PBS News, Global National, CNN, DW News, ABC News, TED Talks, The New York Times, and Scientific American

PBS News: March 15 & 16, 2020, and Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

 Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

CNN: Fareed Zakaria – Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

DW News: Coronavirus update – Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders

ABC News: Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency – Four Corners – ABC News In-depth

TED Talks: Adam Kucharski How can we control the coronavirus pandemic?

The New York Times: We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L. By Chris Stanford

Scientific American: Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there By Jane Qiu, and WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 16, 2020

Mar 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the novel coronavirus pandemic dominates the U.S., as numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb and cities essentially shut down. Plus: The economic fallout from the outbreak, what epidemiologists mean by “flattening the curve,” the Biden-Sanders debate, Politics Monday, coronavirus threatens Lebanon with another crisis, coping through art and song and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 15, 2020

Mar 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 15, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, what you need to know about “social distancing,” how the coronavirus scare is shaping the political playing field, and what’s being done to stop Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

Mar 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the unique magnitude of the novel coronavirus pandemic, how President Trump is handling the crisis, what the government should do to reassure fearful Americans, and how the outbreak might affect the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race.

Category  News & Politics

Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

Mar 15, 2020  Global News

Canadian travellers are scrambling to return home amid the COVID-19 outbreak as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says nothing is ‘off the table” in combating the pandemic in Canada. Abigail Bimman reports on whether those plans could also involve border closures, and Jennifer Johnson reports on how U.S. health authorities are raising the possibility of more country-wide crackdowns. Heather Yourex-West reports on how many Canadian provinces are beginning to enforce tough measures by closing public spaces and schools. Robin Gill reports on a disastrous pipeline explosion in Nigeria and why the COVID-19 pandemic is halting Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial. Plus, Mike Le Couteur looks at why hundreds of millions of dollars allocated to support Canadian veterans has not been spent. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #Coronavirus #COVID19

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

Mar 15, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria discusses how President Trump is handling coronavirus and America’s well-being in comparison to other countries’ response to the global pandemic. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus update: Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders | DW News

Mar 15, 2020  DW News

Germany joins a growing list of EU countries to at least partially shut out its neighbors. Authorities here have decided to close borders with Switzerland and Austria. That’s according to German media reports. Added restrictions are also being imposed on the French-German boundary. Spain is in lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus Covid-19. Unprecedented lockdowns and border closures are coming into effect in many European countries, and the streets are empty throughout Europe, with Spain and France among the worst hit by the virus’ spread behind Italy. England is planning self-isolation measures for all people over 70, for up to four months. Austria’s Chancellor Sebstian Kurz says his government is banning gatherings of more than five people. Iran’s coronavirus death toll has leapt by 113 in one day to reach 724. And the Vatican says all Easter services will take place without worshipers in attendance. Pope Francis will hold Sunday blessings via TV and the internet. Meanwhile, the United States has tightened its ban on visitors from Europe. President Donald Trump says it will now include travelers from Britain and Ireland. In countries that are far away from coronavirus hotspots, like Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia, the response from authorities has ranged from tough to nonexistent.Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #dwNews

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency | Four Corners

Feb 24, 2020  ABC News In-depth

It’s likened to a scene from an apocalypse. Wuhan — a city more populous than London or New York — placed in ‘lockdown’ following the outbreak of the new and deadly coronavirus. In China, more than two thousand people have died, with tens of thousands more infected, and authorities are resorting to extreme measures to try to halt the contagion. In interviews filmed on smartphones, Chinese activists and Australians trapped in the lockdown explain what they are going through. Four Corners charts how the outbreak occurred and investigates whether a cover-up by Chinese authorities allowed the virus to spread. _________ Watch more Four Corners investigations here: https://bit.ly/2JbpMkf You can also like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abc4corners/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/4corners And sign up to our newsletter: https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/newsl… _____________

Category  News & Politics

As the threat of COVID-19 continues, infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski answers five key questions about the novel coronavirus, providing necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what might need to change about our social behavior to end the pandemic. (This video is excerpted from a 70-minute interview between Kucharski and head of TED Chris Anderson. Listen to the full interview at go.ted.com/adamkucharski.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Adam Kucharski · Infectious disease scientist

Adam Kucharski is working to understand how epidemics spread — and how they can be controlled.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread — and Why They Stop Hardcover

Adam Kucharski

Basic Books (2020)

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Monday, March 16, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L.
 

By Chris Stanford

Chelsea Market in Manhattan on Sunday. Restaurants and bars were ordered closed in several parts of the U.S.  Jose A. Alvarado Jr. for The New York Times
Americans are urged to ‘hunker down’
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that no gatherings of 50 people or more be held in the U.S. for the next two months, one of the federal government’s most sweeping efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
“For a while, life is not going to be the way it used to be in the United States,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Sunday. “We have to just accept that if we want to do what’s best for the American public.”
Here are the latest updates on the outbreak and maps of where the virus has spread.
In other developments:
? New York City’s public school system, the largest in the country, will be closed starting today. The city has also ordered a shutdown of tens of thousands of bars and restaurants, except for delivery and pickup services.
To ease a bottleneck in coronavirus testing, federal officials are setting up more drive-through centers and increasing commercial laboratories’ ability to process multiple samples at once.
? The Trump administration tried to persuade a German company that is developing a possible vaccine to move its work to the U.S., German officials said, raising fears in Berlin that any inoculation would be available first — and perhaps exclusively — in the U.S.
? Italy, the hardest-hit country outside China, reported a death toll of 1,809, a 25 percent increase over the day before. In a communal effort to lift the mood, Italians stuck in their homes have been breaking out in song. “It’s not like we’re maestros,” a woman in Rome said, but “it’s a moment of joy in this moment of anxiety.”
? As part of restrictions across Europe, Germany will close its borders with several neighbors.
? A Tennessee man who became a subject of national scorn after stockpiling more than 17,000 bottles of hand sanitizer donated the supplies. The state has begun a price-gouging investigation.
? Movie theaters had their worst weekend in two decades. Domestic ticket sales totaled $55.3 million, a 44 percent drop from the previous weekend.
What to know: Here’s how to practice social distancing and clean your phone. The Times is providing free access to much of our coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, like all of our newsletters, is free.
Another angle: On a special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. The story is a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” Listen here.
Fed cuts rates to near zero
The Federal Reserve on Sunday cut its benchmark interest rate by a full percentage point and said it would inject hundreds of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy, making an aggressive effort to address the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.
If the measures remind you of the 2008 global financial crisis, you’re not alone, our senior economics correspondent writes.
Global markets fell today. Here’s the latest.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the financial system’s response to the pandemic.
Related: Retailers, dairy farmers and meat producers say the U.S. food supply chain remains intact and has been ramping up to meet pandemic stockpiling.
Another angle: As the outbreak forces the cancellation of trips, nights out and large gatherings, economic damage is mounting. “Last week, I would have told you nothing had changed,” a California real estate agent said. “This week, it has all gone to hell.”  
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders bumped elbows rather than shaking hands before Sunday’s debate.  Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Democrats debate pandemic, and each other
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders called on Sunday for far more aggressive government action against the coronavirus and its economic effects, during their first one-on-one debate of the Democratic primary race.
The shadow of the pandemic loomed over the event, which was held without a live audience and with a six-foot distance between the candidates, following guidelines for social distancing.
Mr. Biden committed for the first time to selecting a female running mate, and Mr. Sanders said that “in all likelihood” he would do so as well. Here are six takeaways from the debate. We also fact-checked some of the candidates’ remarks.
Perspective: Writers from our Opinion section ranked the performances.
What’s next: Polls suggest that Mr. Biden is likely to win the four states with primaries on Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio. Georgia, which had been scheduled to vote March 24, postponed its primary for two months because of the coronavirus.
Go deeper: The Times Magazine looks at Mr. Sanders’s campaign. “Even as the two-man race has taken a more pugilistic turn while the economy reels and a pandemic sweeps the globe, Sanders has remained steadfast in his willingness to let the Democratic voters judge him by his democratic-socialist vision of what America should be. And so, it would seem, they have.”
Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. Shira Ovide wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

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How China’s “Bat Woman” Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

     By Jane Qiu on March 11, 2020 

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Shi Zhengli, known as China’s “bat woman” for her virus-hunting expeditions in bat caves, releases a fruit bat after taking blood and swab samples from it. Credit: Wuhan Institute of Virology

BEIJING—The mysterious patient samples arrived at Wuhan Institute of Virology at 7 P.M. on December 30, 2019. Moments later, Shi Zhengli’s cell phone rang. It was her boss, the institute’s director. The Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention had detected a novel coronavirus in two hospital patients with atypical pneumonia, and it wanted Shi’s renowned laboratory to investigate. If the finding was confirmed, the new pathogen could pose a serious public health threat—because it belonged to the same family of bat-borne viruses as the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that plagued 8,100 people and killed nearly 800 of them between 2002 and 2003. “Drop whatever you are doing and deal with it now,” she recalls the director saying.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-chinas-bat-woman-hunted-down-viruses-from-sars-to-the-new-coronavirus1/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=health&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-03-16_featured-this-week&spMailingID=64310566&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1841993808&spReportId=MTg0MTk5MzgwOAS2

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

     By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT on March 11, 2020

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

Coronavirus illustration. Credit: Dowell Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, acknowledging what has seemed clear for some time—the virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe.

Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the situation will worsen.

“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” said Tedros, as the director general is known.

As of Wednesday, 114 countries have reported that 118,000 have contracted Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, known as SARS-CoV2. In the United States, where for weeks state and local laboratories could not test for the virus, just over 1,000 cases have been diagnosed and 29 people have died. But authorities here warn continuing limits on testing mean the full scale of spread in this country is not yet known.

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Read more from this special report:

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

The virus causes mild respiratory infections in about 80% of those infected, though about half will have pneumonia. Another 15% develop severe illness and 5% need critical care.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/who-declares-the-coronavirus-outbreak-a-pandemic/

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PBS News, TED Talks, Washington Post, Best Documentary, Global News, ABC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: December 31, 2019 and January 1 – 7, 2020, Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many, Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

TED Talks: The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live – David Brooks, How to escape education’s death valley, Bring on the learning revolution!,   Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit,  – Sir Ken Robinson, Guy Winch How to turn off work thoughts during your free time,

Washington Post: On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.,

Best Documentary: A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Global News: In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

ABC News: The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost

Thisiscolossal: VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside, The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

PBS NewsHour live episode, Jan 7, 2020

Started streaming 42 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 6, 2020

Jan 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Iran mourns Gen. Qassem Soleimani, killed by the U.S. in an airstrike on Friday. Plus: Possible political and military repercussions of the Soleimani killing, a Senate impeachment trial in limbo, 2020 Democrats focus on foreign policy amid Iran tensions, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer, political upheaval in Venezuela and refugee artists in exile in France. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Iranians unite to mourn military giant Qassem Soleimani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Srd… Iranian ambassador on revenge for Soleimani’s death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4TE-… News Wrap: Pelosi to introduce war powers resolution on Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjMS7… What killing of Iranian general means for U.S., nuclear deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBQPB… What Pelosi, McConnell are saying about impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdGje… Iran tensions put foreign policy in focus for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_nxV… Tamara Keith and Lisa Lerer on Soleimani death, Iowa polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Wku… Venezuela’s political crisis roiled by chaos in parliament https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKBXl… In Europe, can art change the conversation around refugees? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlIm2… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 5, 2020

Jan 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 5, tensions escalate in the Middle East amid an outpouring of grief over the killing of Iran’s top military leader by a U.S. airstrike. Also, our ongoing series “Peril & Promise” examines the impact of climate change on communities along the Mississippi River in Louisiana and Missouri. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode January 4, 2020

Jan 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 4, the diplomatic fallout over the killing of Iranian military leader Qassim Suleimani, wildfires rage out of control in Australia, and the first part of our ongoing Peril and Promise series explores how climate change is impacting communities along the Mississippi River. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode Jan. 3, 2020

Jan 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a targeted U.S. attack in Baghdad kills a top Iranian general, raising ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Iran to new heights. Plus: American lawmakers respond to the killing of Qassam Soleimani, what’s next for the U.S. and Iran after Soleimani’s death, disinformation on the 2020 campaign trail and Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the week’s political news. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Who was Qassam Soleimani, and what does his death mean? https://youtu.be/Y1Ih9abqb6w Kaine says Trump’s Iran policy is hurting U.S. allies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8zyB… Risch says Soleimani was ‘ratcheting up’ attacks on the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhHJF… Why the U.S. targeted Soleimani — and how Iran might react https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1u2f7… News Wrap: Senate still divided on impeachment trial process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejXH-… How 2020 candidates are grappling with online disinformation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syCEN… Shields and Brooks on Soleimani’s death, 2020 fundraising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aX5ID… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 2, 2020

Jan 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Australia is still burning amid a record fire season that has destroyed millions of acres and killed 17 people. Plus: Financing the 2020 presidential race, President Trump’s support among evangelical Christians, why millennials are leaving organized religion, what’s in the huge 2020 federal spending bill, Carlos Ghosn flees Japan and psycholinguist Jean Berko Gleason. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 1, 2020

Jan 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a standoff outside the U.S. Embassy in Iraq ends — but tensions over American involvement in the country remain high. Plus: What North Korea’s nuclear decision means for relations with the U.S., new laws go into effect as 2020 begins, Antarctic penguins warn of climate change consequences, the decline of local newspapers and harvesting water from fog. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Death in Australian wildfires rises to 17 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LE2U… Crisis at Baghdad embassy is over, but tensions remain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vl9wR… Amid stalled U.S. talks, Kim Jong Un’s ‘major policy shift’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ocQU… How state laws are changing in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAtFe… What America is losing as local newsrooms shutter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSVIX… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 31, 2019

Streamed live on Dec 31, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, 2020

Dec 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week’s political news, including the battle between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over rules for a Senate impeachment trial, how the presidential primary race is shaping up among 2020 Democrats and the year’s most surprising political developments. Sream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many

Dec 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

British painter J.M.W. Turner was both prolific and peripatetic, producing more than 30,000 watercolors during a lifetime in which he traveled throughout Europe. But these works are extremely susceptible to light damage and can be shown only once in a generation. Now, they’re on view at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut — their only North American stop. Jared Bowen of WGBH reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

Dec 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

By almost any measure, 2019 was a year of especially sobering news on climate change, with grim warnings about what could happen in the future along with extreme weather events occurring now. The year also saw a global protest movement, initiated by young people, arise to try to tackle the problem. But as Miles O’Brien reports, the call for action was often divorced from political reality. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live | David Brooks

Jul 3, 2019   TED

Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy. Get TED Talks recommended just for you! Learn more at https://www.ted.com/signup. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here: https://media-requests.ted.com/ Follow TED on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category   People & Blogs

How to escape education’s death valley | Sir Ken Robinson

May 10, 2013  TED

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at https://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category   Education

Bring on the learning revolution! | Sir Ken Robinson

May 24, 2010  TED

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at https://www.ted.com/translate. Follow us on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/tednews Checkout our Facebook page for TED exclusives https://www.facebook.com/TED

Category   Education

Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit

Aug 13, 2018   Better Together: California Teachers Summit

At the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit, Sir Ken Robinson, a leading education and creativity expert, delivered the keynote address from the Summit’s headquarters at Cal State Fullerton. Sir Ken’s thought-provoking speech challenged California’s teachers to transform our education system by building personal relationships and developing the appetite and curiosity of learners. Because, as he put it, “when the conditions are right, miracles happen everywhere.”

Category   Education

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Guy Winch · Psychologist, author

Guy Winch asks us to take our emotional health as seriously as we take our physical health — and explores how to heal from common heartaches.

More Resources

How to Fix a Broken Heart

Guy Winch

TED Books (2018)

Emotional First Aid

Guy Winch

Plume (2014)

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About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | November 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

2°C: Beyond the limit

On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.

By Darryl Fears  Photos by Bonnie Jo Mount
Graphics by John Muyskens and Harry Stevens Dec. 27, 2019

BRUNY ISLAND, Tasmania — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia’s ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Rodney Dillon noticed the day he squeezed into a wet suit several years ago and dove into Trumpeter Bay to catch his favorite food, a big sea snail called abalone. As he swam amid the towering kelp forest, he saw that “it had gone slimy.” He scrambled out of the water and called a scientist at the University of Tasmania in nearby Hobart. “I said, ‘Mate, all our kelp’s dying, and you need to come down here and have a look.’

“But no one could do anything about it.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/img/1800/ECE6XKHZEMI6THQCDVC4WPP2R4.jpg

Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined. Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making.

Climate change had arrived at this island near the bottom of the world, and the giant kelp that flourished in its cold waters was among the first things to go.

Over recent decades, the rate of ocean warming off Tasmania, Australia’s southernmost state and a gateway to the South Pole, has climbed to nearly four times the global average, oceanographers say.

More than 95 percent of the giant kelp — a living high-rise of 30-foot stalks that served as a habitat for some of the rarest marine creatures in the world — died.

Giant kelp had stretched the length of Tasmania’s rocky east coast throughout recorded history. Now it clings to a tiny patch near Southport, the island’s southern tip, where the water is colder.

“This is a hot spot,” said Neil Holbrook, a professor who researches ocean warming at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “And it’s one of the big ones.”

Click any temperature underlined in the story to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit

Climate scientists say it’s essential to hold global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times to avoid irreversible damage from warming.

The Tasman Sea is already well above that threshold.

The Washington Post’s examination of accelerated warming in the waters off Tasmania marks this year’s final installment of its global series “2C: Beyond the Limit,” which identified hot spots around the world. The investigation has shown that disastrous impacts from climate change aren’t a problem lurking in the distant future: They are here now.

Nearly a tenth of the planet has already warmed 2 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century, and the abrupt rise in temperature related to human activity has transformed parts of the Earth in radical ways.

In the United States, New Jersey is among the fastest-warming states, and its average winter has grown so warm that lakes no longer freeze as they once did. Canadian islands are crumbling into the sea because a blanket of sea ice no longer protects them from crashing waves. Fisheries from Japan to Angola to Uruguay are collapsing as their waters warm. Arctic tundra is melting away in Siberia and Alaska, exposing the remains of woolly mammoths buried for thousands of years and flooding the gravesites of indigenous people who have lived in an icy world for centuries.

Australia is a poster child for climate change. Wildfires are currently raging on the outskirtsof itsmost iconic city and drought is choking a significant portion of the country.

Nearly 100 fires are burning in New South Wales, nearly half of them out of control. Residents of the state, where Sydney sits, wear breathing masks to tolerate the heavy smoke, which has drifted more than 500 miles south to the outskirts of Melbourne.

This is happening even though average atmospheric temperatures in Australia have yet to increase by 2 degrees Celsius.

The ocean is another story.

A stretch of the Tasman Sea right along Tasmania’s eastern coast has already warmed by just a fraction below 2 degrees Celsius, according to ocean temperature data from the Hadley Center, the U.K. government research agency on climate change.

Sea surface temperature change in a region off the coast of Tasmania

Trend

1900195019802018-202ºF above 1900-2018average-101ºC above 1900-2018average

+1.9ºCAnnual average for the region

Source: Met Office Hadley Center for Climate Science and Services

As the marine heat rises and the kelp simmers into goo, Dillon and other descendants of Tasmania’s first people are losing a connection to the ocean that has defined their culture for millennia.

Aboriginals walked to present-day Tasmania 40,000 years ago during the Stone Age, long before rising sea levels turned the former peninsula into an island.

Cut off from Aboriginals on the mainland, about a dozen nomadic tribes were the first humans to live so close to the end of the Earth, fishing amid the giant kelp for abalone, hunting kangaroo and mutton birds, turning bull kelp into tools, and fashioning pearlescent snail shells into jewelry for hundreds of generations.

But that was before British colonizers took their land and deployed an apartheid-like system to wipe them out.

Now, as descendants try to finally get full recognition as the first people and original owners of Tasmania, climate change is threatening to remove the marine life that makes so much of their culture special.

Two of the most severe marine heat waves ever recorded struck back to back in recent years.

In the first, starting in 2015, ocean temperatures peaked at nearly 3 degrees Celsius above normal in the waters between Tasmania and New Zealand. A blob of heat that reached 2 degrees Celsius was more than seven times the size of Tasmania, an island the size of Ireland.

The region’s past heat waves normally lasted as long as two months. The 2015-2016 heat wave persisted for eight months. Alistair Hobday, who studied the event, compared it to the deadly 2003 European heat wave that led to the deaths of thousands of people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/heat-wave-map-2-medium.jpg?v=5

Marine heat waves, Feb. 1, 2016

MAINLAND

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

Mild heat wave

Moderate

TASMANIA

Severe

Extreme

100 MILES

Source: Robert Schlegel, Ocean Frontier Institute

“Except in this case, it’s the animals that are suffering,” said Hobday, a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, a government agency.

South of the equator, Australia’s summer stretches from December to February — and soaring temperatures turned the mainland deadly this year. An estimated 23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of that species’s population in Australia — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April.

The bats, called flying foxes, cannot survive temperatures above 42 degrees Celsius. Another 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into meadows, backyard gardens and swimming pools.

A month later, more than 100 ringtail possums fell dead in Victoria when temperatures topped 35 degrees Celsius for four consecutive days.

The warming waters off Tasmania are not just killing the giant kelp, but transforming life for marine animals.

Warm-water species are swimming south to places where they could not have survived a few years ago. Kingfish, sea urchins, zooplankton and even microbes from the warmer north near the mainland now occupy waters closer to the South Pole.

“There’s about 60 or 70 species of fish that now have established populations in Tasmania that used not to be here,” said Craig Johnson, who leads the ecology and biodiversity center at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “You might see them occasionally as sort of vagrants, but they certainly did not have established populations.”

But the region’s indigenous cold-water species have no place to go. Animals such as the prehistoric-looking red handfish are accustomed to the frigid water closer to the shore. They cannot live in the deep-water abyss between the bottom tip of Tasmania and Antarctica.

“It’s a geographic climate trap,” Johnson said. Marine animals unique to Australia — the wallabies and koalas of the deep — could easily vanish. “So there’s going to be a whole bunch of species here that we expect will just go extinct.

“You know, it’s not a happy story.”

Genocide

Every time he dives for abalone, Rodney Dillon plays his part in what is arguably Tasmania’s saddest story of all.

At 63, he’s getting too old for the occasional plunge. Before a dive on a windy day in September, two people had to wrestle his wet suit over a thick athlete’s body softened by time.

Dillon persists because diving puts a favorite food on the family table, and, more important, it carries on a dying Aboriginal custom nearly ended by the British crown and the Australian governors it appointed.

A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Jun 3, 2017  Best Documentary

Enduring raging winds and icy waters with minimal protection, he enters the intimacy of elephant seals and orcas using clever ethological analyses and gets them used to his presence. Then comes the extraordinary: meet a man who communicates with penguins with body language, calms young seals and turns them into live pillows, lies underwater with 8 ton orcas or mature male seals…

Category   Pets & Animals

In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

Dec 31, 2019  Global News

Global News looks back at the exceptional individuals we said goodbye to in 2019, with a retrospective produced by Global National’s Eric Sorensen and videographer Trevor Owens. For more info, please go to https://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: https://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: https://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: https://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #2019PeopleWeLost #GlobalNews #2019InMemoriam

Category   News & Politics

The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost l ABC News

Dec 23, 2019  ABC News

We lost many legends this year, from actress Valerie Harper to “Beverly Hills 90210” star Luke Perry, fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt and ABC News’ own Cokie Roberts. #ABCNews #ValerieHarper #BH90210 #LukePerry #CokieRoberts #GloriaVanderbilt

Category News & Politics

VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside

March 24, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects / Hiroyuki Oki

Blurring the line between the interior and exterior, Vo Trong Nghia Architects designed and built a three-level residential home in Ho Chi Minh City that is overflowing from within with fiddle leaf fig plants, various palms, and winding vines. Going beyond arrangements of potted house plants, the architects integrated the flora into the physical structure. Corridors, staircases, and rooms are lined with natural dividers that add color, block sunlight, and ventilate the space.

The latest project in the firm’s “House for Trees” series, the Stepping Park House is a commentary on environmental issues in Vietnam caused by a lack of green spaces. Views of the exterior show that the driveway, balconies, and perimeter fence have also sprouted leaves. The top floor of the building has an open slatted design with spaces that are filled with even more greenery, which further connects the home with the surrounding environment, and in particular to the rare park nearby. (via Jeroen Apers)

The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

September 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

A sinuous new gallery and bridge reaches across the Randselva River in Jevnaker, Norway. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the aluminum-clad structure joins north and south river fronts on the campus of Kistefos Sculpture Park. 15,000 square feet of space allows visitors to explore Kistefos’s large art collection while also taking in the surrounding landscape through floor-to-ceiling windows. The Twist opened to the public on September 18th, with an exhibition featuring the work of conceptual artist Martin Creed and painter Howard Hodgkin. Kistefos Sculpture Park has  ticketed admission, which includes entry to The Twist, and is open seasonally from the end of May to mid-November. (via Design Milk)

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Mesmerizing New Animation, Maxim Zhestkov, PBS News, TED Talks, Click BBC, NASA, Rebwar Tahir & More

Mesmerizing New Animation, Maxim Zhestkov, PBS News, TED Talks, Click BBC, NASA, Rebwar Tahir & More

Layers: A Mesmerizing New Animation by Maxim Zhestkov

December 3, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Layers is a new 4K digital art film by Russian director Maxim Zhestkov (previously) which follows amutating black cube as colorful layers are revealed inside, showcasing a stark contrast between its surface and core. Several iterations of the black monolith are bisected by an invisible force, showcasing purples, greens, reds, and a bright blue that fills the largest area at the structures’ center. The objects float through fictional gallery spaces (like we’ve seen in previous films Elements and Volumes) presenting each as impossible sculptures that can only be produced by digital means. Layers is the fourth film Zhestkov has launched since 2017. You can view other art films from his series, and keep up with future projects on VimeoInstagram, and Behance.

PBS NewsHour full episode May 15, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on May 15, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump returns to the issue of immigration with a proposal for system reform. Meanwhile, state legislatures pursue new abortion laws, artists use imagery of natural disasters to educate, a lawsuit over the prices of generic drugs, an interview with former Justice John Paul Stevens and an educational program that uses classical music to calm stressed children. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode May 14, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on May 14, 2019

Tuesday on the NewsHour, tensions between the U.S. and Iran continue to rise amid an attack by Yemeni rebels in which Iran may have been involved. Plus: U.S. concerns about Chinese telecommunications company Huawei, what the Teamsters think of Trump’s trade war with China, an interview with 2020 Democrat Rep. Tim Ryan, a new approach to teaching math and author Jared Diamond’s latest book.

PBS NewsHour full episode May 13, 2019

PBS NewsHour   Published on May 13, 2019

Monday on the NewsHour, China imposes tariffs on U.S. goods in retaliation for tariffs President Trump levied Friday. Plus: Trump welcomes Hungary’s right-wing prime minister to the White House, issues on the 2020 campaign trail, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter, a brutal regime of torture in Syria, a play that recreates life in a crowded refugee camp and the value of team sports. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: After oil tankers damaged, Trump warns Iran https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ic20… What Trump’s trade war with China means for U.S. consumers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvWSO… Why Trump’s meeting Hungary’s Orban is a ‘bit controversial’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKdp-… How 2020 Democrats are balancing policy, personal connection https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v71p8… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on 2020 Democrats’ policy plans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gymPX… The untold stories of Bashar al-Assad’s brutal regime https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxUnN… For these refugees, theater plays a ‘vital role’ in healing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXodX… John Urschel on why every child should play team sports https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7Em5… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 12, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Published on May 12, 2019

On this edition for Sunday, May 12, rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran, Venezuelans fleeing crisis are seeking asylum in Texas, and a trip to the musical forest where wood for the famed Stradivarius instruments was sourced. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York.

Category   News & Politics

5G Whizz – BBC Click

BBC Click   Published on May 6, 2019

The future is 5G: from race tracks to connected cows on the farm. Plus a look at Chinese company Huawei’s leading role in developing the technology. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

U.S.-China tariff dispute threatens to cause economic damage on all sides | Power & Politics

CBC News   Published on May 13, 2019

China announced tariffs on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods in retaliation for President Donald Trump’s decision to raise duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports after American officials accused China of backtracking on commitments it made in trade talks. With investors unnerved by the potential for economic damage on all sides, stocks sank across the globe. To read more: https://cbc.ca/1.5133363 »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: https://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: https://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O

The Collapse of the American Empire?

The Agenda with Steve Paikin   Published on Sep 12, 2018

The Agenda welcomes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges, who over the past decade and a half has made his name as a columnist, activist and author. He’s been a vociferous public critic of presidents on both sides of the American political spectrum, and his latest book, ‘America, the Farewell Tour,’ is nothing short of a full-throated throttling of the political, social, and cultural state of his country.

Category   Education

Sleep is your life-support system and Mother Nature’s best effort yet at immortality, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. In this deep dive into the science of slumber, Walker shares the wonderfully good things that happen when you get sleep — and the alarmingly bad things that happen when you don’t, for both your brain and body. Learn more about sleep’s impact on your learning, memory, immune system and even your genetic code — as well as some helpful tips for getting some shut-eye.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Matt Walker · Sleep scientist, professor, author

Matt Walker is a brain scientist trying to understand why we sleep.

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep. [Directed by TED-Ed, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Carlos Palomares].

Meet the educator

Claudia Aguirre · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

A condition called Charles Bonnet Syndrome can cause blind patients to hallucinate scenes in vivid color. fMRI studies show that these hallucinations activate the same brain areas as sight — areas that are not activated by imagination. Other hallucinations also involve the same brain areas as real sensory experiences. What’s going on? Elizabeth Cox details the science of hallucinations. [TED-Ed Animation by Nerdo]

Meet the educator

Elizabeth Cox · Educator

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Euronews English Live

euronews (in English)   Started streaming 3 hours ago

Euronews: the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe! https://bit.ly/2xkUwqi What are the top stories today? Click to watch: https://www.youtube.com/user/Euronews… Follow us on: Website: https://www.euronews.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/euronews Twitter: https://twitter.com/euronews Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/euronews.tv/ Flipboard: https://flipboard.com/@euronews WhatsApp or Messenger: https://www.euronews.com/follow-us#ne… Euronews is available in 12 languages: https://www.youtube.com/user/euronews…

Category   News & Politics

Money, luxury and fame – the new super-rich of India | DW Documentary

DW Documentary    Published on Feb 20, 2019

Only the US and China currently have more billionaires than India. Some of them are as famous as pop stars and enjoy similar adulation. Their social media accounts have millions of followers – in a country where more than half the population lives below the poverty line and has no electricity or fresh water. India’s super-rich have been dubbed the “new maharajas.” The sources of their seemingly unlimited wealth are almost as varied as their values and lifestyles. 23-old Evan Luthra uses his father’s seed capital to invest in new ideas in the software industry. He loves luxury, meets the young moneyed elite in fashionable destinations around the world, and is active on all the social networks. Abhimanyu Alsisar, nephew of the Maharajah of Jaipur, runs a chain of luxury hotels in the ancient palaces of India and invests in music events. Kalpana Saroj comes from the lowest caste in India and has worked her way up from destitution to become a multimillionaire – but she never forgets her background, and helps impoverished farmers in her homeland with medical care and gifts of money. Vijay Mallya even bought his own Formula 1 racing team, but faces a long prison sentence for fraudulent bankruptcy and tax evasion should he return to India. The documentary is the result of six months of investigative research and offers a deep insight into the everyday and professional lives of India’s super-rich. DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more documentaries visit: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

Category   Education

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CGTN Live   Started streaming on May 9, 2019

CGTN is China’s preeminent 24-hour English language television channel. We provide global audiences with a better understanding of today’s China, while offering a Chinese perspective on international news and current affairs. CGTN is a high quality, trusted and respected global news brand, and a leading source of information on China, Asia and the world.

Category   News & Politics

FRANCE 24 Live – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

FRANCE 24 English   Started streaming on Apr 27, 2019

Watch FRANCE 24 live in English on YouTube for free Subscribe to France 24 now https://f24.my/YouTubeEN Watch France 24 live news: all the latest news live broadcasted from Paris, France. Le DIRECT France 24 en français : https://f24.my/YTliveFR France 24 EN VIVO en Español: https://f24.my/YTliveES ????? 24 ???? ??????? https://f24.my/YTliveAR Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.Eng… Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 https://www.france24.com/en/

Category   News & Politics

Originally shared by Todd William
Isaac Asimov on why YOUR Ignorance doesn’t equal MY Ignorance…

In every century people have thought they understood the Universe at last, and in every century they were proven to be wrong. It follows that the one thing we can say about out modern “knowledge” is that it is wrong.

Socrates had said on learning that the Delphic oracle had proclaimed him the wisest man in Greece. “If I am the wisest man,” said Socrates, “it is because I alone know that I know nothing.” 

The basic trouble, you see, is that people think that “right” and “wrong” are absolute; that everything that isn’t perfectly and completely right is totally and equally wrong.

Let me dispose of Socrates because I am sick and tired of this pretense that knowing you know nothing is a mark of wisdom.

No one knows nothing. In a matter of days, babies learn to recognize their mothers. Socrates would agree, of course, and explain that knowledge of trivia is not what he means.

He means that in the great abstractions over which human beings debate, one should start without preconceived, unexamined notions.

Now where do we get the notion that “right” and “wrong” are absolutes? 

Young children learn spelling, for instance, and here we tumble into apparent absolutes.

How do you spell “sugar?” Suppose Alice spells it p-q-z-z-f and Genevieve spells it s-h-u-g-e-r. Both are wrong, but is there any doubt that Alice is more wrong than Genevieve?

When people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical, they were wrong.

But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is more wrong than both of them put together.

_______________________________

Source: Relativity of Wrong: Essays on Science by Isaac Asimov
(Artwork by: Igor Artyomenko)

Originally shared by Todd William
Optimism Is the one quality more associated with success and happiness than any other.
~ Brian Tracy


(Artwork by: Vladimir Kush)

Originally shared by Todd William
It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.
~ Carl Sagan

(This awesome image created by: Manipula Art)
https://www.manipula.art.br/

The Brutal Logic of Climate Change

Carbon Neutral University Sheffield   Published on May 19, 2017

Full length talk that covers the facts of climate change, the urgency with which it needs to be addressed and actions we can take to stop it. Delivered by Dr Aaron Thierry at the University of Sheffield, hosted by the Carbon Neutral University Network. Check out the Carbon Neutral University Network on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carbonneutra… Weebly: https://carbonneutralshef.weebly.com/ Twitter: @CNUniShef

Category   Science & Technology


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Watch ABC News Live

ABC News (Australia)

Started streaming on Feb 5, 2019

This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: https://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category   News & Politics

Originally shared by Rebwar Tahir

Self portrait (drawing) , #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

#Rebwar_K_Tahir.
In advance Happy new year to all my friends…


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Self model , #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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When I was with Van Gogh , by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.


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Malaye Jziri, one of the most famous Kurdish writer, poet and mystic. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.


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Mastoureh Ardalan , (1805 –1848), she was a Kurdish poet and writer. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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When I was with Van Gogh , by #Rebwar_K_Tahir. (2).


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Self portrait . #Rebwar_K_Tahir.


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Hapsa Kahani Naqib, (1891-1953), was a politician woman, had a role in Gaining women’s rights. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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Qadam Khair,1898-1932, Kurdish revolutionary woman, a national leader. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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Sheikh Ubeydullah (1830- 1883), was the leader of the first modern Kurdish nationalist struggle. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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A little gift to my master , Van Gogh , by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.



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Mustafa Besarani,(1642- 1701), was a Kurdish poet who wrote in Hewrami dialect. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir..

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Self portrait , #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

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Wafaei or Wefayî, (1844–1902), was a Kurdish poet. by #Rebwar_K_Tahir.

Space & The Universe HD

Black Holes and Our Solar System Documentary – The Universe and Space Exploration

Started streaming on May 11, 2019

How likely is it that a black hole could enter the Solar System? Well, you’d have to define likely; it is more likely that the Earth will get swallowed by a black hole than, say, winning the lottery ten times in a row, but less likely than being struck by lightning. In fact the odds of a black hole devouring our planet are estimated at one in a trillion. There are two predominant types of black hole in the universe. The first are supermassive black holes found churning at the centre of galaxies. These don’t really pose any threat to us, until our galaxy collides with another like the Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years.

Category   Science & Technology

NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV
Started streaming on Dec 28, 2018
Direct from America’s space program to YouTube, watch NASA TV live streaming here to get the latest from our exploration of the universe and learn how we discover our home planet. NASA TV airs a variety of regularly scheduled, pre-recorded educational and public relations programming 24 hours a day on its various channels. The network also provides an array of live programming, such as coverage of missions, events (spacewalks, media interviews, educational broadcasts), press conferences and rocket launches. In the United States, NASA Television’s Public and Media channels are MPEG-2 digital C-band signals carried by QPSK/DVB-S modulation on satellite AMC-3, transponder 15C, at 87 degrees west longitude. Downlink frequency is 4000 MHz, horizontal polarization, with a data rate of 38.86 Mhz, symbol rate of 28.1115 Ms/s, and ¾ FEC. A Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) compliant Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD) is needed for reception.
Category Science & Technology

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