Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

AXIOS PM, January 17, 2022

2.  King family urges action on voting rights

March for voting rights in D.C. today. Photo: Sophia Cai/Axios

In near-freezing temperatures, nearly a thousand activists and residents from every D.C. ward joined members of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s family in a march across the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge to demand federal voting rights legislation.

·  Axios’ Sophia Cai reports that at the foot of the bridge, MLK’s 13-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King — bundled up in a black, hooded parka — banged on the sides of a wooden lectern as she led the crowd in a fiery chant:

Spread the word! Have YOU all heard? All across the nation! We are going to be! A great generation!

Videos of the march.

Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images

At Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, attendees listen to Vice President Harris, speaking from the White House to the Martin Luther King Jr. Beloved Community Service(More on the service.)

·  “Today, our freedom to vote is under assault,” the vice president said.

Screenshot: MSNBC

The backdrop is tomorrow’s Senate debate on voting legislation.

AXIOS PM, January 17, 2022 by

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

 

The following photos are the march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights leads by Martin Luther King Jr.’s family

WASHINGTON, DC – AUGUST 28: Martin Luther King III speaks during the “March On for Washington and Voting Rights” on the National Mall on August 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. The event was organized to honor the 58th anniversary of the March On Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech and also urge the Senate to pass voting rights legislation. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

ABC News: Martin Luther King Jr.’s family leads march urging lawmakers to pass federal voting rights

“Let the Senate hear you!” said King’s granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King.

By Briana Stewart and Rachel Scott

January 17, 2022, 6:24 PM

Voting rights take center stage on Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King III, along with other civil rights leaders, marched in Washington, D.C…Read More

Carlos Barria/Reuters

As voting rights legislation remains stalled in Congress, Martin Luther King Jr.’s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, and his 13-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King, were among a coalition of civil rights activists who led the annual Peace Walk in Washington on Monday to honor the legacy of the civil rights icon and demand action on voting rights.

MORE: Democrats back where they started on voting rights: The Note

“What we want is for Americans to be engaged,” King III told ABC News anchor Linsey Davis, adding that the need for federal safety guards is more urgent than ever. “This year, we are laser focused on getting the right to vote sustained and getting the right to vote empowered.”

Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Yolanda Renee King, granddaughter of Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks as her father Marti…Read More

MORE: Advocates launch hunger strikes, hold events throughout US to push for voting rights

The march comes as lawmakers are expected to take up a vote to change the Senate rules as early as Tuesday that encompasses both the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. If voted to proceed, it would be the first time this Congress takes up a debate on voting rights in the Senate.

Without the support of 10 Republicans needed to overcome a GOP filibuster to block the legislation, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is expected to raise rules change vote as early as Tuesday, according to a Democratic aide familiar. But with moderate Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema making clear they will not vote to end the Senate’s filibuster — even though both support the underlying legislation — the fate of the reforms that activists are demanding action on is unclear.

Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“Let the Senate hear you! Let the White House hear you all! Spread the word!” said King’s granddaughter before her family led hundreds of marchers across a snow-capped Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge.

Yolanda Renee King had sharp words for lawmakers, calling out Senators Manchin and Sinema by name.

“Sen. Sinema, Sen. Manchin, our future hinges on your decision and history will remember what choice you make. So, join me in demanding action for today, tomorrow and generations to come,” Yolanda Renee King said.

She added, “For all the elected leaders out there who are tweeting, posting and celebrating my grandfather, Dr. King, today, my message to you is simple do not celebrate, legislate!”

Manchin released a statement Monday celebrating the life and legacy of King, but made no mention of voting rights.

Carlos Barria/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“We celebrate and honor the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., one of the most inspiring and important figures in American history. Dr. King taught us to stand up for what we believe in through civil, peaceful means to unite our nation instead of divide it,” the statement read.

When asked if Manchin’s words are enough, King III told ABC News, “First of all, I would say that, you know, it’s kind of frustrating for people to be releasing statements and you really have not totally adhered to my father’s ideals. My father not only gave his life, but he fought for the right to vote, and he and others gave their lives. And again, Sen. Manchin says he supports a bill but he won’t move or is not so far moved on a pathway to say that there’s a pathway for it.”

He added, “So my hope and my message to him would be senator, you got to go further. You can’t say, ‘I’m for something’ but don’t have a pathway to [it], and that’s anybody who’s talking about dad today, because I’m sure [there are also] many senators also on the Republican side, who ought to be ashamed of themselves, who have shut down the process for voter expansion, voter protections.”

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Martin Luther King III and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi embrace during a press co…Read More

At least 19 states have passed new restrictive voting laws since the 2020 election. There have been 34 such new laws in total across the country, according to the nonpartisan Brennan Center for Justice, and most of them in states controlled by Republicans.

Many of the new laws, fueled by false claims of widespread election fraud by former President Donald Trump, take aim at mail-in voting, implement stricter voter ID requirements, allow fewer early voting days and limit ballot drop boxes.

MORE: Clyburn asks senators ‘which side are you on?’ for voting rights

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi joined the King family Monday for a voting rights rally at Washington’s Union Station outside Capitol Hill, where she spoke in support of expanding voter access, alongside other members of Congress and activists, including Congressional Black Caucus Chair Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, and Rev. Al Sharpton.

Elizabeth Frantz/Reuters

Martin Luther King III, the eldest son of the late civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr…Read More

“The Congress and I give great credit to the Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer for his relentless and persistence and trying to get this done, and to the president for his leadership, but we have to get this done,” Pelosi said, before launching into an argument for changing Senate rules to make way for election reform legislation.

MORE: Sinema, Manchin rejects Biden push to change filibuster for voting rights

Mike Theiler/Reuters

Visitors walk past the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial as the sun breaks through clouds…Read More

“While it may be true to them that the filibuster is an important custom, it is not the Constitution of the United States, the truth is,” Pelosi said. “If you really truly want to honor Dr. King, don’t dishonor him by using compression of custom as an excuse for our democracy.”

Megan Varner/Getty Images, FILE

President Joe Biden delivers remarks on voting rights legislation at the Atlanta University…Read More

Beatty, following Pelosi, told the crowd of supporters, “Silence is not an option.”

“We will not yield our efforts to enshrine voting rights legislation into law, nor will we allow a filibuster to filibuster away our democracy and our voting rights,” she said.

ABC News’ Libby Cathey contributed to this report.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://abcnews.go.com/US/martin-luther-king-jrs-family-leads-march-urging/story?id=82300731

Martin Luther King Jr’s family, activists urge Congress to pass voting rights legislation

Jan 17, 2022  CBS News

Family members of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. are honoring the late civil rights leader by pressing Congress to act to pass voting rights legislation. Nsé Ufot, CEO of the New Georgia Project, joins CBSN’s Tanya Rivero to discuss what’s at stake. CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

Speakers at, Family of Martin Luther King Jr. hold news briefing after march for voting rights

WATCH LIVE: Family of Martin Luther King Jr. hold news briefing after march for voting rights

Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022PBS NewsHour   Dr. King was 93 Today

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

MLK Jr. would be ‘greatly disappointed’ by Senate inaction on voting reform, son says

Jan 17, 2022  PBS NewsHour

Monday has been a day to remember the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and also a day of calls to action on voting rights. Demonstrators marched through streets in Washington in support of voting legislation now stalled in the U.S. Senate, and Vice President Harris warned the freedom to vote is under assault. Judy Woodruff discusses the day with the King Jr.’s son, Martin Luther King III. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

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Nightly News Full Broadcast – Jan. 17

Jan 17, 2022  NBC News

Winter storm slams East Coast, investigation underway after hostage standoff at Texas synagogue, and omicron appears to have peaked in some states. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

2022 King Holiday Observance – Beloved Community Commemorative Service

Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022  The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change

The culminating program for the week-long celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life and legacy is the 2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Beloved Community Commemorative Service. This event will be televised locally on FOX 5 Atlanta, Monday, January 17, 2022 beginning at 10:00 A.M. EST. and live-streamed on Facebook, Youtube and thekingcenter.org.

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MLK Day Virtual Event 2022 ?The State of Civil Rights in Maine

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Streamed live on Jan 17, 2022  UMaine Alumni

This event is co-hosted by the University of Maine Alumni Association and the Greater Bangor Branch of the NAACP.

President Biden’s Challenges

Jan 22, 2022  Washington Week PBS

On the anniversary of taking office, President Biden faces challenges on all fronts and seeks to distance himself from the progressive wing of his party. The panel discussed new reporting about Chief of Staff Ron Klain, the future of voting rights and what’s to come in 2022. Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leads a march to the courthouse in Montgomery, Ala., on March 17, 1965. AP

MLK Talks ‘New Phase’ Of Civil Rights Struggle, 11 Months Before His Assassination | NBC News

Apr 4, 2018  NBC News

In 1967, at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia, Martin Luther King spoke with NBC News’ Sander Vanocur about the “new phase” of the struggle for “genuine equality.” » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC MLK Talks ‘New Phase’ Of Civil Rights Struggle, 11 Months Before His Assassination | NBC News

An Intimate Conversation with Martin Luther King | David Susskind Meets MLK | Timeline

Oct 19, 2021  Timeline – World History Documentaries

David Susskind’s historical, long and intimate interview with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Originally aired on June 9, 1963 by WPIX-TV New York. Among the subjects discussed were the current state of the American Civil Rights Movement and the recent (at that time) events in Birmingham, Alabama. Recently restored by the Paley Center. ? It’s like Netflix for history… Sign up to History Hit, the world’s best history documentary service and get 50% off using the code ‘TIMELINE’ http://bit.ly/3a7ambu You can find more from us on: https://www.facebook.com/timelineWH https://www.instagram.com/timelineWH Content licensed from MVD to Little Dot Studios. Any queries, please contact owned-enquiries@littledotstudios.com

Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18.

Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image

USA TODAY: Mobilize everyday people to fight Republican attacks on voting, just like in 1965: MLK III

The backlash is a reminder of how far we’ve come, how much we have to defend and how far we have to go. The world we want will take a lifetime of work.

Martin Luther King III

Opinion contributor

Shortly after Congress passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, my father, Martin Luther King Jr., visited President Lyndon Johnson alongside other civil rights leaders and urged him to support the Voting Rights Act. President Johnson was reluctant. He had used up all his political capital on civil rights, he said. He had no power to push through a bill to secure the right to vote for Black Americans.

Dad and his allies weren’t giving up. Their response was to go back to the South, mobilize the people and “go get him some power.” They sparked massive mobilizations for voting rights across the South: among them the Selma to Montgomery march, immortalized on “Bloody Sunday.” In its aftermath, President Johnson introduced the Voting Rights Act, which was signed exactly 56 years ago.

Today though, the rights it enshrined are under threat from dozens of voter suppression laws being passed in states across the country. To resist them we have to understand, like Dad did, that power doesn’t just come from a single election, or negotiations in the Senate. It comes from us: everyday people who demand justice and equality in America.

We won’t stop demanding justice

I was reminded of this last week, as my wife, Arndrea, and I joined the Rev. Al Sharpton and Texas Democrats in meetings on Capitol Hill. We asked members and senators to fight to pass the For the People Act and the  the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act to protect the sanctity of our votes. We demanded equal congressional representation for the over 700,000 residents of majority Black and brown Washington, D.C. And we called on them to bypass the filibuster – that old Jim Crow relic – to secure these basic constitutional rights for all Americans. The message we heard was that once again, they need the power of the people to mobilize and push Congress to pass this vital legislation.

 LBJ daughters:Our dad, Lyndon Johnson, showed that civil rights could be bipartisan. Where is that now?

Later this month, when we commemorate the 58th anniversary of the March on Washington, we’ll be bringing that power to Washington and to demonstrations all over the country. Our demand is that Congress act to defend our voting rights and secure our democracy for the next generation.

For some of us, it’s discouraging to know this fight isn’t yet won. In 2020, millions of us took to the streets for the largest demonstrations in American history. We held panels and made speeches, we registered thousands of new voters, and more than 81 million of us cast our votes to sweep President Joe Biden and Democrats into the White House and Congress. Some of us will ask why, after all that, it’s still our duty to fight.

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At these moments I look back on what my mother often said, “Struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation.”

She taught me that for every step forward there will always be backlash, but that it’s our duty to keep pushing forward. Less than three weeks after the 1963 March on Washington, when activists like my father were riding high on hope, a domestic terrorist bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four precious little girls. Still, activists stood up and organized Freedom Summer the next year, sending hundreds of volunteers to the South to register Black voters and paving the way for the Civil Rights Act.

We need courage from our leaders

Now, less than a year after Black and brown voters cast the deciding votes in the biggest election of our lives, the backlash has been swift and brutal. Republican-controlled states are creating new voting restrictions to block Black and brown people from the polls. Many are openly discussing how to break up majority-minority districts through redistricting.

In my home state of Georgia, the legislature has even given itself power to take over local elections and overturn results they dislike.

That backlash is a reminder of how far we’ve come, how much we have to defend and how far we have to go as a nation. We don’t have the luxury to sit down or leave the fight. This moment calls us instead to lift our voices and show once again that the power lies in our hands. We have to call on our leaders – Democrats and Republicans – to act with courage and moral conviction to defend our democracy. We have to demand that when they quote my father, or say they loved John Lewis, they show that love in their actions.

Don’t let rights slip away: Pass ‘Manchin Plus’ voting and election protection with or without Republicans

That will be our demand when we gather in Washington this month, and we won’t stop. The world we are called to build – one based on love, sister and brotherhood, justice and peace – will not be won in a single summer of protest or an autumn of campaigning. It will be won in a lifetime of work, fueled by the power of our conviction, and we will then be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.

Martin Luther King III (@OfficialMLK3) is a global human rights activist and chairman of the Drum Major Institute.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2021/08/06/voting-rights-act-republicans-attack-king-legacy-mlk-iii/5465958001/

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‘Diamond rain’ on Uranus and Neptune seems likely

(Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

The ice giants Uranus and Neptune don’t get nearly enough press; all the attention goes to their larger siblings, mighty Jupiter and magnificent Saturn.

At first glance, Uranus and Neptune are just bland, boring balls of uninteresting molecules. But hiding beneath the outer layers of those worlds, there may be something spectacular: a constant rain of diamonds.

Full Story: Live Science (1/11)

Scientists watched a star explode in real time for the first time ever

(W. M. Keck Observatory/Adam Makarenko)

Astronomers have watched a giant star blow up in a fiery supernova for the first time ever — and the spectacle was even more explosive than the researchers anticipated.

Scientists began watching the doomed star — a red supergiant named SN 2020tlf and located about 120 million light-years from Earth — more than 100 days before its final, violent collapse, according to a new study published Jan. 6 in the Astrophysical Journal. During that lead-up, the researchers saw the star erupt with bright flashes of light as great globs of gas exploded out of the star’s surface.

Full Story: Live Science (1/10)

Live Science:  <livescience@smartbrief.com> January 7, 2022

Rare and fragile fossils found at a secret site in Australia’s ‘dead heart’

TOP SCIENCE NEWS
Bizarre cloud of gas is one of the longest structures in the Milky Way

(ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO & T. Müller/J. Syed/MPIA)

Astronomers have discovered what may be the longest structure in the Milky Way: an unusual cloud of hydrogen.

The gigantic structure, which is more than 3,900 light-years long and around 150 light-years wide, is located roughly 55,000 light-years away from the solar system, according to a statement by researchers. (Previously, the largest known clouds of gas in the Milky Way were thought to be about 800 light-years across.) The team named the lengthy cloud “Maggie,” which is short for the Magdalena River, the longest river in Colombia.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

COVID-19
Rapid tests may not detect omicron early in infection

(PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)

Rapid antigen tests for COVID-19 may not reliably detect the omicron variant during the first few days of infection, even when a person is shedding the virus in high enough quantities to be contagious, preliminary evidence hints.

For the new study, posted Wednesday (Jan. 5) to the preprint database medRxiv, researchers looked at 30 people from five different workplaces in New York and California, all of whom tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in December 2021.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY
Rare and fragile fossils found at a secret site in Australia’s ‘dead heart’

(Michael Frese)

Buried in Australia’s so-called dead heart, a trove of exceptional fossils, including those of trapdoor spiders, giant cicadas, tiny fish and a feather from an ancient bird, reveal a unique snapshot of a time when rainforests carpeted the now mostly-arid continent.

Paleontologists discovered the fossil treasure-trove, known as a Lagerstätte (“storage site” in German) in New South Wales, in a region so arid that British geologist John Walter Gregory famously dubbed it the “dead heart of Australia” over 100 years ago. The Lagerstätte’s location on private land was kept secret to protect it from illegal fossil collectors, while scientists excavated the remains of plants and animals that lived there sometime between 16 million and 11 million years ago.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

AMAZING EARTH
Weird structures near Earth’s core may be scars from a primordial interplanetary collision

(Tim Bertelink, CC 4.0)

A group of mysterious, ultradense structures just outside Earth’s core may be the remnants of an ancient interplanetary collision, new research suggests.

These strange structures are known as ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs), because seismic waves generated by earthquakes travel about 50% more slowly through these zones than through the surrounding mantle. That means the ULVZs are also much denser than the rest of the mantle, and possibly made of heavier elements.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

MATH & PHYSICS
China’s $1 trillion ‘artificial sun’ fusion reactor just got five times hotter than the sun

(VCG via Getty Images)

China’s “artificial sun” has set a new world record after superheating a loop of plasma to temperatures five times hotter than the sun for more than 17 minutes, state media reported.

The EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) nuclear fusion reactor maintained a temperature of 158 million degrees Fahrenheit (70 million degrees Celsius) for 1,056 seconds, according to the Xinhua News Agency. The achievement brings scientists a small yet significant step closer to the creation of a source of near-unlimited clean energy.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

Nuclear-powered US submarine collided with a hidden underwater mountain, Navy reveals

(Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

A nuclear-powered U.S. submarine that ran aground in the South China Sea last month collided with an uncharted seamount, according to a U.S. Navy investigation.

The USS Connecticut, a Seawolf-class fast-attack submarine, collided with an unknown object in international waters on Oct. 2, causing minor to moderate injuries to 11 crewmembers, NPR reported. The damaged submarine surfaced and made it to a port in Guam unassisted. The Navy hasn’t disclosed the full extent of the damage, and all the Navy said about the incident at the time was that “it was not another submarine” that had collided with the vessel, The Associated Press reported.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

YOUR HEALTH

U.K.’s first human case of H5N1 avian flu detected in man with pet ducks

(Wagner Lessa / EyeEm via Getty Images)

A 79-year-old man named Alan Gosling, who kept pet ducks at his home in Devon, England, recently became the first U.K. resident to catch the H5N1 strain of bird flu, DevonLive reported.

A flock of more than 100 ducks lived outside on Gosling’s property in Buckfastleigh, and after feeding the animals for some time, Gosling brought 20 of the ducks into his home to keep as pets. In December 2021, a few of the ducks in the outdoor flock fell ill, Gosling noticed.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS
The sun used to have rings like Saturn

(Andrea Isella/Rice University)

Before Earth and the other planets in our solar system existed, the sun may have been surrounded by giant rings of dust similar to Saturn’s, according to a new study.

Those rings of dust may have prevented Earth from growing into a “super-Earth” — a type of planet that is about twice the size of Earth and up to 10 times its mass, according to NASA. Astronomers have discovered super-Earths orbiting about 30% of sun-like stars in our galaxy.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

‘Cosmic wildfires’ burn bright in new photo of the Flame Nebula

(ESO/Th. Stanke & ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA. Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit)

A fiery new photograph of the Flame Nebula depicts the emissions from brand-new stars, burning through space like cosmic wildfires.

These wildfires don’t actually burn hot — the orange and yellow regions captured in this image are actually only a few tens of degrees warmer than absolute zero, the point at which the movement of atoms and other fundamental particles freezes, according to the European Southern Observatory (ESO). But the emissions are revealing. By pointing the SuperCam instrument aboard the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment in the Chilean desert at this region, researchers were able to discover a brand-new nebula and explore two dusty interstellar clouds, Messier 78 and NGC 2071.

Full Story: Live Science (1/7)

 

 

CURIOUS CREATURES
Wild video shows goldfish ‘driving’ a water-filled car in weird experiment

(Shachar Givon, Matan Samina, Prof. Ohad Ben Shahar, Prof. Ronen Segev/BGU)

Fish may not need bicycles, but they seem to like cars.

A supremely weird new video shows a goldfish driving a water-filled, motorized “car” from one end of a room to another, bobbing and weaving to avoid obstacles along the way. Scientists performed the odd experiment to better understand how goldfish navigate terrestrial environments.

Full Story: Live Science (1/6)

 

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan. 14, 2022

Jan 14, 2022  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, health systems buckle under the latest surge of hospitalizations from COVID-19 as schools struggle to keep the virus at bay. Also, millions of Kenyans face hunger and ethnic conflict exacerbated by the global climate crisis, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart consider the push in Congress for voting rights and the Supreme Court’s decision on vaccine mandates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Ukraine blames Russia for sweeping cyberattack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHN4J… Health systems buckle under surge of COVID hospitalizations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKZlI… How Boston’s sky-high COVID count impacts teachers, staff https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0Ggr… Djokovic battles with Australia after violating COVID rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=403GF… Brooks and Capehart on voting rights, partisanship https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxRqv… Deadly drought in Kenya creates humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnp5t… Immersive Van Gogh exhibits paint new experiences with art https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kq4lf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Jan. 14

Jan 14, 2022  NBC News

Millions across the U.S. are under winter weather alerts, inside a Pittsburgh children’s hospital overwhelmed by Covid cases, and bodycam video shows dramatic rescues from Colorado wildfire. 00:00 Intro 01:44 Millions in U.S. under winter weather alerts 03:48 Inside children’s hospital overwhelmed by Covid cases 06:30 Novak Djokovic facing deportation, again 08:08 U.S. warning Russia may be prepping Ukraine invasion 09:05 Trump set for first rally of 2022 11:34 Bodycam video from Colorado wildfire 13:10 Covid testing company investigation 15:33 Critics blame China for Mekong River environmental disaster 19:16 Chicago’s oldest hot dog stand’s special community connection » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #NBCNews #FullBroadcast

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Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Happy New Year Everyone: CNN News, Mercury News, NBC News, AXIOS, The New York Times, Global News, Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in NYC, News 19 WLTX, Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

Mercury News: Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

AXIOS AM: Mike Allen Jan 1, 2022, Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood. Parting shot: Ball drop, behind the scenes

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021, by Ian Prasad Philbrick, Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show,

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Global News Dec 31, 2021 

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines, Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy New Year Live! ? London Fireworks 2022, Streamed live 3 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  BBC

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022, Started streaming 2 hours ago,

Rio Brasil fireworks 022 countdown celebrations | LIVE, Started streaming 14 hours ago, Dec 31, 2021,  MH Noticias,

Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video, Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Slow Walks, BBC, MH Noticias, Emilio Exploring, News 19 WLTX, ABC News, and Revive Music

Countdown to 2022 from all over the world, Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022, Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show, Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

CNN News: New year’s Celebrations around the world

New Year’s celebrations around the world

Updated 2:21 AM ET, Sat January 1, 2022

With the rapid spread of the new Omicron coronavirus variant, many cities across the world scaled back their New Year’s celebrations.

In New York City, for example, the traditional event in Times Square allowed fewer revelers and everyone was required to wear a mask.

Some major cities canceled their events altogether, while others moved forward with their plans.

People observe candles lit to bring luck in the upcoming New Year at the Hasedera Buddhist temple in Kamakura, Japan, south of Tokyo.  Hoon/Reuters Kim Kyung

People watch the light show by St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Millennium Bridge in London.

Matt Dunham/AP                       

People gather to welcome the new year in Chongqing, China.

Li Xiaoxiang/VCG/Getty Images

Fireworks explode over the the St. Basil’s Cathedral and the Kremlin with Red Square sitting empty due to pandemic restrictions during New Year’s celebrations in Moscow.

Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/AP

Berlin has no live audience during its televised New Year’s Eve display at the Brandenburg Gate. Adam Berry/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt at Expo 2020 as part of the New Year’s festivities in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

AFP/Getty Images

Fireworks erupt over the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand.

Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

A light show illuminates the Sky Tower and Harbour Bridge in Auckland, New Zealand. The light show, “Auckland Is Calling,” replaced the city’s traditional fireworks show this year.

Dave Rowland/Getty Images for Auckland Unlimited

Fireworks explode over Sydney Harbour during New Year’s celebrations in Australia.

Jaimi Joy/Reuters

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/31/world/gallery/2022-new-year-celebrations/index.html

Mercury News:

Photos: New Year’s Eve celebrations welcome 2022 around the world

The world says goodbye to 2021, a year where the pandemic still lingered impacting all aspects of life

By GIESON CACHO | gcacho@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group

PUBLISHED: December 31, 2021 at 4:58 p.m. | UPDATED: January 1, 2022 at 4:36 p.m.

Fireworks explode at the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, during the New Year’s Eve celebration in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

The world said goodbye to 2021, a year that was hamstrung by the lingering COVID-19 pandemic, and welcomed 2022 with high hopes. Celebrations around some areas were scaled back because of the rising number of cases blamed on the spread of the omicron variant.

In places in Serbia and France, revelers stood shoulder to shoulder awaiting festivities. Other places such as India had more subdued festivities. In New York, the annual Times Square celebration was scaled back but still welcomed celebrants unlike last year, which had no public event.

According to the Associated Press, “The city said it would limit the number of people it lets into Times Square to witness a 6-ton ball, encrusted with nearly 2,700 Waterford crystals, descend above a crowd of about 15,000 in-person spectators.”

Here are images from around the world:

CHINA

Artiste Kong Ning wears her latest work entitled “Earth’s Snowflake” to usher in 2022 on the eve of the New Year in Beijing, China, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) 

INDIA

Laser lights are seen at the Bandra Worli sea link on New year in Mumbai, India, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool) 

Indians, wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus, hold the cutouts to welcome 2022 on New Year’s Eve in Ahmedabad, India, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki) 

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Ras Al Khaimah New Year’s Eve dazzled with a never seen before fireworks display that smashed two Guiness World Records at Al Marjan Island on Jan. 1, 2022, in Ras al Khaimah, United Arab Emirates. (Cedric Ribeiro/Getty Images for Marjan) 

TURKEY

Fireworks explode over the Ottoman-era Mecidiye mosque in Ortakoy square next to ‘July 15th Martyrs’ bridge, known as Bosphorus bridge, during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Istanbul, Turkey, early Saturday, Jan 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel) 

UNITED KINGDOM

Drones create a lion in the sky above the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich to bring in the New Year on Jan. 1, 2022, in London. The countries that make up the U.K. have differing COVID measures in place over the festive period. In Scotland, a maximum of 500 people can attend outdoor events where physical distancing of one meter is in place meaning the traditional Edinburgh Hogmanay celebrations have been canceled. In England, the government has not introduced any new measures. (Rob Pinney/Getty Images) 

SPAIN

Fireworks explode during New Year’s celebrations at the Madrid’s Puerta del Sol in downtown Madrid, Spain, early Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez) 

BRAZIL

People bring in the New Year as they watch fireworks explode over Copacabana Beach, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Jan. 1, 2022. (AP Photo/Bruna Prado) 

Revelers enjoy the fireworks and celebrate the New Years on Copacabana beach on Jan. 01, 2022, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Due to the spread of the Omicron variant and the surge of cases, Mayor Eduardo Paes announced cancellation of massive and traditional celebration in the beach of Copacabana known as Reveillon. The event that every New Year’s Eve gathers hundreds of thousands of locals and tourists will consist of only a 16 minute fireworks display, with no live music shows nor massive gatherings. (Photo by Wagner Meier/Getty Images)

NEW YORK

The New Year’s Eve Ball touches down to mark the beginning of the new year on January 1, 2022 in New York City. People began celebrating New Year’s Eve at Times Square in 1904, in 1907 the New Year’s Eve Ball made its first descent from the flagpole at One Times Square. (David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/12/31/photos-new-years-eve-celebrations-welcome-2022-around-the-world/

NBC News: Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Hello 2022! Muted celebrations ring in new year around the world

Revelers around the world bid farewell to another year marred by the pandemic.

/ Updated Dec. 31, 2021 / 8:47 PM EST20 PHOTOS

New York City

Revelers gather ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations in Times Square. Despite record numbers of Covid-19 cases across the city and nationwide, New York City moved forward with New Year’s Eve celebrations.

— Dieu-Nalio Chery / Reuters

Switzerland

Revelers use lights to paint “2022” for a long-exposure photograph in Arolla, Switzerland.

— Jean-Christophe Bott / EPA

Athens

Fireworks explode over the ancient Parthenon temple at the Acropolis in Athens.

— Yorgos Karahalis / AP

Paris

A couple looks out at the Eiffel Tower lit up in blue to mark France hosting the rotating presidency of the European Union.

Paris canceled its annual New Year’s Eve fireworks display.

— Julien De Rosa / AFP – Getty Images

Australia

A girl watches the family fireworks with her mother at Alexandra Garden during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Melbourne.

— Diego Fedele / Getty Images

Philippines

Fireworks explode over Quezon Memorial Circle in Metro Manila, Philippines. Large celebrations to ring in the new year were staged in Metro Manila despite Covid cases surging over the Christmas week.

— Ezra Acayan / Getty Images

Taiwan

Fireworks light up the Taipei skyline.

— Gene Wang / Getty Images

Sydney

Fireworks light up the sky over Sydney Harbor as the clock strikes midnight.

— Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nbcnews.com/slideshow/hello-2022-muted-celebrations-ring-new-year-around-world-n1286814

 

AXIOS AM:

  Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> Jan 1, 2022

  1. Great photos of 2021: My wish for your New Year’s mood

Photo: Stefano Mazzola/Awakening/Getty Images

This violin-shaped boat — “Violin of Noah,” built during the pandemic — paraded in Venice, Italy, in September with a string quartet aboard.

Why it matters: The zen of the standing instrumentalists, the glee of the spectators, the whimsy of the design, the supportive fleet — all captured a joyful resilience that I pray propels you into ’22.

  1. COVID New Year II

Photo: Kiichiro Sato/AP

Despite COVID cutbacks around the globe, including this one in Tokyo …

Photo: Craig Ruttle/AP

… Times Square still put on a show, with about 15,000 revelers — about a quarter of the usual 58,000.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/ Getty Images

Above, a sanitation worker takes on his first job of ’22.

  1. New York’s new Hizzoner

Photo: Ben Hider/Invision/AP

Eric Adams holds a framed photo of his mother at his swearing-in as New York mayor during the Times Square New Year’s celebration.

  • Adams made no remarksbut told Ryan Seacrest on “Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve”: “We’re ready for a major comeback because this is New York.”

AXIOS PM: by Mike Allen ·Dec 31, 2021

  1. Parting shots: Ball drop, behind the scenes

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

With his inauguration postponed due to COVID, Eric Adams will be sworn in as New York mayor in Times Square in the wee hours, shortly after the midnight ball drop.

Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Fun facts: The ball is actually a geodesic sphere — 12 feet in diameter, and weighs 11,875 pounds (6 tons), according to a Times Square fact sheet.

  • 2,688 Waterford Crystal triangles are bolted to 672 LED modules, attached to the aluminum frame.

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

The New York Time: The Morning, December 31, 2021

   
By Ian Prasad Philbrick

Good morning. We wish you a happy and healthy 2022. Below, a look at some unusual New Year’s Eves.

Ringing in 1973 in Times Square.Michael Evans/The New York Times

New Year’s Eve

David Carr, the late Times columnist and media critic, starred in videos years ago that were shot in Times Square. At the end of them, he cheerily said: “They call it Times Square for a reason.”
Carr’s point was that many people don’t know that the square is named for the newspaper. New York City changed the name from Longacre Square in 1904, in honor of The Times moving its offices there.
Adolph Ochs, who was the publisher of The Times at the time, celebrated the move by staging a New Year’s Eve fireworks display in the square. He organized the first midnight ball drop three years later, a tradition that continues even though The Times no longer occupies the building at the center of the square.
This year’s celebrations will be muted as coronavirus cases surge. Attendance will be limited to 15,000 people instead of the usual 58,000. Paris, Los Angeles and other cities are also downsizing their celebrations.
Today, we’re looking back. We focused on past New Year’s events that resonated in this unusual year.

The Times’s first New Year’s: The newspaper, founded in September 1851, covered its first New Year’s Eve less than four months later. It advertised religious ceremonies “appropriate to the close of the year” and stores selling New Year’s presents. On Jan. 1, the paper listed the past year’s notable deaths and “principal events,” including a gale that struck Massachusetts, a world’s fair in London and a coup in France.

The Civil War: On Dec. 30, 1862, Union troops near Murfreesboro, Tenn., played “Yankee Doodle” and “Hail Columbia.” Their Confederate foes answered with “Dixie,” and the two sides ended the night playing “Home, Sweet Home” together. The battle that followed, fought between New Year’s Eve and Jan. 2, 1863, was among the war’s deadliest.

Also on New Year’s Eve 1862, abolitionists held vigils as they waited for President Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. He did so the next day, freeing enslaved people in the states that had seceded from the Union. The vigils became the origin of the New Year’s Eve services that some African American churches still hold.

World War I: America entered World War I in 1917, and Times Square on New Year’s Eve that year was “thoroughly sedate and solemn,” The Times reported. Soldiers and sailors, forbidden to drink, sat in restaurants and hotels. Sugar was rationed, and dinner at the Waldorf Astoria was meatless. Broadway, “ankle-deep in confetti” a year before, was “gloomy, deserted and silent.”

Flu pandemic: New Year’s Eve 1918 also took place during a pandemic. A brutal fall and winter wave had killed tens of thousands of Americans. By Dec. 31, some cities had loosened their public health measures, inviting a more joyous holiday. “Hotels and clubs and other places where revelers congregate to greet the new year are overdoing themselves in the way of entertainment,” The Chicago Daily News reported.

And an image that may resonate in 2021: At a Milwaukee hotel ball, dancers wore masks as prescribed by the health department.
World War II: New Year’s Eve 1941 — less than a month after the U.S. joined World War II — found Times Square upbeat and patriotic. More than half a million people cheered and sang the national anthem under Broadway’s neon lights. “If Axis ears did not hear last night’s revelry in Times Square it was not that New Yorkers didn’t try,” The Times reported the next day.

Still, the square featured a robust police presence, street signs with evacuation instructions and loudspeakers in the event of an air raid. And later wartime holidays were less festive. Because of the “dim outs” meant to conceal the city from a possible attack, 1942 and 1943 were the only New Year’s Eves since 1907 that did not feature Times Square ball drops.

Transition to television: Today, most people experience New Year’s Eve in Times Square as a television show with musical interludes. The Canadian-born musician Guy Lombardo and his band, the Royal Canadians, were early pioneers. They broadcast over the radio starting in the 1920s and, in later decades, on television, an example Dick Clark, Carson Daly and others built on. This year, too, live television will be flush with celebrity-driven countdowns. If you’ll be ringing in the New Year from home, here’s what to watch.

Related:
·         Eric Adams postponed his indoor inauguration ceremony, and will instead be sworn in as New York City’s mayor after midnight in Times Square.

·         Follow along as the world enters 2022.

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Sydney, Australia puts on spectacular fireworks show

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Once again Sydney, Australia went all out with their famous fireworks show over the harbour and Opera House, ringing New Year’s 2022 with music, lights and a full display for over 8 minutes after midnight. For the second year in a row, crowds around Sydney harbour were limited in an effort to keep them safe amid COVID-19. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

#GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE

New Year’s 2022: Hong Kong skyline lights up with fireworks as orchestra performs

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Hong Kong rings in the New Year with a light show and fireworks, a countdown display on a 65.8-metre-tall LED facade, and to the classical music from a live orchestra performance. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

 

#GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Bangkok, Thailand ushers in New Year with stunning fireworks display

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Thailand ushered in the New Year with a 6-minute long fireworks display, spanning across the Chao Phraya River bend in Bangkok. Here’s just one of the raw angles from the show. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global Nws on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews

New Year’s 2022: Dubai puts on dazzling fireworks, laser show at Burj Khalifa

Dec 31, 2021  Global News

Dubai, United Arab Emirates welcomed the new year with a mesmerizing display of fireworks from the world’s tallest building, the iconic Burj Khalifa. For more info, please go to https://globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #NEWYEARS2022 #NYE #NewYearsEve

[4K] 2022 New Year Fireworks in 5th Ave. BGC Philippines

Dec 31, 2021  Slow Walks

Happy new year everyone! Thank you for supporting my Youtube channel in 2021. Wishing you health, wealth, and happiness in the New Year ahead. 00:00 Fireworks shots from IP 12 Pro Max 17:16 Fireworks shots from Osmo Pocket 2 – Walk with me and enjoy the city/nature atmosphere! [no talking, no bgm] – Walking Route Map: http://bit.ly/3qWWlUN Time: Jan, 2022 12AM – Camera Setting: 4K 60fps – Feel free to comment which place that you like me to walk next 🙂 SUPPORT ME: – Patreon : https://www.patreon.com/slowwalks – Buy me a coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/slowwalks or Click “Join” or https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7GC… at my youtube home page to support me with just 1usd/month Thanks and enjoy the video! FOLLOW ME: – Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/slow_walks/

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Subscribe and ? to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube ? https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Big Ben rings in the new year. New Year’s Eve 2022 | BBC #BBC #BBCiPlayer #NewYearsEve #HappyNewYear2022 #2022 #Fireworks All our TV channels and S4C are available to watch live through BBC iPlayer, although some programmes may not be available to stream online due to rights. If you would like to read more on what types of programmes are available to watch live, check the ‘Are all programmes that are broadcast available on BBC iPlayer?’ FAQ ? https://bbc.in/2m8ks6v.

Paris FireWorks 2022 countdown celebrations | LIVE WELCOME 2022

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Seattle New Year’s Fireworks And Augmented Reality Show 2022 (Full Show), Jan 1, 2022  Emilio Exploring

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Times Square 2022 Ball Drop in New York City: full video

Jan 1, 2022  News 19 WLTX

Though with a smaller crowd this time, confetti and fireworks still popped at midnight to ring in another year from the heart of New York City’s Times Square.

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Countdown to 2022 from all over the world

Jan 1, 2022  ABC News

Highlights from New Year’s Eve celebrations around the globe. Watch Brazil’s dazzling firework show by the water to bring in 2022. WATCH the ABC News Livestream: https://bit.ly/3rzBHum SUBSCRIBE to ABC News: https://bit.ly/2vZb6yP WATCH MORE on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc #HappyNewYear #Fireworks #NewYearsEve #World #Countdown #2022

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Happy New Year: Watch How The World Rang In 2022

Jan 1, 2022  NBC News

From Australia to New York City, onlookers around the globe gathered to celebrate the New Year with fireworks and dazzling light shows. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NYE #Fireworks #NewYear

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LIVE: New Years Fireworks Around the World ? Happy New Year 2022 ? New Years Eve Fireworks Show

Started streaming 5 hours ago, 12.31.2021  Revive Music

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Month in Review, NASA’s JPL, November 2021 Skywatching, The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Triumph at Saturn, PBS new and NBC News

Month in Review, NASA’s JPL, November 2021 Skywatching, The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Triumph at Saturn, PBS new and NBC News

JPL News – Month in Review, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Tuesday, November 2, 2021

What’s Up: November 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA

The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos, Nov 17, 2021

How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts, Nov 15, 2021

NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere, Oct 28, 2021

Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Nov. 19 & 20, 2021

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Nov. 19 & 20, 2021

 

JPL News – Month in Review

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory <jplnewsroom@jpl.nasa.gov> 

Tuesday, November 2, 2021

 

 

MONTH IN REVIEW

 

 

What’s Up – November 2021
Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies.
› Watch now

NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere
NASA’s Jovian orbiter lends deeper understanding of what happens below the gas giant’s striking clouds.
› Read the full story

Getting NASA Data to the Ground With Lasers
Two optical ground stations, including one managed by JPL, will support NASA’s Laser Communications Relay Demonstration mission when it launches this fall.
› Read the full story

How to Find Hidden Oceans on Distant Worlds? Use Chemistry
A new study shows how the chemicals in an exoplanet’s atmosphere can, in some cases, reveal whether or not the temperature on its surface is too hot for liquid water.
› Read the full story

NASA 3502527

Upgrading the Space Station’s Cold Atom Lab With Mixed Reality
NASA is looking into whether mixed reality technology could help with repairs and upgrades on the cutting-edge Cold Atom Lab aboard the space station.
› Read the full story

You Can Help Train NASA’s Rovers to Better Explore Mars
Members of the public can now help teach an artificial intelligence algorithm to recognize scientific features in images taken by NASA’s Perseverance rover.
› Read the full story

A ‘Monster’ Star-Forming Region Spied by NASA’s Spitzer
Just like clouds on Earth, clouds of gas and dust in space can sometimes resemble familiar objects, or even popular movie creatures.
› Read the full story

‘Roving With Perseverance’: NASA Mars Rover and Helicopter Models on Tour
Catch Mars mania as a traveling exhibit visits more than a dozen towns across the U.S. with lifelike models of NASA’s Perseverance rover and Ingenuity helicopter.
› Read the full story

NEID Spectrometer Lights Up Path to Exoplanet Exploration
A new NASA instrument will look for planets by detecting subtle wobbles from their parent stars. To prepare, it will study the Sun.
› Read the full story

Hear Sounds From Mars Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover
Two microphones aboard the six-wheeled spacecraft add a new dimension to the way scientists and engineers explore the Red Planet.
› Read the full story

Online Film Premiere: ‘Triumph at Saturn’ (Part I)
Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.
› Read the full story

My Favorite Martian Image: the Ridges of ‘South Séítah’
NASA’s Perseverance rover captures a geologic feature with details that offer clues to the area’s mysterious past.
› Read the full story

NASA Leadership Visits JPL, Discusses Climate Change and Mars
NASA Administrator Bill Nelson and Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy met with elected officials about Earth science and visited mission control for the Perseverance Mars rover.
› Read the full story

NASA Turns to the Cloud for Help With Next-Generation Earth Missions
As satellites collect larger and larger amounts of data, engineers and researchers are implementing solutions to manage these huge increases.
› Read the full story

With First Martian Samples Packed, Perseverance Initiates Remarkable Sample Return Mission
NASA, along with the European Space Agency, is developing a campaign to return the Martian samples to Earth.
› Read the full story

Icy ‘Glue’ May Control Pace of Antarctic Ice-Shelf Breakup
As the ice-and-snow rubble known as mélange melts in Antarctica’s ice shelves, rifts can grow and icebergs break off even in the brutal cold of winter.
› Read the full story

NASA’s Perseverance Sheds More Light on Jezero Crater’s Watery Past
Pictures from NASA’s latest six-wheeler on the Red Planet suggest the area’s history experienced significant flooding events.
› Read the full story

Working Overtime: NASA’s Deep Space Atomic Clock Completes Mission
Geared toward improving spacecraft navigation, the technology demonstration operated far longer than planned and broke the stability record for atomic clocks in space.
› Read the full story

Science of Psyche: Unique Asteroid Holds Clues to Early Solar System
Set to launch next year, NASA’s Psyche mission marks the first time the agency has set out to explore an asteroid richer in metal than rock or ice.
› Read the full story

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What’s Up: November 2021 Skywatching Tips from NASA

Nov 2, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

What are some skywatching highlights in November 2021? Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies. In particular, note that several destinations of NASA’s Lucy mission are located near the Pleiades. Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What’s Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/whats-up….

Enjoy the Moon and planets after sunset all month, plus a lunar eclipse! A partial lunar eclipse will be visible to much of the world on Nov. 18 and 19. Also, the familiar stars of Northern Hemisphere winter (or Southern summer) are returning to late night skies. In particular, note that several destinations of NASA’s Lucy mission are located near the Pleiades.

Transcript:

What’s Up for November? Sunset planets, a partial lunar eclipse, and the return of the winter stars.

From November 6th through the 11th, watch the Moon glide past Venus, Saturn, and Jupiter after sunset in the south/southwest. In particular, if you step outside for a look on November 7th, you’ll find the four-day-old crescent Moon just about 2 degrees away from Venus. Should be really pretty, so don’t miss it.

And from now through early December, you’ll find Jupiter and Saturn drawing a little closer to Venus each night.

A partial lunar eclipse is on the way, taking place overnight on November 18th and 19th, when the Moon slips into Earth’s shadow for a couple of hours. Weather permitting, the eclipse will be visible from any location where the Moon appears above the horizon during the eclipse. Depending on your time zone, it’ll occur earlier or later in the evening for you.

Now that’s a huge swath of the planet that’ll be able to see at least part of the eclipse, including North and South America, Eastern Asia, Australia and the Pacific Region. So check the timing of its visibility for your area.

For U.S. East Coast observers, the partial eclipse begins a little after 2 a.m., reaching its maximum at 4 in the morning. For observers on the West Coast, that translates to beginning just after 11 p.m., with a maximum at 1 a.m.

Partial lunar eclipses might not be quite as spectacular as total lunar eclipses – where the Moon is completely covered in Earth’s shadow – but they occur more frequently.

And that just means more opportunities to witness little changes in our solar system that sometimes occur right before our eyes.

All month long, if you’re up late and cast your gaze toward the east, you’ll notice some familiar companions have begun rising late in the night. The familiar stars of Northern winter skies are returning, rising late at night and sitting high in the south by dawn.

You’ll find the Pleiades star cluster leading the constellations Taurus the bull and the hunter Orion, followed by the brightest star in the sky, Sirius – all of them back to keep us company on the long winter nights here in the Northern Hemisphere. (And for those in the Southern Hemisphere, they’re keeping you company on shorter nights as spring gives way to summer there.)

A fun note about the Pleiades this month is that several of the 8 asteroids to be visited by NASA’s Lucy mission are located in that part of the sky. The Lucy spacecraft launched on Oct. 16th on its 12-year mission to visit a bunch of special asteroids called the Trojans. They share the orbit of Jupiter, with a group of them leading the planet, and another group following behind it.

Lucy will be the first space mission to explore this unique group of asteroids, providing new insights about the formation and early history of our solar system.

Here are the phases of the Moon for November. You can catch up on all of NASA’s missions to explore the solar system and beyond at nasa.gov. I’m Preston Dyches from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and that’s What’s Up for this month.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzeK4TcOSPU

The Orbit of Asteroid Didymos

Nov 17, 2021

CONTEXT IMAGE

This diagram shows the orbit of binary asteroid Didymos around the Sun. Didymos consists of a large, nearly half-mile-wide (780-meter-wide) asteroid orbited by a smaller, 525-foot-wide (160-meter-wide) asteroid, or moonlet. Didymos’ orbital path around the Sun is shown as the thin white ellipse and Earth’s orbit is the thick white line. In the background are the orbits for 2,200 other known potentially hazardous asteroids.

A potentially hazardous asteroid is classified as an asteroid wider than about 460 feet (140 meters) with an orbit that brings it within 5 million miles (8 million kilometers) of Earth’s orbit.

Didymos’ smaller asteroid is the target of NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) mission. The DART spacecraft is a kinetic impactor designed to collide with the moonlet to see how its orbit around the larger asteroid will be changed by the impact. The outcome of this mission will help NASA determine whether the method could be used to modify the trajectory of an asteroid should one threaten Earth in the future. Didymos is not a danger to our planet.

This orbital diagram was produced by the Center for Near Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), which is managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California. CNEOS characterizes every known near-Earth asteroid (NEA) orbit to improve long-term impact hazard assessments in support of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO).

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/the-orbit-of-asteroid-didymos

How NASA’s Curiosity Rover Is Making Mars Safer for Astronauts

Nov 15, 2021

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its Mast Camera, or Mastcam, to capture this image of an outcrop with finely layered rocks within the “Murray Buttes” region on lower Mount Sharp on Sept. 8, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS Full Image Details

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used its Mars Hand Lens Imager, or MAHLI, to take this selfie at the “Quela” drilling location in the “Murray Buttes” area on lower Mount Sharp between Sept. 17 and 18, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS Full Image Details

This pit crater was created by an empty lava tube in Mars’ Arsia Mons region. The image was captured by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Aug. 16, 2020.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

A radiation sensor aboard the spacecraft is providing new data on the health risks humans would face on the surface.

Could lava tubes, caves, or subsurface habitats offer safe refuge for future astronauts on Mars? Scientists with NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover team are helping explore questions like that with the Radiation Assessment Detector, or RAD.

Unlike Earth, Mars doesn’t have a magnetic field to shield it from the high-energy particles whizzing around in space. That radiation can wreak havoc on human health, and it can seriously compromise the life support systems that Mars astronauts will depend on, as well.

Based on data from Curiosity’s RAD, researchers are finding that using natural materials such as the rock and sediment on Mars could offer some protection from this ever-present space radiation. In a paper published this summer in JGR Planets, they detailed how Curiosity remained parked against a cliff at a location called “Murray Buttes” from Sept. 9 to 21, 2016.

While there, RAD measured a 4% decrease in overall radiation. More significantly, the instrument detected a 7.5% decrease in neutral particle radiation, including neutrons that can penetrate rock and are especially harmful to human health. These numbers are statistically high enough to show it was due to Curiosity’s location at the foot of the cliff rather than normal changes in the background radiation.

“We’ve been waiting a long time for the right conditions to get these results, which are critical to ensure the accuracy of our computer models,” said Bent Ehresmann of the Southwest Research Institute, lead author of the recent paper. “At Murray Buttes, we finally had these conditions and the data to analyze this effect. We’re now looking for other locations where RAD can repeat these kinds of measurements.”

How’s the Weather on Mars? (NASA Mars Report) (November 15, 2021)

Nov 15, 2021  NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Seasons change even on Mars and NASA’s fleet of explorers are helping scientists learn more about the effects on the Red Planet. NASA’s Perseverance and Curiosity rovers provide daily weather reports by measuring conditions such as humidity, temperature, and wind speed on the surface. Orbiters including Odyssey, Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) survey the scope and scale of storms from above. Changing weather conditions can be challenging for the spacecraft. The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter recently increased its rotor speed from 2,537 rpm to 2,700 rpm to fly in a thinner summer atmosphere. Meanwhile, NASA’s InSight lander, which is studying Mars’ interior, recently measured one of the biggest, longest-lasting marsquakes the mission has ever detected. For more information on NASA’s Mars missions, visit mars.nasa.gov. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/ASU/MSSS

Seasons change even on Mars and NASA’s fleet of explorers are helping scientists learn more about the effects on the Red Planet.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/ASU/MSSS

A Space Weather Outpost on Mars

Most of the radiation measured by RAD comes from galactic cosmic rays – particles cast out by exploding stars and sent pinballing throughout the universe. This forms a carpet of “background radiation” that can pose health risks for humans.

Far more intense radiation sporadically comes from the Sun in the form of solar storms that throw massive arcs of ionized gas into interplanetary space.

“These structures twist in space, sometimes forming complex croissant-shaped flux tubes larger than Earth, driving shock waves that can efficiently energize particles,” said Jingnan Guo, who led a study, published in September in The Astronomy and Astrophysics Review, analyzing nine years of RAD data while she was at Germany’s Christian Albrecht University.

“Cosmic rays, solar radiation, solar storms – they are all components of space weather, and RAD is effectively a space weather outpost on the surface of Mars,” says Don Hassler of the Southwest Research Institute, principal investigator of the RAD instrument.

Solar storms occur with varying frequency based on 11-year cycles, with certain cycles bearing more frequent and energetic storms than others. Counterintuitively, the periods when solar activity is at its highest may be the safest time for future astronauts on Mars: The increased solar activity shields the Red Planet from cosmic rays by as much as 30 to 50%, compared to periods when solar activity is lower.

“It’s a trade-off,” Guo said. “These high-intensity periods reduce one source of radiation: the omnipresent, high-energy cosmic ray background radiation around Mars. But at the same time, astronauts will have to contend with intermittent, more intense radiation from solar storms.”

“The observations from RAD are key to developing the ability to predict and measure space weather, the Sun’s influence on Earth and other solar system bodies,” said Jim Spann, space weather lead for NASA’s Heliophysics Division. “As NASA plans for eventual human journeys to Mars, RAD serves as an outpost and part of the Heliophysics System Observatory – a fleet of 27 missions that investigates the Sun and its influence on space – whose research supports our understanding of and exploration of space.”

The top of the Radiation Assessment Detector can be seen on the deck of NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

RAD has measured the impact of more than a dozen solar storms to date (five while traveling to Mars in 2012), although these past nine years have marked an especially weak period of solar activity.

Scientists are just now starting to see activity pick up as the Sun comes out of its slumber and becomes more active. In fact, RAD observed evidence of the first X-class flare of the new solar cycle on Oct. 28, 2021. X-class flares are the most intense category of solar flares, the largest of which can lead to power outages and communications blackouts on Earth.

“This is an exciting time for us, because one of the important objectives of RAD is to characterize the extremes of space weather. Events such as solar flares and storms are one type of space weather that happens most frequently during increased solar activity – the time we are approaching now,” Ehresmann said. More observations are needed to assess just how dangerous a really powerful solar storm would be to humans on the Martian surface.

RAD’s findings will feed into a much larger body of data being compiled for future crewed missions. In fact, NASA even equipped Curiosity’s counterpart, the Perseverance rover, with samples of spacesuit materials to assess how they hold up to radiation over time.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/how-nasas-curiosity-rover-is-making-mars-safer-for-astronauts

For more information:

https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/home/

and

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Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-2433

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NASA Headquarters, Washington

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karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

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NASA’s Juno: Science Results Offer First 3D View of Jupiter Atmosphere

Oct 28, 2021

NASA’s Jovian orbiter lends deeper understanding of what happens below the gas giant’s striking clouds.

The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures a Jovian cyclone known as a barge type in polar jet stream called “Jet N4.”

Credit: Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS. Image processing: Gerald Eichstädt CC BY

New findings from NASA’s Juno probe orbiting Jupiter provide a fuller picture of how the planet’s distinctive and colorful atmospheric features offer clues about the unseen processes below its clouds. The results highlight the inner workings of the belts and zones of clouds encircling Jupiter, as well as its polar cyclones and even the Great Red Spot.

Researchers published several papers on Juno’s atmospheric discoveries today in the journal Science and the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. Additional papers appeared in two recent issues of Geophysical Research Letters.

“These new observations from Juno open up a treasure chest of new information about Jupiter’s enigmatic observable features,” said Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s planetary science division at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “Each paper sheds light on different aspects of the planet’s atmospheric processes – a wonderful example of how our internationally-diverse science teams strengthen understanding of our solar system.”

Juno entered Jupiter’s orbit in 2016. During each of the spacecraft’s 37 passes of the planet to date, a specialized suite of instruments has peered below its turbulent cloud deck.

“Previously, Juno surprised us with hints that phenomena in Jupiter’s atmosphere went deeper than expected,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio and lead author of the Science journal paper on the depth of Jupiter’s vortices. “Now, we’re starting to put all these individual pieces together and getting our first real understanding of how Jupiter’s beautiful and violent atmosphere works – in 3D.”

Juno’s microwave radiometer (MWR) allows mission scientists to peer beneath Jupiter’s cloud tops and probe the structure of its numerous vortex storms. The most famous of these storms is the iconic anticyclone known as the Great Red Spot. Wider than Earth, this crimson vortex has intrigued scientists since its discovery almost two centuries ago.

The new results show that the cyclones are warmer on top, with lower atmospheric densities, while they are colder at the bottom, with higher densities. Anticyclones, which rotate in the opposite direction, are colder at the top but warmer at the bottom.

The findings also indicate these storms are far taller than expected, with some extending 60 miles (100 kilometers) below the cloud tops and others, including the Great Red Spot, extending over 200 miles (350 kilometers). This surprise discovery demonstrates that the vortices cover regions beyond those where water condenses and clouds form, below the depth where sunlight warms the atmosphere.

Jupiter’s banded appearance is created by the cloud-forming weather layer. This composite image shows views of Jupiter in infrared and visible light taken by the Gemini North telescope and NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

Credit: International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/NASA/ESA, M.H. Wong and I. de Pater (UC Berkeley) et al.

Full Image Details

This illustration combines an image of Jupiter from the JunoCam instrument aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft with a composite image of Earth to depict the size and depth of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot.

Credit: JunoCam Image data: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSSJunoCam Image processing by Kevin M. Gill (CC BY)Earth Image: NASA

Full Image Details

Data collected by the JunoCam imager and microwave radiometer from a flyover of the Great Red Spot on July 11, 2017 provides a glimpse of the inner-workings of Jupiter’s most iconic anticyclone.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS Image processing: Kevin Gill CC BY

During a flyby of Jupiter in July 2019, mission scientists conducted an experiment measuring minute velocity changes in the Juno spacecraft as a result in the gravity field near the Great Red Spot.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI

Full Image Details

The height and size of the Great Red Spot means the concentration of atmospheric mass within the storm potentially could be detectable by instruments studying Jupiter’s gravity field. Two close Juno flybys over Jupiter’s most famous spot provided the opportunity to search for the storm’s gravity signature and complement the MWR results on its depth.

With Juno traveling low over Jupiter’s cloud deck at about 130,000 mph (209,000 kph) Juno scientists were able to measure velocity changes as small 0.01 millimeter per second using a NASA Deep Space Network tracking antenna, from a distance of more than 400 million miles (650 million kilometers). This enabled the team to constrain the depth of the Great Red Spot to about 300 miles (500 kilometers) below the cloud tops.

“The precision required to get the Great Red Spot’s gravity during the July 2019 flyby is staggering,” said Marzia Parisi, a Juno scientist from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and lead author of a paper in the journal Science on gravity overflights of the Great Red Spot. “Being able to complement MWR’s finding on the depth gives us great confidence that future gravity experiments at Jupiter will yield equally intriguing results.”

Belts and Zones

In addition to cyclones and anticyclones, Jupiter is known for its distinctive belts and zones – white and reddish bands of clouds that wrap around the planet. Strong east-west winds moving in opposite directions separate the bands. Juno previously discovered that these winds, or jet streams, reach depths of about 2,000 miles (roughly 3,200 kilometers). Researchers are still trying to solve the mystery of how the jet streams form. Data collected by Juno’s MWR during multiple passes reveal one possible clue: that the atmosphere’s ammonia gas travels up and down in remarkable alignment with the observed jet streams.

“By following the ammonia, we found circulation cells in both the north and south hemispheres that are similar in nature to ‘Ferrel cells,’ which control much of our climate here on Earth,” said Keren Duer, a graduate student from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and lead author of the Science journal paper on Ferrel-like cells on Jupiter. “While Earth has one Ferrel cell per hemisphere, Jupiter has eight – each at least 30 times larger.”

Juno’s MWR data also shows that the belts and zones undergo a transition around 40 miles (65 kilometers) beneath Jupiter’s water clouds. At shallow depths, Jupiter’s belts are brighter in microwave light than the neighboring zones. But at deeper levels, below the water clouds, the opposite is true – which reveals a similarity to our oceans.

“We are calling this level the ‘Jovicline’ in analogy to a transitional layer seen in Earth’s oceans, known as the thermocline – where seawater transitions sharply from being relative warm to relative cold,” said Leigh Fletcher, a Juno participating scientist from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom and lead author of the paper in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets highlighting Juno’s microwave observations of Jupiter’s temperate belts and zones.

Polar Cyclones

Juno previously discovered polygonal arrangements of giant cyclonic storms at both of Jupiter’s poles – eight arranged in an octagonal pattern in the north and five arranged in a pentagonal pattern in the south. Now, five years later, mission scientists using observations by the spacecraft’s Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) have determined these atmospheric phenomena are extremely resilient, remaining in the same location.

“Jupiter’s cyclones affect each other’s motion, causing them to oscillate about an equilibrium position,” said Alessandro Mura, a Juno co-investigator at the National Institute for Astrophysics in Rome and lead author of a recent paper in Geophysical Research Letters on oscillations and stability in Jupiter’s polar cyclones. “The behavior of these slow oscillations suggests that they have deep roots.”

JIRAM data also indicates that, like hurricanes on Earth, these cyclones want to move poleward, but cyclones located at the center of each pole push them back. This balance explains where the cyclones reside and the different numbers at each pole.

More About the Mission

JPL, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission. Juno is part of NASA’s New Frontiers Program, which is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Lockheed Martin Space in Denver built and operates the spacecraft.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-juno-science-results-offer-first-3d-view-of-jupiter-atmosphere?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211102-19

Follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter, and get more information about Juno online at:

https://www.nasa.gov/juno

Ride With Juno Past the Solar System’s Biggest Moon

NASA’s Juno Mission Expands Into the Future

The Dark Origins of One of Jupiter’s Grand Light Shows

News Media Contact

Karen Fox / Alana Johnson

NASA Headquarters, Washington

301-286-6284 / 202-358-1501

karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov

DC Agle

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-9011

agle@jpl.nasa.gov

Deb Schmid

Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

210-522-2254

dschmid@swri.org

2021-220

Catch the premiere of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory documentary “Triumph at Saturn” on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT online at JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels.

The latest in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory series of historical documentaries, “Triumph at Saturn” chronicles the story of NASA’s Cassini mission. Part I of this two-part story will premiere on JPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels on Oct. 15 at 3 p.m. PDT; part II will premiere there at the same time on Oct. 22.

These films use rare archival footage and interviews with pioneering engineers and scientists in retelling the story of humanity’s first steps into the cosmos. The films go with 12 others in the series “JPL and the Space Age,” which documents everything from JPL’s origins to the Voyager spacecraft to the Mars Pathfinder mission and beyond. Each episode of was written, produced, and directed by JPL Fellow Blaine Baggett.

The full “Triumph at Saturn” film is planned to be available on this webpage in the near future.

Caltech, in Pasadena, California, manages JPL for NASA.

For more information, please visit the following link

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/online-film-premiere-triumph-at-saturn-part-i?utm_source=iContact&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nasajpl&utm_content=monthly20211102-19

News Media Contact

Gretchen McCartney

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

818-393-6215

gretchen.p.mccartney@jpl.nasa.gov

Triumph at Saturn (Part I)

Premiered Oct 15, 2021   NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Chronicling the story of NASA’s Cassini mission, this is the latest in our series of documentaries, “JPL and the Space Age.” These films use rare archival footage and interviews with pioneering engineers and scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in retelling the stories of many of humanity’s first steps into the cosmos. Part I of this two-part story will premiere here on Oct. 15, 2021 at 3 p.m. Pacific time; part II will premiere here at the same time on Oct. 22: https://youtu.be/oGsajLIALJE. Other films in this series are available for viewing at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/who-we-are/d…. “Triumph at Saturn” is planned to be added to this collection in the near future.

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Nov. 19, 2021

Nov 19, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Kyle Rittenhouse is cleared on all charges in a case that sparked national debate over racial injustice, guns and self-defense. Then, the U.S. House of Representatives passes the president’s priority Build Back Better bill, sending it on to the Senate. And, why those who were wrongfully convicted still face great struggles when adjusting to their post-prison life. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Does the Rittenhouse acquittal set a precedent? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXC56… News Wrap: ‘Unite the Right’ trial jurors begin deliberating https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awcXo… Child care, climate change and more in Build Back Better Act https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiQR-… Here’s what you need to know about COVID boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzGm-… How the exonerated struggle to heal from ‘wounds’ of prison https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umJdh… Capehart and Abernathy on Rittenhouse trial, Dem social bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2TKH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend, Full Episode November 20, 2021

Nov 20, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 20th, protests, celebration, and talk of reform after Kyle Rittenhouse was found not guilty on all five charges, new pressure to protect frontline communities from oil and gas drilling in California, and, ‘if at first you don’t succeed’—lessons learned at the Museum of Failure. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

#NightlyNews #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

Nightly News Full Broadcast – Nov. 19, 2021

Nov 19, 2021  NBC News

Kyle Rittenhouse acquitted on all charges in homicide trial, FDA and CDC authorize 3rd Pfizer, Moderna Covid shots for all adults, and airlines under pressure as millions expected to travel for Thanksgiving. 00:00 Intro 02:08 Kyle Rittenhouse Not Guilty 05:14 Vaccine Boosters For All 07:40 Holiday Travel Trouble 10:53 House Passes Biden Plan 13:56 Charlottesville Jury Deliberations 16:12 The Cost Of Care: Caregiving Financial Toll » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

Nightly News Full Broadcast – November 20th

Nov 20, 2021  NBC News

Chaos erupts at Atlanta Airport amidst Thanksgiving travel, Protests across the U.S. over Kyle Rittenhouse trial verdict, and CDC greenlights Covid boosters for all adults. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #AtlantaAirport #KyleRittenhouse #BoosterShots

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Climate awareness: Artist creates city mural from Amazon ashes, by FRENCH PRESS AGENCY, Ruptly, TEDCountdown-Climate Change, TED,  PBS News, NBC News,  

Climate awareness: Artist creates city mural from Amazon ashes, by FRENCH PRESS AGENCY, Ruptly, TEDCountdown-Climate Change, TED,  PBS News, NBC News,  

Climate awareness: Artist creates city mural from Amazon ashes, by FRENCH PRESS AGENCY

Brazil: Artist creates mural with ashes from Amazon fires, Oct 17, 2021,  Ruptly

#TEDCountdown: [Replay] Watch the 2021 TED Countdown Global Livestream

TED: The global movement to restore nature’s biodiversity

TED: Jean Francois Bastin What if there were 1 trillion more trees?

TED: Melati Wijsen A roadmap for young changemakers?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 22, 24, 25, 29 and 30 2021

As high temperatures hurt Sicily’s food production, rising sea levels threaten housing, Sep 21, 2021  PBS NewsHour

NBC News: Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 29th& 30th

Climate awareness: Artist creates city mural from Amazon ashes

BY FRENCH PRESS AGENCY – AFP

 SAO PAULO ENVIRONMENT 

OCT 19, 2021 10:03 AM GMT+3

An aerial photo shows a mural by Brazilian artist and activist Mundano, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Oct. 15, 2021. (EPA Photo)

To raise awareness of climate change, Brazilian street artist Mundano painted a giant mural in Sao Paulo using ashes collected from the scorched Amazon rainforest.

The giant 1,000-square meter fresco titled “The Forest Firefighter” – featuring a heroic figure who is helpless in the face of a raging fire – will be inaugurated on Tuesday.

“The idea came from impotence. We’ve been seeing for decades how the jungle has been burnt, and in the last few years that has reached record levels,” Mundano, who goes by one name and calls himself an “artivist,” told Agence France-Presse (AFP).

Mundano, 36, collected 200 kilograms (441 pounds) of ashes from different areas affected by fires to create the mural on a building close to Avenida Paulista, the main avenue running through Brazil’s largest city.

The ashes came from the Amazon jungle, the Pantanal wetlands, the Atlantic Forest and the Cerrado savannah.

Bringing ‘ashes to the people’

Mundano hopes his mural will raise awareness among Sao Paulo residents about the vast fires that ravage Brazil’s precious ecosphere every year.

“No one sees the fires, they’re very far away in the Amazon. The idea is to bring the ashes here to the people to create greater empathy,” said Mundano.

In June and July, Mundano felt the heat of the fires firsthand when he went to collect the ashes.

But what also caught his attention was the distress of the firefighters trying to extinguish the flames that do so much damage to Brazil’s flora and fauna.

Symbolizing the fauna in the mural is a crocodile skeleton painted next to the heroic firefighter.

The entire fresco is made in various shades of black and grey depending on how much water Mundano mixed in with the ashes.

The black and white artwork contrasts sharply with the colorful graffiti that adorns many buildings in Sao Paulo.

“We live in a city that is grey, or asphalt and grey. The pavement is grey, there’s pollution … and we’re becoming grey too.”

‘Negligent’

A graffiti artist during his teenage years, Mundano made a name for himself in 2012 by decorating the carts of the city’s recyclable materials collectors with bright colors and signs that read “My vehicle doesn’t pollute.”

In 2020, Mundano painted another giant mural using toxic mud from the Brumadinho dam that collapsed in 2019 leaving 270 people dead.

His current mural is a statement denouncing Brazil’s successive governments that Mundano calls “negligent” and incapable of protecting the environment.

Things only got worse under far-right President Jair Bolsonaro.

Since he took office in 2019, an average of 10,000 square kilometers (3861 square miles) of Amazon forest has been destroyed per year, compared to 6,500 square kilometers over the previous decade.

The fires that follow deforestation to prepare the land for agriculture and livestock farming have also reached alarming levels.

“The current government is promoting the dismantling of the environment and trampling on the basic rights of vulnerable populations” such as indigenous people, said Mundano.

His mural is based on a famous painting by Brazilian artist Candido Portinari titled “The Coffee Farmer.”

Like the 1934 painting, Mundano’s fresco shows a Black man with his face turned to the side and vegetation in the background.

Mundano used a real person to model for his painting, a volunteer fire fighter named Vinicius Curva de Vento, whom the artist saw battle the flames.

But while Portinari’s farmer wields a spade to dig the ground, the forest firefighter uses his shovel to smother the flames.

And the luxurious vegetation in Portinari’s painting contrasts with the mural’s scorched landscape that includes trucks piled high with felled tree trunks.

LAST UPDATE: OCT 19, 2021 11:34 AM

CLIMATE CHANGE

 CLIMATE CRISIS

 AMAZON RAINFOREST

BRAZIL

MUNDANO

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.dailysabah.com/life/environment/climate-awareness-artist-creates-city-mural-from-amazon-ashes

A mural by Brazilian artist and activist Mundano, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Oct. 15, 2021.

Brazilian artist and activist Mundano, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Oct. 15, 2021.

A mural by Brazilian artist and activist Mundano, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Oct. 15, 2021.

Brazil: Artist creates mural with ashes from Amazon fires

Oct 17, 2021  Ruptly

Subscribe to our channel! rupt.ly/subscribe The artist Mundano had created a mural from the ashes of burnt trees in the Amazon rainforest on a house facade in Sao Paulo, as seen on Saturday. The 1,000-square-metre (10,000 sq ft) mural showed a firefighter standing amidst deforestation, fires and dead animals, symbolising the more than 28,060 fires in the Amazon region. Mundano said he had travelled more than 10,000 kilometres through Brazil between June and July to collect ash from the Amazon rainforest, the Pantanal, the Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest. #Mundano #SaoPaulo #Brazil Video ID: 20211016-035 Video on Demand: https://ruptly.tv/videos/20211016-035 Contact: cd@ruptly.tv Twitter: http://twitter.com/Ruptly Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Ruptly

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode October 24, 2021

Oct 24, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 24 possible,signs of progress for smaller ‘Build Back Better’ bills stalled in Congress, putting the organizers of the deadly 2017 Charlottesville ‘Unite the Right’ rally on trial, and meet your new self – holograms are adding a new dimension to our online world. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

#TEDCountdown

[Replay] Watch the 2021 TED Countdown Global Livestream | Take action on climate change

Streamed live 13 hours ago, 10.30.2021

TED

YouTube Originals presents the TED Countdown Global Livestream, an empowering event laying out a credible and realistic pathway to a net-zero future. Watch now and take action on climate change.

The global movement to restore nature’s biodiversity

Biodiversity is the key to life on Earth and reviving our damaged planet, says ecologist Thomas Crowther. Sharing the inside story of his headline-making research on reforestation, which led to the UN’s viral Trillion Trees Campaign, Crowther introduces Restor: an expansive, informative platform built to enable anyone, anywhere to help restore the biodiversity of Earth’s ecosystems.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Thomas Crowther · Ecosystem ecology professor

In collaboration with vast networks of ecologists around the world, Thomas Crowther works to address the global threats of biodiversity loss and climate change.

Countdown: A global initiative to accelerate solutions to the climate crisis

Learn how you can help cut the world’s emissions in half by 2030, in the race to a zero-carbon world.

Today humanity produces more than 1,400 tons of carbon every minute. To combat climate change, we need to reduce fossil fuel emissions, and draw down excess CO2 to restore the balance of greenhouse gases. Like all plants, trees consume atmospheric carbon through photosynthesis. So what can trees do to help in this fight? Jean-François Bastin digs into the efforts to restore depleted ecosystems. [Directed by Lobster Studio, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Fabrizio Martini].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Jean-François Bastin · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

Become a TED Member

Want to hear more great ideas like this one? Sign up for TED Membership to get exclusive access to captivating conversations, engaging events, and more!

Join Now

Activism is a tough job, especially for young people yearning for immediate change — something climate activist Melati Wijsen has learned over ten years of pushing for environmental protection, starting at age 12 in her home on the island of Bali, Indonesia. How can young changemakers acquire the skills they need and keep from burning out? Wijsen offers three pieces of advice for anybody seeking to make lasting, sustainable progress.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melati Wijsen · Activist, social entrepreneur

Since the age of 12, in her island of Bali and around the world, Melati Wijsen has been a leading voice for change.

MORE RESOURCES

Countdown: A global initiative to accelerate solutions to the climate crisis

Learn how you can help cut the world’s emissions in half by 2030, in the race to a zero-carbon world.

More at countdown.ted.com ?

Countdown Summit | October 2021

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode, October 30, 2021

Oct 30, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 30, President Biden and other world leaders take on tax havens at the G20 summit, Facebook, Inc. changes its name to ‘Meta,’ as revelations from leaked internal documents continue, how flooding from climate change is putting critical infrastructure at risk, and how guaranteed income is changing many lives in Gary, Indiana. Hari Sreenivasan anchors. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 29, 2021

Oct 29, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Joe Biden kicks off an overseas trip, meeting with key world leaders as the fate of his domestic agenda remains uncertain. Then, David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart break down the battle over the president’s spending bill, and growing distrust between Democrats. And, why a vaccine mandate in New York City is generating fierce opposition from its police officers. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Biden reemphasizes alliance with France, meets Pope Francis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkFQm… News Wrap: Key Fed barometer shows inflation at 30-year high https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFPZ1… What classified documents about U.S. war in Afghanistan show https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VObah… Why U.S. police, firefighters are fighting vaccine mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlJZ0… Minneapolis residents split on reducing police role https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHzmB… Brooks and Capehart on Build Back Better, Biden abroad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huQl2… A look at new Netflix series on Kaepernick’s coming of age https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdYXh… TikTok’s ‘devious licks’ trend countered by ‘angelic yields’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsVoz… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 25, 2021

Oct 25, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Joe Biden’s agenda enters a critical week as he pushes his party to reach a spending bill agreement ahead of his upcoming overseas trip. Then, organizers of the Jan. 6 Capitol riot claim they coordinated their efforts with GOP lawmakers and top Trump officials. And, residents of another predominantly Black city in Michigan are exposed to dangerous levels of lead. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: The core unresolved issues holding up Biden spending bills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IPbn… News Wrap: Sudan Prime Minister detained in military coup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7hrh… GOP lawmakers involved in Jan. 6 protest plan, report shows https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqvMe… Ex-U.S. diplomat reflects on exit deal with Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijhgo… Facebook leaders had ‘no appetite’ to combat disinformation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBaHY… Benton Harbor residents fuming over lead water crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBaHY… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden agenda, VA Gov. race https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MorNf… Viral TikTok challenge encourages kids to steal from school https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GCin… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 22, 2021

Oct 22, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the Supreme Court agrees to hear challenges to a restrictive Texas abortion law, which remains in place for now. Then, David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart analyze how cuts to the president’s spending plan impact the bill’s path ahead. And, one of Cuba’s most prolific painters finally gets his due in the United States, decades after the revolution cut his career short. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What to expect from Supreme Court hearing of TX abortion law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkHSC… News Wrap: Pfizer says vaccine 91% effective among kids 5-11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeLnz… What you need to know about mixing and matching COVID shots https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPu6_… Internal DHS documents show migrant abuse at southern border https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7qEU… Brooks and Capehart on voting rights, Build Back Better plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Opdxt… How Mariano Rodríguez’s work honored his Cuban heritage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qdWD… Terence Smith reflects on reporting on U.S. presidents, wars https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mxEJ… Couple dedicate life to breeding San Clemente Island goats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYGGj… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

As high temperatures hurt Sicily’s food production, rising sea levels threaten housing

Sep 21, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Climate change experts in Sicily, Italy are warning that rising sea waters are threatening some of the island’s most crucial heavy industrial plants. They are also forecasting food shortages because crops are being destroyed. The island endured record temperatures this summer. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports from Sicily for NewsHour’s climate change series. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 30th

Oct 30, 2021  NBC News

Alec Baldwin speaks out after ‘Rust’ movie set tragedy, Pfizer begins shipping vaccines for children aged 5-11, and deadline passes for New York City employees to get Covid vaccine. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NightlyNews #AlecBaldwin #CovidVaccine

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 29th

Oct 29, 2021  NBC News

FDA authorizes Pfizer’s Covid vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11, President Biden meets with Pope Francis ahead of G-20 summit, and the armorer speaks out after the fatal shooting on ‘Rust’ movie set. 00:00 Intro 01:23 FDA authorizes vaccines for kids 5-11 04:36 Covid vaccine mandate showdowns 06:55 Biden meets with Pope Francis 09:36 Cuomo investigation latest 10:28 Armorer speaks out on ‘Rust’ movie set 12:13 Queen Elizabeth’s health concerns 12:38 Rising lumber costs adding home renovation delays 14:27 Day of the Dead tradition 16:15 Runner set to make history on 50th anniversary of New York City Marathon » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

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Former Secretary of State Colin Powell Dies from Complications of COVID-19, PBS News, NBC News, New York Time, Academy of Achievement, The Film Archives, Commonwealth Club of California, Colossal, Night life in the Mediterranean Sea and Aquatilis

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell Dies from Complications of COVID-19, PBS News, NBC News, New York Time, Academy of Achievement, The Film Archives, Commonwealth Club of California, Colossal, Night life in the Mediterranean Sea and Aquatilis

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 18, 2021

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 18th, NBC News

The New York Times: Colin Powell’s death highlights the continuing Covid risks to older Americans with medical conditions.

Gen. Colin Powell, Academy Class of 1988, Full Interview, Oct 21, 2016  Academy of Achievement

Colin Powell: Autobiography, Leadership, Quotes, Family, Youth, Education, Military Career (1994), Jun 25, 2014  The Film Archives

General Colin Powell (6/7/12), Jun 26, 2012  Commonwealth Club of California

Colossal: Footage from a Blackwater Dive Off the Coast of Italy Frames the Striking Marine Creatures Found in Its Depths – By Alexander Semenov

Night life in the Mediterranean Sea, Aquatilis, Colossal

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 18, 2021

Oct 18, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Joe Biden’s ambitious legislative agenda exposes deep rifts within his party ahead of a looming deadline. Then, former secretary of state Colin Powell dies from complications of COVID-19 after battling cancer. We remember his trailblazing career and complicated legacy. And, how applying white paint to exterior surfaces could combat the rising temperatures. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Jury selection begins in Ahmaud Arbery trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZFKG… How Biden’s legislative agenda is faring in Congress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2Ido… How American missionaries’ kidnapping signals chaos in Haiti https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pq8tm… Rising number of U.S. workers pushing back against employers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a7nZy… Can the world’s whitest paint save Earth? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qyE-… Remembering the life and legacy of Colin Powell https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dNcW… How Powell was the nexus of America’s ‘momentous’ decisions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AuH4… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden agenda, voter views https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRvsM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 18th

Oct 18, 2021  NBC News

Remembering former Secretary of State Colin Powell, FBI and State Dept. team in Haiti after 17 missionaries kidnapped, conflict over Covid vaccine mandates in Chicago and beyond. 00:00 Intro 02:15 Remembering Colin Powell 05:17 Americans Kidnapped In Haiti 07:53 Vaccine Mandate Showdown 11:00 Ahmaud Arbery Murder Trial 12:46 Former Miami Police Chief Speaks Out 14:51 School Lunch Shortages 16:36 China’s Major Global Infrastructure Push » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #ColinPowell #VaccineMandates

The New York Times <nytdirect@nytimes.com> 

October 19, 2021

Good morning. Colin Powell’s death highlights the continuing Covid risks to older Americans with medical conditions.

By David Leonhardt

Colin Powell in 2002, when he was secretary of state. Brooks Kraft/Corbis, via Getty Images

The threat, in perspective

Colin Powell’s death at 84 underscores the continuing risk that Covid-19 presents to older people — even if they are fully vaccinated, as Powell was.

For vaccinated Americans in their 70s and 80s, Covid remains more dangerous on average than many other everyday risks, including falls, choking, gunshot wounds or vehicle accidents:

Covid data is an annualized rate from the week of Aug. 29 to Sept. 4, and is a sample from 16 U.S. jurisdictions. Data for other causes is from 2019.Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The numbers in this chart are averages, of course, covering a wide range of situations. They encompass both healthy older people and those with compromised immune systems (as was the case with Powell, who had multiple

myeloma and Parkinson’s disease). At every age, Covid presents considerably more danger to people with serious underlying medical conditions.

“Vaccines turn Covid into a mild disease,” Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, wrote yesterday. But mild infections can “kill vulnerable people,” he explained.
For older people with a medical condition, the vaccines both sharply reduce the dangers of Covid and still leave Covid as a meaningful threat, one that arguably justifies a different approach to day-to-day life. Spending time indoors with an unmasked, untested grandchild or eating a meal inside a restaurant may not be worth the risk, at least until case counts have fallen to low levels.
For older people who are healthy, the risks may be more tolerable. Covid is probably not vastly more dangerous than other activities that people do without thinking — like driving a vehicle or climbing a flight of stairs — but it is not zero risk, either.
“Getting vaccinated doesn’t deliver you into an entirely new category of pandemic safety — safer and more protected than anyone who hasn’t gotten vaccinated — but simply pushes you down the slope of mortality risk by the equivalent of a few decades,” David Wallace-Wells has written in New York Magazine.

As a country, what can we do to protect older people from Covid? The data points to at least three good answers.

1. Reduce caseloads

The main reason that Covid deaths surged in the U.S. recently is that cases surged. If cases return to their low levels of the spring and early summer, deaths among older adults will probably plummet as well. In June, only about one-tenth as many Americans over 65 were dying from Covid as in August, according to the C.D.C.

Chart shows data from a sample of 16 U.S. jurisdictions. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The most effective way to reduce caseloads is to continue raising the country’s vaccination rate, through workplace mandates and other measures. Vaccinating children under 12 can also save the lives of older people.
Cases in the U.S. have already fallen 50 percent since Sept 1. If the declines continue — and can be maintained — the risks for older Americans will be much more manageable than they were in the late summer.
2. Give booster shots
Scientists are still trying to figure out how quickly vaccine immunity wanes. But the bulk of the evidence suggests that it does wane at least somewhat in the first year after vaccination, which creates additional risks for older people. Among that evidence: Covid case counts are higher in Britain, where vaccinations tended to happen earlier, than in other parts of Europe, as John Burn-Murdoch of The Financial Times has noted.
Waning immunity, in turn, suggests that booster shots can protect vulnerable people.
In the U.S., the federal government has not yet authorized booster shots for any recipients of the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines, although a scientific advisory panel has recommended them for people who are 65 and older, among others. Pfizer vaccine recipients 65 and older are already eligible for a booster once they are at least six months removed from their second shot.

Powell was set to receive a booster shot last week but had to postpone it when he became sick, a spokeswoman said.

3. Expand rapid testing

If rapid Covid tests were widely available, as they have been in much of Western Europe, they could help protect the elderly.
In a previous newsletter, I mentioned a woman in Germany who greeted visitors with a stash of rapid tests — allowing her husband, who has Parkinson’s disease, to stay safe and still have a social life. Imagine if American families could do the same. Grandma and grandpa are coming over for Sunday dinner? Everybody else takes a rapid test before they arrive.
The Biden administration has promised to make rapid tests widely available this fall. For now, they are still difficult to find, largely because the F.D.A. has been slow to approve them.
For most Americans, vaccination makes the risk of a serious form of Covid extremely rare. And for children, Covid tends to be mild even without vaccination. But until caseloads decline more, the situation remains frightening for many older people.

Colin Powell with Ronald Reagan in 1988. Barry Thumma/Associated Press

More on Powell’s life

  • Powell was a child of New York City (as he discussed in a PBS interview). He was born in Harlem, raised in the Bronx and graduated from City College.
  • In the prelude to war in 2003, Powell accused Iraq — falsely, it later became clear — of having weapons of mass destruction. He would describe it as a blot on his record. (Our colleague Robert Draper has told the back story.)
  • Powell, once a Republican, lamented the party’s move to the right, endorsing Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden.
The Latest News

The Virus

  • Infection rates remain low in New York City’s schools, these maps show.
Politics
  • The Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to block a Texas law that bans most abortions.
International
Others Big Stories

  • The University of North Carolina can continue using race as a factor in its admissions process, a judge ruled.
Opinions
Embracing Covid’s lessons about better ventilation and masking can help us fight the flu, says Linsey Marr.

Gen. Colin Powell, Academy Class of 1988, Full Interview

Oct 21, 2016  Academy of Achievement

www.achievement.org Copyright: American Academy of Achievement

Colin Powell: Autobiography, Leadership, Quotes, Family, Youth, Education, Military Career (1994)

Jun 25, 2014  The Film Archives

Colin Luther Powell (/?ko?l?n/; born April 5, 1937) is an American statesman and a retired four-star general in the United States Army. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/034… He was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving under U.S. President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2005, the first African American to serve in that position. During his military career, Powell also served as National Security Advisor (1987–1989), as Commander of the U.S. Army Forces Command (1989) and as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (1989–1993), holding the latter position during the Persian Gulf War. He was the first, and so far the only, African American to serve on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and was the first of two consecutive African American office-holders to hold the key Administration position of U.S. Secretary of State. Powell was born on April 5, 1937,[6] in Harlem, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, to Jamaican immigrant parents Maud Arial (née McKoy) and Luther Theophilus Powell. He also has Scottish ancestry.[7][8] Powell was raised in the South Bronx and attended Morris High School, a former public school in the Bronx, from which he graduated in 1954. While at school, he worked at a local baby furniture store where he picked up Yiddish from the shopkeepers and some of the customers.[9] He received his BS degree in geology from the City College of New York in 1958 and was a self-admitted C average student. He was later able to earn a MBA degree from the George Washington University in 1971, after his second tour in Vietnam. Powell married Alma Johnson on August 25, 1962. Their son, Michael Powell, was the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from 2001 to 2005. His daughters are Linda Powell, an actress, and Annemarie Powell. As a hobby, Powell restores old Volvo and Saab cars.[90][91] In 2013, he faced questions about a relationship with a Romanian diplomat, after a hacked AOL email account had been made public. He acknowledged a “very personal” email relationship but denied further involvement. Powell’s experience in military matters made him a very popular figure with both American political parties. Many Democrats admired his moderate stance on military matters, while many Republicans saw him as a great asset associated with the successes of past Republican administrations. Put forth as a potential Democratic Vice Presidential nominee in the 1992 U.S. presidential election[32] or even potentially replacing Vice President Dan Quayle as the Republican Vice Presidential nominee,[33] Powell eventually declared himself a Republican and began to campaign for Republican candidates in 1995.[34] He was touted as a possible opponent of Bill Clinton in the 1996 U.S. presidential election, possibly capitalizing on a split conservative vote in Iowa[35] and even leading New Hampshire polls for the GOP nomination,[36] but Powell declined, citing a lack of passion for politics.[37] Powell defeated Clinton 50-38 in a hypothetical match-up proposed to voters in the exit polls conducted on Election Day.[38] Despite not standing in the race, Powell won the Republican New Hampshire Vice-Presidential primary on write-in votes.[39] In 1997 Powell founded America’s Promise with the objective of helping children from all socioeconomic sectors. That same year saw the establishment of The Colin L. Powell Center for Leadership and Service. The mission of the Center is to “prepare new generations of publicly engaged leaders from populations previously underrepresented in public service and policy circles, to build a strong culture of civic engagement at City College, and to mobilize campus resources to meet pressing community needs and serve the public good.” [40] In the 2000 U.S. presidential election Powell campaigned for Senator John McCain and later Texas Governor George W. Bush after the latter secured the Republican nomination.[citation needed] Bush eventually won, and Powell was appointed Secretary of State. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colin_Po…

General Colin Powell (6/7/12)

Jun 26, 2012  Commonwealth Club of California

General Colin Powell Former U.S. Secretary of State; Former Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Author, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership In conversation with Dan Ashley, News Anchor, ABC 7 TV; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors Throughout his decades of service to the country, General Powell has kept his private life out of the limelight. Now, in his new book, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, Powell is opening up to reveal the important principles that guided his journey from being the son of Jamaican immigrants to becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the first African-American secretary of state. He will reveal the foundations for achievement and leadership that worked for him and can help make others’ dreams come true, too.

Footage from a Blackwater Dive Off the Coast of Italy Frames the Striking Marine Creatures Found in Its Depths

Footage from a Blackwater Dive Off the Coast of Italy Frames the Striking Marine Creatures Found in Its Depths

SEPTEMBER 22, 2021  GRACE EBERT

For marine biologists and photographers, a nighttime dive into the ocean offers an austere backdrop for capturing the myriad creatures that live below the surface: entirely devoid of light, black water creates a stark visual contrast to the iridescent, translucent, and tentacled organisms that float in the dark expanses, making rare sightings of cusk eels and or billowing blanket octopuses all the more striking. An expedition by Alexander Semenov (previously) near Ponza Island unveiled an array of marine life off the western coast of Italy, framing their unique forms and movements. The footage is part of an ongoing documentary project for Aquatilis, and you

can see more from Semenov on his site.

Night life in the Mediterranean sea

Dec 19, 2019  Aquatilis

Underwater world of the Mediterranean sea at the night time. Filmed near Ponza Island as part of a documentary project we are currently working on. Music by Cell – Switch Off (feat. Aes Dana) Shot with Panasonic Lumix GH5 & Subal underwater housing

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Hanging Masses

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PBS News, Washington Week PBS, NBC News, Meet The Press, DW Documentary, TED, Axios, Reuters, BBC News, and VolcanoDiscovery : La Palma volcano eruption

PBS News, Washington Week PBS, NBC News, Meet The Press, DW Documentary, TED, Axios, Reuters, BBC News, and VolcanoDiscovery : La Palma volcano eruption

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 15 & 21, 2021

Culture Wars and Economic Challenges and The Politics of Blue Origin’s Space Launch | Washington Week | October 15, 2021, Washington Week PBS

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 14th, 15th &16th,  NBC News,

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 10th, & 17th, 2021, NBC News

Raising the Future: The Child Care Crisis, PBS NewsHour

What makes a child smart? | DW Documentary, Oct 15, 2021 

TED: Chris Bennett A close to home solution for accessible childcare and Khalil Ramadi Electronic pills that could transform how we treat disease

Axios AM by Mike Allen, October 10, 2021 – 6. Snapchat generation steps up

ReutersLIVE: Lava still flowing one month after volcano erupted on La Palma Island, 10.21.2021

Canary Islands volcano forces further evacuations of La Palma residents – BBC News, Sep 22, 2021 

More destruction feared in La Palma as lava pours from new volcano vent | DW News, Oct 1, 2021 

La Palma volcano eruption 2 Oct 2021: lava fountains and lava flows, Oct 3, 2021  VolcanoDiscovery

PBS NewsHour live episode, Oct. 21, 2021

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 15, 2021

Oct 15, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, an FDA advisory panel authorizes another shot for some Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine recipients, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart analyze President Biden’s efforts to alleviate supply chain issues and navigate Republican pushback to vaccine mandates. Also, Questlove’s mission to bring archived footage of a 1969 concert series to audiences today. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Suicide attack in Afghanistan kills 47 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRcJI… FDA panel backs Johnson & Johnson booster shot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QIbi… International community looks to halt ransomware attacks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaFEe… Brooks and Capehart on supply-chain issues, vaccine pushback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjLVU… City honors man whose land was taken through eminent domain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16H3Z… Questlove film brings iconic 1969 concert back to life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTYsw… A Brief But Spectacular take on mental illness in jails https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ukKE… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Culture Wars and Economic Challenges | Washington Week | October 15, 2021

Streamed live on Oct 15, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel discussed former Trump aide Steve Bannon’s refusal to appear in front of the Jan. 6 committee, expanding political culture wars, and the nation’s economic challenges. Panel: Leigh Ann Caldwell of NBC News, Eugene Daniels of POLITICO, Jonathan Karl of ABC News, Stephanie Ruhle NBC News

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf4usX5ZyB8

The Politics of Blue Origin’s Space Launch | Washington Week | October 15, 2021

Streamed live on Oct 15, 2021  Washington Week PBS

This week, William Shatner, Star Trek’s Captain Kirk, blasted into space on a Blue Origin rocket. The panel discusses the rise of space tourism and the simultaneous growth of economic inequality. Panel: Leigh Ann Caldwell of NBC News, Eugene Daniels of POLITICO, Jonathan Karl of ABC News, Stephanie Ruhle NBC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Nightly News Full Broadcast (October 16th)

Oct 16, 2021  NBC News

Police departments battle Covid vaccine mandates, Covid booster shot confusion after FDA panel recommendation, and former President Bill Clinton still hospitalized.

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 15th

Oct 15, 2021  NBC News

FDA panel recommends Johnson & Johnson booster shot, Covid vaccine mandates fueling showdowns nationwide, and former President Bill Clinton hospitalized with infection. 00:00 Intro 01:25 – FDA panel recommends J&J booster shot 04:33 – Covid vaccine mandate showdowns 06:53 – Fmr. President Bill Clinton hospitalized 10:19 – Capitol Police officer indicted 11:07 – U.K. lawmaker killed in knife attack 13:04 – Hollywood workers threaten to strike 15:00 – Toymakers struggle with supply chain shortages 16:56 – Heating costs on the rise this winter 19:01 – China’s historic mission to new space station » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #NightlyNews #LesterHolt

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 14th

Oct 14, 2021  NBC News

FDA panel recommends Moderna booster for some Americans, thousands of John Deere workers go on strike, and Southlake teachers told to balance Holocaust books with “opposing” view. 00:00 Intro 02:11 Booster Shots 04:51 Nationwide Strikes 07:38 Alex Murdaugh Arrested 11:23 Michigan Water Emergency 13:22 Southlake Book Controversy 17:06 Early Black Friday 19:05 Inspiring America » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC #NBCNews #BoosterShots #JohnDeere

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 17th, 2021

Oct 17, 2021  NBC News

Chuck talks with Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg on the supply chain crisis and Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ar.) on vaccine mandates. Kimberly Atkins Stohr, Garrett Haake, John Podhoretz and Amy Walter join the Meet the Press roundtable. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, The ReidOut, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYo… Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc #MeetThePress #ChuckTodd #NBCNews

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – October 10th, 2021

Oct 10, 2021  NBC News

Chuck talks with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and former White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham about the former president’s final weeks in office. He also sits down with Nick Clegg, Facebook’s VP of Global Affairs, on the reform needed on the platform. Yamiche Alcindor, Donna Edwards and David French join the Meet the Press roundtable. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

Raising the Future: The Child Care Crisis

Premiered 84 minutes ago  PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour presents an in-depth look at how the lack of affordable, quality child care is affecting American families, which has plagued families in the U.S. for more than a century. Now the COVID-19 pandemic is transforming daily life for millions of working parents and pushing the nation’s childcare system to the brink of collapse. Out of that turmoil, a heated debate has emerged over what, if anything, can be done to better meet the needs of parents and preschool age children. In this hour-long documentary, the PBS NewsHour reveals how shifting societal values as well as decades of federal policy have shaped the U.S. child care system into what it is today. It explores the burden costly child care places on low and middle-income families, takes viewers to cities and states experimenting with new ways of providing childcare for working parents, and delves into the political battle brewing over the idea of federally funded, universal childcare. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What makes a child smart? | DW Documentary

Oct 15, 2021  DW Documentary

The first five years of a child’s life are crucial. If early childhood education is neglected, problems can arise that may never be overcome, leading to consequences for the individual and society as a whole. In the United States, there’s little public investment in early childhood education. Yet research shows that the support and education children receive in their first five years has a decisive influence on the course of their lives. A lack of early childhood education affects not only the child and the adult they become, but also the society in which they live. This documentary looks at the topic from several perspectives, including sociology, history, developmental psychology and neuroscience. But at its core are the personal stories of children and their love of learning, as well as families trying against all odds to give their kids a good start in life. It also spotlights preschool teachers – educators who are hardly recognized by society and whose salaries are barely above the poverty line, but whose work is essential. It’s a film that explores a dramatic problem using plenty of warmth and humor. #documentary #freedocumentary #education ______

Childcare needs a transformation — but rather than investing billions in new buildings and schools, what if we could unlock the potential of people already nearby? Entrepreneur Chris Bennett offers an innovative way to tackle the shortage of childcare worldwide and connect families to safe, affordable and high-quality options in their own communities.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Chris Bennett · Entrepreneur, education advocate

Chris Bennett is a Silicon Valley-based entrepreneur and early childhood education advocate who’s passionate about harnessing the internet for social good.

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TEDMonterey | August 2021

Could a small jolt of electricity to your gut help treat chronic diseases? Medical hacker and TED Fellow Khalil Ramadi is developing a new, noninvasive therapy that could treat diseases like diabetes, obesity, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s with an electronic pill. More targeted than a traditional pill and less invasive than surgery, these micro-devices contain electronics that deliver “bionudges” — bursts of electrical or chemical stimuli — to the gut, potentially helping control appetite, aid digestion, regulate hormones — and even stimulate happiness in the brain.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Khalil Ramadi · Medical hacker

Khalil Ramadi builds medical technologies that leverage the connection between the brain and the gut.

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TED Fellows: Shape Your Future

This groundbreaking selection of talks from the TED Fellows are snapshots of influential, new ideas from leading voices in medicine, human rights, conservation, astrophysics, education and beyond. Dive in to discover what (and who) is shaping your future.

More at ted.com/shapeyourfuture ?

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TED Fellows: Shape Your Future | May 2021

Axios AM by Mike Allen, October 10, 2021

Mike Allen <mike@axios.com> 

6. Snapchat generation steps up

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios
In four days, nearly 2 million Snapchat users checked out a new “Run for Office” module aimed at encouraging young candidates, Axios’ Alexi McCammond reports.

·  Why it matters: The tech company — which claims to reach over 90% of the nation’s 18- to 34-year-olds — wants to expand the Snapchat generation” in local and state offices.

The top five issues Snapchatters say they care about: civil rights, education, the environment, health care and jobs.

·  A burst of interest came from six of the most populous states: Texas, Florida, Ohio, California, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

How it works: Snap is partnering with 10 candidate recruitment organizations, including ones that focus on helping young progressives, conservatives and immigrants to seek elected office.

·  In the opening days, more than 24,000 Snapchat users expressed interest in working with one of those organizations to explore running for local positions, including school board or city council.

·  Another 46,000 users nominated a friend to run.

LIVE: Lava still flowing one month after volcano erupted on La Palma Island

Started streaming 10 hours ago, 10.21.2021 Reuters

There is no immediate end in sight to the volcanic eruption that has caused chaos on the Spanish isle of La Palma since it began on September 19, 2021. #Live #Volcano #CumbreVieja #lava #LaPalma #Spain #News #Reuters Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe Reuters brings you the latest business, finance and breaking news video from around the globe. Our reputation for accuracy and impartiality is unparalleled. Get the latest news on: http://reuters.com/ Follow Reuters on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reuters Follow Reuters on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Reuters Follow Reuters on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/reuters/?hl=en

Canary Islands volcano forces further evacuations of La Palma residents – BBC News

Sep 22, 2021  BBC News

An erupting volcano on La Palma in the Spanish Canary Islands has forced authorities to evacuate hundreds of homes, as the lava gushes towards the sea. Local officials have warned the lava could trigger chemical reactions when it reaches the sea, causing explosions and the release of toxic gases. The BBC’s Dan Johnson reports on the latest stage of the evacuations from the ground in La Palma. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog #CanaryIslands #LaPalma #BBCNews

More destruction feared in La Palma as lava pours from new volcano vent | DW News

Oct 1, 2021  DW News

The erupting volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma has blown open new fissures, sending more lava streaking across the island. Authorities are monitoring air quality along the shoreline – where lava has reached the Atlantic ocean. The Spanish Government has committed to re-building the island, and is providing millions for those who lose houses and livelihoods. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwnews Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/dwdeutsch

La Palma volcano eruption 2 Oct 2021: lava fountains and lava flows

Oct 3, 2021  VolcanoDiscovery

As the eruption approaches two weeks of strong activity, there is no sign of it ending or fading soon. Powerful lava fountains continue from the main vent, and several lava flows are descending the slopes of El Paraiso. With the support of Civil Protection, the video was taken from near the vent area showing the activity as observed during the evening of 2 Oct 2021. Video copyright: Tom Pfeiffer / www.volcanodiscovery.com La Palma updates: https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/la-p…

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PBS News, NBC News, NOVA PBS, National Geographic, and DW Documentary

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

NBC News: Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

National Geographic: COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

DW Documentary: Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives?, Can viruses be beneficial? and Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, Oct. 8, 2021

Oct 8, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, employment numbers in the United States fall short of expectations as workers continue to leave their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Then, the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded to news editors from Russia and the Philippines for their reporting in the face of political repression. And, David Brooks and Karen Tumulty consider the week in politics. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Biden to send Trump records to Jan. 6 committee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQdO7… Why so many U.S. workers quit their job during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNwfu… Why the Nobel Peace Prize was won by to 2 journalists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1pNx… Fiona Hill reflects on Trump presidency, opportunity in U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZhSE… Brooks and Tumulty on debt ceiling, Jan. 6 investigation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JwWe6… Bill T. Jones’ new work explores collective American ‘we’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G9JR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast – October 8th

Oct 8, 2021  NBC News

U.S. added 194,000 jobs in September, unemployment rate down, two parents convicted in college admissions scandal trial, and combat medics unite after forming special connection a decade ago. 00:00 Intro 02:01 Major Jobs Setback 04:36 Mandate Battles 07:36 College Admissions Conviction 10:04 Biden – Trump Showdown 14:05 Travel Price Warning 18:28 Those Who Serve » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

 

NOVA PBS: Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition winners announced

From neurons to tick heads to louse claws, here are the top 10 images from the competition.

BY SUKEE BENNETT MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2021 NOVA NEXT

The winning image of the Nikon Small World 2021 Photo Competition shows a southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels. Image credit: Jason Kirk, Baylor College of Medicine

The winners of the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition, which aims to showcase “the beauty and complexity of life as seen through the light microscope,” were announced today.

This is the 47th year of the photo competition, which is open to anyone with an interest in microscopy—the use of microscopes to view samples and objects—and photography. This year the contest received almost 1,900 entries from 88 countries. A panel of five judges* evaluated the entries for originality, informational content, technical proficiency, and visual impact, Nikon reported. The results of the sister video competition, Small World In Motion, were announced last month.

Here are this year’s top 10 images:

A southern live oak leaf’s trichomes, stomata, and vessels photographed by Jason Kirk, a professional imager and core director of Baylor College of Medicine’s Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core. Kirk used a custom-made microscope system to take around 200 individual images of the leaf, which he stacked together to create this image, Nikon reports.

Trichomes, stomata, and vessels are all “essential to plant life,” Nikon writes. Trichomes, fine outgrowths that protect a plant from extreme weather and insects, are featured in white. “In purple, Jason highlights the stomata, small pores that regulate the flow of gases in a plant. Colored in cyan are the vessels that transport water throughout the leaf,” Nikon said in a statement.

  1. Networking neurons in microfluidic device

Image credit: Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen, Dementia Research Centre, Macquarie University, New South Wales, Australia

This image is of a microfluidic device, which contains 300,000 networking neurons divided into two isolated populations (left and right) bridged by axons (center). The isolated populations were each treated with a unique virus, Nikon reports. The image was taken at 40X magnification by Esmeralda Paric and Holly Stefen of Macquarie University’s Dementia Research Centre in New South Wales, Australia, using fluorescence imaging, which uses high-intensity illumination to excite fluorescent molecules in a sample. “When a molecule absorbs photons, electrons are excited to a higher energy level,” Nikon writes. “As electrons ‘relax’ back to the ground-state, vibrational energy is lost and, as a result, the emission spectrum is shifted to longer wavelengths.”

  1. Rear leg, claw and respiratory trachea of a louse

Image credit: Frank Reiser, Nassau Community College, New York

A rear leg, claw, and respiratory trachea of a louse, a wingless parasitic insect, at 5X magnification taken by Frank Reiser, a biologist at Nassau Community College in New York. Reiser used darkfield micrography, which “creates contrast in transparent unstained specimens” and “depends on controlling specimen illumination so that central light which normally passes through and around the specimen is blocked,” Nikon writes, and image stacking to produce this image.

  1. Embryonic rat neuron

Image credit: Paula Diaz, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

A sensory neuron from an embryonic rat taken by Paula Diaz, a physiologist at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in Santiago, Chile. Diaz took the image at 10X magnification and used fluorescence imaging to produce it.

  1. Housefly proboscis

Image credit: Oliver Dum, Medienbunker Produktion, Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany

A proboscis of a housefly (Musca domestica) taken by Oliver Dum of Medienbunker Produktion in Bendof, Rheinland Pfalz, Germany. Dum took the image at 40X magnification and assembled it using image stacking.

  1. Mouse brain vasculature

Image credit: Dr. Andrea Tedeschi, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University

3D vasculature of an adult mouse brain taken by Dr. Andrea Tedeschi of Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Tedeschi took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging, which involves scanning a specimen to create extremely thin (down to 250 nanometer thickness) computer-generated optical sections using visible light, to create it.

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  1. Tick head

Image credit: Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley, Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility

Head of a tick taken by Drs. Tong Zhang and Paul Stoodley of Ohio State University’s Campus Microscopy & Imaging Facility in Columbus, Ohio. Zhang and Stoodley took the image at 10X magnification and used confocal imaging to produce it.

  1. Mouse intestine

Image credit: Dr. Amy Engevik, Medical University of South Carolina

Cross section of a mouse intestine taken at 10X magnification using fluorescence imaging by Dr. Amy Engevik of the Medical University of South Carolina’s Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology in Charleston, South Carolina.

  1. Water flea

Image credit: Jan van IJken, Jan van IJek Photography & Film, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

A water flea (Daphnia) carrying embryos and ciliated vase-shaped protozoans called peritrichs taken at 10X magnification using image stacking and darkfield microscopy by Jan van IJken of Jan van IJek Photography & Film in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

  1. Butterfly wing

Image credit: Sebastien Malo, Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France

Vein and scales on a Morpho didius butterfly wing taken at 20X magnification using image stacking and reflected light photography by Sebastien Malo of Saint Lys, Haute-Garonne, France.

*NOVA Science Editor Robin Kazmier was a judge in this year’s competition.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/nikon-small-world-photography-winners-2021-/

 

National Geographic

A medical student gives a woman a blood glucose test to check possible diabetes at a screening post in Alameda Dom Afonso Henriques during the COVID-19 pandemic on May 29, 2021 in Lisbon, Portugal.

PHOTOGRAPH BY HORACIO VILLALOBOS, CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

COVID-19 is linked to new diabetes cases—but long-term problems could be more severe

In addition to driving new cases of diabetes, the virus may be directly damaging the pancreas in ways that could lead to chronic inflammation and even cancer.

BYAMY MCKEEVER

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 8, 2021

Almost daily microbiologist Peter Jackson receives emails from people who recovered from COVID-19 only to discover that their health troubles have just begun.

Recently, a mother of two in her 30s wrote to the Stanford University professor to say that she now takes a slew of diabetes medications every day—even though she hadn’t been at risk for the disease before her coronavirus infection.

Experts have known since the beginning of the pandemic that having diabetes—a condition when the body doesn’t make enough insulin or use it well enough to counteract a rise in blood sugar—is a risk factor for more severe COVID-19 infections. But they have also long suspected that the inverse might be true as well. In May, Jackson published a study in the journal Cell Metabolism showing that SARS-CoV-2 infects cells in the pancreas that produce insulin and may even target and destroy them—suggesting that the virus may also cause diabetes. (Why scientists began investigating the link between COVID-19 and diabetes.)

“This is a real thing,” Jackson says of the complaints from newly diabetic people that have flooded his inbox. Although some experts argue that the condition is rare, Jackson says the data suggests that in 2020 as many as 100,000 people were diagnosed with an unexpected case of diabetes.

He is one of many scientists who worry there could be a new wave of diabetes patients who will have to monitor their blood sugar levels for the rest of their lives. But he and his colleagues are also concerned that the virus may be harming the pancreas in ways that may not be visible now but could one day have troubling implications for the organ itself and for the rest of the digestive system.

“This could be a pandemic in a pandemic,” says Paolo Fiorina, a professor of endocrinology at the University of Milan and lecturer at Harvard Medical School, who has also spearheaded investigations into the connection between COVID-19 and diabetes.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/article/the-many-ways-covid-19-seems-to-be-harming-the-pancreas?cmpid=org=ngp::mc=crm-email::src=ngp::cmp=editorial::add=SpecialEdition_20211008::rid=B26F10713FF3E74BB579E77159591C7D

Great apes – How intelligent are our closest relatives? | DW Documentary

Oct 7, 2021  DW Documentary

What can animals’ emotions tell us about ourselves? This documentary takes us on a fascinating journey into the lives of the great apes. Did you know that chimpanzees wage war? Not only that, but they also show compassion, engage in cooperative behavior, and value fairness and reciprocity. Chimpanzees reconcile after fights, and comfort each other. Chimpanzee communities also have customs and traditions that vary from tribe to tribe. All this begs the question: are things like morality and culture solely human achievements? This documentary takes us into one of the last great wildernesses of West Africa – the mountainous jungles of Nigeria – and shows footage of chimpanzees in the wild. What is the significance of the mysterious stone piles left by chimpanzees near trees or in hollows? Are they a form of religion? How intelligent are our closest relatives in the animal kingdom? In what kinds of societies did our common ancestors live? And where does the phenomenon of xenophobia come from? #documentary #freedocumentary #chimpanzees ______

Can viruses be beneficial? | DW Documentary

Aug 7, 2021  DW Documentary

Viruses can be fatal, but some viruses can in fact be life-sustaining. The SARS-CoV-2 virus has killed large numbers of people during the current pandemic. But humans wouldn’t exist without viruses. How can they benefit us? Viruses aren’t living beings, yet they have had a great influence on evolution. Some viral elements have embedded themselves into the human genome and reproduce along with us – so-called endogenous retroviruses. One type of virus helps form the placenta, for example, while other viruses attack harmful bacteria. Viruses also maintain balance in marine ecosystems, curbing the growth of algae and attacking bacteria that are harmful to sea animals. Soon, viruses may even replace antibiotics in fish farming. Thousands of viruses have already been sequenced, including Ebola, Zika and bird flu. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world, with a mortality rate of up to 90%. But experts see greater danger in the less deadly diseases like Spanish flu and COVID-19: Because they spread much further, they kill more people overall. Viruses can also be used to create vaccines. In Rome, the shell of a virus found in gorilla feces has been used as a vector for the COVID-19 vaccine, turning a pathogen into a life-saving drug. __

Extreme weather, rising sea levels, devastating floods – The global climate crisis | DW Documentary

Oct 5, 2021  DW Documentary

Extreme weather is occurring more frequently worldwide. Rising sea levels and heavy rain are causing devastating floods. Most researchers agree that these are the consequences of climate change. But what can we do to protect ourselves? In July 2021, the Ahr Valley in western Germany was hit by a flash flood after heavy rainfall. Over 100 people were killed, thousands of homes were severely damaged. Experts are calling it the ‘flood of the century’. Yet extreme weather events such as the Ahr Valley floods have become more frequent in recent years – not only in Germany but worldwide. Mozambique has been hit by devastating cyclones for the third year running. In Bangladesh, the monsoon season has become heavier and more unpredictable due to climate change. More and more land has been flooded as a result. At the same time, heavy storms that cause flooding and rising sea levels threaten the south of the country. Experts estimate that 30 per cent of Bangladesh will be permanently flooded in a few years, making millions of people climate refugees. Wealthy countries such as Germany are now investing billions in the battle against the floods. The Netherlands have long pioneered in flood management, building powerful pumping stations, ever higher dikes and flood barriers. None of these options are available to poor countries. All they can do, along with improving early flood warning systems, is to resettle the people affected. The film ‘Global Climate Crisis – How to Tackle the floods?’ shows the unequal fight against the consequences of climate change with examples from Germany, the Netherlands, Bangladesh, and Mozambique. #documentary #flooding #climatechange #extremeweather ______

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Ing’s Street Art, My Little Red Shoes, Elephant Bath, In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace, and U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction Part 2

Ing’s Street Art, “My Little Red Shoes”, “Elephant Bath”, “In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”, and “U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction”

Halsey Street, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Part 2

 In the Midst of troubles, I Seek Peace

 

 In the midst of trouble

Global warming

Causes the fires in California and elsewhere

 

The weather turns more violence

Hurricane Ida caused destruction in Haiti

Louisiana and other places in its path to the North East

 

Strong winds, rain and floods

Whole cities had to evacuate

Millions homeless caused by the nature

 

What causes nature to be violent?

Who causes Global warming?

 

Humans blame nature

Causing the destruction

 

No one can be blamed but ourselves

 

Let us start again

To care for Nature

for our lives now

And generations to come

  

Where can I Find Peace Street?

 

I got lost.

 

Where do you want to go?

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I can find my mother

Father and my family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where I am happy

To see a peaceful Village

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children have a joyful time

With parents and family

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where children are not afraid

Or cry for food

And no place to stay

 

I want to go to Peace Street

where everyone is happy

No fighting

No disaster

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no weapons produced

And sold to kill each other

For profit and wealth

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where there are no corrupt politicians

And greedy rich people who keep

Everything for themselves

Leaving non for the poor

 

I want to go to Peace Street

Where people are kind

And helpful to one another

 

I want to go to Peace Street

To see beautiful nature

With no pollution

Clean oceans

With all the creatures

Living happily

 

Can you direct me to Peace Street?

I got lost

I am hungry

Where are my mother, father,

my husband, my daughter, my grandsons

and the others in my family?

I miss them

I am lonely

 

Please help to direct me to Peace Street

My life is short

I am lost

Where I can find Peace Street on Earth

I woke up this morning.  I felt sad, thinking about my family and other unfortunate people.  Biden had a policy to deport Haitian people who suffered in their country.  Most immigrants want to have an opportunity to work for survival of their families.  It is cruel to send people back to suffer and die while politicians try to find a way to gain credit for their future election to office.


Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, September 25, 2021

 

U.S. Supreme Court Justices on Eviction

 

Low-income people have difficulty to survive

Even to have enough money to buy food

 To feed themselves and their children

 

A few days ago, a report from the news media stated that

700,000 people in the US died from COVID-19

 

The epidemic of the virus may cause some people not to get jobs

Especially families that have children

No money to pay rent

 

Thanks to an eviction moratorium policy

From Biden’s administration

 Landlords were prevented from evicting families

 

This policy to help the poor

Is just a drop of water to quench the thirst

Of dying families

 

Now! Six Republican Supreme Court Justice Appointees

Declared that landlords can evict poor families

That cannot pay rent

 

Millions of poor families

With children are going to be homeless

 

In the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic

Powerful people receive

Benefits and salary from the tax payers of the country

 

These people use their power to cause the poor

Who cannot get jobs because the COVID-19 epidemic

To suffer even more than they were facing before

 

“Where is the justice?”

I want to ask these six Justices of the Supreme Court  

If it makes you happy to see children and their parents suffer?

These poor families who have difficulty to feed children and themselves

Now have no home to stay

 

Where is your humanity?

Where is your empathy toward the poor?

Where is your kindness for the poor?

Where is your morality toward these citizens?

We, the citizens of the country

Especially the unfortunate poor and homeless

 Who has no voice

Ask the Six Republican Appointed Justices of the Supreme Court

The above questions

 

What were you thinking when you made your decision?

You represent the Supreme Court of the land

 Are happy now that you have

Paid back the favor to billionaires that appointed you

To the Throne of Justice?

 

It is sad to see these humans

These so-called Supreme Court Justices walk the earth

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

Where I can find Peace?

I could not control my tears for the evicted families

My heart is aching to hear such an order from this group of

United State Supreme Court Justices

 

Let me calm down

At least for my recording of the event

Let it be etched into history for future

Generations to learn

To cultivate the next generation

To be kind human beings

helping the unfortunate who

Suffer more than they

 

“In the Midst of Troubles, I Seek Peace”

I will calm myself

Get back to my garden

And continue doing my artwork

 

At least my minuscule contributions

Brings happiness to the others

 

Hearing people pass my little garden

And artwork saying

“The flowers are beautiful”

And commenting

“You changed your artwork.

I like the children in your painting”

 

“The painting is called, My Little Red Shoes”

I respond

  

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, October 2, 2021

 

 Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, “My Little Red Shoes” in 1996. 

Daily Mail:

Supreme Court says letting the Biden administration keep the eviction moratorium in place could open the door to mandates for ‘free grocery delivery for the sick and vulnerable and free computers to let Americans work from home’

  • Conservatives on the Supreme Court said extending eviction moratoriums could lead to government mandates on ‘free grocery delivery and free computers’ 
  • ‘Could the CDC mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads from the six conservatives on the court
  • ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free Internet?’
  • The Supreme Court voted 6-3 to block the eviction moratorium, allowing landlord to kick out renters who haven’t paid rent in the midst of the pandemic
  • Argued that preventing landlords from evicting tenants who breach their leases strips them of their ‘right to exclude’  
  • The six conservative justices elected to end the eviction freeze from the CDC and the three liberals justices voting it should stay
  • Said the CDC overextended its authority in imposing the moratorium 

By KATELYN CARALLE, U.S. POLITICAL REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM  and AP

PUBLISHED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021 | UPDATED: 18:43 EDT, 30 August 2021

Conservatives on the Supreme Court said that allowing the eviction moratorium to continue could set a precedent for government mandated ‘free grocery delivery’ and ‘free internet’ for people to work from home.

‘Preventing [landlords] from evicting tenants who breach their leases intrudes on one of the most fundamental elements of property ownership—the right to exclude,’ the majority opinion reads from the Thursday decision.

The court’s decision will allow for landlords to evict tenants who have not paid rent in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Questioned in the unsigned opinion from the six conservative justices was hypothetical situations for how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could overreach its authority in the future, as they claim it did so in extending the moratorium.

‘Could the CDC, for example, mandate free grocery delivery to the homes of the sick or vulnerable?’ the majority opinion reads. ‘Require manufacturers to provide free computers to enable people to work from home? Order telecommunications companies to provide free high-speed Internet service to facilitate remote work?’

All this to say, the court feels that the CDC cannot decide for the sake of public health that other aspects of business can be impacted, like preventing landlords from collecting rent.

They also claim that congressional action is needed to extend the moratorium.

The Supreme Court elected to end the national eviction moratorium in a 6-3 vote on Thursday, claiming it would lead to a precedent of mandated ‘free grocery delivery for the sick’ or ‘free computers and internet’ to work from home

The decision again exhibited the power Republicans have with the court’s 6-3 conservative majority, which is now allowing evictions to resume across the U.S. as it blocks the Biden administration from continuing to enforce a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The vote was split by party line with conservatives John Roberts, Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett voting to end the eviction moratorium, and liberals Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan voting to keep it.

The justices said in an unsigned opinion Thursday that the CDC, which reimplemented the moratorium on August 3, lacked the authority to do so under federal law without explicit congressional authorization.

‘It would be one thing if Congress had specifically authorized the action that the CDC has taken,’ the court wrote. ‘But that has not happened. Instead, the CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination. It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts.’

Real estate groups in Georgia and Alabama had argued this point and told the high court that the moratorium caused property owners across the nation significant financial hardships, USA Today reports.

Property owners had to continue to pay expenses while not receiving payments from renters. They were also banned from evicting nightmare tenants, who were given free reign to make their neighbors’ lives a misery.

Court said the CDC did not have the power to extend the moratorium. Housing advocates protest on August 4 to allow the eviction moratorium to continue in New York

As of August 25, nearly 90 per cent of the federal funds meant to help landlords make up for the loss of funds had not been distributed, the U.S. Treasury Department said in a statement.

Roughly 3.5 million people in the United States said they faced eviction in the next two months, according to Census Bureau data from early August.

After the Thursday ruling, several progressive lawmakers pleaded with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to act with the ‘highest levels of urgency’ to combat evictions.

The lawmakers asked the leaders in a Friday letter to work to revive the national eviction moratorium after the Supreme Court ruled congressional action is needed.

‘Millions of people who are currently at risk for eviction, housing insecurity, or face becoming unhoused desperately look to their elected representatives to implement legislation that will put their health and safety first and save lives,’ the letter reads.

The effort was led by Representative Ayanna Pressley and signed on by more than 60 Democrats, including fellow ‘squad’ members Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Cori Bush.

Bush, who was once homeless before running for office, led protesters in sleeping outside the Capitol earlier this summer when the moratorium faced its end before the CDC expanded it.

The Supreme Court had originally allowed the eviction freeze to continue to July in a 5-4 vote, but Kavanaugh, who voted to keep it, indicated that he would vote against any further extension.

Roberts followed suit and voted against the moratorium with Kavanagh on Thursday.

In his dissenting opinion, Breyer asserted that the court should not end the moratorium on an expedited basis.

‘Applicants raise contested legal questions about an important federal statute on which the lower courts are split and on which this court has never actually spoken,’ Breyer wrote. ‘These questions call for considered decision making, informed by full briefing and argument. Their answers impact the health of millions.’

The national eviction freeze was set in place at the start of the pandemic and continued on until July, when the Supreme Court previously upheld it in a 5-4 vote

The Biden administration’s extension of the eviction moratorium was heralded by members the ‘the Squad,’ including U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who had celebrated the announcement earlier this month.

She and fellow Democratic congress woman Cori Bush had demonstrated outside the Capitol in protest of the moratorium’s original deadline at the start of August.

Bush was hailed as a key figure who pushed Biden and his administration to extend the deadline after five continuous days of protest, tweeting about her accomplishment.

‘Squad’ member Ilhan Omar also acknowledged Bush’s efforts in spearheading the moratorium extension, The Hill reported.

U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, a fellow democrat from California who sponsored a House bill to extend the eviction freeze, also thanked Biden ‘from the bottom of my heart and on behalf of millions of renters.

‘This extension of the moratorium is the lifeline that millions of families have been waiting for. From the very beginning of this pandemic, it was clear that eviction moratoriums not only kept people housed, but also saved lives,’ Waters said in a statement.

A group of Democratic lawmakers wrote a letter to Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer urging them to act congressionally to extend the moratorium after the Supreme Court said the CDC overreached 

This was the second high court loss for the administration this week at the hands of the court’s conservative majority.

On Tuesday, the court effectively allowed the reinstatement of a Trump-era policy forcing asylum seekers to wait in Mexico for their hearings.

The new administration had tried to end the Remain in Mexico program, as it is informally known.

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court voted the same way to strike down part of New York’s eviction moratorium.

In the same 6-3 ruling, the Supreme Court ruled against allowing COVID-19 hardships to stand as a reason to ban landlords from kicking out tenants. The state’s rules allowed renters to simply state they’d suffered financial hardship and avoid eviction without providing any evidence.

New Yorkers renting apartments will also now no longer be able to stay in homes they’ve stopped paying rent on by claiming that doing so would endanger their health.

The pause on evictions expires at the end of August, meaning people could start getting kicked out of their apartments by the end of this month.

Incoming Governor Kathy Hochul criticized Thursday’s ruling, saying that she and state lawmakers would work to try and reinforce the moratorium.

Both parts of the law that have been cut were enacted when COVID decimated many of New York’s biggest industries – including hospitality and travel – leaving people who worked in them fearful of being made homeless.

The state has since largely reopened, and its economy appears to be on the path to recovery.

Demonstrators protesting evictions are arrested by NYPD

Eviction moratorium finally set to expire 18 months after it was created amid COVID first wave

The national eviction moratorium was put in place last September by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide aid for those struggling from the economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020.

The moratorium was supposed to end in December, but Congress voted to extend it until January 2021.

The Biden administration then pushed the deadline further, once in January and then again in March.

Although the moratorium was set to expire at the end of July, the spread of the delta variant and summer spikes in COVID-19 cases continued to leave millions vulnerable.

Data showed that in July, roughly 3.6 million people would face evictions by September if the moratorium was halted, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey.

The Supreme Court ruled in a 5-4 decision to allow the deadline to extend one final time until the end of July.

The pressure came as landlords and property owners grieved over the loss of income rent while the federal aid set aside for them trickled in at a snail’s pace.

Of the $47 billion in rental assistance that was supposed to go to help tenants pay off months of rent, only about 10% has been distributed as of Aug. 25.

Some states like New York have distributed almost nothing, while several have only approved a few million dollars.

After weeks of protests to extend the eviction moratorium were held at the Capitol, the Biden administration extended the deadline one more time into August.

Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, who voted to extend the deadline to July, had warned that he would switch his vote if the administration tried extending it again.

True to his word, Kavanaugh voted against the order on August 26, with Chief Justice John Roberts following suit.

The Supreme Court ultimately banned the eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision.

For more information, please view the following link:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9941319/Supreme-Court-says-extending-eviction-moratorium-open-door-free-grocery-delivery.html

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Supreme Court says extending eviction moratorium could open the door to ‘free grocery delivery’

In dissent, Justice Breyer wrote that “the public interest is not favored by the spread of disease or a court’s second-guessing of the C.D.C.’s judgment.”

The Biden administration and other moratorium proponents predicted that the decision would set off a wave of dire consequences.

“As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to Covid-19,” Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, said in a statement.

The ruling also renewed pressure on congressional Democrats to try to extend the freeze over the opposition of Republicans.

“Tonight, the Supreme Court failed to protect the 11 million households across our country from violent eviction in the middle of a deadly global pandemic,” said Representative Cori Bush, a Missouri Democrat who slept on the steps of the Capitol this month to protest the expiration of the previous moratorium. “We already know who is going to bear the brunt of this disastrous decision: Black and brown communities, and especially Black women.”

But landlords, who have said the moratoriums saddled them with billions of dollars in debt, hailed the move.

“The government must move past failed policies and begin to seriously address the nation’s debt tsunami, which is crippling both renters and housing providers alike,” said Bob Pinnegar, the president of the National Apartment Association, a trade association representing large landlords.

It will most likely take a while for the backlog of eviction cases in many states to result in the displacement of renters. But tenant groups in the South, where fast-track evictions are common, are bracing for the worst.

In recent days, Mr. Biden’s team has been mapping out strategies to deal with the likely loss of the moratorium, with a plan to focus its efforts on a handful of states — including South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio — that have large backlogs of unpaid rent and few statewide protections for tenants.

The administration had at first concluded that a Supreme Court ruling in June had effectively forbidden it from imposing a new moratorium after an earlier one expired at the end of July. While the administration had prevailed in that ruling by a 5-to-4 vote, one member of the majority, Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh, wrote that he believed the moratorium to be unlawful and that he had cast his vote to temporarily sustain it only to allow an orderly transition. He would not support a further extension without “clear and specific congressional authorization (via new legislation),” he wrote.

Congress did not act. But after political pressure from Democrats, a surge in the pandemic and new consideration of the legal issues, the administration on Aug. 3 issued the moratorium that was the subject of the new ruling.

The administration’s legal maneuvering might have failed, but it bought some time for tenants threatened with eviction. In unusually candid remarks this month, President Biden said that was part of his calculus in deciding to proceed with the new moratorium, which was set to expire Oct. 3.

Congress declared a moratorium on evictions at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, but it lapsed in July 2020. The C.D.C. then issued a series of its own moratoriums, saying that they were justified by the need to address the pandemic and authorized by a 1944 law. People unable to pay rent, the agency said, should not be forced to crowd in with relatives or seek refuge in homeless shelters, spreading the virus.

The last moratorium — which was put in place by the C.D.C. in September and expired on July 31 after being extended several times by Congress and Mr. Biden — was effective at achieving its goal, reducing by about half the number of eviction cases that normally would have been filed since last fall, according to an analysis of filings by the Eviction Lab at Princeton University.

The challengers in the current case — landlords, real estate companies and trade associations led by the Alabama Association of Realtors — argued that the moratorium was not authorized by the law the agency relied on, the Public Health Service Act of 1944.

That law, the challengers wrote, was concerned with quarantines and inspections to stop the spread of disease and did not bestow on the agency “the unqualified power to take any measure imaginable to stop the spread of communicable disease — whether eviction moratoria, worship limits, nationwide lockdowns, school closures or vaccine mandates.”

What to Know About the Supreme Court Term

A blockbuster term begins. The Supreme Court, now dominated by six Republican appointees, returns to the bench to start a momentous term this fall in which it will consider eliminating the constitutional right to abortion and vastly expanding gun rights.

The big abortion case. The court seems poised to use a challenge to a Mississippi law that bars most abortions after 15 weeks to undermine and perhaps overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling could effectively end legal abortion access for those living in much of the South and Midwest.

A major decision on guns. The court will also consider the constitutionality of a longstanding New York law that imposes strict limits on carrying guns outside the home. The court has not issued a major Second Amendment ruling in more than a decade.

A test for Chief Justice Roberts. The highly charged docket will test the leadership of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who lost his position at the court’s ideological center with the arrival last fall of Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

A drop in public support. Chief Justice Roberts now leads a court increasingly associated with partisanship. Recent polls show the court is suffering a distinct drop in public support following a spate of unusual late-night summer rulings in politically charged cases.

The C.D.C. responded that the moratorium was authorized by the 1944 law. Evictions would accelerate the spread of the coronavirus, the agency said, by forcing people “to move, often into close quarters in new shared housing settings with friends or family, or congregate settings such as homeless shelters.”

The moratorium, the administration told the justices, was broadly similar to quarantine. “It would be strange to hold that the government may combat infection by prohibiting the tenant from leaving his home,” its brief said, “but not by prohibiting the landlord from throwing him out.”

The case was complicated by congressional action in December, when lawmakers briefly extended the C.D.C.’s moratorium through the end of January in an appropriations measure. When Congress took no further action, the agency again imposed moratoriums under the 1944 law.

In its Supreme Court brief, the government argued that it was significant that Congress had embraced the agency’s action, if only briefly.

The central legal question in the case was whether the agency was entitled to act on its own. In June, with the earlier moratorium about to expire, the court voted 5 to 4 in favor of the administration, allowing that measure to stand.

But that victory was distinctly provisional. Justice Kavanaugh, who voted with the majority, wrote that he had cast his vote reluctantly and had taken account of the then-impending expiration of the earlier moratorium.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention exceeded its existing statutory authority by issuing a nationwide eviction moratorium,” Justice Kavanaugh wrote. “Because the C.D.C. plans to end the moratorium in only a few weeks, on July 31, and because those few weeks will allow for additional and more orderly distribution of the congressionally appropriated rental assistance funds, I vote at this time to deny the application” that had been filed by the challengers.

The other members of the court did not give reasons for their votes in the June ruling. But four of them — Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett — voted to lift the earlier moratorium. Taken together with Justice Kavanaugh’s statement, that distinctly suggested that a majority of the justices would not look favorably on another extension unless it came from Congress.

The Biden administration initially seemed to share that understanding, urging Congress to act and saying it did not have the unilateral power to impose a further moratorium through executive action. When Congress failed to enact legislation addressing the issue, the moratorium expired.

Under pressure from Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democrats and wary of the rise of the Delta variant, the administration reversed course a few days later.

The new moratorium was not identical to the earlier one, which had applied nationwide. It was instead tailored to counties where Covid-19 was strongest, a category that currently covers some 90 percent of counties in the United States.

Mr. Biden was frank in discussing his reasoning, saying the new measure faced long odds but would buy tenants some time.

“The bulk of the constitutional scholarship says that it’s not likely to pass constitutional muster,” he said on Aug. 3. “But there are several key scholars who think that it may — and it’s worth the effort.”

Many states and localities, including New York and California, have extended their own moratoriums, providing another layer of protection for some renters. In some places, judges, aware of the potential for large numbers of people to be put out on the street even as the pandemic intensifies again, have said they would slow-walk cases and make greater use of eviction diversion programs.

Evictions, the Pandemic and the Courts

As Democrats Seethed, White House Struggled to Contain Eviction Fallout

Aug. 7, 2021

The Biden administration issues a new eviction moratorium as the virus surges.

Aug. 3, 2021

Federal Judge Strikes Down Moratorium on Evicting Renters

May 5, 2021

Adam Liptak covers the Supreme Court and writes Sidebar, a column on legal developments. A graduate of Yale Law School, he practiced law for 14 years before joining The Times in 2002. @adamliptak • Facebook

A version of this article appears in print on Aug. 27, 2021, Section A, Page 15 of the New York edition with the headline: Justices End Biden’s Eviction Moratorium, Leaving Thousands at Risk. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Boston, MA – August 12: Homes for All Massachusetts hosted a rally outside the State House in Boston on August 12, 2021 to voice support for a bill (H 1434 / S 891) up for a hearing later in the day that would temporarily pause evictions and foreclosures for 12 months following the end of the state of emergency. (Photo by Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Tenants rights groups block the north entrance to the Los Angeles County Superior Courthouse in protest of the coming mass evictions if Gov. Gavin Newsom does not replace the Judicial Council’s eviction moratorium Rule 1 and if AB 1436 is not passed on Friday, August 21, 2020. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer)

Tenants’ right advocates march down the Alameda to the offices of the California Apartment Association in San Jose, Calif., Thursday, April 6, 2017. They are protesting against no-cause evictions, which allows landlords to evict tenants in retaliation without giving a reason, displacing families and destabilizing communities. (Patrick Tehan/Bay Area News Group)U.S. Supreme Court on Eviction

On the eviction moratorium, the Supreme Court turns the law on its head | Opinion

Published: Oct. 04, 2021, 5:15 p.m.

Patrick Hill, an author and associate professor at Rutgers University, says that since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on an impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman, File)AP

By Star-Ledger Guest Columnist

By T. Patrick Hill

When the U.S. Supreme Court, on Aug. 26, ruled against President Biden’s extension of the moratorium on evictions, it sacrificed the safety and quite possibly the lives of hundreds of Americans to a legal ideology known as legal positivism or the understanding of law as justified simply because it is law, no matter its consequences.

In an eight-page unsigned decision, made with the concurrence of the six conservative justices and the dissent of the three liberal justices, the Court concluded that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which is responsible nationally for the public’s health, had exceeded its statutory authority by issuing the moratorium.

The statute, the Court correctly notes, is the 1944 Public Health Service Act which authorizes the Health and Human Services secretary (HHS) to “make and enforce such regulations as in his (sic) judgment are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases … from one State or possession into any other State or possession.” Subsequently, this authority was placed in the hands of the CDC.

But from this point, the Court’s reading of the statute goes from bad to worse. Inexplicably, the statute appears to be suspect because, since enactment, it has rarely been used, and certainly not used to justify an eviction moratorium. Are we to conclude from this that the Court considers rarely invoked statutes as something less than law? But even when invoked, the statute has been confined, the Court insists, to measures like quarantining infected individuals, for example. But why should that logically justify the inference that an eviction moratorium exceeds the purposes of the statute?

And just because the statute has specifically included measures like fumigation, disinfection and pest extermination, that cannot be thought logically to mean it has specifically excluded other measures, such as an eviction moratorium. If the statute authorizes something as extreme as quarantining infected individuals in the interests of the public’s safety, why is it, as the Court puts it, a stretch to think an eviction moratorium would also be authorized?

Like any legislation, the statute may be thought to acknowledge that since we may not know, at any particular moment, everything there is to be known about controlling infectious disease, it is prudent to provide reasonably broadly for that inevitable moment when an infectious disease presents itself in radically unprecedented features.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more than 701,000 deaths in the U.S. so far. Yet, what is a major concern for the Court in its decision? The moratorium, it emphasizes, encroaches on “an area that is the particular domain of state law: the landlord-tenant relationship,” adding that earlier decisions of the Court have insisted on exceedingly clear language when congressional legislation might change the balance between state and federal power, in particular, governmental power over private property.

It is surely curious how, for the Court, the language of the 1944 statute is not sufficiently clear that it might be thought to include an eviction moratorium, but it is indeed sufficiently clear to exclude it. More curious is how, in the estimation of the Court, measures to control a raging pandemic, that is no respecter of state borders, are to play second fiddle to a narrow state-based interest.

Bottom of Form

The best that the Court can bring itself to acknowledge how indisputable the strong interest of the American public is in resisting the spreading threat of COVID-19, but not so strong as to justifiably override the private property interests that make up the landlord-tenant relationship. These are the calculations of justices, like Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, who believe so much in what they do but understand so little of what that is, and, as a consequence, bring down upon our heads a perfect storm of irrationality that undermines the very essence of law and its purpose in society.

There can be no clearer demonstration of this than the Court’s declaration, upon closing its argument, that “… our system does not permit agencies to act unlawfully even in pursuit of desirable ends.” With what understanding of the law can it be said that to act, simply as one should, to protect human life from disease and even death is to act unlawfully? That can be only when the law is understood as a law unto itself, as self-justifying, and in no way accountable for its justification to ethics, from which all human law is ultimately derived.

Since judicial review by the U.S. Supreme Court is based on this impoverished understanding of the law, its thoroughly confused decision against the eviction moratorium is not surprising. Nevertheless, how mistaken to think that acting for the good of the public is to act unlawfully when actually it is to act ethically and must therefore be to act lawfully.

  1. Patrick Hill is an associate professor at Rutgers University and the author of the book, No Place for Ethics:Judicial Review, Legal Positivism and the Supreme Court of the United States.

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U.S. Supreme Court ends Biden’s Covid-19 eviction moratorium

Aug 27, 2021  Yahoo Finance

#EvictionMoratorium #moratoriumeviction #Biden Yahoo Finance’s Dani Romero reports on the U.S. Supreme Court blocking the Biden administration’s eviction moratorium. Watch the 2021 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting on YouTube: https://youtu.be/gx-OzwHpM9k Subscribe to Yahoo Finance: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb About Yahoo Finance: At Yahoo Finance, you get free stock quotes, up-to-date news, portfolio management resources, international market data, social interaction and mortgage rates that help you manage your financial life. Yahoo Finance Plus: With a subscription to Yahoo Finance Plus get the tools you need to invest with confidence. Discover new opportunities with expert research and investment ideas backed by technical and fundamental analysis. Optimize your trades with advanced portfolio insights, fundamental analysis, enhanced charting, and more. To learn more about Yahoo Finance Plus please visit: https://yhoo.it/33jXYBp Connect with Yahoo Finance: Get the latest news: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb Find Yahoo Finance on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2A9u5Zq Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2LMgloP Follow Yahoo Finance on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2LOpNYz Follow Cashay.com Follow Yahoo Finance Premium on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3hhcnmV

CDC Announces Targeted Eviction Moratorium After Protests

Aug 4, 2021  NBC News

The CDC has announced a new targeted eviction moratorium after the previous moratorium expired, leaving more than 10 million Americans at risk of losing their homes. NBC News’ Leigh Ann Caldwell explains how the new moratorium differs from the expired one and how Democrats were able to influence the CDC’s decision.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #Eviction #Housing #CDC

NJ eviction moratorium to end soon for some tenants

For the last 1 ½ years, renters across New Jersey have been able to keep a roof over their head regardless of nonpayment of rent, thanks to an eviction moratorium in the state. But a new law is ending that protection as of Aug. 31 for people who make more than 80% of their county’s area median income. For those who make less than 80% of the area median income, the moratorium will be extended through Dec. 31.

Tenants who make more than 80% of the area median income and who are still struggling to pay rent will have to certify under penalty of law that their failure to pay is related to COVID-19. If they can prove that, the moratorium will be extended for them.

While housing advocates say the measure will provide some relief, landlords say it continues to put the brunt of the financial weight on them.

What to know about the eviction moratorium as it nears expiration again

Aug 25, 2021  PBS NewsHour

The clock is ticking away again for those who could face eviction this fall. The CDC’s pandemic moratorium on evictions is set to expire in early October — or possibly even sooner. The Biden administration is pushing states, cities, and counties to tap into more federal aid, and get it to those who need it. But as John Yang reports, new data shows those efforts are moving much slower than needed. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Oct 4, 2021   PBSNewsHour

The “Pandora Papers,” written by a worldwide consortium of journalists, reveal how world leaders and the mega-rich can hide billions of dollars in secret offshore accounts, which investigators say drain money from government treasuries and can undermine national security. Nick Schifrin talks to Drew Sullivan, co-founder and editor of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, or OCCRP. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newsho

What are the Pandora Papers?

Oct 3, 2021  Washington Post

A massive trove of private financial records shared with The Washington Post exposes vast reaches of the secretive offshore system used to hide billions of dollars from tax authorities, creditors, criminal investigators and citizens around the world. Read more: https://wapo.st/3A0AVdi. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/ #WashingtonPost #PostDocs #PandoraPapers

The Pandora Papers: How the world of offshore finance is still flourishing | Four Corners

Oct 4, 2021  ABC News In-depth

In a major international investigation, Four Corners reveals the secrets of the Pandora Papers. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/abcnewsindepth For months, more than 600 journalists from around the world, including the ABC, the Washington Post and the BBC, have been working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists on this top-secret investigation. One of the biggest data leaks in history, the papers reveal how the wealthy and powerful are continuing to use offshore tax havens to hide their ownership of assets and stash their cash – despite attempts to rein the industry in.  _________

Political Divisions Threaten President Biden’s Agenda | Washington Week | October 1, 2021

Oct 1, 2021  Washington Week PBS

Democrats clashed over the size of President Biden’s infrastructure package, as Congress passed a bill to avoid a federal government shutdown before the deadline. The panel also discussed America’s continued division over COVID vaccines and mandates, plus a look into the testimony from military leaders on the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan. Panel: Laura Barrón-López of POLITICO, Natasha Bertrand of CNN, Garrett Haake of NBC News, Carl Hulse of The New York Times

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20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

20th Anniversary of The Sept, 11, 2001 and America After 9/11, PBS News, NBC News, CBS News, DW, BBC News, 60 Minutes, The New York Times, AXIOS, Press-Telegram, and  Encyclopedia Britannica

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 9, 10, 11 and 12, 2021

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world, Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour,

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

How 9/11 Changed American Life, Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

America After 9/11 (full documentary), Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

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9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN, Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

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9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight, Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero, Sep 9, 2021 

The New York Times:  By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

AXIOS AM: By Mike Allen, Sep 12, 2021, 20 years ago this morning

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty,  In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

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PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 12, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, September 12, President Joe Biden’s latest vaccine mandate fuels political division, the Taliban takes initial steps in forming their government, and a 9/11 survivor continues to fight for healthcare for other victims of the tragedy. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode September 11, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, September 11, the nation commemorates the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks as President Biden, Vice President Harris, and others including former presidents Obama, Clinton and Bush attend memorial events at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Jersey City, New Jersey. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour Full Episode, Sept. 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, how President Biden’s inoculation requirements for millions of Americans might be enforced in the workplace, a look at the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades, and David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart discuss the anniversary of 9/11 and the politics of vaccinations. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: 19 Americans among group allowed to leave Kabul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCjhV… What Biden’s vaccine mandates mean for companies, workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=my263… How the 9/11 attacks changed America’s role in the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXYdL… Brooks and Capehart on 9/11 anniversary, Biden’s mandates https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhi_c… Smithsonian Institution pieces together history of 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BYrJ… Educators reflect on the significance of teaching about 9/11 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35I1J… Teens facing off at U.S. Open create ‘fairy tale moment’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKjbj… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Sept. 9, 2021

Sep 9, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Taliban orders an end to all protests as they finally allow the departure of some 200 American citizens from Afghanistan. Then, we talk with Dr. Anthony Fauci about the difficult path ahead in navigating the pandemic. And, 9/11 first responders reflect on the trauma of that day and how it compares to the stresses of the current pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: DOJ sues Texas over 6-week abortion ban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmHQU… How Taliban rule triggered Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeuJp… Scattered thunderstorms complicate Louisiana’s recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KXRRP… Why the ATF is often leaderless and how that affects it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFrUS… Dr. Fauci on vaccine mandates, reopening schools, boosters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-V5Q… NYC’s first responders reflect on trauma of 9/11, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRD1n… Robert Hogue reflects on surviving 9/11 Pentagon attack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTDvG… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How the attacks of 9/11 reshaped America’s role in the world

Sep 10, 2021  PBS NewsHour

This week PBS NewsHour has been marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by exploring how they have impacted the U.S. at home and abroad. Judy Woodruff leads our latest conversation on the ways the 9/11 attacks shaped American foreign policy over the last two decades. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

9/11 – 20 Years Later – A PBS NewsHour Special Report

Premiered 5 hours ago, 9.10.2021  PBS NewsHour

Two decades after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, PBS NewsHour explores how the world has changed since that day. This documentary compiles a series of special reports to help viewers understand how the attacks on the World Trade Center towers, the Pentagon and Flight 93 have left a lasting mark on victim’s families, first responders, survivors and the nation as a whole. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How 9/11 Changed American Life | Washington Week | September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  Washington Week PBS

The panel continues the conversation, reflecting on the 20 year anniversary of 9/11. The panel also discussed how the attacks shifted American life, politics, and the impact the event had on Muslim Americans. Panel: Peter Baker of The New York Times, Asma Khalid of NPR, Martha Raddatz of ABC News, Vivian Salama of The Wall Street Journal, Pierre Thomas of ABC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

America After 9/11 (full documentary) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Sep 7, 2021  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

FRONTLINE traces the U.S. response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the devastating consequences that unfolded across four presidencies. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker and chronicler of U.S. politics Michael Kirk, this feature-length documentary draws on both new interviews and those from the dozens of documentaries Kirk and his award-winning team have made in the years since 9/11. “America After 9/11” offers an epic, two-hour re-examination of the decisions that changed the world and transformed America — from the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq and beyond to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol — and the ongoing challenges that legacy poses for the U.S. president and the country. #AmericaAfter911 #January6th For more reporting in connection with this investigation, visit FRONTLINE’s website: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/fi… Find FRONTLINE on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is produced at GBH in Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation; the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Park Foundation; and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation and additional support from Koo and Patricia Yuen.

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 11th, 2021

Sep 11, 2021  NBC News

U.S. remembers the lives lost on 9/11, families of 9/11 victims honor their loved ones, and tribute paid to heroes of Flight 93. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11th

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 10th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden responds to Republican pushback over vaccine mandate, Los Angeles school district approves Covid vaccine mandate for eligible students, and how September 11 changed security in America. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:14 Biden On Vaccine Mandate Lawsuits 04:54 Back To School Battle 07:23 America Remembers: 9/11 15:38 Afghan Refugee Flights Halted » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #September11 #Biden

NBC Nightly News Full Broadcast – September 9th, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

President Biden announces new vaccine mandates for millions of Americans, DOJ announces lawsuit over Texas abortion law, and 9/11 survivors and first responders ‘forgotten’ by health program, employees say. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:11 Biden’s Covid Strategy 8:44 DOJ Taking On Texas 10:25 American Evacuated From Afghanistan 12:57 9/11 Survivors: Broken Promises 17:19 Missing Airline Funds » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #VaccineMandates #Texas

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – September 10, 2021

Sep 10, 2021  NBC News

Reflecting on 9/11 20 years after the attacks, GOP outraged over Biden vaccine mandates, Jan. 6 committee receives first set of documents.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #NBCNews #GOP #September11

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

Sep 12, 2021  NBC News

Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy breaks down Biden’s shift in Covid strategy. Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R-Ark.) discusses the GOP response to vaccine and mask mandates. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) talks all things infrastructure. Doris Kearns Goodwin, Hallie Jackson, Kimberly Atkins Stohr and George Will join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://apps.nbcnews.com/mobile Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC #FullEpisode #MTP #Politics Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – September 12th, 2021

9/11 ceremonies, events and coverage on 20th anniversary | CBSN

Streamed live on Sep 11, 2021  CBS News

President Biden visited all three sites where planes crashed on September 11, 2001 and cities held ceremonies to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. We followed all of these events and more starting with a CBS News Special Report anchored by Norah O’Donnell. #livenews #livestream CBSN is CBS News’ 24/7 digital streaming news service featuring live, anchored coverage available for free across all platforms. Launched in November 2014, the service is a premier destination for breaking news and original storytelling from the deep bench of CBS News correspondents and reporters. CBSN features the top stories of the day as well as deep dives into key issues facing the nation and the world. CBSN has also expanded to launch local news streaming services in major markets across the country. CBSN is currently available on CBSNews.com and the CBS News app across more than 20 platforms, as well as the Paramount+ subscription service. Subscribe to the CBS News YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/cbsnews? Watch CBSN live: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7c? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Follow CBS News on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/? Like CBS News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/cbsnews? Follow CBS News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbsnews? Subscribe to our newsletters: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

9/11 – The unheeded warning | DW Documentary

Sep 10, 2021  DW Documentary

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 sent the world into a state of shock. Yet some had been loudly and publicly warning of the dangers posed by terrorism. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan Mujahideen commander, was among them. It’s September 9, 2001, two days before the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Ahmad Shah Massoud, an Afghan commander fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan, is assassinated. Who ordered his murder? The same man who masterminded the attacks on the US two days later: Osama Bin Laden. For months, Massoud had tried to make his voice heard, warning about the global dangers posed by an ascendant Taliban in Afghanistan. But Europe and the United States weren’t listening. Why not? Would heeding his warnings have affected lucrative arms deals with Pakistan? Did economic interests take precedence over security? This little-known story is told firsthand by diplomats, political leaders and military officials. It sheds new light on the events leading up to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Above all, it’s the story of a man who could have changed the fate of the world if his warnings had been heeded sooner. #documentary #dwdocumentary #September11 #USA #WorldTradeCenter ______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch top documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: ? DW Documentary (English): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary ? DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental ? DW Documentary (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia ? DW Doku (German): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH1k… ? DW Documentary (Hindi): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC46c… For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Follow DW Documentary on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Follow DW Documental on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dwdocumental We kindly ask viewers to read and stick to the DW netiquette policy on our channel: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

9/11: How the terror attack changed the world and counterterrorism strategies – BBC Newsnight

Sep 10, 2021  BBC News

Twenty years on from 9/11 and we reflect on the evolving nature of terrorism and how the attack changed the world through the transformation of US foreign policy, global security and geopolitics. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Twenty years ago, on 11 September 2001, Al-Qaeda began four coordinated terrorist attacks on the US, lasting one hour and seventeen minutes. The world watched as nineteen terrorists crashed four planes – two into the World Trade Centre, one into the Pentagon, the very symbol of American might, and the fourth into a field in Pennsylvania. To this day, Al-Qaeda’s attack 9/11 remains the deadliest terror attack in history. It was the audacity of the attack that was so shocking. The idea that in a little over an hour the United States of America – the leader of the free world – could be shown to be utterly vulnerable, not invincible. That terrible day arguably has impacted every American psyche to this day, the way America sees its place in the world and the way we see America. Newsnight’s David Grossman reports on how September 11th changed the world

60 Minutes 9/11 Archive: Under Ground Zero

Sep 9, 2021  60 Minutes

60 Minutes went beneath ground zero, where an underground city had become a 16-acre burial ground and an exhausting and dangerous cleanup job was taking place. “60 Minutes” is the most successful television broadcast in history. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 and is still a hit, over 50 seasons later, regularly making Nielsen’s Top 10. Subscribe to the “60 Minutes” YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu Watch full episodes: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F Get more “60 Minutes” from “60 Minutes: Overtime”: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr Follow “60 Minutes” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry Like “60 Minutes” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao Follow “60 Minutes” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX Subscribe to our newsletter: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ For video licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

The New York Times

By David Leonhardt, September 10, 2021

A second plane approaching the World Trade Center before hitting the South Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. Kelly Guenther for The New York Times

A missing legacy

The great crises in U.S. history have often inspired the country to great accomplishments.
The Civil War led to the emancipation of Black Americans and a sprawling program of domestic investment in railroads, colleges and more. World War II helped spark the creation of the modern middle class and cemented the so-called American Century. The Cold War caused its own investment boom, in the space program, computer technology and science education.

The attacks of Sept. 11 — which occurred on a sparkling late-summer morning 20 years ago tomorrow — had the potential to leave their own legacy of recovery. In sorrow and anger, Americans were more united in the weeks after the attacks than they had been in years. President George W. Bush’s approval rating exceeded 85 percent.

It isn’t hard to imagine how Bush might have responded to Sept. 11 with the kind of domestic mobilization of previous wars. He could have rallied the country to end its reliance on Middle Eastern oil, a reliance that both financed radical American enemies and kept the U.S. enmeshed in the region. While attacking Al Qaeda militarily, Bush also could have called for enormous investments in solar energy, wind energy, nuclear power and natural gas. It could have been transformative, for the economy, the climate and Bush’s historical standing.

Bush chose a different path, one that was ambitious in its own right: the “freedom agenda.” He hoped that his toppling of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Saddam Hussein in Iraq would inspire people around the world to rise up for democracy and defeat autocracy. For a brief period — the Arab Spring, starting in 2010 — his vision almost seemed to be playing out.

Today, though, we know it did not. Bush and his team bungled Iraq’s postwar reconstruction. In Afghanistan, the U.S. rejected a Taliban surrender offer, and the Taliban recovered to win the war. In Egypt and Syria, autocrats remain in power.

Some wars have left clear legacies of progress toward freedom — like the anti-colonization movement and the flowering of European democracy that followed World War II. The post-9/11 wars have not. If anything, the world has arguably become less democratic in recent years.

Twenty years after Sept. 11, the attacks seem likely to be remembered as a double tragedy. There were the tangible horrors: The attacks on that day killed almost 3,000 people, and the ensuing wars killed hundreds of thousands more. And there is the haunting question that lingers: Out of the trauma, did the country manage to create a better future?

A police officer covered in ash after the first building collapsed at the World Trade Center.Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Radical pessimism is a mistake,” David Ignatius argues in The Post. “These two decades witnessed many American blunders but also lessons learned.”

Twenty Years Gone”: The Atlantic’s Jennifer Senior on one family’s heartbreaking loss and struggle to move on.

“The fact that the United States itself went on to attack, and wreak even greater violence against innocent civilians around the world, was largely omitted from official narratives,” the novelist Laila Lalami writes for Times Opinion.

“The twin towers still stand because we saw them, moved in and out of their long shadows, were lucky enough to know them for a time.” Colson Whitehead wrote this essay shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. Many people revisit it.

Michele Defazio on Sept. 11, holding up a poster of her missing husband, Jason Defazio, who worked in One World Trade Center.Krista Niles/The New York Times

From The Times
Dan Barry asks what it means to “never forget” given the inevitable fallibility of human memory.

Jennifer Steinhauer speaks to veterans of two wars that followed the attacks. “I am still fighting a little bit of that war, inside,” one said.

Elizabeth Dias reports that the deluge of anti-Muslim hate that followed the attacks has forged a new generation of Muslim Americans determined to define their place in the country.

The site of the World Trade Center “still feels like an alien zone,” Michael Kimmelman, The Times’s architecture critic, writes. But the rest of Lower Manhattan has bloomed.

The remains of more than 1,100 victims have never been identified. But New York City continues to search for DNA matches, Corey Kilgannon writes — a task the chief medical examiner called “a sacred obligation.”

AXIOS AM

by Mike Allen mike@axios.com   Sep 12, 2021

  1. 20 years ago this morning

An 18-page special section in today’s New York Times includes, in tiny black type, the names of all 2,977 victims at the three 9/11 attack sites.

  1. Top talker: Blazing SigAlerts

Photo: L.A. County Fire Air Operations via AP

A wildfire — the Route fire, “0% contained” — broke out yesterday in mountainous terrain near Castaic in L.A. County, prompting the CHP to close a stretch of the 5 Freeway in both directions. (L.A. Times)

7.  Salesforce offers to relocate workers with abortion concerns
After Texas’ anti-abortion law was upheld, Salesforce told employees via Slack that the company will help them relocate “if you have concerns about access to reproductive healthcare in your state,” CNBC reports.

·  The company didn’t take a stand on the Texas law, but said: “We recognize and respect that we all have deeply held and different perspectives. … [W]e stand with all of our women at Salesforce and everywhere.”

With Florida legislators planning to take up new abortion restrictions in January, Gov. Ron DeSantis is backing away from the Texas law’s bounty provision, BuzzFeed’s Kadia Goba reports.

·  DeSantis press secretary Christina Pushaw told BuzzFeed: “Gov. DeSantis doesn’t want to turn private citizens against each other.”

  1. The Boss: ” I remember you, my friend”

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen sang “I’ll See You in My Dreams” at the 9/11 Memorial, on the site of the Twin Towers:

I got your guitar here by the bed

All your favorite records and all the books that you read

And though my soul feels like it’s been split at the seams

I’ll see you in my dreams.

Watch it on YouTube.

  1. College games honor the lost

Photo: Ryan M. Kelly/Getty Images

Above, members of the U.Va. Cavaliers marching band — most not born on 9/11 — perform a memorial salute at halftime at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville.

  • College football teamsacross the country unveiled tributes, including special uniforms.

Photo: Joann Muller/Axios

  • Axios’ Joann Mullersent me this evening shot from the Big House at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor.
  • Attendance: 108,345. Michigan says that’s “the 295th consecutive game with more than 100,000 fans at Michigan Stadium.”

More photos, videos 

  1. America on pause

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

An unfurled American flag greets the day at the Pentagon.

Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden greeted families and laid a wreath at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pa.

  • This native, 17½ ton sandstone boulderwas placed in 2011 to show the edge of the impact site in an open field, next to a hemlock grove.

More photos from Shanksville … Read Biden’s remarks.

Photo: Brittainy Newman/AP

The “Tribute in Light” beams in Lower Manhattan consist of 88 xenon light bulbs, each 7,000 watts, positioned in two 48-foot squares on the roof of the Battery Parking Garage, south of the 9/11 Memorial.

  • They can be seenfor 60 miles.

More photos from Ground Zero.

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

In photos: 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero

AXIOS: By  Erin Doherty

Remembrances of lives lost are plentiful as New York commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in Lower Manhattan near Ground Zero. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden on Saturday were joined by former presidents, family members of victims and first responders at Ground Zero in New York City to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

Driving the news: The ceremony at Ground Zero began with a moment of silence at 8:46am, when Flight 11 struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center, followed by a reading of the victims’ names who died in New York from the attack.

  • “Joe, we love and miss you more than you can ever imagine,” said Lisa Reina, who was eight months pregnant when her husband, Joseph Reina Jr., died on the deadly day, per the Washington Post.
  • “[While] 20 years feels like an eternity … it still feels like yesterday,” Reina said.
  • Bruce Springsteen also performed his song, “I’ll See You Ii My Dreams,” following the second moment of silence.
In photos:

Family members and loved ones of victims attend the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum on Sept. 11 in New York. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

NYPD and FDNY Memorial Ceremony at FDNY Engine 8, Ladder 2, Battalion 8 on Sept. 11 in New York City. Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

A member of the FDNY visits the reflecting pool. Photo: Mike Segar-Pool/Getty Images

Katie Mascali is comforted by her fiance Andre Jabban as they stand near the name of her father, Joseph Mascali, at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Photo: Craig Ruttle/PoolAFP via Getty Images

Bruce Springsteen performs during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden are joined by former presidents and others at the 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

People embrace during the annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Go deeper: Biden attends ceremony at Ground Zero on 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks

 AXIOS  Erin Doherty

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Biden attends wreath-laying ceremony at Pentagon

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Axios

Updated Sep 11, 2021 – Politics & Policy

Harris, Bush preach unity at Flight 93 memorial, 20 years on from attacks

President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff attend a wreath-laying ceremony at the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial on Sept. 11 in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Pentagon on Saturday to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The latest: Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrived at the Pentagon after visiting the Flight 93 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Ground Zero in New York City.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during a 9/11 commemoration at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President Kamala Harris joined former President George W. Bush at a ceremony on Saturday to honor the lives lost 20 years ago on United Airlines Flight 93.

Driving the news: The vice president and the 43rd president devoted much of their remarks to remembering the unity that brought Americans together after the 9/11 attacks.

Go deeper (1 min. read)

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Never Forgotten | Southern California remembers

Sept. 11, 2001

Press-Telegram <email@newsletters.presstelegram.com>   Sep 11, 2021

20 Years Since 9/11
Twenty years ago, we were rocked when terrorists attacked the United States and killed nearly 3,000 people. In addition to so many innocent lives, we lost our vital belief that we were safe, just as Americans had with the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

In our local coverage of the 20th anniversary of the attacks, we examine how we have changed since 9/11 and how lessons we learned have surfaced again in a new crisis. Finally, we honor those who lost their lives, including the many heroes who ran toward danger to help when they were needed most.

Enduring images of 9/11

By MICHELE CARDON | mcardon@scng.com and PAUL BERSEBACH | pbersebach@scng.com | Orange County Register

PUBLISHED: September 7, 2021 at 3:37 p.m. | UPDATED: September 10, 2021 at 1:06 p.m.

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Sept, 11, 2001 began like any other Tuesday. School kids ate breakfast before heading to class, and parents prepared for their workday. Terrorism, especially on American soil, was the farthest thought from most people’s minds. But before many could walk out their front door, events were unfolding on the East Coast that would change America, and the world, forever.

At 8:46 a.m. EDT, a jetliner carrying thousands of gallons of fuel slammed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. What began with confusion as to what could have gone wrong quickly turned to the realization of a planned attack as a second plane hit the South Tower 17 minutes later.

Within two hours, two other planes had crashed into the Pentagon and in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. And the twin towers fell. The attacks 20 years ago killed nearly 3,000 people, in the hijacked planes and on the ground, and injured thousands. The attacks forever changed the world.

A plane approaches New York’s World Trade Center moments before it struck the tower at left, as seen from downtown Brooklyn, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. In an unprecedented show of terrorist horror, the 110 story towers collapsed in a shower of rubble and dust after 2 hijacked airliners carrying scores of passengers slammed into them. (AP Photo/ William Kratzke)

The south tower begins to collapse as smoke billows from both towers of the World Trade Center, in New York.  (AP Photo/Jim Collins/FILE)

Two women embrace each other as they watch the World Trade Center burn following a terrorist attack on the twin skyscrapers in New York. (AP Photo/Ernesto Mora)

Chief of Staff Andy Card whispers into the ear of President George W. Bush to give him word of the plane crashes into the World Trade Center, during a visit to the Emma E. Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Fla. (AP Photo/Doug Mills)

Smoke billows from one of the towers of the World Trade Center and flames and debris explode from the second tower, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Chao Soi Cheong)

People run from the collapse of one of the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo. (AP Photo/FILE/Suzanne Plunkett)

A person falls from the north tower of New York’s World Trade Center in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, after terrorists crashed two hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center and brought down the twin 110-story towers. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File

A fiery blast rocks the World Trade Center after being hit by two planes September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

People flee the falling South Tower of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

A man with a fire extinguisher walks through rubble after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on September 11, 2001, in New York. The man was shouting as he walked looking for victims who needed assistance. Both towers collapsed after being hit by hijacked passengers planes. (Photo by DOUG KANTER/AFP via Getty Images)

People flee lower Manhattan across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001, following a terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Daniel Shanken)

A jet airliner heads into one of the World Trade Center towers for the second attack in New York.  (AP Photo/Carmen Taylor/File)

The south side of the Pentagon burns after it took a direct, devastating hit from an aircraft Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Tom Horan)

Emergency workers look at the crater created when United Airlines Flight 93 crashed near Shanksville, Pa., in this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Julie McDermott, center, walks with other victims as they make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York Tuesday Sept. 11, 2001.(AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

Pedestrians on Beekman St. flee the area of the collapsed World Trade Center in lower Manhattan following a terrorist attack on the New York landmark Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)

Survivors of the World Trade Center terrorist attacks make their way through smoke, dust and debris on Fulton St., about a block from the collapsed towers, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 in New York. (AP Photo/Gulnara Samoilova)

The twin towers of the World Trade Center burn behind the Empire State Building in New York, Sept. 11, 2001. In a horrific sequence of destruction, terrorists crashed two planes into the World Trade Center causing the twin 110-story towers to collapse. (AP Photo/Marty Lederhandler)

A helicopter flies over the Pentagon in Washington as smoke billows over the building. The terrorist-hijacked airliner that slammed into the west side of the Pentagon killed 184 people. (AP Photo/Heesoon Yim, File)

With the skeleton of the World Trade Center twin towers in the background, New York City firefighters work amid debris on Cortlandt St. after the terrorist attacks of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

As rescue efforts continue in the rubble of the World Trade Center, President George W. Bush puts his arms around firefighter Bob Beckwith while standing in front of the World Trade Center in New York. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, File)

A woman looks at missing person posters of victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on Sept. 14, 2001. (AP Photo/Robert Spencer)

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Michele Cardon | Director of Photography

Orange County Register Director of Photography Michele Cardon has worked at The Register for more than 25 years. Her editing skills have been honored by the National Press Photographer Association, Society of News Design and Pictures of the Year. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Journalism. As a Register photo editor, Michele has covered events such as the World Series, Stanley Cup Finals, NBA Championship, Oscars, Emmys, Los Angeles riots, and the Laguna Beach firestorm.

mcardon@scng.com

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September 11 attacks 

Encyclopedia Britannica

September 11 attacks, also called 9/11 attacks, series of airline hijackings and suicide attacks committed in 2001 by 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al-Qaeda against targets in the United States, the deadliest terrorist attacks on American soil in U.S. history. The attacks against New York City and Washington, D.C., caused extensive death and destruction and triggered an enormous U.S. effort to combat terrorism. Some 2,750 people were killed in New York, 184 at the Pentagon, and 40 in Pennsylvania (where one of the hijacked planes crashed after the passengers attempted to retake the plane); all 19 terrorists died (see Researcher’s Note: September 11 attacks). Police and fire departments in New York were especially hard-hit: hundreds had rushed to the scene of the attacks, and more than 400 police officers and firefighters were killed.

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