PBS News, Africanews, Sky News, CAN, Roylab Stats, Google news, BBC – Future, TED-Ed, The Guardian and Colossal  

 PBS News: April 28 – 30 & May 1, 2020, and Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

 Africanews Live

 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Washington Post: April 28, 2020 – Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic
BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

TED-Ed: Emma Bryce What really happens to the plastic you throw away

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Colossal: Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 1, 2020

May 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, with millions of Americans filing for unemployment and businesses desperate, more states lift pandemic restrictions. Plus: Rising tensions between the White House and China, a perspective on reopening restaurants, essential workers strike for their health, Joe Biden denies a sexual assault allegation, the analysis of Shields and Brooks, Jazz Fest goes quiet and in memoriam. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Economic strain drives more states to lift pandemic rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZzPh… The ongoing U.S.-China rhetorical battle over the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKamw… News Wrap: White House blocks Fauci from House testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4fJa… The CEO of Waffle House on adapting restaurants to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qd6uZ… How these essential workers feel about the risks they face https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58M4… What Biden said in 1st public response to assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ApNi… Shields and Brooks on Biden’s assault allegation denial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1I-up… Trombone Shorty on New Orleans’ quieted musical heartbeat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWULo… Mourning some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUNnk… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 30, 2020

Apr 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new jobs numbers emphasize the depths of the pandemic’s economic damage. Plus: What happens to Americans struggling to pay for housing, complications around accessing food stamps, viewer questions about the economic crisis, Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso on COVID-19, the World Health Organization under fire and a Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone. Correction: When discussing President Trump’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic during the interview with Sen. Barrasso, Judy Woodruff mistakenly said 15 Americans had died of the disease in late February. She meant that there were 15 confirmed U.S. cases of the disease then. We regret the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States ask for more federal aid as economic crisis deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1T_Xq… How to get help if you can’t pay your mortgage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo7RD… How COVID-19 is keeping food from America’s hungriest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7TvV… Michelle Singletary answers viewers’ financial questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXtif… News Wrap: Pelosi defends Biden over assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9weo… Sen. Barrasso: Early remdesivir results ‘very encouraging’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-mI2… 2 perspectives on the Trump administration’s clash with WHO https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyIcz… A Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEtvP… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 29, 2020

Apr 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, U.S. deaths from COVID-19 now exceed American fatalities incurred in the Vietnam War. Plus: The latest on testing and possible treatment, how the pandemic threatens U.S. food production, distance learning challenges for students with special needs, earning potential for collegiate athletes and a new book on community and relationships from a former U.S. surgeon general. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Amid economic gloom, is there hope for a COVID-19 treatment? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3TNr… What we know about remdesivir study and COVID-19 antibodies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWuPp… News Wrap: Navy widens investigation of Roosevelt outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkHat… Trump wants meat processing plants open. But are they safe? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elxBy… How distance learning is creating a special education crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgxRo… Does NCAA earnings decision mean a ‘new era’ for athletes? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oo31s… Could pandemic loneliness spark a ‘social revival?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIecV… What could a post-pandemic world look like? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJCs8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 28, 2020

Apr 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, more states start to lift restrictions put in place due to COVID-19, causing some health experts to worry. Plus: Small businesses struggle to obtain federal aid, Sen. Chuck Schumer on the federal response, New Zealand and Australia successfully battle virus spread, how the pandemic is changing religious observation and telling fact from fiction in a global health crisis. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lift restrictions, in bid for economic relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roc_a… News Wrap: Violent new protests in Lebanon turn deadly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YJVO… Why can’t more small businesses get federal pandemic aid? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgjoY… Schumer demands hearings on coronavirus relief oversight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Omuw6… How New Zealand and Australia have kept COVID-19 losses loz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… How religious leaders are keeping the faith during COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… The dangerous flood of misinformation surrounding COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xl9zg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

Apr 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

We mark this 50th anniversary of Earth Day with Jane Goodall, one of the world’s most renowned scientists and environmentalists. A new National Geographic documentary explores her life and work, teaching generations how interconnected we are with the natural world. Jeffrey Brown talks to Goodall about her career and mission — and the pandemic that has brought modern civilization to its knees. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,424,254 440 1,092,715 243,674
United States 1,157,782 3,513 150,934 67,046
Spain 216,582 4,598 117,248 25,100
Italy 209,328 3,475 79,914 28,710
United Kingdom 182,260 2,743 28,131
Germany 164,967 1,984 121,014 6,812
France 130,979 1,953 50,562 24,760
Turkey 124,375 1,496 58,259 3,336
Russia 124,054 845 15,013 1,222
Brazil 96,559 457 40,973 6,750
Iran 96,448 1,157 77,350 6,156
China 84,388 60 77,713 4,643
Canada 56,714 1,493 23,801 3,566
       

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Washington Post                                          April 28, 2020
Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Goldman Sach
By Angela Fritz
 Email

The latest

The United States surpassed 1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus Tuesday, which is around a third of all the world’s reported infections. More than 55,000 deaths in the United States have been reported since February, according to tracking by The Washington Post. Health experts say that both cases and deaths are likely being undercounted.

The pandemic is endangering the U.S. beef, chicken and pork supply chains, as worker infection has shut down at least 20 plants and forced those still open to slow production. President Trump is expected to sign an executive order to force meat production plants to keep operating, despite mounting reports of employee deaths due to covid-19. Read about the risks for workers and what it means for your grocery store, then check out answers to your questions below.

A Federal Reserve program to begin within weeks will provide $500 billion in emergency aid to large American corporations without requiring them to protect workers or limit payments to executives and shareholders. Since it’s exempt from rules passed by Congress for other aid, critics say it would allow large companies to take federal help without saving any jobs.

Meanwhile, despite pressure from the Trump administration, some larger businesses — including cruise line operators — are refusing to return their small business Paycheck Protection Program money. The program ran out of funds in just weeks, and several businesses have already said they would return money because they realize they weren’t the intended small-business recipients. Read about the companies that are keeping their loans. 

This couple got married in the middle of the friendliest street in town — and the neighbors all came to help create their outdoor, socially distant wedding. The bride wore a white lace jumpsuit with a peach tulle skirt. Big chalk hearts were drawn on the sidewalks. The neighbors hung flowers on the trees, and the neighborhood kids constructed a dogwood bouquet.

More important news

Will summer kill coronavirus? Cities fear heat waves will quickly become deadly.

Patients with three certain cancers are at a much higher risk of death or severe complications from covid-19, according to a new study.

U.S. intelligence agencies issued warnings about the coronavirus in more than a dozen classified briefings prepared for Trump in January and February.

Attorney General William P. Barr told prosecutors to ‘be on the lookout’ for state and local coronavirus orders that could violate the Constitution.

Across the political spectrum, leaders are warning of financial calamity if Congress and the White House don’t help struggling states.

BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200422-how-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

By Martha Henriques – 23rd April 2020

We know that carbon emissions have sharply fallen during lockdown. But will all these changes actually be good for the environment in the long run?

There’s clear water in the Venice canals, blue skies over Delhi and wild animals are roaming boldly in locked-down cities. The oil industry and airlines are floundering in this new world, and carbon emissions are falling fast.

But there are also mountains of food going to waste that our supply chains aren’t set up to deal with. And, what’s more, the radical changes to daily life that we’re seeing now are not – thankfully – going to be permanent.

History tells us that when emissions have fallen sharply in the past, as they do after recessions, there’s often a rocketing rebound that wipes out any short-term cut in emissions. (Read more about Covid-19’s lasting impact on the environment.)

Is this pandemic any different?

Future Planet talks to BBC Minute about the close ties between lockdown and carbon emissions. In a nutshell: we could see long-lasting positive environmental change after the pandemic. But it’s all down to how we move on after lockdown.

You can watch the video above.

As an award-winning science site, BBC Future is committed to bringing you evidence-based analysis and myth-busting stories around the new coronavirus. You can read more of our Covid-19 coverage here.

TED-Ed

We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Emma Bryce traces the life cycles of three different plastic bottles, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. [Directed by Sharon Colman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Peter Gosling].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Coronavirus outbreak

Plenty of countries with male leaders have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly

Jon Henley and Eleanor Ainge Roy

Sat 25 Apr 2020 00.00 EDT Last modified on Sat 25 Apr 2020 19.15 EDT

12,643

On 1 April, the prime minister of Sint Maarten addressed her nation’s 41,500 people. Coronavirus cases were rising, and Silveria Jacobs knew the small island country, which welcomes 500,000 tourists a year, was at great risk: it had two ICU beds.

Jacobs did not want to impose a strict lockdown, but she did want physical distancing observed. So she spelled it out: “Simply. Stop. Moving,” she said. “If you don’t have the bread you like in your house, eat crackers. Eat cereal. Eat oats. Eat … sardines.”

The 51-year-old Caribbean premier may not have the global profile of Angela Merkel or Jacinda Ardern, but her blunt message exemplified firm action, effective communication – and showed another female leader getting the job done.

From Germany to New Zealand and Denmark to Taiwan, women have managed the coronavirus crisis with aplomb. Plenty of countries with male leaders – Vietnam, the Czech Republic, Greece, Australia – have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly.

Ardern, 39, New Zealand’s premier, has held Kiwis’ hands through the lockdown, delivering empathetic “stay home, save lives” video messages from her couch and communicating daily through non-combative press conferences or intimate Facebook Live videos, her favourite medium.

Her insistence on saving lives and her kindness-first approach – urging New Zealanders to look after their neighbours, take care of the vulnerable, and make sacrifices for the greater good – has won her many fans, while her emphasis on shared responsibility has united the country.

Choosing to “go hard and go early”, Ardern imposed a 14-day quarantine on anyone entering the country on 14 March and implemented a strict lockdown two weeks later, when fewer than 150 people had been infected and none had died. New Zealand has recorded just 18 deaths; public trust in Ardern’s government is greater than 80%.

In Germany, Angela Merkel has been hailed for direct but uncharacteristically personal public interventions, warning that up to 70% of people would contract the virus – the country’s “greatest challenge” since 1945 – and lamenting every death as that of “a father or grandfather, a mother or grandmother, a partner …”

Thanks to extensive testing from the outset, plenty of intensive care beds, and the chancellor’s periodic forthright reminders that Covid-19 was “serious – so take it seriously”, Germany has so far recorded fewer than 5,000 deaths, a far lower figure than most EU countries.

With a doctorate in quantum chemistry, Merkel’s clear, calm expositions – a clip of her explaining the scientific basis behind the government’s lockdown exit strategy was shared thousands of times online – have also helped propel public approval of the fourth-term chancellor’s handling of the crisis above 70%.

1:38

Merkel sets out clear explanation of how coronavirus transmission works – video

In nearby Denmark, meanwhile, the prime minister, Mette Frederiksen, acted equally firmly, closing the Scandinavian country’s borders as early as 13 March, and following up a few days later by shutting all kindergartens, schools and universities and banning gatherings of more than 10 people.

That decisiveness appears to have spared Denmark the worst of the pandemic, with fewer than 8,000 confirmed cases and 370 deaths. Frederiksen’s no-punches-pulled speeches and clear instructions to the nation have been widely praised.

She even managed to show a sense of fun, posting a clip on Facebook of herself doing the dishes while singing along to the 1980s Danish popsters Dodo and the Dodos during the nation’s weekly TV lockdown singalong. The Scandinavian country’s youngest-ever prime minister, whose approval ratings have doubled to more than 80%, has now begun easing its lockdown.

Taiwan’s president Tsai Ing-wen responded equally fast, activating the country’s central epidemic command centre in early January and introducing travel restrictions and quarantine measures. Mass public hygiene measures were rolled out, including disinfecting public areas and buildings.

In all, Taiwan adopted 124 control and contain measures in weeks, making a full lockdown unnecessary. It has reported just six deaths, and is now dispatching millions of face masks to the worst-struck parts of the US and Europe. Tsai’s warm, authoritative style has won her plaudits, even from political opponents.

Norway, with 7,200 cases and 182 deaths, this week began relaxing its restrictions by reopening kindergartens. The prime minister, Erna Solberg, told CNN she had made a point of “letting scientists make the big medical decisions”, adding that she thought her country’s early lockdown and thorough testing programme had been key.

Following an example set earlier by Frederiksen, Solberg also took the unusual step of directly addressing the country’s children, telling them in two press conferences – from which adult journalists were banned – that it was “permitted to be a little bit scared” and that she, too, missed being able to hug her friends.

Meanwhile, Iceland, under the prime minister, Katrín Jakobsdóttir’s, leadership, has offered free testing to all citizens, not only those with symptoms, and has recorded 1,800 cases and 10 deaths. Some 12% of the population has taken up the offer, and an exhaustive tracing system has meant the country has not had to close schools.

The world’s youngest head of government, Finland’s prime minister, Sanna Marin, also moved decisively to impose a strict lockdown, including a ban on all non-essential travel in and out of the Helsinki region. This has helped her country contain the spread of the virus to just 4,000 cases and 140 deaths, a per-million toll 10 times lower than that of neighbouring Sweden.

Not all the women who have excelled in the corona crisis are national leaders. Jeong Eun-kyeong, the unflappable head of South Korea’s centre for disease control, has become a national icon after overseeing a “test, trace, contain” strategy that has made the country the world’s coronavirus role-model, with daily infections in single digits and a death toll of less than 250.

Jeong, a former rural doctor dubbed “the world’s best virus hunter”, has delivered no-nonsense daily press conferences, including demonstrating the ideal way to cough. While these have won praise, her work ethic – she has left an emergency operations bunker only for quick visits to a food truck – has prompted concern for her health.

5:06

Why South Korea’s coronavirus death toll is comparatively low – video explainer

Whatever conclusions we may draw from these leaders’ performances during the pandemic, experts caution that while women are “disproportionately represented to a rather startling degree” among countries managing the crisis well, dividing men and women heads of state and government into homogenous categories is not necessarily useful.

Complicating factors may be at play. Kathleen Gerson, a professor of sociology at New York University, notes, for example, that women leaders are more likely to be elected in “a political culture in which there’s a relative support and trust in the government – and that doesn’t make stark distinctions between women and men. So you’ve already got a head start”.

In addition, it may be harder for men to escape “the way they are expected to behave” as leaders, Gerson told The Hill website. And since the very best leaders are both strong and decisive and capable of displaying feeling, women could, perhaps, “lead the way in showing that these are not competing and conflicting attributes, but complementary – and necessary for good leadership”, she said.

America faces an epic choice …

… in the coming year, and the results will define the country for a generation. These are perilous times. Over the last three years, much of what the Guardian holds dear has been threatened – democracy, civility, truth. This administration has cleared out science and scientists across all departments. America’s reputation as a competent global leader is in peril. Truth is being chased away. But with your help we can continue to put it center stage.

Rampant disinformation, partisan news sources and social media’s tsunami of fake news are no bases on which to inform the American public in 2020. We believe every one of us deserves equal access to fact-based news and analysis. So we’ve decided to keep Guardian journalism free for all readers, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. This would not be possible without the generosity of readers, who now support our work from across America in all 50 states.

Our journalism relies on our readers’ generosity – your financial support has meant we can keep investigating, disentangling and interrogating. It has protected our independence, which has never been so critical. We are so grateful.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/25/why-do-female-leaders-seem-to-be-more-successful-at-managing-the-coronavirus-crisis?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

OCTOBER 22, 2018  SASHA BOGOJEV

After taking a much-needed break over the summer following his successful presentation in Paris in June, Pejac is now back in his studio, developing new works for his U.S. debut in New York City and preparing a special limited edition that will be released toward the end of the year. Mixing his most recognizable techniques and mediums, he’s been sharing some of the alluring new pieces via his Instagram, including most recent drawings and works on pressed wood panels.

The Spanish artist first introduced the captivating works on wooden chipboard from the Redemption series back in January 2017, and eventually had an entire showcase focused on these pieces back in September 2017 in Venice. Known for revisiting his ideas and concepts, he recently finished this poignant new piece titled Safari. Mixing some of the previously seen imagery, such as patrolling helicopters with a spotlight, or a lonely stag, Pejac combines these visuals into a dynamic image that depicts a wild animal caught in the open by an unknown authority. Using fastidious shading and light effects, he uses the unorthodox composite wood medium to create a powerful effect of objects flying around the animal as its surrounding crumble around it. Once again putting a focus on the careless and ignorant bearing of humans towards nature, the artist constructed a gripping image utilizing an original technique he developed.

With similar thematic content, Pejac’s most recent solo exhibition on an old waterway barge on the Seine in Paris included three masterful large-scale drawings, along with other works on paper. Portraying a post-apocalyptic, surreal future, these meticulously rendered drawings mounted on thick frames were matched the quality of his paintings while depicting the hefty subject with a direct and delicate technique. Showing a lone character diving deep to retrieve a sinking lifebuoy ring in between plastic waste, or a helicopter removing a lighthouse over a desert, these images showcase Pejac’s poetic vision and his ability to pass a sharp and weighty message in the most poetic way.

A great example of such narrative is his canvas Le Bateau Ivre (The drunken boat) from 2015, titled after a poem written by Arthur Rimbaud, describing the drifting and sinking of a boat lost at sea in a fragmented first-person narrative saturated with vivid imagery and symbolism. Making an analogy with poem’s verbal saturation, the image shows two boys finishing from a small boat drifting through a sea densely polluted with garbage. Originally exhibited at his 2016 London solo show “Law of the Weakest,” this troubling vision from only three years ago is repeatedly becoming an alarming reality around the globe. You can see Pejac’s works in progress and stay up to date on show and print release announcements by following him on Instagram.

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PBS News, Africanews, Sky News, CAN, Roylab Stats, Google news, 92nd Street Y, The New York Times, Miumiu Guitargril, and boredpanda

PBS News: April 17 – 20, 2020, Washington Week, and In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

 Africanews Live

 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

92nd Street Y: Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

The New York Times: Morning Briefing, April 19, 2020

 Miumiu Guitargril – [ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old

 boredpanda: 29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 20, 2020

Apr 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, protesters demand U.S. government restrictions be lifted despite the continued spread of COVID-19. Plus: The price of oil tanks, evaluating the risks of reopening the U.S., the pandemic’s effect on agriculture, Brazil’s president minimizes the public health threat, a fragile Afghanistan confronts COVID-19, Politics Monday and an essential worker on taking out the trash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Crowds protest restrictions as health experts warn of risks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQApS… Troubled global oil market tanks amid pandemic’s demand drop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DPob… News Wrap: Nova Scotia reels as mass shooting kills 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PeRr… The ‘fantasy’ that normal American life will resume in weeks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn52p… How COVID-19 is causing chaos for American agriculture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zlpx2… Brazil’s people fear COVID-19 threat their president denies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kl2xm… Can politically fragile Afghanistan combat COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDdtn… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on U.S. pandemic response polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBT9V… The special hazards of collecting garbage during a pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeJYU… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 19, 2020

Apr 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 19, states weigh-in on re-opening for business, the coronavirus exposes the need for programmers for outdated unemployment systems, the popularity of animal fostering during a pandemic, and a breakdown of the debate for the latest federal relief package as millions of small businesses languish. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 18, 2020

Apr 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 18, the latest on the coronavirus, what scientists are finding out about antibody testing, some big companies are redeploying their employees during the outbreak, and the impact of the pandemic on a cultural cornerstone in Portland, Oregon. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 17, 2020

Apr 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump offers states guidance on reopening, but some governors fear it’s too soon. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on COVID-19 testing and PPE, why testing remains slow, an assault allegation against former Vice President Joe Biden, the latest from Congress on funding economic relief, Shields and Brooks, in memory of those lost to COVID-19 and a Broadway triumph. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States try to balance economic crisis, public health threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e_S9… Pence: Health care ‘has not been overwhelmed’ by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQow7… News Wrap: Ukraine wildfires cause surge in air pollution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waqx5… The supply chain fiasco has derailed U.S. COVID-19 testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piPGT… What we know about sexual assault allegation against Biden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hblpN… What’s holding up additional funding for U.S. small business https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS3m7… Shields and Brooks on Trump vs. states on COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqYr… Remembering some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvORW… This Broadway cast ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ for digital performance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrErM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

 

Apr 17, 2020  Washington Week

President Trump unveiled his plan for states to shoulder the brunt of the burden on deciding when to reopen. The panel also discussed the effort among congressional Republicans and Democrats and the White House to negotiate more funding for the small business lending program, which has maxed out. Panel: Kimberly Atkins, Senior News Correspondent, WBUR, Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent, The New York Times, Paula Reid, White House Correspondent, CBS News, Kristen Welker, White House Correspondent, NBC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,478,634 318.76 651,736 170,389
United States 799,456 2,425.86 72,368 42,604
Spain 200,210 4,250.71 80,587 20,852
Italy 181,228 3,008.26 48,877 24,114
Germany 147,065 1,768.69 84,717 4,862
United Kingdom 124,743 1,877.65 16,509
France 114,657 1,709.36 37,409 20,265
Turkey 90,980 1,094.1 13,430 2,140
Iran 83,505 1,002.09 59,273 5,209
China 82,758 59.03 77,123 4,632
Russia 47,121 321.11 3,446 405
Brazil 40,581 192.02 22,130 2,575
Belgium 39,983 3,469.41 8,895 5,828
Canada 36,831 969.77 12,586 1,690
Netherlands 33,405 1,914.21 3,751
Switzerland 27,673 3,222.83 18,600 1,429

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

Sep 17, 2018  92nd Street Y

Watergate journalist Bob Woodward’s new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House, announced as the most acute and penetrating portrait of a sitting president ever published during the first years of an administration, is unprecedented. Talking with Jacob Weisberg, Bob Woodward gives a front-row-seat view of life inside Donald Trump’s White House, as revealed in his new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, an associate editor at The Washington Post, shows how the president makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Drawing from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, contemporaneous meeting notes, files, documents, and personal diaries, FEAR brings to light the most explosive debates that drive decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence. It’s the inside story on President Trump as only Bob Woodward can tell it. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear first-hand as the legendary journalist sits down with the chairman and editor-in-chief of Slate. Recorded on September 12, 2018 at 92nd Street Y. Subscribe for more videos like this: http://bit.ly/1GpwawV Your support helps us keep our content free for all. Donate now: http://www.92y.org/donatenow?utm_sour… Facebook: http://facebook.com/92ndStreetY Instagram: http://Instagram.com/92ndStreetY Twitter: https://twitter.com/92Y Tumblr: http://92y.tumblr.com/ On Demand: http://www.92yondemand.org

Category  Nonprofits & Activism

The New York Times – Morning Briefing

By Remy Tumin and Elijah Walker

 

Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.  April 19, 2020

Mark Felix/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

1. Demonstrators across the country violated social-distancing orders to call for the reopening of states and the American economy.

The rallies, like the one outside the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, above, rode a wave of similar protests this past week. On Saturday alone, people also gathered in Indianapolis, Ind.; Carson City, Nev.; Annapolis, Md.; Salt Lake City, Utah, and Brookfield, Wis.

President Trump on Friday openly encouraged the right-wing protests in states with stay-at-home orders, even after officially and publicly conceding that reopening was up to governors.

2. What does the year ahead look like?
There will be no quick return to normal American life, but there is hope for managing the outbreak now and in the long term. Our global health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. spoke to over 20 experts on what to expect in the coming months.
Some of their predictions:
  • The lockdowns will end haltingly. Putting safety first could mean reopening only after coronavirus cases declined for 14 days, 90 percent of contacts of infected people could be traced, infections of health care workers were eradicated, recuperation sites existed for mild cases — and many other hard-to-reach goals.
  • It is not clear whether recovery from the virus and antibodies confer immunity. If they do, or are believed to, America could be split into two classes: those protected (or thought to be) and those still vulnerable.
  • The virus can be kept in check, but only with expanded resources like widespread testing. And treatments are likely to arrive before a vaccine.
3. The U.S. needs to triple the number of coronavirus tests it is currently administering before the country can reopenexperts say. Above, a testing line in the Bronx.
An average of 146,000 people per day have been tested for the virus nationally so far this month, according to the COVID Tracking Project. A total of 3.6 million tests have been administered. But to reopen the U.S. by mid-May, the number of daily tests performed should be 500,000 to 700,000, according to researchers at Harvard University.
Continue reading the main story
Germany was the first large democracy to contain the spread of the virus, and is now the first to methodically go about reopening its economy: It is aiming to test the entire population for antibodies in the coming months to assess the virus’s spread.
And in Africa, limited testing is only part of the problem. Basic supplies like oxygen and soap are needed first.
4. Access to food is changing.
Many U.S. school cafeterias are now operating more like soup kitchens, sending days’ worth of food home for entire families even though the federal school meals program will not reimburse them.
Slaughterhouses have turned out to be the weakest link in the nation’s food supply chain. Some of the country’s highest-producing meat plants have closed because workers are getting sick.
But shutting down a plant backs up production, crushes prices paid to farmers and eventually leads to months of shortages.
5. In normal times, men are a majority of the overall work force. The pandemic has flipped that.
One in three jobs held by women has been designated as essential, according to a Times analysis of census data. Nonwhite women are more likely to have essential jobs — cashier, emergency room nurse, home health aide and more — than anyone else. Above, Constance Warren, who works the cold cuts counter in a New Orleans grocery.

No matter their sex, race or income level, most Americans are united on one thing, according to a Times survey: a sense of deep pessimism about the economy.

6. Republicans think blaming China for the coronavirus is a winning strategy for the November elections. But President Trump keeps going off message.
Republican senators locked in difficult races are preparing commercials that will condemn China. Party officials are brandishing polling data in hopes that Mr. Trump will confront Beijing. But with a reliance on China’s manufacturers for lifesaving medical supplies as well as trade talks and unstable markets to consider, Mr. Trump has repeatedly muddied those efforts.

We also spoke to Bernie Sanders’s supporters about whether they’ll be voting for Joe Biden. They weren’t unenthusiastic.

7. The latest threat to Indonesia’s wildlife: bird-singing competitions.
Officials and conservationists say wild songbirds are disappearing at a tremendous rate across the vast archipelago. One bird protection organization estimates that poachers capture more than 20 million songbirds a year.

Much of the demand is fueled by the growing craze for high-stakes bird singing contests at which government officials frequently preside. To build a bird’s stamina, one poacher said that he would slap the sides of its 20-foot-cage to make it fly 500 laps a day.

[ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old INS @miumiuguitargril

Feb 24, 2020  Miumiu Guitargirl

INS @miumiuguitargril Thank you for your encouragement.I will continue to study hard. To fulfill my dream to be an excellent guitarist. Please forgive me for my poor English. This is not my native language. I’ve tried my best to do it well. Because of my English level, I can’t Reply every message. If you have any good suggestions, please email me. My mother will help me reply. 234361800@qq.com

Category  Music

In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

Apr 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

During a period when art lovers can’t simply visit a museum or gallery, a new social media phenomenon has arisen as a creative outlet. Participants isolating at home amid the pandemic are encouraged to recreate a prominent work of art using everyday objects. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

29 Paintings by My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

Tristan and V?j?n? Rimaši?t?

Tristan is my five-year-old son who was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder at the age of three. Despite this life-changing diagnosis, he is still a very and playful child.

One day Tristan saw his older sister painting. After a while, he showed great interest and asked us, his parents, if he could also paint sometimes. I found myself in a little awkward situation because I didn’t know what to answer to my beloved son who’s having difficulty with fine motor skills.

Then, I came up with the idea that Tristan could paint but in a different way and style. The next day, Tristan got his first acrylic color set and right away started splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures.

After he had created a few paintings, we realized that they were unique and rather special. We decided to create an Instagram profile to show off his works. During his painting sessions, I record him and after he’s finished, Tristan watches and analyses his creations back with a big smile on his face.

For Tristan as an autistic child, creating these paintings in his own unique style and for us to enjoy, is priceless and we believe very therapeutic for him. His movements and actions when he is expressing himself and his thoughts through his art are really quite magical.

We want to share these happy moments with you so we’ve created this Bored Panda profile to show the world our cute and special artist and his amazing works.

More info: Instagram

Tristan

Splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures

His artwork

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.boredpanda.com/boy-with-autism-paintings-tristan/

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali Wins the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019

The Nobel Peace Prize: The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali

Wikipedia: Abiy Ahmed

 DW News:  Nobel Peace Prize 2019: Who is Abiy Ahmed?

CAN: Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed wins Nobel Peace Prize

AFP: Africa Weekly – Nobel Prize for Abiy Ahmed and electricity in Madagascar

Nidhi Taneja @@nidhitaneja0795, New Delhi: EXPLAINED – Why Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded Nobel Peace Prize 2019, and not Greta Thunberg

https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2019/press-release/

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019

English, Norwegian

Announcement

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided to award the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea. The prize is also meant to recognise all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast African regions.

When Abiy Ahmed became Prime Minister in April 2018, he made it clear that he wished to resume peace talks with Eritrea. In close cooperation with Isaias Afwerki, the President of Eritrea, Abiy Ahmed quickly worked out the principles of a peace agreement to end the long “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries. These principles are set out in the declarations that Prime Minister Abiy and President Afwerki signed in Asmara and Jeddah last July and September. An important premise for the breakthrough was Abiy Ahmed’s unconditional willingness to accept the arbitration ruling of an international boundary commission in 2002.

Peace does not arise from the actions of one party alone. When Prime Minister Abiy reached out his hand, President Afwerki grasped it, and helped to formalise the peace process between the two countries. The Norwegian Nobel Committee hopes the peace agreement will help to bring about positive change for the entire populations of Ethiopia and Eritrea.

In Ethiopia, even if much work remains, Abiy Ahmed has initiated important reforms that give many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future. He spent his first 100 days as Prime Minister lifting the country’s state of emergency, granting amnesty to thousands of political prisoners, discontinuing media censorship, legalising outlawed opposition groups, dismissing military and civilian leaders who were suspected of corruption, and significantly increasing the influence of women in Ethiopian political and community life. He has also pledged to strengthen democracy by holding free and fair elections.

In the wake of the peace process with Eritrea, Prime Minister Abiy has engaged in other peace and reconciliation processes in East and Northeast Africa. In September 2018 he and his government contributed actively to the normalisation of diplomatic relations between Eritrea and Djibouti after many years of political hostility. Additionally, Abiy Ahmed has sought to mediate between Kenya and Somalia in their protracted conflict over rights to a disputed marine area. There is now hope for a resolution to this conflict. In Sudan, the military regime and the opposition have returned to the negotiating table. On the 17th of August, they released a joint draft of a new constitution intended to secure a peaceful transition to civil rule in the country. Prime Minister Abiy played a key role in the process that led to the agreement.

Ethiopia is a country of many different languages and peoples. Lately, old ethnic rivalries have flared up. According to international observers, up to three million Ethiopians may be internally displaced. That is in addition to the million or so refugees and asylum seekers from neighbouring countries. As Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed has sought to promote reconciliation, solidarity and social justice. However, many challenges remain unresolved. Ethnic strife continues to escalate, and we have seen troubling examples of this in recent weeks and months. No doubt some people will think this year’s prize is being awarded too early. The Norwegian Nobel Committee believes it is now that Abiy Ahmed’s efforts deserve recognition and need encouragement.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee hopes that the Nobel Peace Prize will strengthen Prime Minister Abiy in his important work for peace and reconciliation. Ethiopia is Africa’s second most populous country and has East Africa’s largest economy. A peaceful, stable and successful Ethiopia will have many positive side-effects, and will help to strengthen fraternity among nations and peoples in the region. With the provisions of Alfred Nobel’s will firmly in mind, the Norwegian Nobel Committee sees Abiy Ahmed as the person who in the preceding year has done the most to deserve the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019.

Oslo, 11 October 2019

To cite this section
MLA style: The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB 2019. Sun. 13 Oct 2019. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2019/press-release/

https://www.nobelprize.org/

Abiy Ahmed Ali: “I was so humbled and thrilled when I just heard the news.”

Oct 11, 2019  Nobel Prize

Listen to the call between Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali and Olav Njølstad, Secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, recorded shortly after the public announcement of the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize.

Category   Education

Abiy Ahmed Ali: “Peace is a very expensive commodity in my country.”

Oct 11, 2019  Nobel Prize

Immediately after hearing news of the award of Nobel Peace Prize, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali answered two quick questions from Adam Smith. He describes the encouragement and energy that the prize will provide, both to his and others’ ongoing efforts towards achieving peace in their region, and to those who are trying to work for peace worldwide. Copyright Nobel Media

Category   Education

Announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize 2019

Streamed live on Oct 11, 2019

Nobel Prize

The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 was awarded to Abiy Ahmed Ali “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.” The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 was announced at The Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway. #nobelprize

Category   Education

Abiy Ahmed

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigation Jump to search

This article is about a person whose name ends in a patronymic rather than a family name. The article properly refers to the person by his given name, Abiy, and not as Ahmed.

Abiy Ahmed  ??? ???? ??
15th Prime Minister of Ethiopia
Incumbent
Assumed office
2 April 2018
President Mulatu Teshome
Sahle-Work Zewde
Deputy Demeke Mekonnen
Preceded by Hailemariam Desalegn
3rd Chairman of the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front
Incumbent
Assumed office
27 March 2018
Deputy Demeke Mekonnen
Preceded by Hailemariam Desalegn
Leader of the Oromo Democratic Party
Incumbent
Assumed office
22 February 2018
Deputy Lemma Megersa
Preceded by Lemma Megersa
Minister of Science and Technology
In office
6 October 2015 – 1 November 2016
Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn
Preceded by Demitu Hambisa
Succeeded by ???
Director of the Information Network Security Agency
Acting
In office
2008–2015
Preceded by Teklebirhan Woldearegay
Succeeded by ???
Personal details
Born 15 August 1976 (age 43)
Beshasha, Ethiopia
Political party Oromo Democratic Party
Other political
affiliations
Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front
Spouse(s) Zinash Tayachew
Children 3 daughters
1 adopted son
Education Microlink Information Technology College (BA)
University of Greenwich (MA)
Ashland University (MBA)
Addis Ababa University (PhD)
Awards Nobel Peace Prize (2019)
Website Official website
Military service
Allegiance   Ethiopia
Branch/service Ethiopian Army
Years of service 1991–2010
Rank     Lieutenant Colonel
Unit Army Signals Corps
Commands Information Network Security Agency
Battles/wars Ethiopian Civil War
United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda
Eritrean–Ethiopian War

Ethiopian Flag

Abiy Ahmed Ali[pronunciation?] (Amharic: ??? ???? ?? [?a.bij ?ah.mad ?a.li], Oromo: Abiyyii Ahimad Alii, often shortened to Abiy Ahmed or just Abiy; born 15 August 1976) is an Ethiopian politician serving since 2 April 2018 as the fourth[1] and current prime minister[2] of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. He is chairman of both the ruling EPRDF (Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front)[3] and the ODP (Oromo Democratic Party) (which is one of the four coalition parties of the EPRDF).[4] Abiy is also an elected member of the Ethiopian parliament, and a member of the ODP and EPRDF executive committees.

A former army intelligence officer, since becoming prime minister Abiy has launched a wide programme of political and economic reforms,[5] not all of which have met with favour by supporters of the federalism-based constitution/system of Ethiopia and in Tigray (in which Abiy’s shake-up of the Ethiopian state that has targeted Tigrayans is seen as selective).[6][7]

Abiy was awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for his work in ending the 20-year post-war territorial stalemate between Ethiopia and Eritrea.[8]

Personal life and education – Early life

Abiy Ahmed was born in the town of Beshasha[9] in the historic Kaffa Province (in the present-day Jimma Zone, Oromia Region) of Ethiopia on 15 August 1976.[10][11] His deceased father, Ahmed Ali, was a Muslim Oromo[12] (and had four wives[13]), while his deceased mother, Tezeta Wolde,[14] was an Orthodox[15] Christian Amhara.[16][17]

Abiy is the 13th child of his polygamous father and the sixth and youngest child of his mother.[9][16] His childhood name was Abiyot (English: “Revolution”). The name was sometimes given to children in the aftermath of the Derg revolution of 1974.[9] The then Abiyot went to the local primary school and later continued his studies at secondary schools in Agaro town. Abiy, according to several personal reports, was always very interested in his own education and later in his life also encouraged others to learn and to improve.[9]

Education

While serving in the Ethiopian National Defense Force, Abiy received his first degree, a Bachelor’s degree in computer engineering[18] from the Microlink Information Technology College in Addis Ababa in 2001.[19]

Abiy holds a Master of Arts in Transformational Leadership[18] earned from the business school at Greenwich University, London, in collaboration with the International Leadership Institute, Addis Ababa, in 2011. He also holds a Master of Business Administration[18] from the Leadstar College of Management and Leadership in Addis Ababa in partnership with Ashland University in 2013.[19]

Abiy, who had started his Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) work several years ago as a regular student,[20] completed his Ph.D. in 2017 at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies, Addis Ababa University. He did his Ph.D. work on the Agaro constituency with the PhD thesis entitled “Social Capital and its Role in Traditional Conflict Resolution in Ethiopia: The Case of Inter-Religious Conflict In Jimma Zone State”. As a follow-up to his Ph.D. thesis, he published a research article on de-escalation strategies in the Horn of Africa in a special journal issue dedicated to countering violent extremism.[21]

Personal life

He met and married his wife, Zinash Tayachew, an Amhara woman from Gondar,[22][9][16] while both were serving in the Ethiopian Defense Forces.[23] They are the parents of three daughters and one recently adopted son.[23] Abiy is multilingual and speaks Afaan Oromo, Amharic, Tigrinya, and English.[24] He is a fitness aficionado and professes that physical health goes hand in hand with mental health and, as such, he frequents physical and gym activities in Addis Ababa.[23] Abiy is a devout Evangelical Pentecostal Christian of the Full Gospel Believers’ Church.[25]

Military career

As a teenager and in early 1991,[26] he joined the armed struggle against the Marxist–Leninist regime of Mengistu Haile Mariam after the death of his oldest brother. He did so as a member of ODP (Oromo Democratic Party), which at that time was a tiny organization of only around 200 fighters in the large coalition army of about 100,000 fighters that resulted in the regime’s fall later that year.[24][9][23] As there were only so few ODP fighters in an army with its core of about 90,000 Tigrayans, Abiy quickly had to learn the Tigrinya language. As a speaker of Tigrinya in a security apparatus dominated by Tigrayans, he could move forward with his military career.[24]

After the fall of the Derg, he took formal military training from Assefa Brigade in West Wollega and was stationed there. His military post was in intelligence and communications. Later on he became a soldier in the now Ethiopian National Defense Force in 1993 and worked mostly in the intelligence and communications departments. In 1995, after the Rwandan genocide, he was deployed as a member of the United Nations Peace Keeping Force (UNAMIR), Kigali, Rwanda.[27] In the Ethio-Eritrea War between 1998 and 2000, he led an intelligence team to discover positions of the Eritrean Defence Forces.[28]

Later on, Abiy was posted back to his home town of Beshasha, where he – as an officer of the Defense Forces – had to address a critical situation of inter-religious clashes between Muslims and Christians with a number of deaths.[24][29] He brought calm and peace in a situation of communal tensions accompanying the clashes.[24] In later years, following his election as an MP, he continued these efforts to bring about reconciliation between the religions through the creation of the Religious Forum for Peace.[28]

In 2008, Abiy was one of the co-founders of the Ethiopian Information Network Security Agency (INSA), where he worked in different positions.[9] For two years, he was acting director of INSA due to a leave of absence of the director assigned to the post.[9] In this capacity, he was board member of several government agencies working on information and communications, like Ethio Telecom and Ethiopian Television. In 2010, Abiy eventually decided to leave the military and his post as deputy director of INSA to become a politician. The highest rank he had achieved during his military career was that of a Lieutenant Colonel.[21][24]

Political career

Member of Parliament

He started his political career as a member of the ODP (Oromo Democratic Party).[30] The ODP is the ruling party in Oromia Region since 1991 and also one of four coalition parties of the ruling coalition in Ethiopia, the EPRDF (Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front). He became a member of the central committee of ODP and congress member of the Executive Committee of the EPRDF – in quick succession.[24]

Religious Forum for Peace with Abiy Ahmed (2010)

In the 2010 national election, Abiy represented the woreda of Agaro and became an elected member of the House of Peoples’ Representatives, the lower chamber of the Ethiopian Federal Parliamentary Assembly. Before and during his time of parliamentary service, there were several religious clashes among Muslims and Christians in Jimma zone. Some of these confrontations turned violent and resulted in the loss of life and property. Abiy, as an elected member of parliament took a proactive role in working with several religious institutions and elders to bring about reconciliation in the zone. He was then setting up a forum entitled “Religious Forum for Peace”, an outcome of the need to devise a sustainable resolution mechanism to restore peaceful Muslim-Christian community interaction in the region.[21]

In 2014, during his time in parliament, Abiy became the Director General of a new and in 2011 founded Government Research Institute called Science and Technology Information Center (STIC).[9][31] The year after, in 2015, Abiy became an executive member of ODP. The same year he was elected to the House of Peoples’ Representatives for a second term, this time for his home woreda of Gomma.[32]

Rise to power

Starting from 2015, Abiy became one of the central figures in the violent fight against illegal land grabbing activities in Oromia Region and especially around Addis Ababa. Although the Addis Ababa Master Plan at the heart of the land-grabbing plans was stopped in 2016, the disputes continued for some time resulting in injuries and deaths.[33] It was this fight against land-grabbing, that finally boosted Abiy’s political career, brought him into the spotlight and allowed him to climb the political ladder.[24]

Oromia Urban Development and Planning Office

In October 2015, Abiy became the Ethiopian Minister of Science and Technology (MoST), a post which he left after only 12 months. From October 2016 on, Abiy served as Deputy President of Oromia Region as part of the team of Oromia Region’s president Lemma Megersa while staying a member of the Ethiopian Federal House of Peoples’ Representatives.[34][35] Abiy also became the head of the Oromia Urban Development and Planning Office. In this role, Abiy was expected to be the major driving force behind Oromia Economic Revolution, Oromia Land and Investment reform, youth employment as well as resistance to widespread land grabbing in Oromia region.[36] As one of his duties in office, he took care of the displaced one million Oromo people from Somali region during the 2017 unrest.[37]

As head of ODP Secretariat from October 2017, Abiy crossed over religious and ethnic divides to facilitate the formation of a new alliance between Oromo and the Amhara groups, both making up two thirds of the 100 million Ethiopian population.[38]

In early 2018, a lot of political observers considered Abiy and Lemma as the most popular politicians within the majority of the Oromo community and other Ethiopian communities.[39][40] This came after several years of unrest in Ethiopia. But despite this favourable rating for Abiy and Lemma, young people from Oromia Region called for immediate action without delays to bring fundamental change and freedom to Oromia Region and Ethiopia – otherwise more unrest was to be expected.[33] According to Abiy himself, people are asking for a different rhetoric, with an open and respectful discussion in the political space to allow political progress and to win people for democracy instead of pushing them.[33]

Until early 2018, Abiy continued to serve as head of the ODP secretariat and of the Oromia Housing and Urban Development Office and as Deputy President of Oromia Region. Then he left all these posts after his election as Leader of EPRDF.[41][34]

EPRDF leadership election

Following three years of protest and unrest, on 15 February 2018 the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, announced his resignation – meaning that he also resigned from the post of EPRDF Chairman. Historically, the incoming EPRDF Chairman is the next Prime Minister. The EPRDF Chairman on the other hand is one of the heads of the four parties that make up the ruling coalition: ODP, ADP, SEPDM and TPLF.[42]

Hailemariam’s resignation triggered the first ever contested leadership election among EPRDF coalition members to replace him. A lot of political observers made Lemma Megersa (the ODP Chairman) and Abiy the front-runners to become the Leader of the ruling coalition and eventually Prime Minister of Ethiopia. Despite being the clear favourite for the general public, Lemma Megersa was not a member of the national parliament, a pre-condition to become Prime Minister as required by the Ethiopian constitution. Therefore, Lemma was excluded from the leadership race.[43] On 22 February 2018, Lemma’s party, ODP, called for an emergency executive committee meeting and replaced Lemma as Chairman of ODP with Abiy. Abiy had the advantage of being a Member of Parliament in contrast to Lemma, and some observers saw that as a strategic move by the ODP to retain its leadership role within the coalition and to promote Abiy to become Prime Minister.[32]

On 1 March 2018, the 180 EPRDF executive committee members started their meeting to elect the leader of the party. Each of the four parties sent in 45 members. The contest for the leadership was among Abiy of ODP, Demeke Mekonnen, the Deputy Prime Minister and ADP leader, Shiferaw Shigute as Chairman of SEPDM and Debretsion Gebremichael as the Leader of TPLF. Despite being the overwhelming favorite by the majority of Ethiopians, Abiy faced major opposition from TPLF and SEPDM members during the leadership discussions.[44]

On 27 March 2018, a few hours before the beginning of the leadership elections, Demeke Mekonnen, who had been seen as the major opponent to Abiy, dropped out of the race. Many observers saw this as an endorsement of Abiy. Demeke was then approved as Deputy Prime Minister and got another term in that post. Following Demeke’s exit, Abiy received a presumably unanimous vote from both the ADP and ODP executive members, with 18 additional votes in a secret ballot coming from elsewhere. By midnight, Abiy was declared Chairman of the ruling coalition in Ethiopia, the EPRDF, and was considered as the Prime Minister Designate of Ethiopia by receiving 108 votes while Shiferaw Shigute received 58 and Debretsion Gebremichael received 2 votes.[3] On 2 April 2018, Abiy was elected as Prime Minister of Ethiopia by the House of Representatives and sworn in.[2]

Prime Minister of Ethiopia

On 2 April 2018, Abiy was confirmed and sworn in by the Ethiopian parliament as Prime Minister of Ethiopia. During his acceptance speech, he promised political reform; to promote the unity of Ethiopia and unity among the peoples of Ethiopia; to reach out to the Eritrean government to resolve the ongoing Eritrean–Ethiopian border conflict after the Eritrean–Ethiopian War and to also reach out to the political opposition inside and outside of Ethiopia. His acceptance speech sparked optimism and received an overwhelmingly positive reaction from the Ethiopian public including the opposition groups inside and outside Ethiopia. Following his speech, his popularity and support across the country reached an historical high and some political observers argued that Abiy was overwhelmingly more popular than the ruling party coalition, the EPRDF.[3]

Domestic policy

Since taking office in April 2018, Abiy’s government has presided over the release of thousands of political prisoners from Ethiopian jails and the rapid opening of the country’s political landscape.[45][46][47] In May 2018 alone the Oromo region pardoned over 7,600 prisoners.[48] On 29 May Ginbot 7 leader Andargachew Tsege, facing the death penalty on terrorism charges, was released after being pardoned by President Mulatu Teshome, along with 575 other detainees.[49]

That same day, charges were dropped against Andargachew’s colleague Berhanu Nega and the Oromo dissident and public intellectual Jawar Mohammed, as well as their respectively affiliated US-based ESAT and OMN satellite television networks.[50] Shortly thereafter, Abiy took the “unprecedented and previously unimaginable” step of meeting Andargachew, who twenty-four hours previously had been on death row, at his office; a move even critics of the ruling party termed “bold and remarkable”.[51] Abiy had previously met former Oromo Liberation Front leaders including founder Lencho Letta, who had committed to peaceful participation in the political process, upon their arrival at Bole International Airport.[52]

On 30 May 2018, it was announced the ruling party would amend the country’s “draconian” anti-terrorism law, widely perceived as a tool of political repression. On 1 June 2018, Abiy announced the government would seek to end the state of emergency two months in advance of the expiration its six-month tenure, citing an improved domestic situation. On 4 June 2018, Parliament approved the necessary legislation, ending the state of emergency.[47] In his first briefing to the House of Peoples’ Representatives in June 2018, Abiy countered criticism of his government’s release of convicted “terrorists” which according to the opposition is just a name the EPRDF gives you if you are a part or even meet the “opposition”. He argued that policies that sanctioned arbitrary detention and torture themselves constituted extra-constitutional acts of terror aimed at suppressing opposition.[53] This followed the additional pardon of 304 prisoners (289 of which had been sentenced on terrorism-related charges) on 15 June.[54]

The pace of reforms has revealed fissures within the ruling coalition, with hardliners in the military and the hitherto dominant TPLF said to be “seething” at the end of the state of emergency and the release of political prisoners.[55] These hardliners, centered around TPLF chief Debretsion Gebremichael, had grown to deeply resent the leadership of Abiy’s predecessor Hailemariam (at times supposedly bringing him to the brink of tears), and had hoped to place a more assertive figure in the prime minister’s office willing to “act with an iron fist”, rather than a reformist.[56]

An editorial on the previously pro-government website Tigrai Online arguing for the maintenance of the state of emergency gave voice to this sentiment, saying that Abiy was “doing too much too fast”.[57] Another article critical of the release of political prisoners suggested that Ethiopia’s criminal justice system had become a revolving door and that Abiy’s administration had quite inexplicably been rushing to pardon and release thousands of prisoners, among them many deadly criminals and dangerous arsonists.[58] On 13 June 2018, the TPLF executive committee denounced the decisions to hand over Badme and privatize SOEs as “fundamentally flawed”, saying that the ruling coalition suffered from a fundamental leadership deficit.[59]

Constitutional reform

In his briefing to parliament of 18 June 2018, Abiy announced that he would set up a commission aimed at reviewing the divisive system of ethnic federalism, which he said was failing to adequately deal with the proliferation of localized disputes over which particular ethnicity was entitled to control certain towns and districts, potentially paving the way for sweeping constitutional reform.[60]

Economic reforms

Abiy has announced that state-owned enterprises such as Ethiopian Airlines are to be partially or wholly privatised.

In June 2018, the ruling coalition announced its intention to pursue the large-scale privatisation of state-owned enterprises and the liberalization of several key economic sectors long considered off-limits, marking a landmark shift in the country’s state-oriented development model.[61]

State monopolies in the telecommunications, aviation, electricity, and logistics sectors are to be ended and those industries opened up to private sector competition.[62] Shares in the state-owned firms in those sectors, including Ethiopian Airlines, Africa’s largest and most profitable, are to be offered for purchase to both domestic and foreign investors, although the government will continue to hold a majority share in these firms, thereby retaining control of the commanding heights of the economy.[63] State-owned enterprises in sectors deemed less critical, including railway operators, sugar, industrial parks, hotels and various manufacturing firms, may be fully privatised.[64]

Aside from representing an ideological shift with respect to views on the degree of government control over the economy, the move was seen as a pragmatic measure aimed at improving the country’s dwindling foreign-exchange reserves, which by the end of the 2017 fiscal year were equal in value to less than two months worth of imports, as well as easing its growing sovereign debt load.[63][61]

In June 2018, Abiy announced the government’s intention to establish an Ethiopian stock exchange in tandem with the privatization of state-owned enterprises.[60] As of 2015 Ethiopia was the largest country in the world, in terms of both population and gross domestic product, without a stock exchange.[65]

Foreign policy

In May 2018, Abiy visited Saudi Arabia, receiving guarantees for the release of Ethiopian prisoners including billionaire entrepreneur Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi, who was detained following the 2017 Saudi Arabian purge.[45]

In June 2018, he met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in Cairo and, separately, brokered a meeting in Addis Ababa between the South Sudanese president Salva Kiir and rebel leader Rieck Machar in an attempt to encourage peace talks.[66]

Djibouti and port agreements

Abiy with President Guelleh of Djibouti

Since taking power Abiy has pursued a policy of expanding landlocked Ethiopia’s access to ports in the Horn of Africa region. Shortly before his assumption of office it was announced that the Ethiopian government would take a 19% stake in Berbera Port in the unrecognized Republic of Somaliland as part of a joint venture with DP World.[67] In May 2018, Ethiopia signed an agreement with the government of Djibouti to take an equity stake in the Port of Djibouti, enabling Ethiopia to have a say in the port’s development and the setting of port handling fees.[68]

Two days later a similar agreement was signed with the Sudanese government granting Ethiopia an ownership stake in the Port of Port Sudan. The Ethio-Djibouti agreement grants the Djiboutian government the option of taking stakes in state-owned Ethiopian firms in return, such as the Ethiopian Airlines and Ethio Telecom.[69] This in turn was followed shortly thereafter by an announcement that Abiy and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta had reached an agreement for the construction of an Ethiopian logistics facility at Lamu Port as part of the Lamu Port and Lamu-Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport Corridor (LAPSSET) project.[70]

The potential normalization of Ethiopia-Eritrea relations likewise opens the possibility for Ethiopia to resume using the Ports of Massawa and Asseb, which, prior to the Ethio-Eritrean conflict, were its main ports, which would be of particular benefit to the northern region of Tigray.[61] All these developments would reduce Ethiopian reliance on Djibouti’s port which, since 1998, has handled almost all of Ethiopia’s maritime traffic.[71][69]

Eritrea

Main articles: Eritrea–Ethiopia relations and 2018 Eritrea–Ethiopia summit

Upon taking office, Abiy stated his willingness to negotiate an end to the Ethio-Eritrean conflict. In June 2018, it was announced that the government had agreed to hand over the disputed border town of Badme to Eritrea, thereby complying with the terms of the 2000 Algiers Agreement to bring an end to the state of tension between Eritrea and Ethiopia that had persisted despite the end of hostilities during the Ethiopia-Eritrea War.[61] Ethiopia had until then rejected the international boundary commission’s ruling awarding Badme to Eritrea, resulting in a frozen conflict (popularly termed a policy of “no war, but no peace”) between the two states.[72]

Abiy and President Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea

During the national celebration on 20 June 2018, the president of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki, accepted the peace initiative put forward by Abiy and suggested that he would send a delegation to Addis Ababa. On 26 June 2018, Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed visited Addis Ababa in the first Eritrean high-level delegation to Ethiopia in over two decades.[73]

In Asmara, on 8 July 2018, Abiy became the first Ethiopian leader to meet with an Eritrean counterpart in over two decades, in the 2018 Eritrea–Ethiopia summit.[74] The very next day, the two signed a “Joint Declaration of Peace and Friendship” declaring an end to tensions and agreeing, amongst other matters, to re-establish diplomatic relations; reopen direct telecommunication, road, and aviation links; and facilitate Ethiopian use of the ports of Massawa and Asseb.[75][76][77] Abiy was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2019 for his efforts in ending the war.[8]

Religious harmony

Abiy with one of the Patriarchs of the Orthodox Tewahedo Church

Ethiopia is a country of various religious groups, primarily Christian and Muslim communities. Both inter-religious and intra-religious divisions and conflicts were a major concern, where both the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and the Ethiopian Islamic Council experienced religious and administrative divisions and conflicts.[78][79] In 2018, he was given a special “peace and reconciliation” award by the Ethiopian Church for his work in reconciliating rival factions within the church.[80]

Abiy with the Ethiopian Muslim Grand Mufti

Security sector reform

In June 2018, Abiy, speaking to senior commanders of the Ethiopian National Defense Force (ENDF) declared his intention to carry out reforms of the military to strengthen its effectiveness and professionalism, with the view of limiting its role in politics. This followed renewed calls both within Ethiopia and from international human rights groups, namely Amnesty International, to dissolve highly controversial regional militias such as the Liyyu force.[81] This move is considered likely to face resistance from TPLF hardliners, who occupy much of the military high command.[82]

Notably, he has also called for the eventual reconstitution of the Ethiopian Navy, dissolved in 1996 in the aftermath of Eritrea’s secession after an extraterritorial sojourn in Djibouti, saying that “we should build our naval force capacity in the future.”[83] It was reported that this move would appeal to nationalists still smarting from the country’s loss of its coastline 25 years prior. Ethiopia already has a maritime training institute on Lake Tana as well as a national shipping line.

On 7 June 2018, Abiy carried out a wide-ranging reshuffle of top security officials, replacing ENDF Chief of Staff Samora Yunis with Lieutenant General Se’are Mekonnen, National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS) director Getachew Assefa with Lieutenant General Adem Mohammed, National Security Advisor and former army chief Abadula Gemeda, and Sebhat Nega, one of the founders of the TPLF and director-general of the Foreign Relations Strategic Research Institute[84][85] Sebhat’s retirements had been previously announced that May.[86]

Grenade attack

A large peaceful demonstration was organized in Addis Ababa at Meskel Square on 23 June 2018 to show support for the new prime minister. Just after Abiy had finished addressing the crowd a grenade was thrown and landed just 17 metres away from where he and other top officials were sitting. Two people were killed and over 165 were injured. Following the attack, 9 police officials were detained, including the deputy police commissioner, Girma Kassa, who was fired immediately. Questions were asked as to how a police car carrying attackers got so close to the prime minister and soon after the car was set alight destroying evidence. After the attack the prime minister addressed the nation on national TV unhurt by the blast and describing it as an “unsuccessful attempt by forces who do not want to see Ethiopia united”. On the same day the prime minister made an unannounced visit to the Black Lion general hospital to meet victims of the attack.[87][88][89][90]

Cabinet reshuffle

In the parliamentary session held on 16 October 2018, Abiy proposed to reduce the number of ministries from 28 to 20 with half of the cabinet positions for female ministers, a first in the history of the country.[91] The new cabinet restructure included the first female president, Sahle-Work Zewde; the first female minister of the Ministry of Defense, Aisha Mohammed Musa;[92] the first female minister of the new Ministry of Peace, Muferiat Kamil responsible for the Ethiopian Federal Police and the intelligence agencies; the first female press secretary for the Office of the Prime Minister, Billene Seyoum Woldeyes.[93]

Increasing ethnic unrest

The internal political power shift has created fears for Tigrayans, and already “simmering anti-Tigrayan sentiments have led to violence” people told IRIN, “from barricading roads and forcibly stopping traffic to looting and attacks on Tigrayan homes and businesses in the Amhara and Oromia regions”. Tens of thousands Ethiopian Tigrayans have been displaced from their homes (or killed), due to ethnic based violence, since Abiy assumed office.[94][95][96][97]

Since the 2018 election of Abiy, around 1.5 million Ethiopians were forced from their homes by ethnic violence – the highest number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) of any country in 2018.[98][99][100][101][102]

Some of the worst calamities were in the south, where more than 800,000 Ethiopian Gedeos[103] have fled from the district of West Guji amid persecution by the Oromo Liberation Front. Abiy’s government has been accused by humanitarian groups of ignoring the ethnic violence and withholding of aid from Gedeon refugees.[104][105]

In the north of Ethiopia, and especially in Tigray which was the cradle of the successful revolt against the Derg that in 1991 put in place the current governing coalition, there are reports of increasing anger and ethnic tension as Abiy’s shake-up of the Ethiopian state, which has targeted Tigrayans in top positions, is widely seen as biased and vindictive.[6][106]

Government spokesmen have countered that there are many ex-officials accused of amassing billions in the past decades that are wanted by law enforcement on corruption charges and that many of these defendants come from the ruling Tigrayan elite of the past decades. These legal proceedings are sometimes conflated with ethnic persecution, especially by those ex-officials that fear persecution.[107]

Debretsion Gebremichael, the acting President of Tigray Region and currently chairman of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and part of the EPRDF ruling coalition, has been reported as having accused prime minister Abiy of “conducting ethnic profiling in the name of fighting corruption” and described “recent arrests of senior military officials as being politically motivated and implemented along ethnic lines”,[108] and his criticisms are echoed by other prominent TPLF members and people of Tigray.[109][110][111][7] A local University law professor that IRIN talked to, added and said “there is a lot of [lies] and propaganda, and the TPLF has been made the scapegoat for all vice”.[94] Abiy has also sacked around 160 Tigrayan army Generals and much more lower ranking army officers, in his reforms.[106]

In a March 2019 interview with the Financial Times of London, Debretsion Gebremichael said “concentrating on one ethnic group is dangerous”, when talking about Abiy’s crack-down on Tigrayan government workers and politicians, and the fact that Abiy is calling them “daytime hyenas” (a phrase being interpreted as an ethnic slur).[112]

Awards

Award Awarding institution Date
Most Excellent Order of the Pearl of Africa: Grand Master[113] Uganda 9 June 2018
Order of the Zayed Medal[114] UAE Crown Prince 24 July 2018
High Rank Peace Award[115] Ethiopian Orthodox Church 9 September 2018
Order of King Abdulaziz[116] Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 16 September 2018
Nominee for Tipperary International Peace Award alongside Mary Robinson (the eventual winner); Aya Chebbi; humanitarian worker in South Sudan Orla Treacy; the President of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki; Swedish student and climate change activist Greta Thunberg and Nigerian humanitarian activist Zannah Bukar Mustapha[117] Tipperary Peace Convention November 2018
100 Most Influential Africans of 2018[118] New African magazine 1 December 2018
African of the year[119] The African leadership magazine 15 December 2018
100 Most Influential People 2018[120] Time magazine 1 January 2019
100 Global Thinkers of 2019[121] Foreign Policy magazine 1 January 2019
Personality of the Year[122] AfricaNews.com 1 January 2019
African Excellence Award for Gender[123] African Union 11 February 2019
Humanitarian and Peace Maker Award[124] African Artists Peace Initiative 9 March 2019
Laureate of the 2019 edition of the Félix Houphouët-Boigny – UNESCO Peace Prize [125] UNESCO 2 May 2019
Peace Award for Contribution of Unity to Ethiopian Muslims[126] Ethiopian Muslim Community 25 May 2019
Chatham House Prize 2019 Nominee [127] Chatham House – The Royal Institute of International Affairs July 2019
World Tourism Award 2019[128] World Tourism Forum August 2019
Hessian Peace Prize[129] State of Hessen August 2019
African Association of Political Consultants Award[130] APCAfrica September 2019
Nobel Peace Prize[131] Nobel Foundation 11 October 2019

Nobel Peace Prize: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Peace_Prize

Ethiopia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopia

Nobel Peace Prize 2019: Who is Abiy Ahmed? | DW News

Oct 11, 2019  DW News

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has been announced as the winner of this prestigious award for his work to resolve the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea. Ahmed was up against around 300 nominees. The Norwegian Nobel Committee made the announcement in Oslo. Earlier this week, the Nobel prizes in the fields of Medicine, Physics, Chemistry and Literature were also awarded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: https://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #AbiyAhmed #NobelPeacePrize #DWNews

Category   News & Politics

Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed wins Nobel Peace Prize

Oct 11, 2019  CNA

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 has been awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. He was cited for his peacemaking efforts with Ethiopia’s rival, Eritrea. Henrik Urdal, Director of the Peace Research Institute Oslo, shared his views on Mr Abiy clinching the award. Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: https://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

Category   News & Politics

Africa Weekly: Nobel Prize for Abiy Ahmed and electricity in Madagascar | AFP

Oct 11, 2019  AFP news agency

This week on Africa Weekly, pride in Ethiopia, as Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize. We take a look at his first year and a half in office. We also head to Madagascar, where access to electricity is increasingly proving a luxury for the few who can afford it. Subscribe to AFP and activate your notifications to get the latest news ? https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC86db…

Category   News & Politics

https://www.indiatvnews.com/fyi/explained-why-ethiopian-pm-abiy-ahmed-ali-has-got-nobel-peace-prize-2019-and-not-greta-thunberg-555809

EXPLAINED: Why Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded Nobel Peace Prize 2019, and not Greta Thunberg

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize for 2019, defeating Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. The Norwegian Nobel Committee chose Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali as the Nobel Peace Prize winner 2019 for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 award has gone to the Ethiopian Prime Minister particularly for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.

Nidhi Taneja @@nidhitaneja0795
New Delhi Updated on: October 11, 2019 16:26 IST

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize for 2019, defeating Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. The Norwegian Nobel Committee chose Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali as the Nobel Peace Prize winner 2019 for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 award has gone to the Ethiopian Prime Minister particularly for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 also recognises all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast Agrican regions. 

Story of Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali’s peacemaking efforts: 

Abiy Ahmed Ali assumed office as the Ethopian Prime Minister in April 2018, he was clear on resuming peace talks with Eritrea. In a bid to end the long “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries, Abiy Ahmed worked out certain principles of a peace agreement in close cooperation with President of Eritrea Isaias Afwerki. These principles are set out in the declarations that Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali and President Afwerki signed in Asmara and Jeddah last July and September. What came as a breakthrough was Abiy Ahmed’s unconditional willingness to accept the arbitration ruling of an international boundary commission in 2002.

Both Prime Minister Abiy and President Afwerki helped formalise the peace process between the two counties. Prime Minister Abiy has initiated important reforms in Ethiopia that give many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future. In his first 100 days as Prime Minister, Abiy lifted the country’s state of emergency, granting amnesty to thousands of political prisoners, discontinuing media censorship, legalising outlawed opposition groups, dismissing military and civilian leaders who were suspected corruption, and significantly increasing the influence of women in Ethiopian political and community life. Prime Minister Abiy also engaged with other peace and reconciliation processes in East and Northeast Africa. The Norwegian Nobel Committee sees Abiy Ahmed as the person who in the preceding year has done the most to deserve the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019.

On a day when the Nobel Peace Prize 2019 is announced, we remember 16-year-old environmental activist Greta Thunberg too for her histrionics at the United Nations last month. The young Swedish activist furiously attacked world leaders at the United Nations with a fiery speech, and asked: “How dare you?”. Not just that. Greta’s stare at US President Donald Trump when he arrived to attend a meeting on religious freedom was also caught on camera. She was hailed by some, and criticised by some. A lot many had predicted Greta Thunberg as the Nobel Peace Prize winner, but that clearly didn’t happen.

ALSO READ | Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg wins Alternative Nobel

ALSO READ | ‘A very happy young girl…’: Greta Thunberg after Trump’s remark

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