PBS News, BBC News, Scientific American, TED Talks, Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids, Abolitionist, Biography, Thisiscolossal, and Dezeen

PBS News: February 14 – 20, 2020

BBC News: How mattresses could solve hunger 

Scientific American: The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

TED Talks: Debbie  Millman How Symbols and brands shape our humanity?, Rayma Suprani dictators hate political cartoons so I keep drawing them#t-87937 and Patrick Chappatte A free world needs satire

Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids , Abolitionist – Mini Bio: Susan B. Anthony

Biography: Grant Wood

Thisiscolossal: 50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles and Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Dezeen: Second Home Hollywood – Architecture

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 20, 2020

Feb 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Trump associate Roger Stone is sentenced to 40 months in prison after a public drama involving commentary from President Trump. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a fiery Las Vegas debate, analyzing the 2020 Democratic race, Venezuela’s political dynamics a year after Juan Guaido tried to seize power, California’s homelessness problem and saving for retirement after job loss. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Stone sentenced to 40 months in prison after DOJ drama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6VH4… News Wrap: Germany reels from deadly shooting rampage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4xHK… Bloomberg takes criticism at Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=086dG… 3 political experts on 2020 Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kosiH… A year after Guaido’s rise, Venezuelans wait for change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kPne… Can California solve its major problem with homelessness? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SoEP… When older workers are laid off and can’t afford to retire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFGf8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 19, 2020

Feb 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, six Democratic rivals face off in Las Vegas ahead of the Nevada caucuses. Also: A look at the billionaire businessman shaking up the presidential race, the world-wide spread of novel coronavirus, inhuman conditions grow bleaker in a Greek migrant camp, the melting block of ice threatening the world’s sea level and author Kevin Wilson on his new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Pentagon official resigns in impeachment fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXkzD… What to watch as Democrats’ Nevada competition ramps up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzS6V… What Bloomberg’s record means for his White House bid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8X2A… People may be catching novel coronavirus without symptoms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6-De… Children yearn for peace in hellish Greek refugee camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwLdu… Visiting the ‘doomsday glacier’ that’s melting away https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ782… This novel makes fun of your child’s meltdown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pie33… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 17, 2020

Feb 17, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, hundreds of American passengers are evacuated from cruise ships stranded by novel coronavirus in Asia. Plus: 2020 Democrats prepare for the Nevada caucuses, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, a migrant crisis builds on the Greek island of Lesbos, a book about presidential authors and the moment comedians Steve Martin and Martin Short became friends. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 16, 2020

Feb 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 16, the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates turn to Nevada as early voting takes place ahead of the upcoming caucuses, a look back at the historic Baldwin-Buckley race debate and how it is still resonating, and in Arizona an experimental program is being used to battle a decades-long drought. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 15, 2020

Feb 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 15, new cases of the coronavirus decrease in China, early voting begins in Nevada’s caucuses, the intersection of politics and architecture in North Macedonia, the Trump administration plans to ramp up enforcement in sanctuary cities, and a vital tuna industry struggles to stay afloat amid a perfect storm of obstacles. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 14, 2020

Feb 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, conflict looms over the Justice Department, as President Trump continues to tweet about pending cases. Plus: The U.S. reaches an agreement with the Taliban to wind down the war in Afghanistan, 2020 Democrats head south and west, political analysis with Mark Shields and Michael Gerson, consequences of Trump’s asylum policies and why young Brits are playing the cello. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS 2 former DOJ officials on Trump, Barr and the rule of law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlRDX… News Wrap: Army says Vindman won’t be investigated https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ4XS… U.S., Taliban agree on short-term plan to pave way for peace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFhes… Nevada, South Carolina offer next tests for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oez9… Mark Shields and Michael Gerson on NH primary, Trump v. DOJ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9asIb… What’s happening to asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VkvS… A 20-year-old classical cellist inspires other youth to play  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZYgi… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/video_and_audio/headlines/51466978/how-mattresses-could-solve-hunger

How mattresses could solve hunger 

BBC News

Syrian refugees at Zaatari camp in Jordan and scientists from the University of Sheffield are working together to create a way to grow healthy, fresh food with nothing but water and old mattress foam.

These ‘recycled gardens’ use the mattresses in place of the soil, which solves two problems in one: It reuses the mountain of plastic mattresses that have piled up in the camp and it allows everyone to grow fresh food in a crowded, desert environment.

Victoria Gill has been to the camp in Jordan to see how it’s working.

Produced by Vanessa Clarke. Filmed and edited by Stephen Fildes.

12 Feb 2020

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/eye-of-the-storm/january-2020-earths-warmest-january-on-record/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-02-13_top-stories

January 2020: Earth’s Warmest January on Record

The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

      By Jeff Masters on February 13, 2020

January 2020: Earth's Warmest January on Record

Fire and Rescue personnel run to move their truck as a bushfire burns on December 19, 2019 near Sydney, Australia. Fires in Australia were the most expensive weather-related disaster so far in 2020, with damages estimated in the billions by insurance broker Aon. Credit: David Gray Getty Images

January 2020 was the planet’s warmest January since record keeping began in 1880, said NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) on Thursday. Global ocean temperatures during January 2020 were the second warmest on record, and global land temperatures were the warmest on record. Global satellite-measured temperatures in January 2020 for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were the warmest or second warmest in the 42-year record, according to the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) and RSS, respectively.

January 2020 had the fourth highest departure of temperature from average of any month since 1880. Only March 2016, February 2016 and December 2015 had a greater temperature departure. Impressively, the warmth of January 2020 came without an El Niño event being present. Furthermore, we are also near the nadir of one of the least active solar cycles in the past century–a time when it is more difficult to set global heat records, due to the reduced amount of solar energy Earth receives. Thus, the remarkable warmth of January 2020 is a strong reminder that human-caused global warming is the primary driver of our warming climate.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 1. Departure of temperature from average for January 2020, the warmest January for the globe since record keeping began in 1880. Record warm January surface temperatures were present across parts of Scandinavia, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the central and western Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, and Central and South America. No land or ocean areas had record cold January temperatures. Credit: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

TWO BILLION-DOLLAR WEATHER DISASTERS IN JANUARY 2020

Two billion-dollar weather-related disaster hit the Earth last month, according to the January 2020 Catastrophe Report from insurance broker Aon:

U.S. severe weather outbreak: A powerful winter storm over central and eastern sections of the U.S. from January 10 – 12 killed 12 and did $1.2 billion in damage. The storm brought a multi-day severe weather outbreak to parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia, with 79 confirmed tornadoes.

Australia wildfires: Intense heat and drought over much of Australia in January caused destructive wildfires blamed for billions of dollars in damages. The combined death toll for the 2019/20 Australia bushfire season stands at 34, with more than 5,900 homes and other structures destroyed. Guardian Australia has launched the first of six very impressive immersive multimedia features on climate change, reported through the experiences of people living through it in Australia. The first episode–on bushfires–is best viewed on a large screen (not mobile) with the sound on.

NEUTRAL EL NIÑO CONDITIONS REIGN

NOAA’s February 13 monthly discussion of the state of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) stated that neutral ENSO conditions existed, with neither an El Niño nor a La Niña event in progress. Over the past month, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño3.4 region of the eastern tropical Pacific, though warmer than average, have been below the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions.

Forecasters at NOAA and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) are calling for a roughly 60% chance of neutral conditions continuing through Northern Hemisphere spring, and a 50% chance of continuing through summer. They put the odds of an El Niño event during the August-September-October peak of the hurricane season at 23%, and the odds of a La Niña event during that period at 33%.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 2. Departure of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño 3.4 region (in the equatorial Pacific) ending on February 13, 2020. Over the past month, SSTs were about 0.3°C above average, falling short of the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions. Credit: Levi Cowan, tropicaltidbits.com.

ARCTIC SEA ICE: EIGHTH LOWEST JANUARY EXTENT ON RECORD

Arctic sea ice extent during January 2020 was tied for eighth lowest in the 41-year satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The ice extent was higher than seen in recent years thanks to a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which kept cold air bottled up in the Arctic. Antarctic sea ice extent in January 2020 was the tenth lowest on record.

NOTABLE GLOBAL HEAT AND COLD MARKS FOR JANUARY 2020

Hottest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January
Coldest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: -66.0°C (-86.8°F) at Geo Summit, Greenland, 3 January (dubious data)
Hottest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: 48.9°C (120.0°F) at Penrith, Australia, 4 January
Coldest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: -47.4°C (-53.3°F) at Concordia, Antarctica, 31 January

 (Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

MAJOR WEATHER STATIONS THAT SET (NOT TIED) NEW ALL-TIME HEAT OR COLD RECORDS IN JANUARY 2020

Among global stations with a period of record of at least 40 years, 28 set new all-time heat records in January, and 3 set all-time cold records:

Canberra (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Newcastle (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January    
Katoomba (Australia) max. 39.8°C, 4 January   
Parramatta (Australia) max. 47.0°C, 4 January  
Bankstown (Australia) max. 47.0 °C, 4 January  
Taralga (Australia) max. 40.5°C, 4 January
Goulburn Airport (Australia) max. 42.0°C, 4 January  
Albury (Australia) max. 46.1°C, 4 January
Burrinjuck Dam (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Grenfell (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Young (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January  
Gundagai (Australia) max. 45.2°C, 4 January  
Cootamundra (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Temora (Australia) max. 46.4°C, 4 January
Narrandera (Australia) max. 47.4°C, 4 January  
Griffith (Australia) max. 47.2°C, 4 January
Calama (Chile) max. 31.2 °C, 12 January
Fraserburg (South Africa) max. 42.4°C, 16 January
Pofadder (South Africa) max. 43.0°C, 16 January
Willowmore (South Africa) max. 42.2°C, 16 January
Beaufort West (South Africa) max. 44.5°C, 16 January
Saint Raphael-Cargados Islands (Mauritius) max. 35.6°C, 9 January
Honiara Downtown (Solomon Islands) max. 35.4°C, 3 January
Veguitas (Cuba) min. 7.0 °C, 23 January
Pinares de Mayari (Cuba) min. 6.5°C, 23 January
Conakry Airport (Guinea) max. 38.0°C, 24 January
Kalewa (Myanmar) min. 6.6°C, 26 January
Cabramurra (Australia) max. 34.0°C, 31 January
Hobart Airport (Australia) max. 41.4°C, 31 January
Maydena (Australia) max. 38.2°C, 31 January
Gisborne (New Zealand) max. 38.2°C, 31 January

No all-time national heat or cold records have been set thus far in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

THIRTEEN MONTHLY NATIONAL/TERRITORIAL HEAT RECORD BEATEN OR TIED IN 2020 AS OF FEBRUARY 13

As of February 13, 13 national monthly all-time heat records have been beaten or tied in 2020:

January (10): Norway, South Korea, Angola, Congo Brazzaville, Dominica, Mexico, Indonesia, Guinea Bissau, Gambia, Sao Tome and Principe

February (3): Spain, Antarctica, Azerbaijan

No monthly national cold records have been beaten or tied in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

HEMISPHERICAL AND CONTINENTAL TEMPERATURE RECORDS IN 2020

Highest minimum temperature ever recorded the Northern Hemisphere in January: 29.1°C (84.4°F) at Bonriki, Kiribati, 17 January.

Highest maximum temperature ever recorded in North America in January: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January.

Highest temperature ever recorded in continental Antarctica and highest February temperature ever recorded in Antarctica plus the surrounding islands: 18.4°C (65.1°F) at Base Esperanza, 6 February.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Jeff Masters

Jeff Masters worked as a hurricane scientist with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. After a near-fatal flight into category 5 Hurricane Hugo, he left the Hurricane Hunters to pursue a safer passion–a 1997 Ph.D. in air pollution meteorology from the University of Michigan. In 1995, he co-founded the Weather Underground, and served as its chief meteorologist until the company was sold to the Weather Company in 2012. Since 2005, his Wunderblog (now called Category 6) has been one of the Internet’s most popular sources of extreme weather and climate change information, and he is one of the most widely quoted experts in the field. He can be reached at weatherman.masters@gmail.com.

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Will Past Criminals Reoffend? Humans Are Terrible at Guessing, and Computers Aren’t Much Better

February 14, 2020 — Sophie Bushwick

“Branding is the profound manifestation of the human spirit,” says designer and podcaster Debbie Millman. In a historical odyssey that she illustrated herself, Millman traces the evolution of branding, from cave paintings to flags to beer labels and beyond. She explores the power of symbols to unite people, beginning with prehistoric communities who used them to represent beliefs and identify affiliations to modern companies that adopt logos and trademarks to market their products — and explains how branding reflects the state of humanity.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Debbie Millman · Design evangelist

As host of the long-running podcast “Design Matters,” Debbie Millman illuminates the creative processes of some of our era’s most intriguing artists, designers and icons.

TEDWomen 2019 | December 2019

“A political cartoon is a barometer of freedom,” says Rayma Suprani, who was exiled from her native Venezuela for publishing work critical of the government. “That’s why dictators hate cartoonists.” In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent railing against totalitarianism, Suprani explores how cartoons hold a mirror to society and reveal hidden truths — and discusses why she keeps drawing even when it comes at a high personal cost. (In Spanish with consecutive English translation)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rayma Suprani · Political cartoonist

An award-winning satirist, Venezuelan cartoonist Rayma Suprani’s life’s work is speaking truth to power — even when being outspoken comes at a steep price.

Check out more of Rayma Suprani’s political cartoons and graphic work.

FOLLOW

Follow Rayma Suprani on Twitter.

TEDWomen 2019 | December 2019

We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_B._Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

American women’s rights activist

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women’s rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. Wikipedia

BornFebruary 15, 1820, Adams, MA

DiedMarch 13, 1906, Rochester, NY

Full nameSusan Brownell Anthony

SiblingsMary Stafford AnthonyDaniel Read AnthonyMORE

Quotes

Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.

I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.

Independence is happiness.

Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO

Oct 17, 2012  Biography

Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 to March 13, 1906), better known as Susan B. Anthony, was an American writer, lecturer and abolitionist who was a leading figure in the women’s voting rights movement. Raised in a Quaker household, Anthony went on to work as a teacher. She later partnered with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and would eventually lead the National American Woman Suffrage Association. #Biography Subscribe for more Biography: http://aetv.us/2AsWMPH Delve deeper into Biography on our site: http://www.biography.com Follow Biography for more surprising stories from fascinating lives: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Biography Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/biography Twitter – https://twitter.com/biography Biography.com captures the most gripping, surprising, and fascinating stories about famous people: The biggest break. The defining opportunity. The most shattering failure. The unexpected connection. The decision that changed everything. With over 7,000 biographies and daily features that highlight newsworthy and compelling points-of-view, we are the digital source for true stories about people that matter. Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO https://www.youtube.com/user/Biograph…

Rating  No mature content   Category  Entertainment

Susan B. Anthony, Fighter for Women’s Rights!

Mar 9, 2017 Simon Kids

Susan B. Anthony knew from a young age that women deserved the same rights as men, especially the right to vote! Read along as Susan strives for equality through delivering speeches, handing in a new declaration to Congress and even getting arrested! Come #readalong with us in SUSAN B. ANTHONY, FIGHTER FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS by Deborah Hopkinson! To find more great Ready-to-Read books visit http://www.readytoread.com .

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Grant-Wood

Grant Wood AMERICAN ARTIST

WRITTEN BY: The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

LAST UPDATED: Feb 9, 2020 See Article History

Grant Wood, (born February 13, 1891, near Anamosa, Iowa, U.S.—died February 12, 1942, Iowa City, Iowa), American painter who was one of the major exponents of Midwestern Regionalism, a movement that flourished in the United States during the 1930s.

Wood was trained as a craftsman and designer as well as a painter. After spending a year (1923) at the Académie Julian in Paris, he returned to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where in 1927 he was commissioned to do a stained-glass window. Knowing little about stained glass, he went to Germany to seek craftsmen to assist him. While there he was deeply influenced by the sharply detailed paintings of various German and Flemish masters of the 16th century. Wood subsequently abandoned his Impressionist style and began to paint in the sharply detailed, realistic manner by which he is now known.

A portrait of his mother in this style, Woman with Plants (1929), did not attract attention, but in 1930 his American Gothic caused a sensation when it was exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago. The hard, cold realism of this painting and the honest, direct, earthy quality of its subject were unusual in American art. The work ostensibly portrays a farmer and his daughter—modelled for Wood by his dentist, B.H. McKeeby, and Wood’s sister, Nan—in front of their farmhouse. As a telling portrait of the sober and hardworking rural dwellers of the Midwest, the painting has become one of the best-known icons of American art.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.SuperStock

The meaning of American Gothic has been subjected to scrutiny since Wood painted it. Was it meant to be an homage to the strong values in the Midwest or was it a satire? Is it a husband and wife or a father and daughter? Wood’s own statements on its meaning were wishy-washy, leading to further ambiguity and debate. Open to so much interpretation, the American Gothic trope lent itself to countless parodies in popular culture as well as in the political arena, in advertisements, in television shows such as The Simpsons, in albums, in comic books, on magazine covers, and by Jim Henson’s Muppets.

Get exclusive access to content from our 1768 First Edition with your

Wood became one of the leading figures of the Regionalist movement.

Daughters of Revolution

Painting by Grant Wood

Daughters of Revolution is a painting by American artist Grant Wood; he claimed it as his only satire. Wikipedia

ArtistGrant Wood

Created1932

PeriodRegionalism

GenrePortrait

MediumMasonite

Dimensions50.8 cm × 101.4 cm (20.0 in × 39.9 in)

Another well-known painting by him is Daughters of Revolution (1932), a satirical portrait of three unattractive old women who appear smugly satisfied with their American Revolutionary ancestry. In 1934 Wood was made assistant professor of fine arts at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. Among his other principal works are several paintings illustrating episodes from American history and a series of Midwestern rural landscapes that communicate a strong sense of American ambience by means of a skillful simplification of form.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Naomi Blumberg, Assistant Editor.

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Grant Wood American Gothic Paintings,  Art….biography.com

From 1920 to 1928 he made four trips to Europe, where he studied many styles of painting, especially impressionism and post- impressionism. Influenced by the work of Jan Van Eyck. From 1924 to 1935 he lived in the loft of a carriage house that he turned into his personal studio Wood helped found the Stone City Art Colony near his hometown to help artists get through the Great Depression. He became a great proponent of regionalism in the arts.

50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles

DECEMBER 12, 2019   GRACE EBERT

Designed by Spanish architects SelgasCano, a Los Angeles workspace has popped up in a formerly empty parking lot in Hollywood. The recently opened SecondHome Hollywood boasts a 50,000-square-foot garden of 6,500 trees and plants and 700 tons of soil and vegetation. It is Los Angeles’s densest urban forest and is also home to 112 native species.

The Hollywood location, which is the first in the United States, contains sixty yellow-roofed office pods. It also encompasses the Anne Banning Community House, a ’60s building designed by prominent architect Paul Williams who is known for defining much of Los Angeles’s architectural aesthetic throughout the 20th century. (via Jeroen Apers)

Second Home Hollywood | Architecture | Dezeen

•Dec 4, 2019  Dezeen

Second Home Hollywood, the first US location from the British co-working company, is revealed in this captioned video produced by Dezeen for Second Home. Spanish architecture practice SelgasCano transformed a former Hollywood parking-lot into a sprawling co-working complex that will house 250 companies. It has previously worked with Second Home to create other spaces in London and Lisbon. In Los Angeles, the architects filled the site with sixty oval-shaped office pods of varying sizes, which are topped with bright-yellow rooftops that resemble a cluster of lily pads when seen from above. The site has been populated with more than 6,500 plants and trees from 112 species native to Los Angeles, in order to create a tranquil working environment for members. The site also incorporates the former Anne Banning Community House, a historic 1960s building which SelgasCano renovated to accommodate 30 additional office spaces for Second Home members. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1442212 WATCH NEXT: Watch our talk with Thomas Heatherwick from Second Home LA – https://youtu.be/Blx2gF63xJ4 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/

Category  Entertainment

https://theinspirationgrid.com/food-artworks-by-tatiana-shkondina-sasha-tivanov/

Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Published Oct 3, 2017

Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov worked in collaboration to produce incredible food artworks inspired by famous paintings.

More food art via Behance

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PBS News, BBC News, TED Talks, Unexplained Mysteries, My Modern Met, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: November 5-11, 2019

BBC News: Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager, and Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

TED Talks: Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck the price of a clean internet, Claire Wardle How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust, and Misha Glenny Hire the hackers,

Unexplained Mysteries: 5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

My Modern Met: Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

Ing’s Peace Project: Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland

PBS NewsHour full episode November 11, 2019

Nov 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, embattled Bolivian President Evo Morales resigns, leaving the country with a vacuum of power. Plus: Violence grips Hong Kong protests, an impeachment inquiry update, how Rudy Giuliani became involved with Ukraine, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, the Supreme Court takes up DACA “Dreamers,” rural arts in Minnesota and a Veterans Day commemoration. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 10, 2019

Nov 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 10, three officials will testify in public hearings this week as part of the impeachment inquiry, and humanitarian workers along the U.S.-Mexico border face prosecution under federal law for helping undocumented migrants. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 9, 2019

Nov 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 9, Republicans release their witness wishlist, why Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Graham Nash is performing his lesser-known tracks, and Marie Kondo’s tidying tricks for kids. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 8, 2019

Nov 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, House committees release transcripts from two more witnesses in the impeachment inquiry — and President Trump expresses anger toward the whistleblower. Plus: The 30th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s collapse, Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week’s political news, a brief but spectacular take on comedy and the year’s blockbuster Leonardo da Vinci exhibition. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How depositions link Mulvaney to Ukraine impeachment saga https://youtu.be/Km8TDlhoUGg News Wrap: Anonymous staffer’s book says Trump unfit to lead https://youtu.be/0qQHD_IvDEk 30 years after Berlin Wall, why German divisions remain https://youtu.be/zdif8sKubJM Shields and Brooks on impeachment hearings, state elections https://youtu.be/e664ih4ByQ8 Scott Aukerman on the origins of ‘Between Two Ferns’ https://youtu.be/UQQGS7TJCIg Louvre exhibition showcases da Vinci’s ‘endless curiosity’ https://youtu.be/eblCEzB0M0c Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 7, 2019

Nov 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

Thursday on the NewsHour, how far did President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, go to circumvent normal U.S. diplomatic channels with Ukraine? Plus: Saudi Arabia uses Twitter to target dissent, California fire fallout for utility PG&E, the latest on the health care marketplace, privacy issues around DNA testing, toxic pollution over India and Jane Fonda’s climate change crusade. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 6, 2019

Nov 6, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, election results from high-profile races in Kentucky, Mississippi and Virginia. Plus: The latest revelations from the impeachment inquiry, a conversation with Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the risks and benefits of genetic genealogy in solving crimes, the launch of NewsHour’s Broken Justice podcast and Ben Crump’s new book about the racist flaws of American criminal justice. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 5, 2019

Nov 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour   

Tuesday on the NewsHour, transcripts are released from the testimonies of two figures central to the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Analysis of and reaction to the newly released transcripts, U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate deal, criminal justice reform in Oklahoma, standardized tests in higher education admissions, rejecting white supremacy and a new film from actor and director Edward Norton. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager

By James Gallagher Health and science correspondent

Image copyright Ewan Fisher

A teenage boy nearly died after vaping caused a catastrophic reaction in his lungs, doctors in Nottingham say.

Ewan Fisher was connected to an artificial lung to keep him alive after his own lungs failed and he could not breathe.

Ewan told BBC News e-cigarettes had “basically ruined me” and urged other young people not to vape.

His doctors say vaping is “not safe”, although health bodies in the UK say it is 95% safer than tobacco.

Listen: Beyond Today – Can vaping kill you?

What happened?

Ewan started vaping in early 2017. He was 16 at the time and wanted to quit smoking to improve his boxing.

Despite being under age, he said, “it was easy” to buy either cigarettes or e-cigarettes.

In May that year, Ewan was finding it harder and harder to breathe.

His mother took Ewan to accident and emergency on the night before his GCSE exams, because he was coughing and choking in his sleep.

His lungs were failing and he very quickly ended up on life-support in intensive care in Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham.

“I thought I was going to die,” Ewan told BBC News.

Ewan was getting worse. Even ventilation could not get enough oxygen into his body and his life was in the balance.

Image copyright Ewan Fisher Image caption Ewan was attached to an ECMO machine to keep him alive

He was taken to Leicester and attached to an artificial lung or ECMO (extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) machine.

“This machine saved my life,” he said.

Large tubes took blood out of Ewan, removed the carbon dioxide, added oxygen and pumped the blood back into his body.

“He had very serious respiratory failure, he had to go to ECMO and that is a very big deal,” Dr Jayesh Bhatt, a consultant at Nottingham University Hospitals, told BBC News.

“He got as ill as anyone can get.”

The case – from May 2017 – has just come to light in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

How is Ewan now?

Ewan, who is 19 on Tuesday, had a long recovery. It was six months before he was properly up and, on his feet, again.

“I’m still not back to normal, I’d say 75-80%, it’s in the last six months that I’m feeling a bit stronger in myself,” he said.

“Vaping has basically ruined me, I try to tell everyone and they think I’m being stupid, I tell my mates and they don’t listen.

“They still do it, they all still vape, but they’ve seen what I’ve been through.

“Is it worth risking your life for smoking e-cigs?

“I don’t want you to end up like me and I don’t want you to be dead, I wouldn’t wish [that] on anyone.”

Ewan also fears being around other vapers – everywhere from the pub to High Street – could damage his lungs again.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxCERN, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speakers

Hans Block · Filmmaker, theater director, musician

Under the label Laokoon, Hans Block develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

Moritz Riesewieck · Author, scriptwriter, theater and film director

Under the label Laokoon, Moritz Riesewieck develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

More Resources

The Cleaners

Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck

Gebrueder Beetz Filmproduktion (2018)

Take Action  participate

Support the BPO Industry Employees Network, which advocates for the rights of Filipino clickworkers.

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxCERN | November 2018

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

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Learn more skills to help you navigate the online world.

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TED2019 | April 2019

Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation — and learn we can start to make the internet less toxic.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Andrew Marantz · Writer

Andrew Marantz writes narrative journalism about politics, the internet and the way we understand our world.

More Resources

Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation

Andrew Marantz

Viking (2019)

Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Misha Glenny · Underworld investigator

Journalist Misha Glenny leaves no stone unturned (and no failed state unexamined) in his excavation of criminal globalization.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

May 30, 2019

Unexplained Mysteries

5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. We take a look at these 5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been at the center of a number of public discoveries. So today, here at unexplained mysteries, we will be highlighting the incredible breakthroughs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to help show the overwhelming support the agency has provided for the fields of science and technology. Thank you for watching! Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!

BBC News: “If I see someone with the same disability as I have, I encourage them to show the world what you can do.”

Manners from Zimbabwe makes artwork using thrown away cans.

bbc.in/36NEaqZ (via BBC News Africa

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-47975425/zimbabwean-manners-mukuwiri-recycles-rubbish-into-art?fbclid=IwAR3UQdowWVDz-5Lp6g_06dVFUJUpMb90OBjsIVAgTEVMFFfttoPPA2CeZgU

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri was struggling to earn a living until he started turning rubbish into art.

People with disabilities can often find it difficult to find work in the country, but his creations sell for up to $800 (£615) and Manners is hoping to turn his hobby into a full-time career.

Video journalists: Ashley Ogonda and Anthony Irungu.  22 Apr 2019

Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

By Jessica Stewart on October 23, 2019

Fluorescent turtle embryo. Teresa Zgoda & Teresa Kugler (Campbell Hall, New York, USA). First Place. Stereomicroscopy, Fluorescence. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

For forty-five years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the microscopic world and, in the process, allowed scientists and enthusiasts to show off the artistry of scientific imagery. Passionate micro-photographers from nearly 100 countries submitted over 2000 stunning pieces of microphotography to the competition. In the end, the expert judging panel narrowed the field to the top 20 images with a photo of a turtle embryo taking the top prize.

The colorful image, taken by microscopy technician Teresa Zgoda and recent university graduate Teresa Kugler, is the result of painstaking work done with precision and skill. Extensive image-stitching was necessary to create the final photograph, as the size and thickness of the turtle embryo meant that only a small portion of the turtle could be photographed at one time. By stacking and stitching together hundreds of photographs, the duo was able to create an image that is both scientifically and artistically satisfying.

“Microscopy lets us zoom in on the smallest organisms and building blocks that comprise our world–giving us a profound appreciation for the small things in life that far too often go unnoticed,” shared Kugler, “It allows me to do science with a purpose.”

The turtle wasn’t the only embryo in the winning selection. Reproduction was a topic for many photographers. An alligator and a California two-spot octopus embryo, as well as a pregnant planktonic crustacean and mosquito larva also joined the top twenty. Away from the animal kingdom, something as simple as a frozen drop of water was transformed into a mesmerizing, abstract photograph. At the same time, a close view of different flora helps us marvel at the beauty and precision of how nature develops.

Whether using focus stacking, image stacking, or confocal microscopy, the techniques employed help these scientists bring their vision to life. And as technology continues to grow and evolve, we can only expect even richer results. Take a look at the rest of the top 20 photos from the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition below and view more finalists via their online gallery.

For 45 years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the artistry of scientific imagery.

Alligator embryo developing nerves and skeleton. Daniel Smith Paredes & Dr. Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar (Yale University, Department of Geology and Geophysics, New Haven, Connecticut, USA). Third Place. Immunofluorescence. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Small white hair spider. Javier Rupérez (Almáchar, Málaga, Spain). Sixth Place. Reflected Light, Image Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Housefly compound eye pattern. Dr. Razvan Cornel Constantin (Bucharest, Romania). 16th Place. Focus Stacking, Reflected Light. 50x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Tulip bud cross section. Andrei Savitsky (Cherkassy, Ukraine). Ninth Place. Reflected Light. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Female Oxyopes dumonti (lynx) spider. Antoine Franck (CIRAD – Agricultural Research for Development, Saint Pierre, Réunion). 14th Place. Focus Stacking. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Male mosquito. Jan Rosenboom (Universität Rostock, Rostock, Mecklenburg Vorpommern, Germany). Fourth Place. Focus Stacking. 6.3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Octopus bimaculoides embryo. Martyna Lukoseviciute & Dr. Carrie Albertin (University of Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom). 19th Place. Confocal, Image Stitching. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Snowflake. Caleb Foster (Caleb Foster Photography, Jericho, Vermont, USA). Fifth Place. Transmitted Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Chinese red carnation stamen. Dr. Guillermo López López (Alicante, Spain). Seventh Place. Focus Stacking. 3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cuprite (mineral composed of copper oxide). Dr. Emilio Carabajal Márquez (Madrid, Spain). Focus Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Vitamin C. Karl Deckart (Eckental, Bavaria, Germany). 17th Place. Brightfield, Polarized Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification)

Depth-color coded projections of three stentors (single-cell freshwater protozoans). Dr. Igor Siwanowicz (Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, Virginia, USA). Second place. Confocal. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Frozen water droplet. Garzon Christian (Quintin, Cotes-d’Armor, France). Eighth Place. Incident Light. 8x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Pregnant Daphnia magna (small planktonic crustacean). Marek Mi? (Marek Mi? Photography, Suwalki, Podlaskie, Poland). 15th Place. Modified Darkfield, Polarized Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cristobalite crystal suspended in its quartz mineral host. E. Billie Hughes (Lotus Gemology, Bangkok, Thailand). 18th Place. Darkfield. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Mosquito larva. Anne Algar (Hounslow, Middlesex, United Kingdom). 12th Place. Darkfield, Polarizing Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

A pair of ovaries from an adult Drosophila female stained for F-actin (yellow) and nuclei (green); follicle cells are marked by GFP (magenta). Dr. Yujun Chen & Dr. Jocelyn McDonald (Kansas State University, Department of Biology, Manhattan, Kansas, USA). 11th Place. Confocal. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Blood vessels of a murine (mouse) heart following myocardial infarction (heart attack). Simon Merz, Lea Bornemann & Sebastian Korste (University Hospital Essen, Institute for Experimental Immunology & Imaging, Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany). 20th Place. Tissue Clearing, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy. 2x (Objective Lens Magnification).

BPAE cells in telophase stage of mitosis. Jason M. Kirk (Baylor College of Medicine, Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core, Houston, Texas, USA). 10th Place. Confocal with Enhanced Resolution. 63x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Nikon Small World: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Nikon Small World.

Finished “Peace” artwork 13

Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on during May and June 2014, organized by Joseph Giacalone Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Links to the finished Peace Project of the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland artwork page:

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PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 27 – 28 2019, This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization, Why does almost half of America’s food go to waste?

TED Talks: Claire Wardle how you can help transform the internet into a place of trust? and Yasmin Green How technology can fight extremism and online harassment

Project Unity: Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

BBC News: Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC?, and Homeless in spite of full-time job

The Secrets of Nature: Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat

Thisiscolossal: Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

PBS NewsHour full episode October 28, 2019

Oct 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi dies during a U.S. special forces raid in northwestern Syria. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on President Trump and impeachment, what al-Baghdadi’s death means for the threat of ISIS, California endures new wildfires and power outages, and our Politics Monday team, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter, analyzes the latest political news. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 27, 2019

Oct 27, 2019 PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 27, analysis on the death of the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and a look at what that may mean for the region, and a return to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania one year after 11 people were killed at the Tree of Life synagogue in the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Detroit is home to an unusual museum that draws on African history and customs, filling an entire city block with installations and sculptures. The MBAD African Bead Museum also allows visitors hands-on experiences — and acts as a stabilizing force in a distressed area of the city. Special correspondent Mary Ellen Geist reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jun 16, 2015  PBS NewsHour

Watch more from Making Sen$e: https://bit.ly/2D8w9kc Read more economic news: https://to.pbs.org/2PNUx19 Roughly 40 percent of food produced in America never makes it to the table. Whether it rots in the field, is trashed at the supermarket, or thrown out at home, NPR’s Allison Aubrey looks at why good food is being discarded, and what can be done to prevent it.

Category   News & Politics

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. “If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong,” Green says. “We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yasmin Green · Geopolitical technologist

Yasmin Green is the director of research and development for Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet Inc. focused on solving global security challenges through technology.

Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

Oct 7, 2014  Project Unity

Homelessness in society needs urgent action. This video documents the homeless people of mid-town New York to find out more about their world and what struggles and hardships they face. More and more people are facing homelessness and housing problems so we are putting out a call to action to stand for some of our most vulnerable members of society. Winter is approaching and without your help, many people who are homeless will die over the winter months in New York City. It is important that we unit to provide whats needed for people who are homeless to have the necessities, such as clothing, blankets, warm food, shelter and the support every human being deserves. Summary Project Unity, a non-profit organisation is committed to unifying communities for good causes. Finding out from grassroots what are the most effective ways to assist people in need, we empower communities with direct action to have a positive effect on the issues facing us. Unity overcomes everything, so transform your environment with the strength of unity.

Category   People & Blogs

Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC? – BBC News

Mar 9, 2015   BBC News

Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It has been one of the coldest winters on record in America’s north-east, and in New York City freezing temperatures have coincided with record numbers of homeless. BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant has been out onto the streets to meet those struggling to find shelter. Subscribe to BBC News HERE https://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: https://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: https://instagram.com/bbcnews

Category   News & Politics

Homeless in spite of full-time job – BBC News

Nov 18, 2016  BBC News

The acute shortage of housing in Britain has been underlined by figures obtained by BBC News. Please subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Category   People & Blogs

Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Jul 15, 2014

Presents some of the animal kingdom’s strangest survival strategies. The most startling behaviour patterns aren’t found among the classic big animals such as lions or polar bears, but among nature’s smaller creatures: Poison dart frogs, chameleons, praying mantises and scorpions, to name only a few. These “Little Monsters” are masters of survival. Until recently, only a handful of scientists enjoyed the technical means to study them up close. But now, thanks to 3D visualization, large audiences can experience a chameleon thrusting out its tongue at close range, rattlesnakes striking at their targets to within fractions of an inch, praying mantises hunting and hummingbirds feeding, filmed from inside the flower! Rather than simply delivering a flat representation of these amazing stunts, modern 3D provides for an emotional experience. And with its ingenious combination of slow-motion-3D and timelapse-3D, “Little Monsters” even improves upon state of the art 3D for greater impact, yielding unbelievable scenes the world has never seen and “felt” before.

Category  Science & Technology

Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

August 15, 2019  Colossal

Photographer Rob Woodcox (previously) travels the world to bring athletes and dancers together in visually captivating locations and poses. The 29-year-old artist first picked up a camera about ten years ago and hasn’t looked back. Woodcox works with a diverse array of models both in studio environments and in deserts and metropolises. A combination of on-site practical effects and post-production editing create the fantastical final images.

Woodcox grew up in Michigan, and shares with Colossal that the lack of a robust local creative industry spurred his imaginative, DIY approach. Woodcox found creative community online, where he connected with likeminded photographers. The scale of his projects grew as his network expanded, and now Woodcox frequently works on client commissions in addition to his personal practice. As his professional identity has evolved over the past eight years, Squarespace has stayed Woodcox’s website platform of choice. Its seamless user experience allows his work to take center stage. “When you’re doing creative work, the website just needs to be simple, clean, and easy to use. And that’s Squarespace. If it’s inhibiting the user’s experience, then that’s a problem,” Woodcox shares with Colossal. 

“Pursuing projects with real people and being a part of things that matter” keeps Woodcox inspired. Teaching workshops has been a huge part of the photographer’s career: to date, he has taught over eighty workshops on five continents. Squarespace’s ecommerce integrations allow students to register for workshops (the next one is in Portland, Oregon) and collectors to purchase fine art prints. An embedded newsletter signup form lets Woodcox’s audience keep up with his latest projects.

“It’s fun to think about what people haven’t even seen yet. I have visions that are so much bigger even than anything I’ve done so far,” Woodcox tells Colossal. “That’s an exciting thing as an artist. I don’t think I’m ever going to run out of fuel. There’s so much that I want to do.”

Ready to show the world your creative potential? Head over to Squarespace.com for a free weeklong trial, and if you like what you see, use code COLOSSAL at checkout to save 10% on your purchase of a website or domain name.

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PBS News,TEDTalks, YVeritasium, BBC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 19 – 26, 2019

TED Talks: Ttara Djokic  An ancient rock suggests a new theory for how life started?, Prosanta Chakrabarty Four billion years of evolution in six minutes and David Druber Glow in the dark sharks and other stunning sea creatures

YVeritasium: World’s lightest solids

BBC News: Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor

Thisiscolossal: A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 26, 2019

Oct 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 26, rising winds and forced power outages stoke new fears as California wildfires continue to burn, a look at how Miami is tackling an affordable housing crisis, and the band Spoon is staying afloat in a transforming music industry. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 25, 2019

Oct 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, wildfires rake California, closing schools and forcing evacuations. Plus: Washington political figures say goodbye to Elijah Cummings, what’s behind protests in Lebanon and Chile, President Trump’s federal appeals court nominations, political analysis from Mark Shields and David Brooks, and legendary entertainer Julie Andrews on balancing films and family. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Judge rules House impeachment inquiry is legal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN1Jn… California crews race against the clock to contain fires https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5keXg… Congressman Elijah Cummings remembered in Baltimore https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yhgic… Across the globe, economic uncertainty is driving protest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIiXB… How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mdz7… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s judiciary, Taylor’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONaDc… Julie Andrews on fame, family and favorite movies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaaL3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 24, 2019

Oct 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Republicans step up criticism of the House impeachment inquiry after stunning testimony about President Trump’s handling of military aid to Ukraine. Plus: Rep. Jackie Speier on impeachment criticism, Andrew Brunson’s Turkish imprisonment ordeal, children held in Cambodian orphanages, how big data changes creativity and a brief but spectacular take on preventing blindness. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 23, 2019

Oct 23, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a group of GOP lawmakers storms an impeachment inquiry session, and President Trump lifts sanctions on Turkey amid controversy over its incursion into Syria. Plus: Mark Zuckerberg in the hot seat, Chicago teachers on strike, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet, Kurds caught in the Syrian crossfire and George Takei on making enemies of each other. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: GOP lawmakers disrupt Pentagon official’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3t-Ks… Violence has calmed in northeastern Syria, but at what cost? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7xlv… News Wrap: British police discover 39 bodies in cargo truck https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HePx7… Lawmakers grill Zuckerberg on cryptocurrency, political ads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i5BA… In Chicago teachers’ strike, how far apart are the 2 sides? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D6F6… Sen. Bennet on ‘incredible weakness’ of Trump’s Syria move https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFWWt… Northern Syrians who endured ISIS face new survival struggle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KL_I… George Takei on internment, immigration and ‘inhumanity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VULlQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 21, 2019

Oct 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump responds to mounting criticism over Syria, the site of the G-7 and an escalating impeachment inquiry. Also: The impact of the U.S. leaving Syria, a one-on-one interview with Bernie Sanders, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter break down the latest political news, a deal in a high-stakes opioid case and healing Flint with nutrition programs. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why Trump is facing weaker GOP support https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY9gM… ‘Trump betrayed us,’ say fleeing Kurds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz-WK… News Wrap: Lebanese government approves economic reforms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VY_Z… Sanders scores endorsement as centrist candidates gain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aBHd… Sanders: Spending a lot on Medicare for All will save money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR86R… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on impeachment public opinion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBCJp… What does a $260 settlement suggest for future opioid cases? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU8-c… Flint fights lead poisoning by improving nutrition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tsx5j… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 22, 2019

Oct 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine testifies that the Trump administration did make military aid to Ukraine contingent upon investigations of Trump’s political rivals, and the leaders of Russia and Turkey meet to determine control of northeastern Syria. Plus: Sen. Kamala Harris on her 2020 campaign, a conversation with Kirstjen Nielsen and training students as pilots. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How Taylor’s testimony could affect impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTheW… Erdogan ignores U.S. agreement for northeastern Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D11Zb… News Wrap: Canada’s Trudeau wins 2nd term but loses majority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yuqK… Kamala Harris defends health care plan from rival critics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn4sY… Kirstjen Nielsen on what she regrets about her tenure at DHS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W023g… Community colleges prepare students for careers in aviation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cVfp… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 20, 2019

Oct 20, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 20, President Trump pulls back on a plan to hold a meeting next year with G-7 leaders at his Florida golf resort, a preview of the high-stakes election for Canada’s prime minister, and in the second of our two-part series a look at ICE detentions in Louisiana and their economic impact on rural communities. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 19, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 19, another setback for a Brexit deal after the British Parliament postpones a vote, the first of a two-part series on ICE detention in rural Louisiana, and writer John Hodgman’s take on losing status. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker 

Tara Djokic · Astrobiologist

Tara Djokic discovered direct evidence that indicates some of Earth’s oldest life once thrived in hot springs on land.

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Get informed about the affects of climate change on our only life support system, Earth.

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Vote with your feet and protest for climate action.

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TEDxSydney | May 2019

Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we’re a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process — and not the end of the line. “We’re not the goal of evolution,” Chakrabarty says. “Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life — connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Prosanta Chakrabarty · Ichthyologist

Prosanta Chakrabarty studies fish to help explain the evolution of human beings and our planet.

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learn

Learn more about Prosanta Chakrabarty’s research and how to support his work on evolution and the Tree of Life.

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TED2018 | April 2018

Just a few meters below the waves, marine biologist and explorer-photographer David Gruber discovered something amazing — a surprising new range of sea creatures that glow in many colors in the ocean’s dim blue light. Join his journey in search of biofluorescent sharks, seahorses, sea turtles and more, and learn how these light-up creatures could illuminate a new understanding of our own brains.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

David Gruber · Marine biologist, explorer-photographer

David Gruber searches the undersea world for bioluminescent and biofluorescent marine animals.

More Resources

Further reading

Mission Blue II

Learn more about the TED-at-sea hosted by TED Prize winner Sylvia Earle.

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May 31, 2019  Veritasium

Aerogels are the world’s lightest (least dense) solids. They are also excellent thermal insulators and have been used in numerous Mars missions and the Stardust comet particle-return mission. The focus of this video is silica aerogels, though graphene aerogels are now technically the lightest. At one point Dr. Steven Jones literally held the Guinness World Record for making the lightest aerogel and therefore lightest solid. If you’re interested in learning more about aerogels, let me know in the comments as there is a potential trilogy in the works… Huge thanks to Dr. Stephen Steiner and the crew at Aerogel Technologies. To find out more or buy your own aerogel sample, check out: https://www.aerogeltechnologies.com/ Thanks to Dr. Steven Jones and Dr. Mihail Petkov at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory And thanks to FLIR for loaning us the awesome high definition thermal camera. The footage is amazing! https://www.flir.com Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme and everyone who provided feedback on an early draft of this video. Filming by Raquel Nuno Animations by Maria Raykova Drawings by Mariel Solsberg Music From https://epidemicsound.com “Seaweed” “Swagger Stagger”

Caption authors (English)   ?? Chop Suey nav

Caption author (Korean)   ???

Caption author (Portuguese)  ARSamogin

Caption author (Chinese (China))  ???

Category   Education

Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor 16 October 2019

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image caption More details about the discovery will be released at a news conference on Saturday

Archaeologists have found more than 20 ancient wooden coffins near the Egyptian city of Luxor, the country’s antiquities ministry says.

The coffins, whose brightly-coloured decorations are still visible, were uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, on the River Nile’s west bank.

They were in two layers, with the ones on top across those below.

The ministry described the discovery as “one of the largest and most important” in recent years.

More details will be released at a news conference on Saturday.

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry

Most of the tombs at Asasif, which is close to the Valley of the Kings, are from the Late Period (664-332BC) of ancient Egypt.

However, there are also tombs from the earlier 18th Dynasty (1550-1292BC), which was the first of the New Kingdom and included the famous pharaohs Ahmose, Hatshepsut, Thutmose III, Amenhotep III, Akhenaton and Tutankhamun.

Last week, the antiquities ministry announced that archaeologists had discovered an ancient “industrial area” in Luxor’s West Valley.

The area included “houses for storage and the cleaning of funerary furniture, with many potteries dated to the 18th Dynasty”, it said.

Media caption’Recipe’ for creating mummies in ancient Egypt revealed

For more information Please Visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50068575

A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

October 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

In the 1500’s self-taught artist and nun Plautilla Nelli created a life-size mural of Jesus and the twelve apostles at the Last Supper. Spanning 21 feet feet, the vibrantly colored painting includes carefully rendered details including wine chalices, salt cellars, wood panelling, and a rhythmically creased tablecloth. In addition to the inanimate objects depicted, Nelli demonstrated impressive facility with human anatomy in her renderings of the religious figures—at the time, women were barred from studying the field of anatomy.

Nelli’s masterpiece stayed for two centuries at her convent, Santa Caterina, and then changed locations a few times before being unstretched, rolled, and put in storage about a hundred years ago. After an initial restoration and then additional damage due to flooding in the 1960’s, The Last Supper has been undergoing restoration for the past four years. Brought back to life by an all-female team of curators, restorers, and scientists at Advancing Women Artists, it is now on permanent display at the Santa Maria Novella Museum in Florence, Italy. (via artnet, Smithsonian Magazine)

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, BBC News, TED Talks, Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Adam Grochowalski, & Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October, 6-13, 2019

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

BBC News: Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

BBC News: Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

TED Talks: Juan Enriquez a personal plea for humanity at the us Mexico border?,                     Jon Lowenstein Family hope and resilience on the migrant trail, Melanie Nezer The fundamental right to seek asylum and Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman What does it mean to be  a refugee jul 2018

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: Poem – Immigrants

Adam Grochowalski: Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Thisiscolossal: Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 13, 2019

Oct 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 13, U.S. troops withdraw in Syria as the Turkish offensive escalates against the Kurds, the latest on the Trump administration and a preview of Tuesday’s Democratic presidential debate. Also, a newly named North Macedonia sets its sights on membership in NATO and the European Union. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 12, 2019

Oct 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 12, the latest acting director of the Department of Homeland Security steps down, a longtime head of security at The Met discusses a new book about his extraordinary career, and in our “Future of Food” series, a look at what farmers in Iowa are doing to help grow more sustainable practices for the future. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 11, 2019

Oct 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, congressional testimony from the former Ukrainian ambassador further roils the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Why Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the Nobel Peace Prize, former United Nations ambassador Susan Rice talks U.S. foreign policy, Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the latest political news, and an unconventional outdoor art center in Montana. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 10, 2019

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, two associates of Rudy Giuliani’s are arrested on charges of violating campaign finance law. Plus: California residents face frustration over planned power outage amid wildfire risk, consequences of Turkey’s military assault in Syria, a new book about high profile FBI and Justice Department investigations, and how “Sesame Street” is serious about supporting families. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 9, 2019

Oct 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.42M subscribers

Wednesday on the NewsHour, As Turkey sends troops into Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo discusses international flashpoints such as China and Ukraine. Also: Returning to the Bahamas after the storm, the crisis caused by the White House refusing to cooperate with Congress, how Democrats are courting a key voting bloc, new details on the Black Sox scandal and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 8, 2019

Oct 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the White House blocks a key player in the Ukraine affair from appearing before House lawmakers. Also: The Supreme Court hears arguments on the rights of LGBTQ Americans, why Iraqi citizens are mobilizing in the face of gunfire, a conversation with Hillary and Chelsea Clinton, the life and struggles of college Dreamers and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump escalates impeachment battle, refusing to cooperate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdSeM… News Wrap: Turkish forces deploy to Syrian border https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SvnA… Supreme Court weighs protections for LGBTQ workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8UJ2… Iraqi protesters’ rage challenges government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln6wm… Clinton: Trump’s actions direct threat to national security https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4R7H… How fear of deportation affects DACA students’ dreams https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md0WZ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 7, 2019

Oct 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump comes under fire from both Republicans and Democrats for abruptly announcing the removal of U.S. troops from Syria. Also: The impeachment inquiry grows as a second whistleblower emerges, Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Politics Monday, a firestorm for the NBA about China, free speech and human rights, and Gary Clark Jr. on the tenor of the times.

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 6, 2019

Streamed live 8 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 6, a report of a second whistleblower is confirmed, and as Brexit looms, the Netherlands benefit from the “Brexodus.” Also, a visit to America’s most accessible playground. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2019/plundering-cambodias-forests/index.html

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia’s timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.

Under a rickety wooden stilt house near Cambodia’s Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary, one of the country’s leading environmental campaigners is preparing dinner.

Ouch Leng stuffs raw meat into an empty beer can and throws it into the fire. It’s a poor man’s feast for his team of investigators to fuel them through a night’s surveillance.

Chewing pork and buffalo, their infrared optics and cameras ready to record, they wait patiently for trucks to emerge from the darkness.

Their cargo? Timber logged illegally inside a wildlife sanctuary that is meant to be protected under Cambodian law.

“We went and saw eight trucks inside one sawmill and another timber truck was loaded with square logs,” he says, as he chops vegetables for dinner.

“It’s ready to export out tonight.”

Before long, two semi-trailers, a procession of tractors and four minivans, all loaded with logs, rumble out of the wildlife sanctuary, which is marked by a sign brandishing the logos of the European Union, USAID and Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment.

It is a significant haul but pales in comparison to the convoy Leng says he witnessed the night before.

“I saw 23 timber trucks transport [logs] from the Phnom Prich area,” says Leng.

Such stakeouts are part of Leng’s relentless pursuit of timber tycoons who pillage his country’s forests for profit, leading to some of the fastest rates of deforestation in the world.

In the 2000s, the Cambodian government began leasing millions of hectares of land – called concessions – to private companies, some of them inside protected forests.

It led to a nation-wide logging gold rush – one that Leng is determined to stop.

Land concessions by country (LICADHO, 2018)

In one of his more daring exploits, Leng disguised himself as a chef working at logging camps to infiltrate the network of notorious logging baron, Try Pheap, an adviser to Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen.

He lifted the lid on Pheap’s vast illegal logging operations in a 2013 report but the tycoon continued to expand his timber business across the country. This year, Leng filmed two major logging operations inside the protected area of Phnom Samkos Wildlife Sanctuary in the western Cardamon Mountains – both in concessions leased by Try Pheap.

What he discovered next is a scandal on an international scale.

Video footage from Try Pheap’s timber depot on the outskirts of Phnom Penh shows huge quantities of luxury wood being loaded into shipping containers.

Al Jazeera tracked these containers and confirmed they travelled from Cambodia’s Sihanoukville Port to northern Vietnam.

Try Pheap and his representatives have not responded to Al Jazeera’s requests for comment.

Leng, the activist, says timber smugglers use illegal crossings dotted across the border as part of a rampant industry, with Vietnam effectively laundering then exporting illegally logged wood from Cambodian forests.

Almost half a million cubic metres of timber were smuggled from Cambodia to Vietnam between 2016 and 2018, according to a series of reports by international non-government organisation, the Environmental Investigation Agency.

In official correspondence seen by Al Jazeera, the Cambodian government accuses Vietnam of issuing permits for illegally logged timber, despite repeated warnings.

“There is still timber going across the border because there is a black market in that area,” spokesman Neth Pheaktra tells Al Jazeera.

“These activities are illegal. That’s why the Ministry of Environment, as well as other relevant ministries, and border officials are cracking down on forest crimes.”

Vietnam’s government says it “strictly prohibits illegal timber harvesting, transportation, processing and trade” and is taking measures to stop it.

From 2001 to 2018, Cambodia lost 2.17 million hectares of tree cover, equivalent to a 25% decrease, according to data analysis by Global Forest Watch.

The timber feeds an insatiable demand for rare wood in China, where prices for luxury timber furniture have soared. One bed made from Siamese Rosewood – which has been almost eradicated in Cambodia – reportedly was on sale for $1 million.

“Sometimes I cry. I feel disappointed because I’m not able to protect the forest,” says Leng. “I see that the destruction is so big, but no one helps to protect it.

With huge profits to be made, Leng’s investigations are undertaken at great risk.

Another Cambodian forest activist, Chut Wutty, was murdered in 2012 while investigating a logging company. Several more forest patrollers have been killed since, including three who were shot at the Vietnamese border last year.

Leng himself has received numerous death threats and had his equipment smashed.

“I know that this is dangerous work… No one dares to challenge the companies,” says Leng. “Why do I challenge [them]? Because the companies have caused mass destruction to the forest.”

In some cases, protected areas have been completely destroyed – such as Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary in eastern Cambodia.

Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

The sanctuary was so severely damaged, the government removed its protected status in 2018 – conceding there was nothing left to protect.

Travelling in a four-wheel drive vehicle so old the rear brakes often erupt into plumes of smoke, Leng stops at the barren remains of the former sanctuary.

“Maybe 10 years ago there was jungle and a lot of forest and a lot of wildlife like elephants, tigers, rabbits…” he laments.

“The private companies came to destroy, to terminate the forest here.”

Other sanctuaries, like Boeung Per in the north, are rapidly heading towards the same fate.

Boeung Per Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

But despite the forces stacked against him, Leng continues to race off deep into the jungle every time he gets a new tip-off of potential illegal activity.

“This has happened for 10 to 20 years – not just this year, and no one has been able to prevent it,” he says.

But as long as there are precious forests to save in Cambodia, Leng will be on the frontline defending them.

WATCH THE DOCUMENTARY

© 2019 Al Jazeera Media Network.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50005790

Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

10 October 2019

Related Topics  Syrian civil war

Image copyright EPA Image caption Activists say tens of thousands of people have fled towns along the Syria-Turkey border

“It’s like hell. I am afraid for all my family and everyone I know.”

Sevinaz is from a town near Syria’s border with Turkey that immediately came under heavy bombardment when the Turkish military and allied Syrian rebels launched an assault on Kurdish-led forces there on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old Kurdish filmmaker and activist said repeated air and artillery strikes on the town – called Sere Kaniye by Kurds, and Ras al-Ain by Arabs – had forced her to flee with several members of her family.

“I am outside the town with my sick mother. My brother is inside. I have been informed that my cousin might have been martyred. There is no safe place for anybody,” she told the BBC on Thursday morning, hours before rebels said the town was surrounded.

“I’m concerned about it being the last time that I see my city,” she said.

‘Erdogan is a liar’

Turkey’s President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has said the aim of the military operation is to create a 32km (20-mile) deep “safe zone” along the Syrian side of the border and to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees there.

Media captionSome residents began to flee as smoke rose over the border town of Ras al-Ain

He has said he wants to push back from the Turkish border members of a Syrian Kurdish militia called the People’s Protection Units (YPG). He insists the YPG is an extension of a rebel group that has fought for Kurdish autonomy in Turkey and is designated a terrorist organisation by Turkey, the US and EU.

The YPG, which denies the claim, is the dominant force in an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias called the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). It has been the critical partner on the ground in Syria for the US-led multinational coalition against the jihadist group Islamic State (IS).

Sevinaz dismissed Mr Erdogan’s assertion that he wants “to prevent the creation of a terror corridor across our southern border, and to bring peace to the area”.

“He’s a liar and he wants the Kurds to be finished. And not just Kurds, because in Sere Kaniye and all the other cities it’s not just Kurds who are living here,” she said.

Sevinaz said she believed the SDF and YPG’s fighters would do all they could to repel the Turkish assault, and that ultimately they would be victorious.

“They are the children of this land. They are our brothers and sisters,” she explained. “Even with all the things that are happening and the silence from the world, I still believe that the right people will win.”

Azad Cudi, a British-Iranian Kurd who is a sniper for the YPG, told the BBC on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw US troops from the border area in anticipation of a Turkish offensive felt “like a stab in the back”.

The US military had previously attempted to avert a Turkish offensive on its Kurdish allies by setting up with the Turkish military a “security mechanism” in the border area. The YPG co-operated by dismantling fortifications.

“In August, we came to this ‘security mechanism’ agreement,” Mr Cudi said. “Based on that, we withdrew. We destroyed the fighting positions which were built to fight the Turkish in case of an invasion and we handed them over to the Americans.”

‘We have no friends but the mountains’

Mr Cudi said SDF forces were not equipped with the heavy machine-guns and anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapons that they would need to repel a Turkish assault.

“But if there is no choice, there is no choice. We will fight back at all costs.”

“There’s been many, many letting down and abandoning Kurds in the past. This is what we say: ‘We have no friends but the mountains,'” he added. “The United States, like any other state or any other government, will do whatever serves their own best interests. We know that.”

He said Mr Trump and other US politicians had been “lied to” about the war with IS, and he expressed concern about the risk of thousands of suspected IS militants being detained in SDF prisons escaping if their guards came under attack by Turkey.

Image copyright AFP Image caption US troops pulled back from the border on Monday in anticipation of the Turkish assault

“[The war] is not finished, it is not over. We wouldn’t do such a thing as losing prisoners, but imagine when things get tough and there is a war and you are fighting on many fronts. It will be practically difficult to control and manage these prisoners.”

He added: “The Kurds are the only people who have fought [IS]. The Iraqi government and the Syrian government couldn’t stand their attacks. We were the only ones who could resist them. With us being threatened, their hope for a new caliphate may grow again.”

Sevinaz said she believed Turkey was also in contact with IS sleeper cells inside north-eastern Syria and would ask them to target the Kurds. On Wednesday, several IS militants reportedly attacked SDF posts in the region.

“I’m worried and I think soon that there will be lots more movement from them. They already did one [attack] next to Sere Kaniye, and… in Raqqa, and I think there will be more soon.”

Turkey says it has made its military move in northern Syria to fight terrorism and that it wants to take the lead in fighting IS.

She also held out little hope of Mr Trump carrying out his threat to “totally destroy and obliterate” Turkey’s economy if it does anything he considers to be “off limits”.

Image copyright EPA Image caption The Syrian Democratic Forces has said it will defend its territory “at all costs”

“What does ‘off limits’ mean? They’re already attacking everywhere,” she said. “They don’t care about civilians. They don’t care about the middle of the cities.

“Donald Trump is going to do nothing. He cares about money. He doesn’t care about the 11,000 people who died while fighting and resisting against IS.”

Sevinaz insisted that she would not flee to another part of Syria. “I will not move from Rojava. I will never move,” she said, using the Kurdish name for the north-east of the country.

Instead, she called for people across the world to make clear to their governments their anger at the situation.

“The states do not care about us. The states didn’t care about bringing their [foreign] IS prisoners back to their countries. The states didn’t care about us being under threat for a long, long time,” she added. “It is the time for the voices of the people, who believe in freedom, who believe in human rights.”

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Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

13 October 2019

Related Topics  Typhoon Hagibis

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Helicopters rescued people trapped in their homes when the Chikuma river burst its banks

At least nine people are reported dead as Japan recovers from its biggest storm in decades.

Typhoon Hagibis triggered floods and landslides as it battered the country with wind speeds of 225km/h (140mph).

Rivers have breached their banks in at least 14 different places, inundating residential neighbourhoods.

The storm led to some Rugby World Cup matches being cancelled but a key fixture between Japan and Scotland will go ahead on Sunday.

Hagibis is heading north and is expected to move back into the North Pacific later on Sunday.

It made landfall on Saturday shortly before 19:00 local time (10:00 GMT), in Izu Peninsula, south-west of Tokyo and moved up the east coast. Almost half a million homes were left without power.

In the town of Hakone near Mount Fuji more than 1m (3ft) of rain fell on Friday and Saturday, the highest total ever recorded in Japan over 48 hours.

Media captionMore than seven million people were urged to leave their homes

Further north in Nagano prefecture, levees along the Chikuma river gave way sending water rushing through residential areas, inundating houses. Flood defences around Tokyo have held and river levels are now falling, reports the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Japan.

Officials said some of those killed were swept away by landslides while others were trapped in their cars as floodwaters rose. Another 15 people are listed as missing and dozens are reported injured.

What preparations were made?

More than seven million people were urged to leave their homes as the huge storm approached, but it is thought only 50,000 stayed in shelters.

Many residents stocked up on provisions before the typhoon’s arrival, leaving supermarkets with empty shelves.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Torrential rain has caused rivers to flood huge areas

Image copyright EPA Image caption A huge clean-up operation was under way in Kawasaki near Tokyo

“Unprecedented heavy rain has been seen in cities, towns and villages for which the emergency warning was issued,” Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) forecaster Yasushi Kajiwara told a press briefing.

Many bullet train services were halted, and several lines on the Tokyo metro were suspended for most of Saturday.

All flights to and from Tokyo’s Haneda airport and Narita airport in Chiba have been cancelled – more than 1,000 in total.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Bullet trains were half submerged in Nagano, central Japan

Two Rugby World Cup games scheduled for Saturday were cancelled on safety grounds and declared as draws – England-France and New Zealand-Italy. The cancellations were the first in the tournament’s 32-year history.

Sunday’s Namibia-Canada match due to take place in Kamaishi was also cancelled and declared a draw.

The US-Tonga fixture in Osaka and Wales-Uruguay in Kumamoto will go ahead as scheduled on Sunday, organisers said.

Meanwhile, a crunch game between Scotland and tournament hosts Japan on Sunday will now go ahead. The decision followed a safety inspection.

The Japanese Formula One Grand Prix is also taking place on Sunday.

‘A blanket and a biscuit’

Local resident James Babb spoke to the BBC from an evacuation centre in Hachioji, western Tokyo. He said the river near his house was on the brink of overflowing.

“I am with my sister-in-law, who is disabled,” he said. “Our house may flood. They have given us a blanket and a biscuit.”

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Tornado-like winds whipped up by the typhoon struck east of Tokyo

Andrew Higgins, an English teacher who lives in Tochigi, north of Tokyo, told the BBC he had “lived through a few typhoons” during seven years in Japan.

“I feel like this time Japan, generally, has taken this typhoon a lot more seriously,” he said. “People were out preparing last night. A lot of people were stocking up.”

Only last month Typhoon Faxai wreaked havoc on parts of Japan, damaging 30,000 homes, most of which have not yet been repaired.

“I evacuated because my roof was ripped off by the other typhoon and rain came in. I’m so worried about my house,” a 93-year-old man told NHK, from a shelter in Tateyama, Chiba.

Japan suffers about 20 typhoons a year, but Tokyo is rarely hit on this scale.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Shopkeepers tried to protect their stores from the powerful winds and rain

Image copyright AFP Image caption Many supermarket were left empty as people stocked up

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Juan Enriquez · Author, academic, futurist

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and brain research will bring about in business, technology, politics and society.

More Resources

The Untied States of America: Polarization, Fracturing, and Our Future

Juan Enriquez

Crown (2005)

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

For the past 20 years, photographer and TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein has documented the migrant journey from Latin America to the United States, one of the largest transnational migrations in world history. Sharing photos from his decade-long project “Shadow Lives USA,” Lowenstein takes us into the inner worlds of the families escaping poverty and violence in Central America — and pieces together the complex reasons people leave their homes in search of a better life.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jon Lowenstein · Documentary photographer, filmmaker, visual artist

TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and visual artist whose work reveals what the powers that be are trying to hide.

More Resources

Shadow Lives

Jon Lowenstein

PREORDER NOW (2020)

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Learn more about Jon Lowenstein’s work.

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Support Shadow Lives, a decade-long project documenting the experiences and lives of the millions of people along the migrant trail.

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1,216,641 views

TEDSummit 2019 | July 2019

Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMidAtlantic, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Melanie Nezer · Refugee and immigrants rights attorney

Melanie Nezer is a national leader in efforts to inform and educate individuals, institutions, elected officials and communities about refugees and asylum seekers.

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Donate to HIAS and help protect refugees.

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxMidAtlantic | March 2019

About 60 million people around the globe have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence and persecution. The majority have become Internally Displaced Persons, meaning they fled their homes but are still in their own countries. Others, referred to as refugees, sought shelter outside their own country. But what does that term really mean? Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman explain. [Directed by Biljana Labovic, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by David Obuchowski and Peter Linder].

Meet the educator

Benedetta Berti · Conflict and security researcher

Benedetta Berti studies how conflicts impact civilians.

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

664,084 views

TED-Ed | June 2016

Immigrants

Little ducks and big geese swimming in a pond

Where do you come from?

Don’t worry, wherever you come from

We welcome you

And glad to see you

Healthy and strong

You contribute your beauty to the pond

We all come from somewhere

As long as we are in harmony with nature

We add beauty to society as a whole

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Oct 26, 2014  Adam Grochowalski

Pa? królowej, Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Vidlochvost fenyklový. I present here the full development of this beautiful butterfly.

Category   Pets & Animals

Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

October 11, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Chris Perani uses macro photography to capture the microscopic details found on butterflies’ wings, such as multi-colored hairs and iridescent scales. To photograph with such precision, the photographer uses a 10x microscope objective attached to a 200mm lens, which presents an almost non-existent depth of field. “The lens must be moved no more than 3 microns per photo to achieve focus across the thickness of the subject which can be up to 8 millimeters,” Perani explains to Colossal. “This yields 350 exposures, each with a sliver in focus, that must be composited together.” In total this accounts for 2,100 separate exposures combined into a single image. For more detailed observations of butterfly wings, visit Perani’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Gandhi: Peace and Nonviolence for the World and Syria War

Gandhi: Peace and Nonviolence for the World

Sixteen years ago I wrote a book entitled “Remember Gandhi-The Man Of His Century” and the following is the beginning portion of my introduction:

“When I was young in Thailand, in early grade school we read a book about a man named Gandhi who was born in India.  He was married at age thirteen.  As a young man, Gandhi went to study in Britain and became a layer.  He went to work in South Africa where he experienced discrimination.  Because of this he devoted himself to fight for human equality.  The lessons learned in this fight were carried with him to India where he led his country to freedom from British colonial rule thereby creating an independent Indian country.

I was very impressed with Mr. Gandhi’s fight for human rights.  He helped his country gain independence from the British by nonviolent means without using weapons to achieve his goal.”                                                       

“NONVIOLENCE”, is a word that seems to have no meaning for a lot of countries around the world.  It hurts so much to see the pictures of starving children and adults in Syria.  What are you doing Syrian leaders?  Both sides of Syrian political divide, the government and the opposition use the same tactics trying to win over the other side by cut off the food supply to the villages of their opponents.  The pictures of these starving children and adult Syrians reminds me of pictures of Jewish people liberated from the concentration camps of Nazi Germany by American soldiers.   Why are you so cruel?  Do you all have hearts and feeling as decent human beings?   Please!!! Please!!!———A million times please, I beg you on of both sides.  Please stop fighting!!!  Do you know what happiness is? Please have a peace talks.  Both of your sides have destroyed so much.  Your country is in ruins.  Civilians work hard, only to have you buy weapons to kill them and ruin their livelihood.  Both of your sides are not good leaders for your country.  If you cannot make the country more prosperous and bring happiness to your citizens, what good is it to be leaders of your country?  Please do not let your greediness rule over humanity.  We all will be dead someday sooner or later, and history will record whatever you did.  But you do not die yet; you still have a chance to make things better than the past.  Please have peace talks and remember how Gandhi gained independence for his country by nonviolent means.  

I produced 40 artworks for the book.  The following pictures are four of my artworks of Gandhi that I used for the front and back covers of my book respectively.  Two more are from the inside of the book:

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 1       

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000 

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 2         

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 3                          

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2000 

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & Nonviolence 4                         

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts 2000 

I also did more artworks on the subject of Gandhi in 2010 that is shown below.

Gandhi: Man Of Peace & His Words                         

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2010

Gandhi & Spinning Wheel Of Life         

Artwork by Ing-On  Vibulbhan-Watts 2010

Gandhi & Ing’s Poem, Peace Comes To You                   

Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  2010

I was very thankful and glad to find an article from the BBC News on, “Rare pictures of the last 10 years of Gandhi’s life”.  These are shown below:

Rare pictures of the last 10 years of Gandhi’s life

Soutik Biswas Delhi correspondent

Here’s an anxious-looking Mahatma Gandhi making a telephone call from his office in Sevagram village in the western state of Maharashtra in 1938.

India’s greatest leader had moved to a village called Segaon two years earlier. He had renamed it Sevagram or a village of service. He built an ashram, a commune which was home to “many a fateful decision which affected the destiny of India”. Gandhi had moved in with his wife, Kasturba, and some followers. There was also a steady stream of guests.

Kanu Gandhi, a callow young man in his 20s and a grand nephew of the Mahatma, was also there. Armed with a Rolleiflex camera, he was taking pictures of the leader.

He had wanted to become a doctor, but his parents had goaded him to join Gandhi’s personal staff doing clerical work, looking after accounts and writing letters at the ashram.

Kanu Gandhi had developed an interest in photography, but Gandhi had told him there was no money to buy him a camera.

The nephew did not relent. Finally, Gandhi asked businessman Ghanshyam Das Birla to gift 100 rupees ($1.49; £1.00) to Kanu so that he could buy the camera and a roll of film.

But the leader imposed three conditions on the photographer: he forbade him from using flash and asking him to pose; and made it clear that the ashram would not pay for his photography.

Kanu made do with a stipend from a Gandhi acolyte who liked his work. He also began selling his pictures to newspapers.

Over the years and until Gandhi’s assassination in 1948, Kanu Gandhi shot some 2,000 pictures of the greatest leader of the Indian Independence movement. For decades, his pictures remained in obscurity, once surfacing with a German researcher who began compiling and selling them.

Now, 92 of those rare pictures of Gandhi during the last decade of his life have been published in an exquisitely produced cloth-bound monograph by the Delhi-based Nazar Foundation, a non-profit trust founded by two of India’s most well-known photographers Prashant Panjiar and Dinesh Khanna.

This is possibly my most favourite image from the book. Here Gandhi is standing on a weighing scale at the Birla House in Bombay (what is now Mumbai) in 1945.

For a man who undertook more than a dozen fasts during the freedom movement as a part of his non-violent protests – to bring peace, demand Muslim rights or to shame rioting mobs – the picture is telling.

“This is a picture of a man keeping an eye on his weight, testing himself all the time. It tells you a lot about the man,” says leading photographer Sanjeev Saith who went through more than 1,000 images and helped curate the monograph.

Here, Gandhi is seen in front of his office hut at Sevagram ashram in 1940. A pillow covers his head as protection against the severe heat.

It is, at once, an intimate and remote image.

Which is one of the reasons, many say, that made Kanu Gandhi’s pictures of the Mahatma so special.

“Although he had incredible access to the icon, we are always struck at the way Kanu, perhaps because he was in awe of Gandhi always kept a respectful distance, and yet managed to convey a sense of intimacy and proximity,” says Panjiar.

“And because he kept a certain distance, Kanu intuitively found a more modern language of photography than what was prevalent in those times in India, framing many of his images with an interesting and unconventional use of the foreground, breaking many of the accepted rules of composition”.

Kanu Gandhi travelled far and wide with the leader.

Here’s his image of a van carrying Gandhi being pushed by Pathans and Congress workers over some rough terrain in the North West Frontier Provinces in October 1938.

This is a picture of Gandhi, and his wife Kasturba, in Abottabad in November, 1938.

Kanu Gandhi’s first-ever book of photographs chronicles the leader’s political and personal journey in his last decade in vivid detail. There are pictures of Gandhi in his many moods – brooding, joyous, pensive, grieving – and with his supporters.

Here Gandhi is being massaged by a relative and his elder sister Raliatbehn during a three-day fast in Gujarat’s Rajkot city in March 1939.

“These images may be old, but they are not old-fashioned. They are not straightforward, beautifully shot and carefully framed, neat pictures which were popular then,” says Panjiar.

“It possibly helped that Kanu was not a trained photographer because many of his images would have been rejected by his contemporaries on account of being blurred, slightly out of focus or double exposed. But these find pride of place, lovingly pasted by own hands in albums.”

Gandhi and his wife Kasturba are seen here at a wedding of a Christian man and an untouchable woman in Sevagram ashram, 1940.

Sanjeev Saith says the picture of a dying Kasturba Gandhi lying on a bed at the Aga Khan Palace in Pune in 1944 a few months before her death counts among his favourites. A broken shaft of light is streaming in through a window behind her.

“Here is this austere woman lying regally on this stately bed, she is about to die. This picture just shakes me up,” he says.

And then there is this historic 1938 picture of Gandhi in a convivial mood with freedom hero and radical nationalist Subhas Chandra Bose. In the background, Kasturba Gandhi is drawing her sari, and looking into the distance.

This was the high noon of Bose’s political life: he had been elected as president of the Congress party. Gandhi had overruled objections from independence hero Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, who had objected to Bose’s appointment.

The two leaders had shared a complex relationship and fell out later over differences.

“This is an amazing picture,” says Saith. “It contains two of India’s greatest heroes in one frame. Bose is young, cherubic, almost looking at Gandhi in admiration. Gandhi has his characteristic toothless grin. It is a nice, warm moment.”

Here’s Gandhi and Nobel Prize-winning poet Rabindranath Tagore in Shantiniketan, West Bengal, in February 1940, a study of two great men in meditation.

“Look at the bottom of the picture. It is an accidental double exposure [a technique which combined two different images into a single image]. It’s rather inventive. Kanu Gandhi knew it was a good picture, and he didn’t throw away the negative,” says Saith.

There’s a series of pictures of Gandhi collecting donations for a fund for the untouchables during a three-month long train journey that took him to Bengal, Assam and southern India in 1945-46.

In some he’s stretching his arm from a carriage for money; in others he’s surrounded by people and collecting the money in a slender basket.

“He’s an old man, but he looks agile. He’s almost begging for alms, and he’s serious about picking up every bit of money for a good cause. He understands money,” says Saith.

“I am a bania and there is no limit to my greed,” Gandhi once said, alluding to his Indian caste comprising mainly of moneylenders.

Being the only person who was allowed to take Gandhi’s photographs at any time, Kanu Gandhi was shooting every day.

Sometimes Gandhi intervened: one such moment was when Kasturba, lay dying in his lap at the Aga Khan Palace in Pune.

The nephew, however, was allowed to shoot this image of the leader, draped in a shawl, looking at Kasturba after she passed away in February 1944.

According to several accounts, Gandhi kept a vigil for hours, sitting by her side, praying.

“After sixty years of constant companionship,” he said later that night. “I cannot imagine life without her.”

Ironically, for a man who followed Gandhi like a shadow, Kanu Gandhi was away in Noakhali in east Bengal when his leader was killed in 1948.

“Gandhi’s death had a profound effect on Kanu and his wife, Abha’s life. For Kanu, photography was no longer as important as the need to convey his leader’s message,” says Panjiar.

Kanu Gandhi died after a heart attack while on a pilgrimage in northern India in February 1986.

Photographs by Kanu Gandhi/© Gita Mehta, heir of Abha and Kanu Gandhi.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-35259671

The Following are some pictures, information and links on The Destruction of Syria.

KOBANE, Syria — A heap of dust is all that remains of the house where Alan Kurdi was born and raised, before war sent his family fleeing and he drowned on the short sea crossing between Turkey and Greece.

The image of the toddler’s lifeless body washed up on a Turkish beach turned him into an instant symbol of the suffering of Syrians so desperate to reach Europe that they are prepared to risk their lives making the dangerous journey.

His flattened home, destroyed in an American airstrike in the landmark battle for control of the Syrian town of Kobane last year, has not been so widely seen. It is just one of thousands of buildings leveled, among hundreds of thousands more that have been obliterated in Syria during the four-year-old war.

As the conflict drags into a fifth year with no end in sight, little heed is being paid to the enormity of the havoc being wreaked on the country. Some 2.1 million homes, half the country’s hospitals and more than 7,000 schools have been destroyed, according to the United Nations.

The cost of the damage so far is estimated at a staggering $270 billion — and rebuilding could run to more than $300 billion, according to Abdallah al-Dardari, a former Syrian government minister who heads the National Agenda for Syria program at the U.N.’s Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. That’s more than 10 times the amount spent by the United States on reconstruction in Iraq, with few discernible results.

   When a Turkish soldier picked up the body of Syrian toddler Alan Kurdi in September, it became an instant symbol of Syrian refugees’ suffering and desperation. Alan was the son of Abdullah Kurdi, a native of Kobane, who lost his wife and two sons when their dinghy sank off the coast of Turkey. | Graves hold the remains of Kurdi’s family members.

If or when the war ends, any government will find itself “ruling over a pile of rubble,” Dardari said. “I don’t know who will fund this.”

The immense human toll is a far more immediate and obvious concern. As many as 250,000 people are dead, 1 million have been wounded, 7.6 million are displaced within Syria and 4 million have fled across the borders, according to the U.N.

[As tragedies shock Europe, a bigger refugee crisis looms in the Middle East]

The numbers rise daily with each new airstrike and each new offensive launched, as Russian planes join Syrian and American ones in bombing the country and the various factions sustain their relentless attacks on one another with rockets, mortars and artillery.

So, too, does the damage, compounding the tragedy in small and unseen ways that also kill people or drive them to seek new lives elsewhere. The more buildings are flattened, the more homes, shops and businesses are lost, the greater the incentive to flee the country — and the less people will have to return to whenever the war finally ends.

“We’re allowing a level of destruction we will never have the means to address,” said Peter Harling of the International Crisis Group. “They’re wiping one city after another off the map.”

Kobane stands as a small reminder of how much is being lost.

 Abdullah Kurdi had fled to Turkey to work, but he chose to make the dangerous trip to Greece because he didn’t make enough money to live in Istanbul. His home was leveled in the battle for Kobane.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/world/2015/11/13/kobane/

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.newsweek.com/2015/08/28/syria-war-bombing-aleppo-364035.html

Horror of the starving Syrians cut off from the world: People living in three towns under siege from Assad forces and rebels are forced to eat cats, dogs and grass as food supplies are unable to reach them

  • Madaya near Damascus has been under siege by Assad’s troops since July
  • Activists say desperate residents have resorted to eating domestic animals
  • Some have been killed by snipers or landmines while scavenging for food
  • Foua and Kfarya have been under attack from rebels for more than a year
  • Victims also forced to have surgery without anesthetic due to lack of drugs
  • See full news coverage on Syria at www.dailymail.co.uk/syria

By Simon Tomlinson for MailOnline

Published: 08:00 EST, 7 January 2016 | Updated: 06:33 EST, 8 January 2016

   For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3388505/Starving-survivors-trapped-Syrian-towns-siege-Assad-forces-rebels-forced-eat-cats-dogs-grass-food-supplies-cut-aid-groups-warn.html

  For more information please visit the following link:

https://qz.com/589222/horrifying-images-of-starving-syrians-are-bringing-the-war-back-into-focus/

For more information please visit the following link:

https://abcnews.go.com/International/besieged-madaya-syria-residents-describe-starvation-heartbreaking-conditions/story?id=36233172

Destruction: Parts of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo have been destroyed during the bitter civil war. The aftermath of a separate assault by the Syrian regime on the city is pictured

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2315102/Syrian-government-using-chemical-weapons-people-crosses-red-line-Britain-David-Cameron-warns.html

The Latest War in Syria, 2019

Syria war: Turkey warns Europe of new migrant wave

5 September 2019  BBC News: Europe migrant crisis

Turkey has warned it may reopen the route for Syrian refugees to enter Europe if it does not get more international support for creating a safe zone in northern Syria.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called for “logistical support” to establish a safe zone in Syria’s north-east.

“Either this happens, or we will be forced to open the gates,” he said.

Turkey is hosting more than 3.6 million Syrians who have fled the civil war. The US backs the “safe zone” plan.

But the plan is controversial, because Syrian Kurdish forces are wary of Turkey moving many Syrians into the north-east who are not originally from that area.

The ethnic Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), seen by Turkey as a terrorist group, do not want to make way for Turkish forces in that area.

The US military has backed the YPG against so-called Islamic State (IS) fighters, whose territory is now much diminished.

“Our goal is for at least one million of our Syrian brothers to return to the safe zone we will form along our 450km [280-mile] border,” Mr Erdogan said in a speech in Ankara.

“Give us logistical support and we can go and build housing at 30km depth in northern Syria.”

Exodus from Idlib

Turkey wants US forces to jointly patrol the safe zone, and Mr Erdogan said Turkey was “determined to set it up by the last week of September”.

Turkish officials also fear that heavy fighting in the north-western province of Idlib could push more refugees into Turkey.

Syrian government forces backed by Russian aircraft are pounding rebel and jihadist forces in Idlib. Turkey backs some of the rebel groups there.

For more information please visit the following links:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49599297?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cx1m7zg0w5zt/syria&link_location=live-reporting-story

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-49668689?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cx1m7zg0w5zt/syria&link_location=live-reporting-story

GoldenSwallowtailButterfly

naahblubiv  Published on Aug 24, 2013

To All Syrians from the Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Beautiful Golden Swallowtail Butterfly

Summersaults in the sky

Drinking sweet nectar

For the beautiful wings to fly

The golden wings span out

Showing the black accented lines

A highlight for your beautiful wings

Two perfect tails you have

But a broken wing

Knowing how far you came from

Do you pass by Syria lately?

No! No one cultivates the gardens

They are busy fighting with each other

No trees, no plants

No flowers giving me the nectar to drink

They are running away

From their homes and their land

One million children are refugees now

What are you doing Syrian people?

Everybody stops fighting Please come!

Plant your trees for butterflies and bees

Show your children how nice butterflies can be

They help to fertilize your plants

Producing fruits for your children to enjoy

Syrian people you have a long culture

Your arts and your country are beautiful

Do not ruin your ancestors’ good reputation

Preserve your culture for your children to grow

Show your children your fruitful gardens

And the beautiful Golden Butterfly will visit you

The butterfly says,

You will see no tears

No fear on your children faces

But the sound of your children’s laughter

The joy of seeing my beautiful wings

Everybody stops using weapons Please come!

To enjoy your tasty food Your dance, your music, your arts

And your ancient civilization

We want to visit you

Show us how civilized Syrian Society can be

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Friday, August 23, 2013, 9:45 pm

The Golden Swallowtail Butterfly was captured by me on Saturday, August 17, 2013 at our backyard garden in downtown Newark, New Jersey. I would like to dedicate this video to all the children in Syria.

Please visit www.ingpeceproject.com

 for more pictures and information

Category   Education

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The men competing for love in the deserts of Chad, Africa

The men competing for love in the deserts of Chad, Africa

Monday, February 27, 2017

From BBC News, the section Africa

Pictures and words by Tariq Zaidi.

How the men of Chad’s Wodaabe culture put on their make-up and don their best clothes to impress would-be brides at a week-long festival.

Wodaabe men perform the “Yaake” ritual dance as part of the Gerewol, a week-long courtship ceremony in Chad. It must be one of the only African cultures which allows girls to take the lead in choosing their betrothed and even married women have the right to take a different man as a sexual partner. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Wodaabe means “people of the taboo” – these are subgroups of Fulani and Tuareg, who have migrated around this part of Africa for centuries. Here a Wodaabe man wakes up as dawn breaks in the Sahel desert – his donkeys and very basic shelter his only possessions. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

The Wodaabes mostly live on milk and ground millet, with yoghurt, sweet tea and occasionally the meat of a goat or sheep. Here a child here shakes the milk in a calabash and churn it into yoghurt. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Men start preparing for the Gerewol at daybreak. From early on there is a mounting sense of anticipation, as some years see more than 1,000 people gather for the festivities. The men paint their faces with make-up made from clay, stones and animal bones crushed and turned into a paste. Some men were said to paint their lips black with chemicals from batteries to emphasise their white teeth. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

This participant has shaved his hairline to elongate his forehead and is practising the eye-rolling, teeth-baring aspect of the dance, which shows off the features Wodaabe women find desirable.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

A Wodaabe family shelter from the blazing sun in their basic home. Their wooden beds house all their possessions and the whole family sleep together.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

A Wodaabe man pours his morning brew. Drinking tea is an important ritual in this culture. During Gerewol, men drink a tea made with fermented bark which is said to have a hallucinogenic effect, and also enables them to dance for hours on end. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Preparations for the Gerewol festival are communal and everybody pitches in to help the men look their best. The hours the men spend on their clothes and make-up has led to the Wodaabe being called “the vainest tribe in the world”  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Some make-up is believed to have magical powers and the Wodaabe go to great lengths to secure it. The orange face powder is only to be found beside a special mountain near Jongooria in central Niger, and some clans must undertake a 1,400km (870-mile) round trip on foot to secure a supply. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Gerewol only happens once a year, so the pressure and anticipation is huge and finding a wife is so important. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Wodaabe men make some last-minute adjustments to their costumes for the night’s festivities, checking their reflections in brightly coloured pocket mirrors – indispensable accessories for the Wodaabe male. They look at them constantly, a bit like some people and their smartphones. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Although the girls wear less make-up than the men, they also take great pride in their appearance, plaiting and decorating their hair. The tattoos on this girl’s face are caused by scarification at a young age and indicate tribal affiliations, as well as strength and valour.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Here Wodaabe men grimace during the dance to show off their white teeth. The ostrich feathers in their hats emphasise their height. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

 A long line of Wodaabe men and boys, wearing bejewelled leather tunics and sparkling crowns and feathers, sways rhythmically backwards and forwards. Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

Two Wodaabe men take a break from dancing to catch their breath. The Gerewol festival is a gruelling test of endurance for the men, who dance for hours in stifling heat in the hopes of impressing a woman.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

This is the moment at the end of the week-long ceremony where, with the slightest of hands, a woman selects her husband at Gerewol. It all happens very subtly and quickly, she does not even look him in the eye. The festival is an inter-clan affair, in which women of separate lineages will pick men from opposing clans.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

At sunset the ostrich feathers in the mens’ caps resemble palm trees. They make the Wodaabe, already an incredibly tall and lean people, even taller. Once the week-long festival is over, the Wodaabe return to their day-to-day life as nomadic herders.  Image copyright Tariq Zaidi Image caption

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-39070587

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