been one of the coldest winters on record in America’s north-east, and in New York City freezing temperatures have coincided with record numbers of homeless. BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant has been out onto the streets to meet those struggling to find shelter. Subscribe to BBC News HERE https://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: https://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: https://instagram.com/bbcnews

Category   News & Politics

Homeless in spite of full-time job – BBC News

Nov 18, 2016  BBC News

The acute shortage of housing in Britain has been underlined by figures obtained by BBC News. Please subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Category   People & Blogs

Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Jul 15, 2014

Presents some of the animal kingdom’s strangest survival strategies. The most startling behaviour patterns aren’t found among the classic big animals such as lions or polar bears, but among nature’s smaller creatures: Poison dart frogs, chameleons, praying mantises and scorpions, to name only a few. These “Little Monsters” are masters of survival. Until recently, only a handful of scientists enjoyed the technical means to study them up close. But now, thanks to 3D visualization, large audiences can experience a chameleon thrusting out its tongue at close range, rattlesnakes striking at their targets to within fractions of an inch, praying mantises hunting and hummingbirds feeding, filmed from inside the flower! Rather than simply delivering a flat representation of these amazing stunts, modern 3D provides for an emotional experience. And with its ingenious combination of slow-motion-3D and timelapse-3D, “Little Monsters” even improves upon state of the art 3D for greater impact, yielding unbelievable scenes the world has never seen and “felt” before.

Category  Science & Technology

Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

August 15, 2019  Colossal

Photographer Rob Woodcox (previously) travels the world to bring athletes and dancers together in visually captivating locations and poses. The 29-year-old artist first picked up a camera about ten years ago and hasn’t looked back. Woodcox works with a diverse array of models both in studio environments and in deserts and metropolises. A combination of on-site practical effects and post-production editing create the fantastical final images.

Woodcox grew up in Michigan, and shares with Colossal that the lack of a robust local creative industry spurred his imaginative, DIY approach. Woodcox found creative community online, where he connected with likeminded photographers. The scale of his projects grew as his network expanded, and now Woodcox frequently works on client commissions in addition to his personal practice. As his professional identity has evolved over the past eight years, Squarespace has stayed Woodcox’s website platform of choice. Its seamless user experience allows his work to take center stage. “When you’re doing creative work, the website just needs to be simple, clean, and easy to use. And that’s Squarespace. If it’s inhibiting the user’s experience, then that’s a problem,” Woodcox shares with Colossal. 

“Pursuing projects with real people and being a part of things that matter” keeps Woodcox inspired. Teaching workshops has been a huge part of the photographer’s career: to date, he has taught over eighty workshops on five continents. Squarespace’s ecommerce integrations allow students to register for workshops (the next one is in Portland, Oregon) and collectors to purchase fine art prints. An embedded newsletter signup form lets Woodcox’s audience keep up with his latest projects.

“It’s fun to think about what people haven’t even seen yet. I have visions that are so much bigger even than anything I’ve done so far,” Woodcox tells Colossal. “That’s an exciting thing as an artist. I don’t think I’m ever going to run out of fuel. There’s so much that I want to do.”

Ready to show the world your creative potential? Head over to Squarespace.com for a free weeklong trial, and if you like what you see, use code COLOSSAL at checkout to save 10% on your purchase of a website or domain name.

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