Remembering Madeleine Albright, First Woman to Become Secretary of State of U.S.A. Part 1

Remembering Madeleine Albright, First Woman to Become Secretary of State of U.S.A. Part 1

Madeleine Jana Korbel Albright[1] (born Marie Jana Korbelová; May 15, 1937 – March 23, 2022)[2][3] was an American diplomat and political scientist who served as the 64th United States secretary of state in the Clinton administration from 1997 to 2001. A member of the Democratic Party, Albright was the first woman to hold the post.[4]

Albright immigrated with her family to the United States in 1948 from Communist Czechoslovakia. Her father, diplomat Josef Korbel, settled the family in Denver, Colorado, and she became a U.S. citizen in 1957.[5][6] Albright graduated from Wellesley College in 1959 and earned a PhD from Columbia University in 1975, writing her thesis on the Prague Spring.[7] She worked as an aide to Senator Edmund Muskie before taking a position under Zbigniew Brzezinski on the National Security Council. She served in that position until 1981, when President Jimmy Carter left office.[8]

After leaving the National Security Council, Albright joined the academic faculty of Georgetown University and advised Democratic candidates regarding foreign policy. After Bill Clinton‘s victory in the 1992 presidential election, Albright helped assemble his National Security Council.

Vice President Al Gore swears in Madeleine Albright as the nation’s first female secretary of state on Jan. 23, 1997.                  Diana Walker—Getty Images

President Clinton appointed her United States ambassador to the United Nations from 1993 to 1997, a position she held until elevation as secretary of state. Secretary Albright served in that capacity until Clinton left office in 2001.

Albright served as chair of the Albright Stonebridge Group, a consulting firm, and was the Michael and Virginia Mortara Endowed Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.[9] 

Albright received the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama at the White House on May 29, 2012.                                                                 Alex Wong/Getty Images  

She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. president Barack Obama in May 2012.[10] Albright served on the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.[11]

Madeleine Albright in childhood

Early life and career

Albright was born Marie Jana Korbelová in 1937 in the Smíchov district of PragueCzechoslovakia.[12] Her parents were Josef Korbel, a Czech diplomat, and Anna Korbel (née Spieglová).[13] At the time of Albright’s birth, Czechoslovakia had been independent for less than 20 years, having gained independence from Austria-Hungary after World War I. Her father was a supporter of Tomáš Masaryk and Edvard Beneš.[14] Marie Jana had a younger sister Katherine[15] and a younger brother John (these versions of their names are Anglicized).[16]

When Marie Jana was born, her father was serving as a press-attaché at the Czechoslovak Embassy in Belgrade. The signing of the Munich Agreement in September 1938—and the German occupation of Czechoslovakia by Adolf Hitler‘s troops—forced the family into exile because of their links with Beneš.[17]

Josef and Anna converted from Judaism to Catholicism in 1941.[13] Marie Jana and her siblings were raised in the Roman Catholic faith.[18][19] In 1997, Albright said her parents never told her or her two siblings about their Jewish ancestry and heritage.[18]

The family moved to Britain in May 1939. Here her father worked for Beneš’s Czechoslovak government-in-exile. Her family first lived on Kensington Park Road in Notting Hill, London—where they endured the worst of the Blitz—but later moved to Beaconsfield, then Walton-on-Thames, on the outskirts of London.[20] They kept a large metal table in the house, which was intended to shelter the family from the recurring threat of German air raids.[21] While in England, Marie Jana was one of the children shown in a documentary film designed to promote sympathy for war refugees in London.[22]

After the defeat of the Nazis in the European theatre of World War II and the collapse of Nazi Germany and the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, the Korbel family returned to Prague.[18] Korbel was appointed as press attaché at Czechoslovakian Embassy in Yugoslavia, and the family moved to Belgrade—then part of Yugoslavia—which was governed by the Communist Party. Korbel was concerned his daughter would be exposed to Marxism in a Yugoslav school, and so she was taught privately by a governess before being sent to the Prealpina Institut pour Jeunes Filles finishing school in Chexbres, on Lake Geneva in Switzerland.[23] She learned to speak French while in Switzerland and changed her name from Marie Jana to Madeleine.[24]

The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia took over the government in 1948, with support from the Soviet Union. As an opponent of communism, Korbel was forced to resign from his position.[25] He later obtained a position on a United Nations delegation to Kashmir. He sent his family to the United States, by way of London, to wait for him when he arrived to deliver his report to the UN Headquarters, then located in Lake Success, New York.[25]        

Madeleine Albright in her youth    en.24smi.org

Madeleine Korbel spent her teen years in Denver and in 1955 graduated from the Kent Denver School in Cherry Hills Village, a suburb of Denver. She founded the school’s international relations club and was its first president.[32] She attended Wellesley College, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, on a full scholarship, majoring in political science, and graduated in 1959.[33] The topic of her senior thesis was Zden?k Fierlinger, a former Czechoslovakian prime minister.[34] She became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1957, and joined the College Democrats of America.[35]

Madeleine Albright with her husband

While home in Denver from Wellesley, Korbel worked as an intern for The Denver Post. There she met Joseph Albright. He was the nephew of Alicia Patterson, owner of Newsday and wife of philanthropist Harry Frank Guggenheim.[36] Korbel converted to the Episcopal Church at the time of her marriage.[18][19] The couple were married in Wellesley in 1959, shortly after her graduation.[33] They lived in Rolla, Missouri, while Joseph completed his military service at nearby Fort Leonard Wood. During this time, Albright worked at The Rolla Daily News.[37]

The couple moved to Joseph’s hometown of Chicago, Illinois, in January 1960. Joseph worked at the Chicago Sun-Times as a journalist, and Albright worked as a picture editor for Encyclopædia Britannica.[38] The following year, Joseph Albright began work at Newsday in New York City, and the couple moved to Garden City on Long Island.[39] 

Madeleine Albright with her children

That year, she gave birth to twin daughters, Alice Patterson Albright and Anne Korbel Albright. The twins were born six weeks premature and required a long hospital stay. As a distraction, Albright began Russian language classes at Hofstra University in the Village of Hempstead nearby.[39]

In 1962, the family moved to Washington, D.C., where they lived in Georgetown. Albright studied international relations and continued in Russian at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, a division of Johns Hopkins University in the capital.[40]

Joseph’s aunt Alicia Patterson died in 1963 and the Albrights returned to Long Island with the notion of Joseph taking over the family newspaper business.[41] Albright gave birth to another daughter, Katharine Medill Albright, in 1967. She continued her studies at Columbia University’s Department of Public Law and Government.[42] (It was later renamed as the political science department, and is located within the School of International and Public Affairs.) She earned a certificate in Russian, an M.A. and a PhD, writing her master’s thesis on the Soviet diplomatic corps and her doctoral dissertation on the role of journalists in the Prague Spring of 1968.[43] She also took a graduate course given by Zbigniew Brzezinski, who later became her boss at the U.S. National Security Council.[44]

Wikipedia

Joseph was a reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times. He became famous in 1961 after publishing a report on the scandalous meeting of Richard Nixon with his supporters (Joseph hid in the hotel bathroom and recorded the conversation). In 1970, the couple sold all News Day shares for $ 37.5 million.

After 23 years of marriage, on January 31, 1983, the couple divorced. After the divorce, Madeleine got a three-storied house in Georgetown, a wealthy suburb of Washington, and a farm in Virginia, as well as a large part of his fortune.                             en.24smi.org

Madeleine Albright with Newspaper Staff at Wellesley College ca. 1958.

 Brooks Kraft LLC/Sygma/Getty Images         Time

Madeleine Albright began her political career early

Madeleine Albright was invited to work in the White House after the 1976 U.S. presidential election of Jimmy Carter. Madeleine’s former professor at Columbia University, Zbigniew Brzezinski, became National Security Adviser and recruited his student to work in the West Wing as the National Security Council’s congressional liaison.

As a Democratic Party activist, in 1984 she became a foreign policy advisor, working with Vice-Presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro when Walter Mondale ran for president. After that, she headed the Center for National Policy, which was created to strengthen the Democratic Party. At that time, Albright managed to broaden contacts and in 1988 became a foreign policy advisor, briefing Presidential candidate Michael Dukakis.

During the presidential debate of Dukakis and his adversary George W. Bush in Washington, Madeleine Albright met Bill Clinton, the then-governor of Arkansas. In 1989, she advised Clinton to join the Council on Foreign Relations (an influential U.S. non-governmental organization), which Clinton did not forget. After becoming president, he appointed Madeleine Albright U.S. Permanent Representative to the U.N.    en.24smi.org

United Kingdom Ambassador to the United Nations, Sir David Hannay, and US Ambassador to the UN Madeleine Albright vote during a Security Council meeting in New York to allow Iraq to export a limited amount of oil to cover the cost of humanitarian supplies for its population on April 14, 1995.  TIME

Timothy Clary—AFP/Getty Images

While working at the U.N. as the United States representative, she played a key role when Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic joined NATO. She is known for her involvement in the use of force during the conflict in the Balkans. Many people blame her for the mass killing of Serbs in Kosovo and call her the “executioner of Serbia.”

Madeleine Albright as U.S. Secretary of State

When Clinton began his second term in January 1997, following his re-election, he required a new Secretary of State, as incumbent Warren Christopher was retiring.[66] The top level of the Clinton administration was divided into two camps on selecting the new foreign policy. Outgoing Chief of Staff Leon Panetta favored Albright, but a separate faction argued, “anybody but Albright”, with Sam Nunn as its first choice. Albright orchestrated a campaign on her own behalf that proved successful.[67] When Albright took office as the 64th U.S. Secretary of State on January 23, 1997, she became the first female U.S. Secretary of State and the highest-ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government at the time of her appointment.[68] Not being a natural-born citizen of the U.S., she was not eligible as a U.S. presidential successor.[69]

Wikipedia

President Bill Clinton with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright in 1999.Cynthia Johnson / Getty Images file      

Madeleine Albright has often sharply criticized the foreign policy of Russia, in particular, President Vladimir Putin:

“He is smart, but a truly evil man. A KGB officer, who wants to keep everything under control and believes that everyone conspires against Russia. It is not true. Putin had bad cards, but they were played well. At least, in the short-term. I think his goal is to undermine and split the E.U. He wants to drive NATO from his sphere of influence.”

President Bill Clinton confers with Albright before delivering the final statement at the Middle East Summit in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt, on October 17, 2000 [File: Jerome Delay/AP Photo]      

When The Washington Post reported on Albright’s Jewish heritage shortly after she had become Secretary of State in 1997, Albright said that the report was a “major surprise”.[149] Albright said that she did not learn until age 59[150] that both her parents were born and raised in Jewish families. As many as a dozen of her relatives in Czechoslovakia—including three of her grandparents—had been murdered in the Holocaust.[18][19][151]

(Al Jazeera)

In the lead-up to the Iraq war in 2003, Albright said the invasion was justified, based on allegations that Baghdad possessed weapons of mass destruction. But she argued that the country did not pose an immediate threat to the US and called for keeping focus on defeating al-Qaeda.

She would later come out forcefully against the war. “Iraq is going to go down in history as the greatest disaster in American foreign policy,” she told Al Jazeera in a 2007 interview.

During efforts to press North Korea to end its nuclear weapons programme, which were eventually unsuccessful, Albright travelled to Pyongyang in 2000 to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, becoming the highest-ranking US official to visit the country.

While hailed in some circles as a feminist icon, critics have criticised Albright’s support for US wars and sanctions.

“Madeline Albright was one of my earliest lessons in the bankruptcy of identity politics. It doesn’t matter if you are the first anything if your politics perpetuate the status quo of racial violence, imperial war making, and capitalist extraction/exploitation,” Palestinian-American author and activist Noura Erakat wrote on Twitter on Wednesday.

State Department spokesperson Ned Price called Albright a “trailblazer” on Wednesday.

“The impact that she has had on this building is felt every single day and just about every single corridor,” Price told reporters.

Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the US House of Representatives, eulogised Albright as a “towering champion for peace, diplomacy and democracy”.

“Her historic tenure as our nation’s first woman to serve as our top diplomat paved the way for generations of women to serve at the highest levels of our government and represent America abroad,” Pelosi said.          (Al Jazeera)

Former President Barack Obama said in a statement, “Madeleine Albright helped bring peace to the Balkans, paved the way for progress in some of the most unstable corners of the world, and was a champion for democratic values. And as an immigrant herself, she brought a unique and important perspective to her trailblazing career.”

Obama also recounted an interaction he said Albright had with an Ethiopian man at a naturalization ceremony.

Obama said the “man came up to Madeleine and said, ‘Only in America could a refugee from Africa meet the Secretary of State.’ She replied, ‘Only in America could a refugee from Central Europe become Secretary of State.'”   ABC News

Madeleine Albright, 1st female secretary of state, dead at 84

Madeleine Albright’s family said the former secretary of state died Wednesday from cancer.

Alex Wong/Getty Images, FILE   ABC News

Albright died from cancer in Washington, D.C., on March 23, 2022, at the age of 84.[157][158][159] Many political figures paid tribute to her, including presidents Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Joe Biden, and former British prime minister Tony Blair.[120]

US President Joe Biden paid tribute to Albright, saying she was a “force for goodness, grace, and decency – and for freedom”. 

 Diana Walker/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Georgetown Univiversity professor Madeleine Albright, foreign policy adviser to presiden…Read More   ABC News

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Madeleine Albright testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the Peace Powers Act and the National Security Revitalization Act in 1995.

Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images

Albright proved adept at making complicated foreign policy accessible to the public.     NPR

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright displays the instruments of accession that brought Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic into NATO.

Cliff Schiappa/AFP via Getty Images

As secretary of state, Albright promoted the eastward expansion of NATO and the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons.     NPR

Douglas Graham/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearin…Read More ABC News

Madeleine Albright and Representative Barbara Mikulski greet each other at the commemorative ceremony of the NATO Summit in Washington on April 23, 1999. 

Stephen Jaffe—AFP/Getty Images          TIME

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright being interviewed by John F. Kennedy Jr. for George Magazine, 1998.

 David Hume Kennerly—Getty Images  TIME

Albright with Benjamin Netanyahu (left) and Yasser Arafat at the Wye River Memorandum, 1998  Wikipedia

https://web.archive.org/web/20041108024912/http://telaviv.usembassy.gov/publish/peace/october98/photo2.html

With NATO officers during NATO Ceremony of Accession of New Members, 1999 Wikipedia

BasilioC – Own work

Madeleine Albright at the World Economic Forum Wikipedia

https://www.flickr.com/photos/worldeconomicforum/3273672687/

Albright holds a bat before throwing out the first pitch before the game between the Kansas City Royals and the Baltimore Orioles during opening day at Camden Yards in 2002.

Ted Mathias/AFP via Getty Images   NPR

Albright remained an active professor at Georgetown University, training the next generation of diplomats.       

Madeleine Albright, seen here in 2009, served as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and secretary of state.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images             NPR

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry greets Albright, February 6, 2013 Wikipedia

https://www.flickr.com/photos/statephotos/8451009047/sizes/o/in/photostream/

Madeleine Albright, photographed in her sitting room, opposite her office in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 12, 2016.

Luisa Dörr for TIME

Bob Schieffer and Madeleine Albright at the LBJ Presidential Library in 2017 Wikipedia

from Austin – DIG14155-46

BOOKS    NPR

Madeleine Albright’s teaching continues — through these books  

BOOKS  NPR

How Madeleine Albright used jewelry as a diplomatic tool

Pins and broaches worn by former Secretary Albright are seen at the Mint Museum on Sept. 3, 2012, in Charlotte, N.C.

Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images     NPR

Madeleine Albright’s brooches

An interesting fact is her impressive collection of pins. In 2009-2010, she exhibited them at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City. Most of them have no artistic or jewelry value, but attract people as a symbol of a new approach to diplomacy.

Madeleine Albright is naturally straightforward. But, as a diplomat, she could not always express her opinion, communicating with an opponent. Madeleine is a woman who came up with her diplomatic language, “brooch language.” en.24smi.org 

In addition to English, Russian, and Czech, Albright spoke French, German, Polish, and Serbo-Croatian.[152] She also understood spoken Slovak.[153]

Albright mentioned her physical fitness and exercise regimen in several interviews. In 2006, she said she was capable of leg pressing 400 pounds (180 kg).[154][155] Albright was listed as one of the fifty best-dressed over 50s by The Guardian in March 2013.[156]

Madeleine Albright: My Life With Pins

Nov 15, 2012  Newfields

Madeleine Albright: My Life With Pins While serving as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and as Secretary of State, Madeleine Albright became known for using jewelry as a tools for diplomacy. Hear her discuss her collection of more than 200 pins, from the gold serpent brooch she wore in response to a poem published by Saddam Hussein’s press, to gifts—like the pin she received from the family of a woman who died as a result of Hurricane Katrina. The program includes an audience Q&A with Secretary Albright moderated by Maxwell Anderson, The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO of IMA. This event took place on November 11, 2010 at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Madeleine Albright, first woman to become secretary of state, dies at 84

Mar 23, 2022  PBS NewsHour

From the very heights of government and diplomacy, to fierce advocacy for democracy and refugees, Madeleine Albright set a new and trailblazing standard. The first woman to become secretary of state died Wednesday afternoon in Washington, but leaves an impressive legacy. Nick Schifrin reports and Judy Woodruff speaks with former President Bill Clinton by phone to discuss her life and career. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Remembering the life and legacy of Madeleine Albright

Mar 23, 2022  PBS NewsHour

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who died Wednesday after a battle with cancer, was known by most everyone in Washington, D.C. in the world of politics, statecraft, and journalism. Susan Rice, one of Albright’s longtime friends and one of her successors as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, joins Judy Woodruff to discuss her legacy. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

‘Irreplaceable’ | Madeleine Albright’s friends remember her contributions to DC

Mar 23, 2022  WUSA9

Albright instructed students at Georgetown University for 40 years all the while attending and serving local churches in the District. » Subscribe to WUSA9: https://bit.ly/2lO8e2F FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA – Twitter: https://twitter.com/wusa9 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wusa9 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wusa9 NEWS TIPS – Email: newstips@wusa9.com » Subscribe to WUSA9: https://bit.ly/2lO8e2F FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA – Twitter: https://twitter.com/wusa9 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wusa9 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wusa9 NEWS TIPS – Email: newstips@wusa9.com

Mika On Madeleine Albright: I Will Miss Her Deeply

Mar 24, 2022  MSNBC

Madeleine Albright, the first woman to serve as the U.S. secretary of state, died Wednesday at the age of 84, her family said in a statement. Mika Brzezinski and the Morning Joe panel remember Albright’s life and legacy. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc About: MSNBC is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, MSNBC offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Mika On Madeleine Albright: I Will Miss Her Deeply

Madeleine Albright Says ‘See Something, Say Something, Do Something’

Apr 10, 2018  The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

Former Sec. of State and ‘Fascism: A Warning’ author Madeleine Albright tells Stephen the warning signs of a strongman. Subscribe To “The Late Show” Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/ColbertYouTube For more content from “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert”, click HERE: http://bit.ly/1AKISnR Watch full episodes of “The Late Show” HERE: http://bit.ly/1Puei40 Like “The Late Show” on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1df139Y Follow “The Late Show” on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1dMzZzG Follow “The Late Show” on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1JlGgzw Follow “The Late Show” on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/29wfREj Follow “The Late Show” on Tumblr HERE: http://bit.ly/29DVvtR Watch The Late Show with Stephen Colbert weeknights at 11:35 PM ET/10:35 PM CT. Only on CBS. Get the CBS app for iPhone & iPad! Click HERE: http://bit.ly/12rLxge Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream live TV, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B — The Late Show with Stephen Colbert is the premier late night talk show on CBS, airing at 11:35pm EST, streaming online via CBS All Access, and delivered to the International Space Station on a USB drive taped to a weather balloon. Every night, viewers can expect: Comedy, humor, funny moments, witty interviews, celebrities, famous people, movie stars, bits, humorous celebrities doing bits, funny celebs, big group photos of every star from Hollywood, even the reclusive ones, plus also jokes.

Bill Clinton: Madeleine Albright Represented The Best Of America

Mar 24, 2022  MSNBC

Former President Bill Clinton joins Morning Joe to discuss the life and legacy of first female Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who died at the age of 84. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc About: MSNBC is the premier destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, MSNBC offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Bill Clinton: Madeleine Albright Represented The Best Of America

Hillary Clinton and Madeleine Albright Speak at the Women in Public Service Institute

WellesleyCollege

On Monday, June 11, 2012, the inaugural Women in Public Service Institute opened at Wellesley College. The two-week program for emerging women leaders is part of a global project launched by the U.S. Department of State and women’s colleges of the Seven Sisters—Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Smith, and Wellesley—with a goal to get world leadership from 17.5% female to “50% by 2050.” Speakers included: Former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright ’59, introduced by Ambassador Michele Sison ’81 U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton ’69, introduced by Wellesley College President H. Kim Bottomly A text transcript of Secretary Clinton’s remarks is available at http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/201…. Learn more about the opening ceremonies: http://new.wellesley.edu/news/wps Learn more about the Institute: http://womeninpublicservice.org/insti…

Wellesley College, Politics and Prose, GrassRoots Community Network, ASPEN INSTITUTE,

Madeleine Albright, “Fascism: A Warning”

Apr 18, 2018  Politics and Prose

Madeleine Albright discusses her book, “Fascism: A Warning”, at a Politics and Prose event at Sixth and I in Washington, DC on 4/16/18. Presidential Medal of Freedom honoree Madeleine Albright is the first woman ever to serve as U.S. Secretary of State. Over her long career as a diplomat, Albright watched Fascism rise and endure. In Fascism: A Warning, she shows us how its legacy shapes today’s world. Albright believes that the momentum toward democracy that swept the world when the Berlin Wall fell has gone into reverse. Extremists on the right and left are taking power all over the globe, and we must join forces to resist in order to avoid repeating the horrors of the past. In this call to arms, Albright gives us the lessons we should take from the past, the questions we need to ask in the present, and the tools we can use to fight for our future. Albright is in conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg, editor in chief of The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting https://www.politics-prose.com/book/9… Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics and Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.’s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics and Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/ Produced by Tom Warren

ASPEN INSTITUTE

The Crisis with Russia – Implications for the U.S. and Europe with Madeleine Albright

Mar 24, 2022  GrassRoots  Community Network

Filmed on 08/08/2014 Also featuring Robert Gates,Condoleezza Rice, and Nicholas Burns. This talk is part of The Aspen Institute- McCloskey Speaker Series. GrassRoots TV is the country’s first and oldest community cable television station. https://bit.ly/GRTVContribute to contribute! Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE, HIT LIKE and leave a COMMENT to let us know if you enjoyed this video, it is important to us and the community for you to become part of the conversation. Thanks for tuning in! Subscribe for more videos: https://bit.ly/2Ycpi4P Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GrassRootsCo… Twitter: https://twitter.com/grassrootstv Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/grassroots-com… Web: http://www.grassrootstv.org/

For more information, please visit the following links:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madeleine_Albright

https://en.24smi.org/celebrity/101620-madeleine-albright.html

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/3/23/madeleine-albright-former-u-s-secretary-of-state-dies-at-84

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/madeleine-albright-1st-female-secretary-state-dead-84/story?id=83627652

https://time.com/5505054/madeleine-albright-dies/

https://www.npr.org/2022/03/24/1075929885/madeleine-albright-trailblazing-diplomat-and-mentor-dies-at-84

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/madeleine-albright-first-female-secretary-state-dies-84-rcna21247

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PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode June 19, 2021

Jun 19, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, June 19, the nation’s newest federal holiday, Juneteenth, and Iran’s hard-line candidate, Ebrahim Raisi wins the presidential election. Also, inside Maryland’s truth and reconciliation process as part of the state’s reckoning with its racist, violent past. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 18, 2021

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Streamed live on Jun 18, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 17, 2021

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Jun 17, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate Thursday on the NewsHour, the Affordable Care Act survives a third major Supreme Court argument. We talk to the secretary of health and human services about the challenges still ahead. Then, counterterrorism forces in Iraq search for remnants of the Islamic State — with civilians often caught in the middle. And, we examine the emotional toll gun violence takes on youth who have lost a loved one. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – June 20th, 2021

Jun 20, 2021   NBC News

Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rob Portman (R-Ohio) discuss the future of bipartisanship and President Biden’s infrastructure plan. Fiona Hill breaks down the Biden-Putin summit. Ashley Parker, Cornell Belcher, Brad Todd and Amna Nawaz join the Meet the Press roundtable.» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

NBC News NOW Full Broadcast – June 18th, 2021

Jun 18, 2021  NBC News

A look into the new Covid variant and what it’s mutation means for U.S. residents, fact checking the ongoing election audit in Maricopa County, AZ, as it enters the final stage of the controversial process, Juneteenth cooking traditions and the significance behind them.  » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – June 17th, 2021

Jun 17, 2021  NBC News

Cities and states across the west experiencing record high temperatures, Supreme Court rejects challenge to Affordable Care Act, and White House to develop antiviral Covid pills as delta variant spreads. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 02:41 Record Breaking Heat Wave In The West 04:56 Obamacare Supreme Court Victory 07:23 Anti-Covid Pills 09:08 Biden’s Next Challenges 10:39 America The Vulnerable: No Access To Water 14:53 Juneteenth National Holiday 18:36 Inspiring America: Love Dad » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews Connect with NBC Nightly News online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNightlyNews.com: https://nbcnews.to/2wFotQ8 Find Nightly News on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2TZ1PhF Follow Nightly News on Twitter: https://bit.ly/1yFY2s4 Follow Nightly News on Instagram: https://bit.ly/2tEncJD NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. #NBCNews #Obamacare #Covid

Can You Hear Us Now: Juneteenth Edition

Jun 19, 2021  NBC News

This is a rebroadcast which originally aired on June 19, 2020. NBC News Now and NBCBLK present ‘Can You Hear Us Now: Juneteenth’ an examination of how free African Americans really are, hosted by Trymaine Lee. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC

NPR: Photos – Americans Celebrate Juneteenth After It Becomes A National Holiday

June 19, 20217:12 PM ET

ELENA MOORE Twitter

People watch the Juneteenth Parade in historic Galveston, Texas on Saturday — where 156 years ago news reached the city that slavery had been abolished.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Juneteenth celebrations are underway across the United States, commemorating the 156th anniversary of the date that is often considered the end of chattel slavery in the country.

Events this year come two days after Presidet Biden signed the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act into law, which is the latest national holiday to be recognized since Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 1983.

 

POLITICS

Juneteenth Is Now A Federal Holiday

It dates to June 19, 1865, when Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger of the Union Army arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce that enslaved people were now free. This came two months after the end of the Civil War and over two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which was supposed to free all slaves living in Confederate states.

The holiday has gone on to be a cause for celebration, remembrance and a call to action as Americans continue to reckon with the country’s history of systemic racism.

HISTORY

Slavery Didn’t End On Juneteenth. Here’s What You Should Know About This Important Day

Commemorative events ranging from festivals and celebrations to rallies and memorials are expected to take place throughout the weekend.

Galveston

People admire a new mural created for Juneteenth that chronicles what happened in Galveston 156 years ago. The mural was created as part of the city’s Juneteenth Legacy Project.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

A Black Lives Matter banner is draped off the back of a pickup truck during a city’s parade.

Go Nakamura/Getty Images

Brooklyn

Activists unveil a new memorial honoring George Floyd in Flatbush Junction on Saturday morning. Terrance Floyd, center, the brother of George Floyd, attended and spoke at the event.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Dancers of the P.U.S.H. (Practice Until Something Happens) dance team perform at a Juneteenth rally outside the Brooklyn Library.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Tulsa

Marlon F. Hall leads a yoga class next to Interstate 244, which runs through the Tulsa neighborhood of Greenwood, the location of the Tulsa Race Massacre 100 years ago. Tulsa’s celebration of Juneteenth comes less than three weeks after the anniversary.

Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

A father and son take a selfie while visiting Greenwood’s Black Wall Street Memorial on Saturday.

Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Louisville

Louisville residents march in honor of Juneteenth, steered by the River City Drum Corps. The crowd heads to the launch of the Roots 101 Museum’s newest art project, which spotlights the city’s history with slavery.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A woman displays an embroidered “1865” in her hair while attending the launch of a new art project at Louisville’s Roots 101 Museum on Saturday. The project, titled “On the Banks of Freedom,” explores Louisville’s participation in slavery and commemorates the lives of enslaved people whose names were not recorded.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Detroit

A mural displaying the words “Power To The People” is repainted in honor of Juneteenth by students studying at the University Prep Art Design. The mural was first painted last year for the holiday.

Ed White/AP

Atlanta

Participants walk in Atlanta’s Juneteenth parade, rain or shine.

Megan Varner/Getty Images

Food vendors gather together on Friday in Atlanta’s Castleberry Hill to honor Juneteenth. The event, named, “Celebration of Truth,” was hosted by The Black News Network.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Black News Chan

Boston

Acting Mayor Kim Janey, right, takes a photo as Bostonians gather together on Friday in Nubian Square. Janey is the first woman and first Black person to serve as mayor of Boston.

Elise Amendola/AP

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/19/1008368899/photos-americans-celebrate-juneteenth-after-it-becomes-a-national-holiday

 

NPR: Slavery Didn’t End On Juneteenth. What You Should Know About This Important Day

June 17, 20216:00 AM ET

SHARON PRUITT-YOUNG

 

Emancipation Day is celebrated in 1905 in Richmond, Va., the onetime capital of the Confederacy.

Library of Congress

It goes by many names. Whether you call it Emancipation Day, Freedom Day or the country’s second Independence Day, Juneteenth is one of the most important anniversaries in our nation’s history.

On June 19, 1865, Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, who had fought for the Union, led a force of soldiers to Galveston, Texas, to deliver a very important message: The war was finally over, the Union had won, and it now had the manpower to enforce the end of slavery.

The announcement came two months after the effective conclusion of the Civil War, and even longer since President Abraham Lincoln had first signed the Emancipation Proclamation, but many enslaved Black people in Texas still weren’t free, even after that day.

That was 156 years ago. Here are the basics of Juneteenth that everyone should know.

What Juneteenth represents

First things first: Juneteenth gets its name from combining “June” and “nineteenth,” the day that Granger arrived in Galveston, bearing a message of freedom for the slaves there.

Upon his arrival, he read out General Order No. 3, informing the residents that slavery would no longer be tolerated and that all slaves were now free and would henceforth be treated as hired workers if they chose to remain on the plantations, according to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

General Order No. 3 was the final execution and fulfillment of the terms of the Emancipation Proclamation. The people to whom this order was addressed were the last group of Americans to be informed that all formerly enslaved persons were now free.

National Archives

“The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired laborer,” the order reads, in part.

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It’s perhaps unsurprising that many former slaves did not stay on the plantations as workers and instead left in search of new beginnings or to find family members who had been sold away.

“It immediately changed the game for 250,000 people,” Shane Bolles Walsh, a lecturer with the University of Maryland’s African American Studies Department, told NPR.

Enslaved Black people, now free, had ample cause to celebrate. As Felix Haywood, a former slave, recalled: “Everybody went wild. We all felt like heroes … just like that, we were free.”

Slavery did not end on Juneteenth

When Granger arrived in Galveston, there still existed around 250,000 slaves and they were not all freed immediately, or even soon. It was not uncommon for slave owners, unwilling to give up free labor, to refuse to release their slaves until forced to, in person, by a representative of the government, historian Henry Louis Gates Jr. wrote. Some would wait until one final harvest was complete, and some would just outright refuse to submit. It was a perilous time for Black people, and some former slaves who were freed or attempted to get free were attacked and killed.

For Confederate states like Texas, even before Juneteenth, there existed a “desire to hold on to that system as long as they could,” Walsh explained to NPR.

Before the reading of General Order No. 3, many slave owners in Confederate states simply chose not to tell their slaves about the Emancipation Proclamation and did not honor it. They got away with it because, before winning the war, Union soldiers were largely unable to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation in Southern states. Still, even though slavery in America would not truly come to an end until the ratification of the 13th Amendment, the Emancipation Proclamation still played a pivotal role in that process, historian Lonnie Bunch told NPR in 2013.

“What the Emancipation Proclamation does that’s so important is it begins a creeping process of emancipation where the federal government is now finally taking firm stands to say slavery is wrong and it must end,” Bunch said.

People have celebrated Juneteenth any way they can

After they were freed, some former slaves and their descendants would travel to Galveston annually in honor of Juneteenth. That tradition soon spread to other states, but it wasn’t uncommon for white people to bar Black people from celebrating in public spaces, forcing Black people to get creative. In one such case, Black community leaders in Houston saved $1,000 to purchase land in 1872 that would be devoted specifically to Juneteenth celebrations, according to the Houston Parks and Recreation Department. That land became Emancipation Park, a name that it still bears.

Juneteenth is celebrated in Houston’s Emancipation Park, which was created specifically for such celebrations, in 1880.

Wikimedia Commons

” ‘If you want to commemorate something, you literally have to buy land to commemorate it on’ is, I think, just a really potent example of the long-lasting reality of white supremacy,” Walsh said.

Nevertheless, Black Americans found a way to continue to celebrate and lift one another up. Early on, Juneteenth celebrations often involved helping newly freed Black folks learn about their voting rights, according to the Texas State Historical Association. Rodeos and horseback riding were also common. Now, Juneteenth celebrations commonly involve cookouts, parades, church services, musical performances and other public events, Walsh explained.

People celebrate last year’s Juneteenth by riding horses through Washington Park in Chicago. This year, it is a federal holiday.

Natasha Moustache/Getty Images

It’s a day to “commemorate the hardships endured by ancestors,” Walsh said. He added, “It really exemplifies the survival instinct, the ways that we as a community really make something out of nothing. … It’s about empowerment and hopefulness.”

And there’s reason to be hopeful. After literal decades of activists campaigning for change, Congress has approved Juneteenth as a federal holiday.

 

CorrectionJune 19, 2021

A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Black community leaders bought the land for Emancipation Park in Houston in 1867. The land was purchased and park established in 1872.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/2021/06/17/1007315228/juneteenth-what-is-origin-observation

The Atlantic: Black Joy-Not Corporate Acknowledgment – Is the Heart of Juneteenth                                                                                                                    

Companies and state governments are finally recognizing Emancipation Day as an official holiday, but black Americans have honored its significance all along.

By Kellie Carter Jackson

Historically, Juneteenth has not been widely recognized outside of black communities. (Library of Congress)

JUNE 19, 2020

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In 2002 I was at the University of Iowa conducting research on the history of Emancipation Day celebrations in the state. I remember at one point being somewhat baffled by what Leslie Schwalm, the professor I was working with, had found: From 1865 to 1963, there were more than 200 Emancipation Day festivities in Iowa alone. I had always thought of the event as a Texas holiday.

While most enslaved people were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation put forth by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, those in Texas weren’t made aware of the decree until 1865. On June 19 of that year, Major General Gordon Granger landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war was over and the enslaved were now, finally, free. Scholars have debated the many reasons for the two-year delay, but one thing is clear: Black people in almost every state have celebrated June 19, or Juneteenth, for generations.

Children celebrate Juneteenth at Fair Park in Dallas, Texas, in 1952. (Marion Butts/Dallas Express / Dallas Public Library)

Historically, Juneteenth has not been widely recognized outside of black communities, and it’s taken some time for the general public to acknowledge the date officially. Over the past 40 years, 47 of 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have come to recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday or a day of observance, but it’s not yet a federal holiday. And given the current nationwide protests against police brutality and systemic racism, major corporations such as Nike, Uber, Spotify, and J. C. Penney have designated Juneteenth as a paid holiday. Though holidays, symbols, statues, and flags matter, it will take more than increased recognition of Juneteenth to combat racism. If not followed with substantive change, the relatively recent scramble to acknowledge Juneteenth will just feel like virtue signaling, acts of solidarity that ring hollow.

Whether companies and governments get it right or not, black-led celebrations will remain the heart of Juneteenth. Early events venerated black Civil War veterans and were mainly held in private places that could be shielded from the white gaze. Later ones were marked by reunions, parades, and symbolic foods such as strawberry soda, red beans and rice, red velvet cake, and watermelon (the color red represents the perseverance of black ancestors). Black churches often spearheaded the day’s programming, which could include speeches from children who memorized quotes from their favorite black heroes, or singing of the black national anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” Post–World War II commemorations were not complete until someone read the Emancipation Proclamation aloud.

THE OAK PARK DRILL TEAM MAKES THEIR WAY THROUGH NORTH MINNEAPOLIS IN PARADE FORMATION AS PART OF JUNETEENTH CELEBRATIONS.

 

A drill team performs in a Juneteenth parade in Minneapolis in 1995. (Marlin Levison / Star Tribune / Getty)

Today, Juneteenth serves as an occasion for voter-registration drives and to support black-owned businesses or community fundraisers. This year in Houston, you can attend a virtual parade or take a Juneteenth bike ride. In Los Angeles, you can go on a four-mile walk to the Juneteenth monument at Ganesha Park. In New Orleans, you can visit Congo Square, a historical gathering place for enslaved and free people, or you can spend the day at the Whitney Plantation, the only plantation museum in Louisiana with a direct focus on the lives of enslaved people.

Despite the numerous ways to honor Juneteenth, one thing about the holiday endures throughout generations: the paradox of black people’s lived experiences. How could they at once celebrate freedom and acknowledge that the residue of slavery continues to influence their lives? The turn of the century represented the height of black minstrelsy, violent attacks on black communities, and the Supreme Court ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson, which made segregation the law of the land. John L. Thompson, the editor of the Iowa State Bystander, the state’s most prestigious black newspaper at the time, grappled with how to negotiate what he saw as a new era of American race relations. At an Emancipation Day celebration in 1898, Thompson asked the audience to “see the slave scarred veterans who are before me today and have witness to their once cruel and inhuman treatment,” noting that “all of this was done under our beautiful and so-called flag of the free.”

Now many black Americans are wrestling with how to celebrate Juneteenth amid the protests and the coronavirus pandemic. I came across a tweet that read, “Some of us fight racism by raising our black children to know joy. This matters too.” Black Americans have always held both jubilation and sorrow in their hands: Demonstrators will chant “I can’t breathe” and in the same space break out into a collective electric slide. As Imani Perry wrote for The Atlantic, “Racism is terrible. Blackness is not.

Miss Juneteenth 2015 waves to her fans in Denver, Colorado. (Kathryn Scott Osler / The Denver Post / Getty)

One of my colleagues at Rhodes College, the professor Charles McKinney, wrote recently to his black students: “We are not solely the history of fighting white folks. That is not who we are. We are double-dutch in summer. We are letting the air out of Big Mama’s house. We are Uncle Ray’s jokes on top of jokes. We are collards, second lines, and blue lights in the basement. We are swagger in the midst of chaos. We are reunions and step shows. We are the borough and the bayou. We are church till two, and the corner till four. We are a universe of experiences.”

And so, in the middle of a chaotic period in this nation’s history, Black Americans pause to celebrate. They will barbecue, and dance, and pray, and love, and live in the name of freedom. The rest of America can use the day off to work on its own freedom—from a shameful past and a violent present.

Kellie Carter Jackson is an assistant professor of Africana studies at Wellesley College, and the author of Force and Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence. Twitter

 

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2020/06/juneteenth-has-always-been-worthy-celebration/613270/

 

The Public Domain Review: Early Photographs of Juneteenth Celebrations

 

Martha Yates Jones (left) and Pinkie Yates (right), daughters of Rev. Jack Yates, in a decorated carriage parked in front of the Antioch Baptist Church located in Houston’s Fourth Ward, 1908 — Source

Although Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, the Civil War then raging prevented it being enacted in much of the American South until months or even years later. Emancipation Day, or Juneteenth, is a celebration to mark the eventual country-wide realization of the decree — on June 19, 1865, when around 250,000 enslaved people were finally declared free in Texas — the last state in the US to be reached by the Union Army, commanded by General Gordon Granger, meaningfully accompanied, as historian Elizabeth Hayes Turner notes, by “two transports of colored troops”. Although Granger did not read out the Emancipation Proclamation itself on that day in Galveston, he did read out “General Order No. 3”, which began:

The people of Texas are informed that in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection therefore existing between them becomes that between employer and free laborer.

One year later, the first anniversary of Juneteenth — or “Jubilee Day” as it was then called — was celebrated in several places in Texas. The tradition soon took hold throughout the state. Communal barbecues, concerts, prayer services, parades, as well as baseball games, fishing, and rodeos, all featured in the festivities. Some former enslaved people and their descendants living in far-flung parts of Texas made a pilgrimage to Galveston, and many dressed in their finest clothes — partly in response to the pre–1865 statewide laws that had prevented enslaved people from dressing in any clothing not given to them by those who held them in slavery.

Many of the photographs that survive from these early decades of the celebration — including sets from Houston and Corpus Christi — depict elegantly dressed groups in horse-drawn carriages elaborately decorated with flowers down to the wheels. Another set from Austin — taken in 1900 by Grace Murray Stephenson — shows a group of older people, many or all of whom would have been born into slavery, dressed up for the day, as well as a very well-posed six-piece band, and a group of men decked out in Civil War uniforms (perhaps reenacting the Union’s entry into Galveston).

Of course, violence toward Black Americans did not magically evaporate with emancipation, and racial segregation and prejudice in some places made Juneteenth celebrations very difficult. Often forbidden from celebrating on public land, many gatherings had to be disparately held in remote rural areas or small church grounds, leading some Black Texan communities to band together and buy land specifically for celebrating Juneteenth (and other community occasions). The first such communally-bought land was Houston’s Emancipation Park, a ten-acre lot purchased in 1872 by the Colored People’s Festival and Emancipation Park Association led by the Baptist minister and formerly enslaved Jack Yates. You can see Reverend Yates pictured (far left) in the Juneteenth group shot below (and in the featured image above, two of his daughters in a decorated carriage).

Group on Emancipation Day, circa 1880s, in Houston’s Emancipation Park. Reverend Jack Yates, who led the community purchase of the Park in 1872, is pictured on the far left, and his daughter Sallie Yates dressed in black in the centre — Source

Following Houston’s example, in 1898, Mexia’s Nineteenth of June Organization bought an area of land on the banks of the Navasota River, now known as Booker T. Washington Park, which was said to draw up to 30,000 for the celebration. Another dedicated community-bought land was in Austin. The photographs we’ve featured of the city’s Juneteenth celebrations of 1900 took place in what was then called Wheeler’s Grove (now Eastwoods Park) but a few years later an association, led by the formerly enslaved Thomas J. White, purchased a plot for the purpose, also named Emancipation Park (although 30 years later the city of Austin seized it to build housing).

Over the course of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Juneteenth festivities became increasingly common outside of Texas — often brought to new places throughout the country by Black Americans who’d moved away from the state. In the 1950s, the holiday temporarily faded in popularity. This was to some extent due to the Great Migration, when many Black Americans found themselves in northern cities, working for bosses who did not recognize Juneteenth. (The US Congress has still not recognized it as a national holiday, although forty-seven states do at least acknowledge its existence.) It was also to some extent due to the changing political attitudes of the mid–twentieth century, when celebration of difference was sometimes seen as antithetical to integration.

During the last half century, however, Juneteenth has grown more and more popular again. In addition to the old traditions of parades, cookouts, and music, new traditions have sprung up — including readings of work by Black American writers such as Maya Angelou and Ralph Ellison (whose second, long, and long-unfinished novel was titled Juneteenth). The celebration of difference and the commemoration of the ongoing struggle for freedom, equality, and respect have become central to this second American Independence Day.

You can read more about Juneteenth —past, present, and future — here and browse our selection of historical photographs of Juneteenth celebrations from across the US below.

For more information, please visit the following link:

https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/juneteenth-photographs

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PBS News, UN, Aljazeera, France24, ABC {Australia) News, Reel Truth History, TED Talks, NPR, Colossal, Newark Museum, & more, July 2019

PBS News ,7.10,11,12,13&14.2019, Blitzed: Nazis On Drugs (WW2 Documentary), Click 1000: The Future of Television – BBC Click, The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day, ALJAZEERA news Live, FRANCE 24 Live, NPR: The Dress Hasn’t Changed, But The Girls Have, Colossal: A Collaboratively Painted ‘Mural of Brotherhood’ Stretches for Over a Mile on Mexico’s Border, ABC News (Australia) Live, Kai & Ing Joined Painting 7.10.19 and Kai’s First Time at Newark Museum7.12.19

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 14, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 14, 2019

On this edition for Sunday, July 14, we take the show on the road to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, home to the 2020 Democratic National Convention next July. We speak to some of the state’s Democratic leadership about efforts to win Wisconsin and explore its dairy farm crisis. Also, ICE begins nationwide raids on undocumented immigrants. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Milwaukee. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

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PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 13, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 13, 2019

On this edition for Saturday, July 13, Louisiana braces as Tropical Storm Barry makes landfall and briefly becomes a Category 1 hurricane, Vice President Mike Pence visits the border ahead of scheduled ICE raids, and our “Future of Food” series looks at cell-based meat grown solely in a laboratory. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

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PBS NewsHour full episode July 12, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 12, 2019

Friday on the NewsHour, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigns amid furor over his prosecution of Jeffrey Epstein for sex crimes in 2008. Plus: Tropical Storm Barry threatens New Orleans with flooding, how legal marijuana is confronting challenges of racial inequity, the ideological divide within the Democratic party, political analysis with Mark Shields and Ramesh Ponnuru and folk legend Joan Baez. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Tumultuous week in White House ends with Acosta resignation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THx_o… Why Tropical Storm Barry threatens more than just the coast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHj-c… News Wrap: House committees might delay Mueller testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfs49… Why legal marijuana industry now struggles with diversity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yo5dK… Pelosi and Ocasio-Cortez expose Democrats’ big divide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-uik… Shields and Ponnuru on Democratic division, citizenship data https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzlDG… Folk legend Joan Baez reflects on a life in music and activism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQwQl… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode July 11, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 11, 2019

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces he’s ending his legal battle to add a controversial citizenship question to the 2020 census. Plus: An interview with the head of Veterans Affairs, the competitive business of growing marijuana, Rep. Debbie Lesko on the shortage of female Republicans in Congress, how a comic writer addresses reality and a singer on finding identity through music. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Losing census fight, how Trump will seek citizenship data https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGTq9… News Wrap: Pelosi spars with progressive party members https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLQ5H… Sec. Wilkie on expanding health care for veterans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oc6BD… Why some small marijuana growers struggle after legalization https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFBzC… Why it’s so hard to get Republican women in Congress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDyPE… How the comic strip ‘Baldo’ blends humor with humanity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxjDV… How Grammy-nominated singer Falu found her identity in music https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l0EL… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode July 10, 2019

PBS NewsHour  Published on Jul 10, 2019

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta publicly addresses his role in the controversial 2008 prosecution of sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. Plus: The British ambassador to the U.S. resigns, how marijuana affects the brain, the U.S. women’s soccer team celebrates its World Cup victory, making baseball safer for fans and getting energy out of buildings. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How Alex Acosta explained his handling of Epstein case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Jy0N… News Wrap: Fed signals impending interest rate reduction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hROsA… What Darroch’s resignation means for U.S.-British diplomacy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMK0l… Scientists race to learn how marijuana affects the brain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6VnG… How U.S. women’s soccer is paving the way for pay equity https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSim9… Why hasn’t Major League Baseball done more to protect fans? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Du8mQ… Designing buildings that create more energy than they use https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqU8o… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Blitzed: Nazis On Drugs (WW2 Documentary) | History Documentary | Reel Truth History

Reel Truth History Documentaries  Published on Jun 28, 2019

In 1938 a drug called Pervitin was created in Nazi Germany. This stimulant was a methamphetamine based pill, was available in every pharmacy and didn’t require a prescription. This drug was distributed to German soldiers during the course of WW2 and Hitler was no exception to these drug highs receiving drug cocktails from his personal physical Theodor Morell. This film explores the use of drugs in WW2 and looks at the potential effects that drugs could have had on Hitler, soldiers and the war itself. Distributed by DRG To be the first to watch more full length documentaries, subscribe here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCb7x… Welcome to Reel Truth History, the home of gripping and powerful documentaries. Here you can watch both full length documentaries and series that explore some of the most comprehensive pieces of world history.

Category   Entertainment

TED Talks: The next global agricultural revolution,

Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Bruce Friedrich · Food innovator

TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich plans to compete with the meat industry on its own terms — by creating alternatives to conventional meat that taste the same or better and cost less.

Learn more about the Good Food Institute and be a part of the next agricultural revolution.

Learn more ? follow Follow Bruce Friedrich on Twitter.

Click 1000: The Future of Television – BBC Click

BBC Click  Published on Jul 8, 2019

This is the 1,000th episode of Click. But we’ve also created a special show that gives you complete control over what you watch. Check it out at bbc.co.uk/click1000. Subscribe HERE https://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

https://webtv.un.org/live-now/watch/24-hour-live-and-pre-recorded-programming/5689257377001

24 Hour Live and pre-recorded Programming

12 Jul 2019 – The UN Web TV Channel is available 24 hours a day with selected live programming of United Nations meetings and events as well as with pre-recorded video features and documentaries on various global issues.

Monday, 15 July 2019

All indicated times are New York time (GMT-4) Email Subscription Full Live Schedule

10:00 am

(Part 9) SDGs Learning, Training & Practice (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI) 2019.

Security Council: 1) The situation in the Middle East (8572nd meeting). 2) Threats to international peace and security (8573rd meeting).

General Assembly (Informal plenary): Gender equality and women’s leadership for a sustainable world (HLPF 2019 Event).

12:00 pm

Daily Press Briefing by the Spokesperson of the Secretary-General.

12:30 pm

Press Conference: The President of the General Assembly, María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka (UN Women) and Helen Clark, former Prime Minister of New Zealand on gender equality and women’s leadership for a sustainable world.

01:00 pm

Press Conference: Launch of the report, “The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2019”.

01:15 pm

Investing into Climate Smart Economies: Energy Efficiency for SDG 13 (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

Building National Capacities for Conflict Prevention: High Level Partner Event of the Joint UNDP-DPPA Programme (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

Inclusive national policies in the face of climate change: towards a rights-based approach to the implementation of SDG 13 (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

The 2030 Agenda under the Japanese presidency of the G20 (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

03:00 pm

(Part 10) SDGs Learning, Training & Practice (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

Youth Skills Day 2019.

Learning to Learn for Life and Work – On the occasion of Youth Skills Day 2019.

2019 High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF 2019) – 15th and 16th meeting.

Press Conference: Alejandra Candia, Vice Minister of Social Development of Chile who will speak on the “Voluntary National Review of Chile”.

What is Democracy? Stepping Up Engagement Around Goal 16 (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

Strengthening the Work of the UN on Tax Cooperation for Sustainable Development (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

03:30 pm

Gender Diversity Beyond Binaries.

06:30 pm

Accelerating progress on the SDGs through the implementation of the Global Action Programme (GAP) on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

The UN Technology Bank for the LDCs – Driving the SDGs through Science, Technology and Innovation (HLPF 2019 Side Event).

https://www.aljazeera.com/live/

ALJAZEERA news

Live, breaking and in-depth news from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas.

FRANCE 24 Live – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

FRANCE 24 English  Started streaming on Jul 4, 2019

Watch FRANCE 24 live in English on YouTube for free Subscribe to France 24 now https://f24.my/YouTubeEN Watch France 24 live news: all the latest news live broadcasted from Paris, France. Le DIRECT France 24 en français : https://f24.my/YTliveFR France 24 EN VIVO en Español: https://f24.my/YTliveES ????? 24 ???? ??????? https://f24.my/YTliveAR Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.Eng… Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 https://www.france24.com/en/

Category News & Politics

Six of the 50 Azalea Trail Maids gather under oak trees. The dresses come in six different colors, but only the queen of the court wears pink.   Adair Freeman Rutledge

The Dress Hasn’t Changed, But The Girls Have

July 7, 20197:00 AM ET   Lindsey Feingold

Photo Stories From NPR

They marched in President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration parade.

They appeared at processions ranging from the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City and Disney’s Easter Parade in Orlando, Fla., to the Rose Bowl Parade in Pasadena, Calif.

They are the Azalea Trail Maids — the embodiment of old school Southern hospitality with a modern twist.

Photographer Adair Rutledge, a native of Mobile, Ala., returned to her hometown to learn more about how some girls are redefining what it means to be a symbol of the South — while they wear a 50-pound, custom-made antebellum dress.

To be one of the 50 Azalea Trail Maids, you have to be chosen — and only those with impressive resumes get the honor. The girls Rutledge profiled were valedictorians, National Merit Scholarship winners and even in ROTC. And the interview process is extensive. “A lot of them take classes and rehearse for years,” Rutledge says.

The selective process and preparation is meant to prepare them to be ambassadors for their town — a modern version of the Southern belle.

Once chosen, they represent Mobile for a year. When wearing the dresses, which can cost up to $6,000, they usually don’t speak; their duty is to smile, wave and have their photo taken.

Rutledge hopes her project will help people work through what seem like contradictions: very accomplished women wearing Southern plantation-era gowns while representing Alabama’s third-largest city.

“There’s sort of a disconnect between what the dress represents historically and these multicultural, highly accomplished modern young women who wear it now,” she says. “They’re not exact replicas, but they are modeled after the attire of the white Southern plantation-era elite, which means that they are the gowns that were once worn by the wives of slave owners. … I really want people to be asking these questions around gender and identity and race and the tensions that are created from being a young Southern black woman wearing an antebellum hoop skirt.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2019/07/07/712253441/the-dress-hasnt-changed-but-the-girls-have?utm_source=pocket-newtab

A Collaboratively Painted ‘Mural of Brotherhood’ Stretches for Over a Mile on Mexico’s Border

June 26, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

All photographs courtesy of Enrique Chiu

Over the past two and a half years, nearly 4,000 volunteers have converged on the US/Mexico border to assist artist Enrique Chiu with painting a mural. Chiu began the project on Election Day in 2016, and once his collaborative project is complete, the “Mural of Brotherhood” will span a mile of Mexico’s border frontage in Tijuana. Shorter segments will also be created in other regions to connect the project to the southern edge of the border. The wide range of styles, including written phrases and more illustrative narratives reflects the diversity of those who have worked alonside Chiu to complete the expansive mural.

Chiu was born in Mexico and has spent 14 years living in the U.S., both as a child and as an adult. However, he re-rooted himself in Tijuana’s vibrant arts scene ten years ago. In an interview with Hyperallergic Chiu explained, “the murals spread messages of peace to people crossing the border by car or on foot,” and are “intended to be a final glimpse of hope for migrants risking danger as they cross northward.”

A recently released documentary by Alejandro Arguelles Benitez follows the project. You can watch the trailer below, and track the progress of the mural on Instagram. (via Hyperallergic)

A Child Peers Over the US/Mexico Border Wall in a Giant New Photographic Work by JR

September 7, 2017   Christopher Jobson

French artist JR just unveiled a new work in progress at the US/Mexico border. The large

photographic piece depicts a child peering over a border fence from the Mexican side, apparently in reference to Trump’s effort to rescind the DACA program which protects the children of undocumented immigrants from being deported. The artist is known for his towering photographic installations backed by scaffolding such as his pieces at the Louvre and the Rio Olympics.

JR will be in LA tonight at Blum & Poe for a discussion with curator Pedro Alonzo about “immigration in the artist’s practice.” Admission is free.

Watch ABC News Live

ABC News (Australia) Started streaming on Jul 6, 2019

This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: https://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

Kai & Ing Joined Painting on Wednesday, 7.10.19 and Kai’s First Time at Newark Museum on Friday, 7.12.19

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Kai and Ing joined painting on Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Kai and Ing joined painting on Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Kai colored the Lizard for his Mommy and Daddy on Friday, July 12, 2019

Kai was played with toy trains on the Mezzanine at the Newark Museum.

There is a great artwork on the wall to inspire children and adults who visit the room.

Kai played with Lego blocks on the wall.

Kai went into the room that has light rods in different colors from the ceiling.  He seems to be amazed to see his multiple image on the wall of mirrors around him.

18

One of the museum teachers gave me the information about their activities for children.

“Go see it in the galleries” Newark Museum’s Promotion Poster

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, July 15, 2019

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Hope for Humanity, Women’s March in Washington and around the World

Hope for Humanity, Women’s March in Washington and around the World

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered for the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Women’s march in Washington and around the world for our hope for Human Rights and Humanity as a whole

January 21, 201711:19 AM ET

Women’s March Floods Washington, Sparking Rallies Worldwide

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, several U.S. territories and countries around the world. They have tried to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump’s agenda, and support of women’s rights and human rights in general.

Given the quirks of time zones, many of those marches kicked off before the event that inspired them. In Sydney, London, New Delhi, and other cities, demonstrators broke out their signs and pink hats before even their compatriots in D.C. could.

Straight from NPR and member station reporters on the ground: Here’s a glimpse of the marches Saturday — across the country, and around the world.

For more Information please visit the following link:

https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/21/510940708/womens-march-on-washington-goes-worldwide-snapshots-from-around-the-globe

Protesters in New York City during the Women’s March.                                         Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Tens of thousands gather in Civic Center Park for the Women’s March on Denver.   Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

Protesters participate in the Women’s March in Chicago, Illinois.                             John Gress/Getty Images

Protesters at the start of the Women’s March on Main Street in Park City, Utah.

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

“Women’s March on Main” during the 2017 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.   Arthur Mola/Invision/AP

Protesters make their way through Chicago during the city’s women’s march.

Participants hold signs as they wait for the start of the women’s march in Los Angeles.

Thousands of participants converge on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza and Second Avenue during the women’s March in New York City.  NY Daily News via Getty Images

Crowds gather for the women’s march on Main Street during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

de Trocadero in Paris in solidarity with supporters of the Women’s March in Washington.   Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators take part in the Women’s March on London on Saturday.                         Tim Ireland/AP

Activists hold a banner that reads “Women’s March Against Fascism” during the Women’s March rally in Belgrade, Serbia, on Saturday.   Darko Vojinovic/AP

A woman wearing an American flag as a headscarf attends a protest for women’s rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington in front of Brandenburger Tor in Berlin, Germany.   Steffi Loos/Getty Images

Women hold placards during an demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Athens, Greece in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington.                               Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators make their way during the Women’s March in Barcelona, Spain. The Women’s March originated in Washington, D.C. but soon spread to become a global event.   David Ramos/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate for women’s rights and freedom in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington in Sydney.  Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

Indian women in New Delhi participate in a nationwide “I Will Go Out” march to raise questions about safe access for women and marginalized communities in public spaces across India.  Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Tens of thousands participated in the BostonWomen’s March In cluding Sen ElizabethWarren & Mayor MartyWalsh (bottom right). Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Women’s March Floods Washington, Sparking Rallies Worldwide

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