PBS News, TED Talks, Scientific America, Bright Side, Inspiration Grid, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: November1-4, 2019, How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect the 2020 race, Why Cambodian orphanages house so many children whose parents are still alive, and George Takei on challenging the ‘mindless inhumanity’ of U.S. history’s darker chapters

TED Talks: Why I love a country that once betrayed me – George Takei,

Scientific America: Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

BRIGHT SIDE: 10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist

Inspiration Grid: Pop Portraits: Illustration Series by Alessandro Pautasso

Thisiscolossal: Meticulously Painted Portraits by Miho Hirano Fuse Introspective Women with Plants and Animals

November 4, 2019 – PBS NewsHour full episode

Nov 4, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, transcripts of some closed-door impeachment inquiry depositions are publicly released. Plus: Rep. Jamie Raskin on the latest developments in the impeachment inquiry, what Kentucky’s gubernatorial race means for President Trump, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, how wavering U.S. support has affected the war in Ukraine and music for Nashville seniors. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 3, 2019

Nov 3, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

On this edition for Sunday, November 3, the impeachment inquiry goes public this week, why protests have erupted across the globe, and a first-of-its- kind campaign finance experiment in Seattle. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 2, 2019

Nov 2, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 2, the president fires back at the impeachment inquiry, fire warnings continue in California, the Democratic presidential candidates stump in Iowa, a Massachusetts state law puts men with addictions in jail for rehab, and a Washington Post writer criticizes a small Minnesota community, then moves there. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode November 1, 2019

Streamed live on Nov 1, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Category   News & Politics

How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect the 2020 race

Oct 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

President Trump has made plenty of headlines for his policies and personality. But in the background, he is cementing a long-lasting legacy through his judicial nominations to federal appeals courts. Lisa Desjardins reports on how this little-noticed effort could influence the 2020 presidential election — and federal courts for decades to come. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Why Cambodian orphanages house so many children whose parents are still alive

Oct 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The concept of orphanages has long been considered outdated in developed countries. In the developing world, however, these institutions still house hundreds of thousands of children. But the surprising reality is that the parents of most of these children are actually still alive. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Cambodia as part of his series Agents for Change. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

George Takei on challenging the ‘mindless inhumanity’ of U.S. history’s darker chapters

Oct 23, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

“Star Trek” actor, civil rights activist and social media maven George Takei has now written a graphic novel, “They Called Us Enemy,” about the trauma of his family’s being rounded up by the U.S. government and sent to internment camps during World War II. Takei talks to William Brangham about why his story still resonates today. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

Why I love a country that once betrayed me | George Takei

Jul 4, 2014  TED

When he was a child, George Takei and his family were forced into an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, as a “security” measure during World War II. 70 years later, Takei looks back at how the camp shaped his surprising, personal definition of patriotism and democracy. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category  People & Blogs

Scientific America

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/undying-cells-speedy-ants-and-a-deep-sea-ghost-science-gifs-to-start-your-halloween-week/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sciences&utm_content=link&utm_term=2019-11-01_top-stories&spMailingID=60882351&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1760136422&spReportId=MTc2MDEzNjQyMgS2

Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

Enjoy and spooky loop on

By Kelso Harper on October 28, 2019

Credit: Nautilus Live, Ocean Exploration Trust

You probably know the GIF as the perfect vehicle for sharing memes and reactions. We believe the format can go further, that it has real power to capture science and explain research in short, digestible loops.

Here is your special Halloween edition of GIF-able science. Enjoy and spooky loop on.

Terrifyingly Fast Ants

Credit: Sarah Pfeffer and Harald Wolf

Not many organisms can survive the harsh climate of the Sahara, where daytime temperatures can reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit. And yet Saharan silver ants thrive, feasting on carcasses of less fortunate, sun-cooked insects. But how do they avoid suffering the same fate as their lunch? Speed.

Credit: Bo Cheng and Pan Liu Pennsylvania State University

When chasing after pesky flies, we may wonder how they manage to land on the ceiling just out of reach. As it turns out, upside-down landings require complex acrobatics. Researchers studied how these tiny creatures pull off the maneuver, hoping it will help roboticists program a tiny robot to do the same.

The scientists expected flies to slow down and reach out to the surface but found that they speed up, complete a split-second cartwheel, extend their legs and pull their body into a firm plant on the ceiling. Such actions require rapid computation of visual cues and a perfectly timed physical response—an impressive feat for a very small nervous system. And yet flies do it effortlessly (though clearly not every time). 

It’s ALIVE! Still.

Credit: Matthew J. Tyska

This cell is immortal. Well, sort of. Unlike most types, the HeLa cell has no off switch for reproduction—it can continue to divide indefinitely. In fact, its line is so resilient, it has lived since the 1950s, when the first such cells were taken from the cancerous tumor of Henrietta Lacks (hence the name HeLa). The cells have a long and controversial history but have been crucial to many medical advancements, from vaccines to genome mapping.

Sadly, they aren’t actually rainbow-colored. Cell biologist Matthew J. Tyska added the hues to illustrate depth: warmer colors show parts farther from the viewer, and cooler ones show nearer bits. The scraggly arms reaching out from the cell, called filopodia, help it sense the physical and chemical properties of its environment. In reality, they don’t squirm around quite so quickly; Tyska sped up the video to be 200 times quicker. Makes for a lovely GIF, though, doesn’t it?

One Spooky Jellyfish

Credit: Nautilus Live, Ocean Exploration Trust

No, it’s not a ghost. You’re witnessing the undulation of a Deepstaria jelly filmed by the E/V Nautilus just in time for #spookyseason. The team spotted this deep-sea specter near Baker Island, a half-mile below sea level.

This jelly may look a bit different than what you would expect. Instead of a fringe of tentacles, it sports an oversize bell that can flexibly stretch and contract. The bell passively captures critters floating by, trapping them inside by cinching closed like a gelatinous trash bag. Stinging cells on the inside of the bell then stun the prey, and hairlike structures called cilia shuttle it to Deepstaria’s stomach.

Scientists don’t spot these deep-dwelling jellies often, but whenever they do, they find other critters, too: pill-bug-like crustaceans called isopods. These typically parasitic animals latch onto the inside of the jelly for a free ride, protection and a portion of its food. They may even munch on Deepstaria itself, but scientists don’t yet fully understand the isopod-jelly relationship.

From this ghoulish jelly and all of us at Scientific American: happy Halloween!

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Kelso Harper  Recent Articles

10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist

Sep 24, 2017  BRIGHT SIDE

10 strange and amazing animals that you have probably never heard of. Nature is truly full of surprises! We live in the twenty-first century, and all continents have already been discovered, all secrets of our planet revealed, all mountain peaks conquered. Just when you think you have seen it all, some new bizarre creature makes an appearance instantly restoring your faith in the impossible! TIMESTAMPS Mangalitsa Pig, a.k.a. “a pig in sheep’s clothing” 0:50 Rhinopithecus or golden snub-nosed monkey 1:33 Emperor tamarin 2:13 Patagonian Mara 3:04 Fluffy cow 3:52 Markhor Goat 4:44 Raccoon dog 5:23 Blue Footed Booby 6:25 Malayan Colugo 7:13 Venezuelan Poodle Moth 8:09 BONUS 8:56 SUMMARY – The birthplace of this curly-haired pig is Hungary where it was discovered in the mid-19th century. Due to the fleece covering this animal, it resembles a sheep, therefore, such a name! – The name of this species is roxellana, and there is a story behind it. It is believed that they were called this way after the supposedly snub-nosed courtesan of Suleiman the Magnificent (a 16th century Sultan of the Ottoman Empire). – They were called like this because of the resemblance of their mustache to that of German Emperor Wilhelm II. – Patagonia Mara is the fourth largest rodent on our planet. There are several interesting facts about them. Females often put offsprings into crèches for safety. – Fluffy cows are looked after by people whose work is to wash, dry and use products to style these animals, so they look as fluffy as they do! It is necessary to maintain them daily, and it will take months of regular grooming until they get this lovely look of kids toys. – If you see a creature which looks as if it’s trying to catch an alien radio signal from space, it’s most likely Markhor Goat. They can grow as long as 6 ft from head to tail! – If you can’t decide if you want to have a dog or a raccoon as a pet, we have just the thing for you – raccoon dog! Despite having raccoon-like markings on their fur, they are not very closely related to the North American raccoon. – Blue Footed Booby are to catch your eye if you ever visit the Galapagos Islands. They can look a bit clumsy and comical on land, but they are excellent at flying and swimming. – Colugo has a large gliding membrane (like a flying squirrel), and they can glide for long distances between trees standing far apart. – Even if the Poodle Moth may look as if it lives in Antarctica with all this fur, in fact, it comes from Venezuela, a tropical country. Its hairs don’t serve for heating. BONUS Cloud Antelope! This species lives in the clouds (that’s why such a name)! Its bright blue fur is the reflection of cloudless blue skies in the area of its habitat. Its diet consists of sun rays and candies… Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz

Inspiration Grid

https://theinspirationgrid.com/pop-portraits-illustration-series-by-alessandro-pautasso/

ArtIllustrationPop Culture

Pop Portraits: Illustration Series by Alessandro Pautasso

Published Oct 14, 2019

Created by Italian artist and graphic designer Alessandro Pautasso, ‘Pop Portraits’ is a fantastic ongoing series of digital collage portraits of celebrities, combining vivid colors, geometric shapes and interesting patterns.

You can view more of Alessandro’s work here.

More illustrations via Behance




Meticulously Painted Portraits by Miho Hirano Fuse Introspective Women with Plants and Animals

October 21, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Solitary female figures command the canvas in oil paintings by artist Miho Hirano. The Japanese artist creates detailed portraits of her human protagonists, who avoid direct eye contact with the viewer. Hirano’s women stare off into the distance as fish and butterflies swarm and flower blossoms and vines seem to grow from the figures’ hair. In a statement on Gallery Sumire’s website, Hirano describes the mission of her work as “to express the changing situation of life’s ugliness and maturity.”

Hirano draws inspiration from her upbringing, noting that her mother cared for plants and animals, and those motifs have continued in her work even though she does not currently reside in a nature-filled place. She also explained to WOW x WOW that she has long found painting a resonant medium to express her thoughts, explore ideas, and escape reality.

Hirano graduated from Musashino Art University’s department of Oil Painting and currently resides in Chiba, Japan. The artist had her first solo show in the U.S. at Corey Helford Gallery in 2017. Hirano’s newest body of work, Recollection, is on view in a two-person show at Corey Helford in Los Angeles from November 2 to December 9, 2019. See more of Hirano’s ethereal paintings on Instagram.

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