Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone, Greeting from Kai and Bodhi with the blooming flowers in our garden, Washington Post, NASA, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, NASA Johnson, AXIOS, Google Doodles, BBC News, and The New York Times

Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone, Greeting from Kai and Bodhi with the blooming flowers in our garden, Washington Post, NASA, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, NASA Johnson, AXIOS, Google Doodles, BBC News, and The New York Times

Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live on Apr 22, 2021  Washington Post, 8:20:10, 1st Day

Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live 17 hours ago, 4.23.2021  Washington Post , 3:36:35, 2nd Day

Climate change: Wikipedia

NASA Science Live: Connected by Earth

Streamed live 9 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

Our Planet, Our Home? An Earth Day Perspective

Apr 22, 2021  NASA

Earth Day Q&A with Astronauts in Space | Hosted by Shawn Mendes

Streamed live 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 22 &23, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 22nd, 2021

What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition, Premiered 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NBC News

Derek Chauvin Verdict, Biden’s Climate Summit, and More | KnowThis

Premiered 10 hours ago, 4.23.2021, NowThis News

4K Earth Views Extended Cut for Earth Day 2021

Apr 22, 2021  NASA Johnson

Axios PM: 5 new climate pledges

Greta Thunberg, climate experts testify before House on fossil fuel subsidies

Streamed live 16 hours ago, 4.22.2021  PBS NewsHour

Earth Day 2021 Doodle: Apr 21, 2021, GoogleDoodles

President Biden pledges 50% cut in US carbon emissions at global climate summit – BBC News

Apr 22, 2021  BBC News, 5:39

It’s time to ‘get serious’ about climate change, Boris Johnson @BBC News? live ? BBC

Apr 22, 2021  BBC, 10:49

The New York Times: Biden’s Intelligence Director Vows to Put Climate at ‘Center’ of Foreign Policy, April 22, 2021

🙂 Have A Happy Earth Day Everyone 🙂

Greetings from our two grandsons, five-year-old Kai, and, one-year-old Bodhi, with the flowers blooming in our garden.

Kai, our 5-year-old Grandson brought the tangerine plant outdoors to the garden on Thursday, April 19, 2021.  We keep our plants inside the apartment during winter.    Now that the weather is about 55 – 60-degree Fahrenheit, I decide to move some of the plants outdoors to the garden. 

Kai was surprised to see the Bleeding-Heat plant brooming.  Daffodils are the first flowers blooming in our garden.  The Bleeding-Heart Plant produced the second blooming of flowers.

This is the first time that Bodhi sees the flowers bloom.  He was very excited to see new things in his one-year-old life.  He wanted to pull the flowers as a young baby accustom to do.  This Bleeding-Heart Plant is a gift from his mother to us many years ago.  We always enjoy to see these beautiful flowers blooming in the early spring.  Because of staying so long inside during winter and the COVID-19 lockdown, we are eager to be outdoor in our garden.  It is really such a pleasure for us to see our daughter’s plant blooming into beautiful flowers.

WATCH: Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live on Apr 22, 2021  Washington Post, 8:20:10, 1st Day

President Biden is convening world leaders for a two-day virtual climate summit to urge the world’s major economies to strengthen their climate ambitions. Read more: https://wapo.st/3gAg2zx?. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK? Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/?

WATCH: Biden hosts world leaders for virtual climate summit

Streamed live 17 hours ago, 4.23.2021  Washington Post , 3:36:35, 2nd Day

President Biden is convening world leaders for a climate summit to urge the world’s major economies to strengthen their climate ambitions. Read more: https://wapo.st/3tLAscI?. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK? Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/?

Daffodils, the first flowers to bloom in our garden. I took photo of these flowers on Friday, April 2, 2021

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Climate change : Wikipedia

Climate change includes both global warming driven by human emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns.

#ConnectedByEarth

NASA Science Live: Connected by Earth

Streamed live 9 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

This year at NASA, EarthDay is about connections—to our planet and to each other. Our planet is home to over 7 billion people of diverse backgrounds and experiences, but we are all #ConnectedByEarth?. Join NASA climate experts to learn about the connections between human activity and climate change. Dr. Kimberley R. Miner will host this episode and is a climate scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). While she’s been at JPL since July 2020, she has been studying and exploring the Earth since…forever! Dr. Miner loves working outside, asking questions about nature and protecting the animals and plants all around us. She loves that being an Earth Scientist lets her do all these things. Dr. Lesley Ott is a climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center where she’s worked since getting her PhD 15 years ago. She studies the processes that control greenhouse gas concentrations and always loves seeing the ways that springtime changes in vegetation show up in satellite data. Ms. Equisha Glenn is a graduate student research assistant at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA GISS) and is finishing her PhD in Civil Engineering. Growing up, Ms. Glenn used to watch TV shows about the environment and loves how diverse Earth is, yet everything works together. Ms. Glenn is passionate about bridging the gap between data, climate and end users to help build a more resilient future for cities and society.

AllNational Aeronautics and Space Administration, U.S.A.PlanetsScienceRelatedFrom NASALiveRecently uploadedWatched

Our Planet, Our Home? An Earth Day Perspective

Apr 22, 2021  NASA

We are all connected to and by Earth — whether it’s the trees and plants that give us the oxygen we breathe, the snow-capped mountains that provide the water we drink, or the breathtaking geophysical forces that shape the land beneath our feet. NASA has over 20 satellites measuring the height of oceans and inland water, clouds and precipitation, carbon dioxide and much more. By understanding our changing world, we improve lives and safeguard our future. https://images.nasa.gov/details-Our%2…? Video Credits: Producer/Editor: Amy Leniart Writer: Jim Wilson Co-Writers: Karen Fox, Amy Leniart, Tylar Greene

Our backyard garden is small.  We have only few daffodils.  But I am happy to see the flowers bloom.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Earth Day Q&A with Astronauts in Space | Hosted by Shawn Mendes

Streamed live 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NASA

Need Earth Day plans? ? We’ve got you covered. On April 22 at 11 a.m. EDT, NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mark Vandehei, and Soichi Noguchi of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will go LIVE from space for a special Earth focused Q&A with guest host Shawn Mendes! The International Space Station live stream will feature your questions sent in from around the world! Don’t miss this opportunity to hear how NASA Earth and astronauts use space to monitor the health of our planet, what life is like on the orbiting lab, and more!

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 23, 2021

Apr 23, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Dr. Anthony Fauci discusses the latest on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and U.S. inoculations. Then, the many obstacles to the Biden administration’s major push for a transition to electric vehicles. A potential lifeline of federal funding for healthcare and infrastructure is within reach for tribal lands. And, political insight from David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: CDC lifts pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f68Jr…? Fauci on brief J&J pause, ‘breakthrough’ infections and more https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkCpj…? Why an electric future may be hard to achieve https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsOHs…? Why Native Americans are excited about the future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhJ0i…? Brooks and Capehart on Chauvin verdict, Biden climate plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTu94…? 5 wonderful people lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJomc…? Plans to create a ‘Super League’ in soccer backfire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8HSP…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr. 22, 2021

Apr 22, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Joe Biden announces ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions as part of the fight against climate change. Then, India records the highest one day number of new COVID-19 infections of any nation since the pandemic began. And, how single-use items like masks, and gloves, are piling up in landfills, wreaking havoc on the environment. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. seeks to lead by example during global climate summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CcnF…? News Wrap: Senate passes bipartisan hate crimes bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mplhk…? India records highest global single day COVID infections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwf1D…? Has the U.S. set realistic goals to combat climate change? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uX3X…? Pandemic pollution: Disposable masks are hurting the earth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0iUC…? Examining the history of police shootings of Black Americans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXDp5…? How a camp for disabled children changed lives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWKgq…? A Brief But Spectacular take on chronic fatigue syndrome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6QEF…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – April 22nd, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Apr 23, 2021  NBC News

Growing debate over CDC guidance on wearing masks outdoors, Daunte Wright remembered in emotional Minneapolis funeral service, and alternate juror in Chauvin case speaks out after guilty verdict. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:09? CDC ‘Looking’ At Revising Outdoor Mask Guidance 02:53? U.S Vaccine Supply Beginning To Outpace Demand 03:24? MLB Team Opening Fully Vaccinated Section At Stadium 03:36? 22 Fully Vaccinated People Infected At Nursing Home 04:00? CDC Panel Meets Tomorrow To Discuss J&J Vaccine Pause 04:30? India Hits World Record 314,000+ Daily Covid Cases 04:56? Daunte Wright Remembered At Emotional Funeral Service 06:39? Alternate Chauvin Juror: ‘I Would Have’ Voted Guilty 08:47? New Fallout After Police Shoot Black Teen Holding Knife 11:10? Biden Pledges To Cut U.S. Carbon Emissions In Half By 2030 12:42? Americans Flee Extreme Weather Amid Climate Change 14:46? Russian Military Plane’s Close Encounter With U.S. Boats 17:08? Inside Covid Vaccine Trials In Young Children » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition, Premiered 12 hours ago, 4.22.2021  NBC News

Ask The Doc: Dr. John Torres answers viewers’ weekly questions. Lift off: NASA launches tiny Mars chopper ‘Ingenuity’ on a historic flight. We introduce you to Blizzard the polar bear and share fun facts about the fuzzy guy! Inspiring Kids series continues: We give you an update on twins Max and Miles who are planting seeds of kindness this spring. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC? Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC? Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC? Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC? What Can We Do To Help Protect Polar Bears? | Nightly News: Kids Edition

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Derek Chauvin Verdict, Biden’s Climate Summit, and More | KnowThis

Premiered 10 hours ago, 4.23.2021, NowThis News

After a year of racial reckoning sparked by George Floyd’s murder, the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict flooded the nation with an emotional sense of relief. We’re covering this story and more on this week’s segment with Zinhle Essamuah. » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? 0:00? Intro 0:20? Helicopter Makes Historic Landing 1:38? Rescue Mission Underway 2:30? Surpassing 200M Vaccines Administered 3:44? Biden Hosts Climate Summit 5:40? Derek Chauvin Found Guilty Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of second- and third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. This week, Derek Chauvin was led out of the courtroom in handcuffs after the jury laid down his guilty verdict. President Joe Biden is hosting a two-day Earth Day climate summit with 40 world leaders. The U.S. surpassed 200 million COVID-19 vaccine shots. Rescuers are scrambling to find an Indonesian submarine and its 53 crew members lost at sea. And, the tiny Ingenuity helicopter made history on Mars, flying over the planet for 39 seconds before nailing the perfect landing. #DerekChauvin? #ClimateChange? #COVID19? #KnowThis? #News? #NowThis?

4K Earth Views Extended Cut for Earth Day 2021

Apr 22, 2021  NASA Johnson

Everything that happens on the International Space Station revolves around one thing: Earth, sixteen times a day! So for Earth Day 2021, NASA offers a gift you can’t get anywhere else with this leisurely view of our home planet, from 250 miles up, rendered in extraordinary ultra-high definition video. Hit play, relax and enjoy. This 4K footage was recorded between 2019 and 2020. _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS? Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/? HD Download: https://archive.org/details/jsc2021m0…? 2021_210422-

Axios PM: 5 new climate pledges

By Mike Allen ·Apr 22, 2021

Mike Allen mike@axios.com

Good afternoon: Today’s PM — edited by Justin Green — is 497 words, a 2-minute read.

·  Stocks fell modestly today after reports that President Biden wants to nearly double the capital gains tax paid by wealthy Americans.

·  Sen. Tim Scott will deliver the GOP’s rebuttal to Biden’s joint address to Congress.

Please join Axios’ Joann Muller and Erica Pandey tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. ET for conversations about electric and autonomous vehicles with Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg and San Francisco-Marin Food Bank executive director Tanis Crosby. Sign up here.

  1. 5 new climate pledges, 4.22.2021

German Chancellor Angela Merkel takes part in the virtual international climate summit with President Biden. Photo: Kay Nietfeld/Pool via Getty Images
1.      Canada: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada would increase its target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from 40% to 45% of its 2005 levels by 2030.

2.     Japan: Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said Japan would cut its emissions by 46% from 2013 levels by 2030.

3.     South Korea: President Moon Jae-in pledged to end all new public financing for overseas coal projects, and will submit new emissions targets later this year.

4.     Brazil: President Jair Bolsonaro pledged to end illegal deforestation by 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

5.     China: President Xi Jinping said his country — the world’s largest consumer of coal — will attempt to “strictly limit increasing coal consumption” over the next five years.

Go deeper: More details on the pledges, via Axios’ Jacob Knutson.

WATCH LIVE: Greta Thunberg, climate experts testify before House on fossil fuel subsidies

Streamed live 16 hours ago, 4.22.2021  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

Earth Day 2021 Doodle

Apr 21, 2021, GoogleDoodles

This year’s annual Earth Day Doodle highlights how everyone can plant the seed to a brighter future—one sapling at a time. Happy Earth Day 2021! Learn more: http://www.google.com/doodles/earth-d…? ——- To follow Google Doodles on YouTube, subscribe to: @GoogleDoodles? Follow Google Doodles on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/GoogleDoodles?

President Biden pledges 50% cut in US carbon emissions at global climate summit – BBC News

Apr 22, 2021  BBC News, 5:39

President Biden has opened a major global climate summit with a call to other world leaders to step up to the challenge. Joe Biden pledged to cut US emissions by at least half from 2005 levels by the end of this decade but he warned that his country couldn’t take action alone. He told world leaders that scientists were calling this the “decisive decade” for tackling climate change and action was needed now. The latest data shows China is the world’s biggest producer of carbon dioxide, emitting 28% of global output. China is second biggest, producing 15% with India producing 7%. Sophie Raworth presents BBC News at Ten reporting by science editor David Shukman and North America editor Jon Sopel. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog? #BBCNews?

It’s time to ‘get serious’ about climate change, Boris Johnson @BBC News? live ? BBC

Apr 22, 2021  BBC, 10:49

Subscribe and ? to OFFICIAL BBC YouTube ? https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn? Stream original BBC programmes FIRST on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ? ? Subscribe and ? @BBC News ? https://bit.ly/3a1zyip? ? Stream BBC News live on BBC iPlayer ? https://bbc.in/3b64IVP? ? Coronavirus / Covid-19 ? https://bbc.in/3luQp33? ? Follow BBC News live updates here ? https://bbc.in/2JmUswL? It’s Thurdsday 22 April. Our top stories this morning 0:00? The US will attempt to re-assert its global leadership on climate change as President Joe Biden hosts 40 leaders at a virtual summit in the White House. Get the full story ? https://bbc.in/3ekUuEk? Get the latest news, sport, business and weather from the BBC’s Breakfast team live on iPlayer daily from 6am. BBC Breakfast | BBC News | BBC #BBC? #BBCiPlayer? #BBCNews? #BBCNewsLive? #BBCCoronavirus? #Coronavirus? #Covid?-19 #CoronavirusOutbreak? #Corona? #CoronavirusUK?

The New York Times: Biden’s Intelligence Director Vows to Put Climate at ‘Center’ of Foreign Policy,

Last Updated 

April 22, 2021, 10:01 p.m. ET 5 hours ago

Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, struck a note of urgency in telling world leaders that climate change must be “fully integrated” with national security. President Biden committed the United States to cutting emissions by half by the end of the decade at a virtual Earth Day summit.

President Biden speaking on Thursday during a virtual summit on climate change from the East Room of the White House.Credit…Pool photo by Al Drago

Here’s what you need to know:

Biden’s intelligence director tells world leaders climate is now ‘at the center’ of U.S. foreign policy.·

Biden wants to slash emissions. Success would mean a very different America.·

China’s leader, Xi Jinping, promises to ‘strictly limit’ coal.·

Here’s what Canada, Russia and other countries have committed to so far today.·

The virtual summit makes history, but proves even world leaders aren’t immune to tech issues.·

Fossil fuel industries react carefully to Biden’s emissions pledge.·

Biden plans to nominate ocean scientist Rick Spinrad to head NOAA, the country’s premier climate science agency.

Biden’s intelligence director tells world leaders climate is now ‘at the center’ of U.S. foreign policy. 

Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, speaking on Capitol Hill last week.Credit…Pool photo by Graeme Jennings

Avril Haines, President Biden’s director of national intelligence, told world leaders on Thursday that climate change was no longer a peripheral issue but now “at the center” of U.S. foreign policy, with far-reaching impacts on force deployments and the stability of hard-hit regions.

Ms. Haines, speaking at this week’s virtual global climate conference, struck a tone of urgency at variance with the attitudes of many of her predecessors, who downplayed the role of rising sea levels, droughts, crop failures, fires, diseases and more frequent severe weather events.

“To address climate change properly it must be at the center of a country’s national security and foreign policy,” she said, echoing the words of Lloyd J. Austin III, the defense secretary, who addressed the conference a few minutes earlier.

“It needs to be fully integrated with every aspect of our analysis in order to allow us not only to monitor the threat but also, critically, to ensure that policymakers understand the importance of climate change on seemingly unrelated policies,” Ms. Haines said.

Her comments came after NATO officials announced they would likely agree on a climate “action plan” to reduce emissions by military units and conduct an alliance-wide assessment of the potential threats arising from climate disruptions.

On Thursday, the C.I.A. announced it was adding a new category covering the environment to its World Factbook. The agency’s unclassified guide will now provide the latest country data on climate, air pollutants, infectious diseases, food security, waste and other environmental topics.

Ms. Haines began by saying that the intelligence services had long recognized the importance of climate change — and praised efforts by the C.I.A. over the last three decades to identify the geopolitical impact of climate-based changes in Russia, Asia, Africa and the Arctic.

“We have not always made it a key priority,” she added.

The Biden administration has promised to put a new focus on climate change at the nation’s intelligence agencies. Top intelligence officials all pledged in their confirmation hearings to increase their agencies’ focus on climate.

A pair of recent intelligence reports have presented a grim picture of climate change. The annual worldwide threat assessment, which looks at short-term challenges, said extreme weather caused by climate change would increase the potential for surges in migration and cause instability around the globe.

The changes will “exacerbate political instability and humanitarian crises,” the annual threat report said.

The intelligence agencies issued even more dire warnings with the quadrennial Global Trends report issued on April 8, which argued that climate change would contribute to instability, strain military readiness and encourage new political movements. It said that all societies would be forced to adapt to a warmer planet through changes both small and complex, including the building of massive new sea walls and the relocation of cities and towns.

The report said the physical effects of climate change would intensify over the next 20 years, particularly in the 2030s, and the impact would fall disproportionately on poor parts of the world.

Some Republicans have expressed reservations at expanding the intelligence community’s focus on climate change. At a hearing last week, Ms. Haines argued that while there was partisan division over the issue, intelligence analysts have been examining the issue for decades during administrations of both parties.

“It’s just become increasingly accepted as something that is part of the national security landscape,” she said.

— Glenn Thrush and Julian E. Barnes

U.S. says it will sharply cut emissions and increase funds to vulnerable countries to fight climate change.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel takes part in the virtual international climate summit with President Biden on Thursday.Credit…Pool photo by Kay Nietfeld

President Biden on Thursday declared America “has resolved to take action” on climate change, and the White House said it would substantially increase the money it offers to developing countries to address the issue.

In a show of renewed resolve after four years of the Trump administration’s unvarnished climate denial, Mr. Biden formally pledged that the United States would cut its emissions at least in half from 2005 levels by 2030. His administration also announced it intends to double by 2024 the amount of money it offers to help developing countries, compared with what the United States spent annually in the second half of the Obama administration.

Barely three months into Mr. Biden’s presidency, the contrast with his science-denying predecessor, President Donald J. Trump, could not have been more striking.

“The signs are unmistakable, the science is undeniable and the cost of inaction keeps mounting,” Mr. Biden said.

John Kerry, President Biden’s global climate change envoy, said he believes the United States will meet and possibly even surpass the new goal.

Speaking at the conclusion of the first day of the summit, Mr. Kerry called the goal “ambitious but appropriate and achievable” and said the market is moving faster than expected in creating renewable energy and new breakthroughs are likely on the horizon in battery storage and other areas.

“Is it doable? Will we probably exceed it? I expect yes,” Mr. Kerry said.

Asked what the Biden administration can do now to prevent a future president from gutting the climate plans as President Trump did to the Obama administration, Mr. Kerry noted that he fielded that question in virtually every diplomatic discussion over the past three months.

“You destroyed your credibility, you left the Paris Agreement, how can we trust you?” Mr. Kerry said other leaders asked him. He insisted the private sector will cement clean energy policies into reality even if Mr. Bidens’ policies stall or are someday overturned.,

“No politician, I think, can change what is now happening in the marketplace.”

The Biden administration said it plans to offer an estimated $5.7 billion a year by 2024. In a statement, the White House said that it would “work closely with Congress to meet these goals.”

Between 2013 and 2016, U.S. international climate finance was around $2.5 billion a year, including in the form of export credit and loans, based on government data from that time.

Joe Thwaites from the World Resources Institute said the foreign aid pledges were not especially ambitious. “The climate finance plan the Biden administration launched today starts to play catch up after the U.S. was largely absent for the last four years — when many other developed countries already doubled their climate finance, and some committed to doubling again before 2025,” he said.

The two-day summit comes at a time when scientists are warning that governments must take decisive action to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels. The consequences of exceeding that threshold includes mass species extinctions, water shortages and extreme weather events that will be most devastating to the poorest countries least responsible for causing global warming.

Officially, nations that are party to the Paris agreement are obligated to announce their new targets for emissions cuts in time for a United Nations conference in Scotland in November.

In an executive order announced late Thursday morning, the White House also said it would “seek to” end investments in “carbon-intensive” fossil fuel projects abroad. It was also not clear if that referred to money for gas pipelines and terminals. The United States is a leading exporter of gas, and development aid has been used to promote the expansion of gas, including in Africa.

Mr. Kerry said in his remarks that no country alone would be able to finance the transition to a green economy, adding that private banks and asset managers would have to align their investments accordingly.

The summit is the first of its kind to be convened by a United States president, and Mr. Biden is joined by other world leaders like Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada.

While the summit is an international one, Mr. Biden’s speech was also aimed at a domestic audience, focusing not just on America’s obligation to help cut its global emissions but on the jobs he believes are available in greening the U.S. economy.

“The countries that take decisive actions now” to tackle climate change, Mr. Biden said, “will be the ones that reap the clean energy benefits of the boom that’s coming.”

Mr. Biden’s target of 50 percent to 52 percent by the end of the decade calls for a steep and rapid decline of fossil fuel use in virtually every sector of the American economy and marks the start of what is sure to be a bitter partisan fight over achieving it.

One of Mr. Biden’s biggest political obstacles is international: Republicans say the United States should not be asked to sacrifice if the world’s largest emitters will swallow U.S. efforts in their pollution.

Christopher Flavelle contributed reporting.

Biden wants to slash emissions. Success would mean a very different America.

By 2030, half of the country’s electricity would come from renewable sources such as wind.Credit…Bing Guan/Reuters

President Biden’s new pledge to slash the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decade is long on ambition and short on specifics, but experts say that success would require rapid and sweeping changes to virtually every corner of the nation’s economy, transforming the way Americans drive to work, heat their homes and operate their factories.

In several recent studies, researchers have explored what a future America might look like if it wants to achieve Mr. Biden’s goal: cutting the nation’s planet-warming emissions at least 50 percent below 2005 levels by the year 2030.

By the end of the decade, those studies suggest, more than half of the new cars and S.U.V.s sold at dealerships would need to be powered by electricity, not gasoline. Nearly all coal-fired power plants would need to be shut down. Forests would need to expand. The number of wind turbines and solar panels dotting the nation’s landscape could quadruple.

It’s achievable in theory, researchers say, but it’s an enormous challenge. To get there, the Biden administration would probably need to put in place a vast array of new federal policies, many of which could face obstacles in Congress or the courts. And policymakers would have to take care in crafting measures that do not cause serious economic harm, such as widespread job losses or spikes in energy prices, that could lead to blowback.

“It’s not an easy task,” said Nathan Hultman, the director of the University of Maryland’s Center on Global Sustainability. “We won’t be able to sit back and hope that market forces alone will do the job.”

In two recent studies, Mr. Hultman and his colleagues modeled possible paths to achieving at least a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030. The changes would be far-reaching:

·         By 2030, half of the country’s electricity would come from renewable sources such as wind, solar or hydropower, up from one-fifth today.

·         New natural gas plants would be built largely with technology that can capture carbon dioxide instead of releasing it into the atmosphere — technology that is still in its infancy.

·         Virtually all of the 200 remaining coal plants in the U.S. would shut down unless they, too, can capture their emissions and bury them underground.

·         By 2030, two-thirds of new cars and S.U.V.s sold would be battery-powered, up from roughly 2 percent today.

·         All new buildings would be heated by electricity rather than natural gas.

·         The nation’s cement, steel and chemical industries would adopt stringent new energy-efficiency targets.

·         Oil and gas producers would slash emissions of methane, a potent heat-trapping gas, by 60 percent.

·         The nation’s forests would expand, and farming practices would be reworked, so that they pull 20 percent more carbon dioxide out of the air than they do today.

— Brad Plumer

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Biden Wants to Slash Emissions. Success Would Mean a Very Different America.

Hitting the targets could require a rapid shift to electric vehicles, the expansion of forests nationwide, development of complex new carbon-capture technology and many other changes, researchers said.

April 22, 2021

China’s leader, Xi Jinping, promises to ‘strictly limit’ coal.

China’s president, Xi Jinping, delivered a speech during the opening of the Boao Forum for Asia on Tuesday. Mr. Xi promised Thursday that China would limit coal consumption.Credit…Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

President Xi Jinping of China said his country would “strictly limit increasing coal consumption” in the next five years and phase it down in the following five years.

That’s significant because China is, by far, the world’s largest coal consumer and is continuing to expand its fleet of coal-fired power plants. Coal is the dirtiest fossil fuel.

Mr. Xi repeated his pledge from last year to draw down carbon emissions to net zero by 2060. And, in a pointed reminder to his host, President Biden, he said that the industrialized countries of the West had a historic responsibility to act faster to reduce emissions.

The United States is history’s largest emitter. China is today’s largest emitter.

Mr. Xi added a conciliatory note by saying “China looks forward to working with the international community, including with the United States” on addressing climate change.

Neither China nor India, whose prime minister, Narendra Modi, spoke after Mr. Xi, made any new commitments to ramp up their climate ambitions. Mr. Modi repeated India’s pledge to expand its fleet of renewable energy projects, urged people to make lifestyle changes to address climate change, and announced a vague new partnership with the United States on green energy projects.

India’s once-galloping economy has slowed sharply and the country is currently in the throes of a deadly coronavirus surge.

— Somini Sengupta

Here’s what Canada, Russia and other countries have committed to so far today.

A video monitor in the East Room of the White House showed the heads of state participating in the virtual climate summit on Thursday.Credit…Al Drago for The New York Times

Beyond the big two of the United States and China, here’s an overview of what some American allies and adversaries have said so far at President Biden’s virtual climate summit with world leaders on Thursday.

·         Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged that Canada would reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent to 45 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, a step up from its previous target of a 30 percent reduction in the same time frame. This is a significant increase in ambition for an economy that is still highly dependent on oil extraction, and a sign that Mr. Biden’s decision to increase the United States’ target is having an influence on his closest allies.

·         Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India reiterated his country’s promise to install 450 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2030, but made no new commitments. He argued that India’s per capita emissions were far smaller than those of other major emitters and said, “We, in India, are doing our part.”

·         Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga announced that Japan would cut emissions 46 percent below 2013 levels by the end of the decade, a significant show of solidarity with the United States.

·         President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, the world’s fourth largest greenhouse gas polluter, made only a vague pledge to “significantly reduce the net accumulated emissions in our country by 2050.” He highlighted a carbon pricing pilot program that he said would allow the Sakhalin region to become carbon neutral by 2025, but he said nothing about construction of the Nord Stream 2, a major natural gas pipeline that is opposed by both climate advocates and United States national security advisers.

·         President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil pledged to eliminate illegal deforestation by 2030, a promise that was met with extreme skepticism by those in the environmental community who have seen the destruction of the Amazon skyrocket under his watch. Mr. Bolsonaro also vowed that Brazil would become carbon neutral by 2050, a decade earlier than it had previously said it would. Ending deforestation by 2030, he claimed, would cut Brazil’s emissions 50 percent.

Coral Davenport, Lisa Friedman and Somini Sengupta contributed reporting.

— Maggie Astor

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.nytimes.com/live/2021/04/22/us/biden-earth-day-climate-summit

My two grandsons, Bodhi and Kai enjoyed to be in the garden. That make me very happy. I wish children all over the world would be able to enjoy nature.  Parents and other adults should cultivate and take care of nature for younger generations to have a chance to appreciate a beautiful and peaceful world.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, April 24, 2021

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Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS News, NBC News,  VOA News,  Reuters, NowThis News, Washington Post, FRONTLINE, and RT Documentary

Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS News, NBC News,  VOA News,  Reuters, NowThis News, Washington Post, FRONTLINE, and RT Documentary

PBS News: Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21, PBS NewsHour 

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 22, 2021

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – February 22nd, 2021

PBS News: National Cathedral rings bells in memory of 500k+ U.S. citizens lost to COVID-19, 2.22.21

VOA News: Biden Laments 500,000 Coronavirus Deaths in US, By Steve Herman

VOA News: Biden Tours Pfizer Vaccine Production Center, Updated February 19, 2021 09:33 PM

VOA News: Biden Announces Financial Support for Global COVID Vaccine Program

By Wayne Lee, Updated February 19, 2021 06:16 PM

Reuters: Biden to Debut at G-7 with Focus on Vaccines, Economy and China

By Reuters, February 19, 2021 08:52 AM

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Washington Post: An inside look at Trump’s failed coronavirus response | America’s Pandemic, Premiered Oct 29, 2020 

PBS News: The Virus: What Went Wrong? (full film) | FRONTLINE, Jun 16, 2020 

RT Documentary:  COVID vs the USA. Why is America’s death toll so high? Aug 21, 2020 

WATCH LIVE: Biden delivers remarks on the 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19

Streamed live 7 hours ago, 2.22.21  PBS NewsHour

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb. 22, 2021

Feb 22, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the U.S. death toll from COVID-19 reaches 500,000 as experts warn safety measures may remain for longer than anticipated, major questions about energy infrastructure and emergency response remain in Texas following the winter storm, and we speak with Bill Gates about the ongoing pandemic response and the consequences of inaction in the global fight against climate change. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS  U.S. death toll from COVID-19 reaches 500,000 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqDXW…? News Wrap: WHO concerned about vaccines in poor nations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qltmV…? Texas faces a cascade of issues after winter storm  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meR9S…? Bill Gates on climate change and the pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMbb4…? How the women of the YPJ led the fight against ISIS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdME1…? Republicans who voted to convict Trump face political peril https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEaIC…? Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Biden’s relief package  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VeEHp…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – February 22nd, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Feb 22, 2021  NBC News

President Biden observes moment of silence for 500,000 U.S. lives lost to Covid, Democrats push for vote on Biden’s $1.9 trillion Covid relief plan, and FAA orders inspections on Boeing 777s after engine failure. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:10? U.S. Surpasses Staggering 500,000 Covid Deaths 02:47? Officials: Millions Of Delayed Doses Arrive By Midweek 03:25? NYC Movie Theaters To Reopen At 25 Percent Capacity 04:19? Democrats Push For Vote On Biden’s $1.9 Trillion Plan 05:17? Over 100 Boeing 777s Grounded After Midair Emergency 07:41? Millions Desperate For Food And Clean Water In Texas 08:24? Texas Residents Outraged By Skyrocketing Energy Bills 08:50? Family Of 11-Year-Old Who Died Files $100 Million Lawsuit 09:30? New Inquiries Launched Into Texas Power Grid Failure 10:13? Confirmation Hearing For Biden’s A.G. Pick Merrick Garland 11:31? Supreme Court Deals Trump Major Defeat Over Taxes 11:56? Probe Finds Police Failures In Elijah McClain Death 13:38? Mother Speaks Out One Year After Ahmaud Arbery Killing 16:02? FDA Rule Forcing Vaccine Doses To Go To Waste? 18:33? New Images Show Perseverance Rover Landing On Mars 18:52? Cancer Survivor Joins First All-Civilian Space Mission » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

WATCH: National Cathedral rings bells in memory of 500k+ U.S. citizens lost to COVID-19

Streamed live 8 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

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https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/biden-laments-500000-coronavirus-deaths-us

Biden Laments 500,000 Coronavirus Deaths in US

By  Steve Herman

White House Bureau Chief

February 22, 2021 08:28 PM

President Joe Biden speaks about the 500,000 Americans that have died from COVID-19, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington.

WHITE HOUSE – As the nation marked 500,000 deaths because of COVID-19, U.S. President Joe Biden at twilight Monday walked to a White House South Portico decorated with black bunting and 500 candles.

Alongside the president were first lady Jill Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, who is known as the second gentleman. They stood silently as the Marine Corps band played the Christian hymn, “Amazing Grace.”

As the music concluded, Biden, a Catholic, made the sign of the cross.

A few minutes earlier at the Cross Hall on the first floor of the White House, Biden asked the nation to join in the moment of silence and, in a subdued tone, directed remarks to those who had lost loved ones to the virus.

“It seems unbelievable, but I promise you the day will come when the memory of the one you have lost brings a smile to your lips before a tear to your eye,” the president said. “We will get through this, I promise you.”

He also spoke of the cruelty of death amid the pandemic.

“So many of the rituals that help us cope, that help us honor those we loved, haven’t been available to us,” the president noted. “As a nation, we cannot and we must not let this go on.”

The president on Monday ordered U.S. flags on federal property lowered to half-staff for five days.

President Joe Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Doug Emhoff participate in a moment of silence during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Feb. 22, 2021.

The National Cathedral in Washington, meanwhile, tolled its bells 500 times to honor the lives lost to the coronavirus.

It was a year ago Tuesday that President Donald Trump declared to reporters on the White House South Lawn as he departed for India that “we have it very much under control,” adding “very interestingly, we’ve had no deaths.”

The first fatality from the virus in the United States had actually occurred more than two weeks before the president’s remarks, but it was not until April 2020 that authorities confirmed 57-year-old Patricia Dowd of San Jose, California, had died of COVID-19.

Amid the gloom of a half-million deaths and the emergence of variants of the virus, there are expressions of optimism from top U.S. government officials.

The seven-day average of deaths in the country is continuing to decline, according to Dr. Rochelle Wolensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A nationwide COVID-19 vaccination campaign is under way and about 13% of the population has received at least one dose, although winter weather in recent days has slowed the pace of immunization in some states.

Officials continue to plead for people to wear masks in public and maintain social distancing as the United States is “still seeing a lot of disease – 66,000 cases per day,” Wolensky said during a video briefing with reporters Monday.

The president’s chief medical adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, also cautioned “we are still at an unacceptably high baseline level,” preventing the resumption of normal society.

The United States has suffered the most deaths from the coronavirus and accounts for nearly 20% of total global deaths from the virus, although it is home to just 4% of the world’s population.

That is partly blamed on a lack of coherent federal response to the pandemic during the Trump administration. Trump, who left office January 20, had clashed with his own health experts and he primarily left it to the individual 50 states to figure out how to combat the virus.

Biden’s team “inherited a mess,” Florida’s emergency management director, Jared Moskowitz, told a state legislative committee last month.

In 2020, the virus shaved a full year off the average life expectancy in the United States, the biggest decline since World War II.

The loss of so many lives is “a horrific human toll of staggering proportions and incomprehensible sadness,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday in a statement, in which she called for swift action by Congress to approve the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan “to put an end to this pandemic and to stem the suffering felt by so many millions.”

The $1.9 trillion plan by the president is intended to increase the country’s recovery from the economic and health effects of the pandemic.

Some lawmakers have expressed concern about the proposed legislation’s total cost and what it covers.

“I’m prepared to hear ideas about how to make the American Rescue Plan better and cheaper,” Biden said in remarks delivered earlier Monday. “But we have to make clear who we’re helping and who it would hurt.”

Katherine Gypson contributed to this report.

https://www.voanews.com/covid-19-pandemic/biden-tours-pfizer-vaccine-production-center

Biden Tours Pfizer Vaccine Production Center

By VOA News

Updated February 19, 2021 09:33 PM

President Joe Biden walks past freezers used to store Pfizer-BioNtech’s COVID-19 vaccine as he tours a Pfizer manufacturing site, Friday, Feb. 19, 2021, in Portage, Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

U.S. President Joe Biden toured a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine manufacturing plant Friday afternoon outside Kalamazoo, Michigan, where he touted his administration’s plans to distribute the vaccine to Americans, even as winter weather across the country caused delays.

“We’re now on track to have enough vaccine supply for all Americans by the end of July. That doesn’t mean it’ll be in all Americans’ arms, but enough vaccine will be available,” Biden said.

The president acknowledged that winter weather across much of the country is currently “slowing up the distribution,” but said his administration is on track to reach its goal of administering 100 million shots in its first 100 days.

White House officials said earlier Friday that the winter storms in the Midwest and South had delayed the delivery of 6 million vaccines, which is impacting every state. The delayed doses of both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines represents three days’ worth of shipments.

Even the president’s trip to see Pfizer’s largest plant was delayed a day because of a storm affecting Washington.

President Joe Biden speaks to the press after a tour of a Pfizer manufacturing site, Feb. 19, 2021, in Portage, Mich.

During his tour of the Pfizer plant, Biden walked through an area called the “freezer farm,” where vaccine doses are stored in ultra-cold conditions. Wearing two face masks, the president spoke with some of the plant’s workers. He was joined by Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla and White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeff Zients.

Speaking before Biden, Bourla said Pfizer would more than double vaccine production capacity in the coming weeks. Currently it averages 5 million doses per week. He said the increase was the result in part of improvements in the manufacturing processes at the plant.

In his remarks, the president touted the vaccine’s safety and encouraged everyone to get vaccinated.

“If there’s one message to cut through to everyone in this country, it’s this: The vaccines are safe,” he said.

Earlier Friday, Pfizer and its pharmaceutical partner BioNTech said a new study they conducted indicates their COVID-19 vaccine can remain effective when stored in standard freezers for up to two weeks.

The finding is a significant development since one of the initial drawbacks of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine was that it was required to be stored in ultra-low-temperature freezers not commonly found in standard clinics and pharmacies.

In a statement posted on Pfizer’s website Friday, the companies said they have submitted the new data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) demonstrating their vaccine is stable when stored at -25°C to -15°C, temperatures commonly found in pharmaceutical freezers and refrigerators.

Also Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said that data collected in the first month of vaccinations in the United States have found no concerning new issues with either the Pfizer- BioNTech vaccine or the Moderna vaccine.

It said data collected from the administration of 13.8 million doses of vaccines between December 14, 2020, and January 13, 2021, showed 6,994 reports of adverse events after vaccination, with 90.8% of them classified as nonserious and 9.2% as serious.

Biden Announces Financial Support for Global COVID Vaccine Program

By Wayne Lee

Updated February 19, 2021 06:16 PM

Pfizer employees handle containers of vaccine as U.S. President Joe Biden tours a Pfizer manufacturing plant producing the coronavirus vaccine in Kalamazoo, Michigan, Feb. 19, 2021.

U.S. President Joe Biden announced Friday a $4 billion pledge to a global campaign to bolster the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines to poor countries.

At his first meeting as president with world leaders at the Munich Security Conference, Biden announced financial support for COVAX, a coalition tasked with distributing vaccines to low- and middle-income countries.

“Even as we fight to get out of the teeth of this pandemic, a resurgence of Ebola in Africa is a stark reminder that we must simultaneously work to finally finance health security, strengthen global health systems, and create early warning systems to prevent, detect and respond to future biological threats because they will keep coming,” Biden said at the virtual meeting.

President Joe Biden participates in a virtual event with the Munich Security Conference in the East Room of the White House, Feb. 19, 2021.

Biden pledged $2 billion that will fund the COVAX program through 2022. The pledge follows an initial $2 billion contribution that the U.S. Congress appropriated two months ago that should be released by the end of this month.

The COVAX program is jointly operated by the World Health Organization, an agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Former President Donald Trump withdrew from the WHO after accusing it of covering up China’s blunders in managing the virus at the start of the public health crisis.

“We have to work together to strengthen and reform the World Health Organization,” Biden said. “We need a U.N. system focused on biological threats that can move quickly to trigger action.”

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Biden used the financial commitment to encourage G-7 partners to fulfill their pledges to the COVAX program and make additional investments in international vaccine development and distribution.

Paris accord 

Also on Friday, the United States officially rejoined the Paris climate accord, the most comprehensive global effort to combat global warming. Biden warned of dire consequences if nations don’t do more to reduce carbon emissions.

“We can no longer delay or do the bare minimum to address climate change,” he said. “This is a global existential crisis. We will all suffer the consequences if we fail.”

Biden called on world leaders to “rapidly accelerate our commitments to aggressively curb our emissions and hold one another accountable for meeting our goals and increasing our ambitions.”

Biden previously said he would consider climate change when reviewing every major domestic and foreign policy decision his administration faces.

https://www.voanews.com/usa/biden-debut-g-7-focus-vaccines-economy-and-china

Biden to Debut at G-7 with Focus on Vaccines, Economy and China

By Reuters

February 19, 2021 08:52 AM

FILE – U.S. President Joe Biden hosts a meeting with labor leaders to discuss coronavirus response legislation and the president’s infrastructure plan in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington.

LONDON – U.S. President Joe Biden will attend his first meeting with Group of Seven leaders on Friday to discuss plans to defeat the coronavirus, reopen the battered world economy and counter challenges posed by China.

The COVID-19 pandemic has killed 2.4 million people, tipped the global economy into its worst peacetime slump since the Great Depression and upended normal life for billions.

Biden “will focus on the global response to the pandemic, including vaccine production, distribution of supplies” and efforts to fight emerging infections, White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said on Thursday.

He “will also discuss the global economic recovery, including the importance of all industrial countries maintaining economic support for the recovery” and “the importance of updating global roles to tackle economic challenges such as those posed by China,” Psaki said.

The call with G7 leaders at 1400 GMT is a chance for Biden, a Democrat who took over as president from Republican Donald Trump on Jan. 20, to project a message of re-engagement with the world and with global institutions after four years of his predecessor’s “America First” policies.

Besides Biden, Italy’s new prime minister, Mario Draghi, will be a new face at the leaders’ virtual table, though he is famous for “doing whatever it takes” at the European Central Bank to save the euro during the European debt crisis.

Vaccine drive

Britain, which holds the rotating chair of the G7 and is trying to recast itself as a steward of the rules-based international system following Brexit, will ask members to help speed up the development of future vaccines to 100 days.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is keen to build ties with Biden, who did not support Brexit and who, as a presidential candidate, last year publicly warned Britain against endangering peace in Ireland.

Johnson has said he is interested in the idea of a global treaty on pandemics to ensure proper transparency after the COVID-19 outbreak which originated in China.

The Biden administration will pledge $4 billion to a coronavirus vaccination program for poorer countries in hopes of prying loose bigger donations from other governments, U.S. officials said on Thursday.

Britain, which has pledged 548 million pounds ($766 million) to the COVAX program co-led by the World Health Organization, will ask other G7 partners to give more.

China

China will also be on the agenda.

In his first major foreign policy speech as president, Biden cast China as the “most serious competitor” of the United States.

“We’ll confront China’s economic abuses; counter its aggressive, coercive action; to push back on China’s attack on human rights, intellectual property, and global governance,” Biden said on Feb. 4.

The United States will keep tariffs imposed on Chinese goods by the Trump administration in place for now, but will evaluate how to proceed after a thorough review, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said.

The G7 of the United States, Japan, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy and Canada has a combined gross domestic product of about $40 trillion – a little less than half of the global economy.

By  Reuters

The Full Story of Trump and COVID-19 | NowThis

Oct 6, 2020  NowThis News

THE FULL STORY OF TRUMP & COVID: More than 7 million Americans have suffered from COVID-19, including Pres. Trump. Emmy winner Jeffrey Wright narrates the documentary detailing how four years of Trump’s actions brought America to this moment (warning: distressing images). » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? Executive Producer – Nate Houghteling Directed by Nate Houghteling and Sarah Sherman Written by Sarah Sherman and Seamus McKiernan Edited by Pierce Wilson Produced with Portal A https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDOS…? For more U.S. politics, 2020 election news, and Trump news, subscribe to NowThis News. #Trump? #Politics? #COVID19? #News? #NowThis? #NowThisNews? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

An inside look at Trump’s failed coronavirus response | America’s Pandemic

Premiered Oct 29, 2020  Washington Post

This video is the final installment of a three-part documentary series by the Washington Post. Read more on The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3ovFoQx? Despite decades of warnings and preparation, President Trump has claimed that covid-19 “came out of nowhere.” He downplayed the coronavirus as it began to take hold in the U.S., disregarding the advice of experts and politicizing a health crisis. Through interviews with former Trump administration officials Mark Harvey and Olivia Troye, along with Washington Post reporters Dan Balz and Yasmeen Abutaleb, “Playing it down” explores why the White House was slow to respond to the pandemic, and the far-reaching consequences of its inaction. After months of mixed messages, contradictory policies, divisive rhetoric — and more than 220,000 deaths — the president continues to insist the virus will one day disappear. Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp…? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/? #WashingtonPost? #Documentary? #AmericasPandemic?

The Virus: What Went Wrong? (full film) | FRONTLINE

Jun 16, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

As COVID-19 spread across the globe, why was the U.S. caught so unprepared??An investigation of how America’s leaders failed to prepare and protect us — and who is accountable. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate? In this 90-minute FRONTLINE documentary special, award-winning journalists Marcela Gaviria and Martin Smith trace the coronavirus’s path across the globe and?identify a chain of fateful missteps — from Chinese authorities’ early silencing of dissent around the virus’s emergence in Wuhan, to the World Health Organization’s failure to more quickly sound the alarm, to Italian officials’ slow initial reaction. Then, “The Virus: What Went Wrong?” zeroes in on key moments in the Trump administration’s halting response — including warnings going back to January, the CDC’s inability to manufacture and mass-distribute a working COVID-19 test early on, and a string of missed opportunities to contain the virus before it was too late. #Coronavirus? #COVID19? #CoronavirusPandemic? Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp? Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs? Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs? Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline? Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

COVID vs the USA. Why is America’s death toll so high? | RT Documentary

Aug 21, 2020  RT Documentary

America’s covid-19 death toll is higher than anywhere else in the world. The richest country in the world is having trouble holding things together in the face of the COVID pandemic. To find out why, RT Documentary visits the #COVID? hotspots of New York City and Florida. There, ordinary people and analysts, homeless people and nurses talk about the underlying social conditions causing the chaos. If you want to support Janet Mendez, who struggles to pay an outrageous medical bill after COVID treatment go visit her go fund me page https://www.gofundme.com/f/5a8ms-covi…? 00:00? – Introduction 2:37? – New York’s protest movement amid the pandemic 5:44? – How to maintain social distance during protests 8:01? – Why was New York hit so badly by COVID-19? 12:22? – Overcrowded homeless shelters – a breeding ground for coronavirus 15:26? – Coronavirus crisis from a homeless man’s standpoint 16:51? – Mass-grave burials on Hart Island 19:14? – Diana Torres, a New York nurse 21:37? – Healthcare workers forced to wear trash bags 23:49? – Florida, America’s new COVID hotbed 25:00? – ‘Shame on you’, Ron DeSantis 28:21? – Masks – to wear or not to wear 29:48? – Flourishing funeral homes? 33:00? – Elmhurst, New York’s virus epicentre 37:27? – A $400,000 medical bill 43:35? – Inside Brownsville, New York’s most dangerous neighbourhood #RT? Documentary offers you in-depth #documentary? films on topics that will leave no one indifferent. It’s not just front-page stories and global events, but issues that extend beyond the headlines. Social and environmental issues, shocking traditions, intriguing personalities, history, sports and so much more – we have documentaries to suit every taste. RT Documentary’s film crews travel far and wide to bring you diverse and compelling #stories?. Discover the world with us! SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy? FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/? RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC? RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary? RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rt_document…? RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/?

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Acosta to Trump: Why does virus task force keep contradicting you? Aug 3, 2020  CNN,

CNN’s Harry Enten tells Chris Cuomo why some states with Covid-19 hotspots are now looking to be key battleground states in the 2020 presidential election. #CNN #News,

Burnett: Trump calls Dr. Birx pathetic after she tells the truth, Aug 3, 2020  CNN

Jared Kushner’s Failed Testing Plan; Trump Threatens to Ban TikTok: A Closer Look, Aug 3, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

 Washington Post: The CFPB once defended consumers. Thanks to Trump, it now helps companies prey on them instead.  By Kathleen Kraninger

 BoredPanda: See How The “10 Billion Tree Tsunami” Tree Planting Campaign Transformed This Area Between 2019 And 2020

 Billion Trees Tsunami Project: After and Before Plantation sites under BTAP, Nov 21, 2017, and Massive Plantation Drive in KP, Dec 6, 2018   

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 7, 2020

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Aug 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the White House and congressional Democrats are at a stalemate over a new coronavirus relief bill. Plus: U.S. intelligence warns of foreign election interference, Americans cope with the pandemic’s financial fallout, Ohio Gov. DeWine on COVID-19 in his state, a contentious election in Belarus, reporting on Hiroshima, Mark Shields and David Brooks and victims of COVID-19. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 6, 2020

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Aug 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, congressional Democrats and Republicans appear to be at an impasse over a new coronavirus relief package. Plus: White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow on where talks stand, teachers and local officials struggle with how to open schools, survivors of Hiroshima, business owners with criminal records can’t get federal loans and an essay on systemic racism and the police. Editor’s Note: In our segment about teachers and school administrators, the original video has been modified to remove two photographs that included students. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: New York sues NRA over alleged misuse of funds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEi8k… Port employees detained in Beirut blast investigation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=281oJ… Congress stuck in ‘staring contest’ over pandemic aid deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GAeO… Kudlow: Trump might repurpose money to fund unemployment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mh0a… Teachers and administrators scramble to adapt school plans www.youtube.com/watch?v=A–Dt6yHN8I Top Mississippi health official recommends virtual school https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATKbK… Japan’s youth rush to document memories of Hiroshima horror https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vd11_… Business owners with criminal records haunted by their past https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNuSF… An essay on power and the police https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ku4I4… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 5, 2020

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Aug 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Beirut grapples with the fallout of a cataclysmic explosion that injured thousands. Plus: What issues matter to voters, a GOP strategist on the party’s migration to President Trump, the 75th anniversary of Hiroshima, Minneapolis considers abolishing its police force, a new book about class and hierarchy and a Brief But Spectacular take on surviving COVID-19 at age 102. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Beirut blast means new suffering for a country in collapse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZkBT… News Wrap: Sally Yates denies Obama influenced Russia probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9a1k… 2 views on what matters most to heartland voters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKV_v… GOP strategist will ‘work with Democrats’ to defeat Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tavb-… Should U.S. president be authorized to launch nuclear bomb? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DufU7… Minneapolis officials debate future of city’s police force https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvfES… ‘Caste’ author Isabel Wilkerson on race, class hierarchy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nz0HY… This nursing home resident survived COVID-19 — at age 102 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOzaJ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 4, 2020

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Aug 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Congress and the Trump administration continue to negotiate over another economic relief package as the coronavirus crisis continues. Plus: Devastating explosions rock Beirut, a conversation with Dr. Jill Biden, authoritarianism grows during the pandemic, a college that is cutting costs for remote learning and more. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Pelosi: GOP still doesn’t recognize ‘gravity’ of pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoOm1… News Wrap: Tropical Storm Isaias pummels East Coast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VYoZ… Mammoth explosions rock Beirut, causing widespread injury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYix1… Jill Biden on healing from heartbreak, possible VP picks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDBrD… How authoritarianism has spread since pandemic began https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7diAn… How 1 college is adapting to pandemic — and cutting tuition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgDww… Trump claims only Florida can vote by mail successfully https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jW6f… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 3, 2020

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Aug 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, negotiations between the White House and Congress over a new pandemic relief bill continue. Plus: How to handle mail-in voting during the pandemic, TikTok is under political scrutiny, a summer without camp, Politics Monday with Tamara Keith and Amy Walter and a new book on the current relevance of James Baldwin’s work. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Where Congress stands on potential new pandemic relief bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CqHS… News Wrap: Carolinas brace for Hurricane Isaias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFmmA… The vital role of U.S. Postal Service in American elections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04aO0… Why ‘grandpa’ Microsoft wants to buy tech upstart TikTok https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cHtZ… What kids are losing as coronavirus cancels camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfbYB… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Trump’s messaging, Biden’s VP https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_kas… Why James Baldwin’s work is attracting renewed attention https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zL18V… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nightly News Full Broadcast (August 8th)

Aug 8, 2020  NBC News

President Trump signs executive orders for coronavirus economic relief, massive Sturgis motorcycle rally taking place amid coronavirus concerns, and speculation swirls over Joe Biden’s vice presidential pick.

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – August 5th, 2020 | NBC Nightly News

Aug 5, 2020  NBC News

Chicago Public Schools to be remote this fall, U.S. citizen among the dead in Beirut explosion, and Tropical Storm Isaias leaves millions without power. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00 Intro 01:27 Chicago To Begin School Year With Online-Only Learning 02:59 Florida Tops 500,000 Coronavirus Cases 03:15 Georgia Second- Grader Tests Positive, Class Quarantined 03:29 Trump Pushes School To Reopen, Says Virus ‘Going Away’ 03:46 New York City Considers Some In-Person Teaching For Fall 04:54 Desperate Search For Survivors After Beirut Explosion 07:38 Biden Will Not Travel To DNC To Accept Nomination 07:54 Trump: ‘I’ll Probably’ Give RNC Speech From White House 08:26 Trump Campaign Sues To Stop Nevada Mail-In Voting Law 09:02 Trump Praises Mail-In Voting In Florida And Arizona 09:20 Post Master General Meets Coronavirus Relief Negotiators 09:45 Facebook Removes Trump Post For ‘Covid Misinformatoin’ 10:02 New York City Imposes Quarantine Checkpoints 10:29 Millions Without Power After Tropical Storm Strikes 12:27 Grocery Prices Surge As American Families Struggle 14:31 Health Officials Leave Jobs Under Pressure And Threats 16:58 Robots Give High-Tech Help To Essential Workers » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

ABC News Prime: Isaias slams Northeast; Multiple dead in Beirut explosion; US COVID-19 cases surge

Streamed live on Aug 4, 2020  ABC News

#isaias #beirut #covid19 SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: https://bit.ly/2vZb6yP Watch More on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc GOOD MORNING AMERICA’S HOMEPAGE: https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jul 15, 2020  Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

AXIOS on HBO: President Trump Exclusive Interview (Full Episode) | HBO

Aug 3, 2020  HBO

On the return of Axios on HBO, Axios National Political Correspondent, Jonathan Swan, speaks with President Donald Trump about multiple topics including the coronavirus crisis, the Black Lives Matter movement, the November election, and U.S. Foreign Policy in Afghanistan, China, and Russia. Axios On HBO airs Mondays at 11pm. #HBO #AxiosOnHBO Subscribe to HBO on YouTube: https://goo.gl/wtFYd7 Known for delivering news, coverage, and insight with a distinctive brand of smart brevity, Axios on HBO helps viewers better understand the big trends reshaping America and the world through exclusive interviews, profiles, and breaking news content. Official Site of Axios on HBO: https://www.hbo.com/axios Watch Now Get HBO: https://itsh.bo/ways-to-get Get More HBO Official Site: https://itsh.bo/dotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/hbo Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hbo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hbo AXIOS on HBO: President Trump Exclusive Interview (Full Episode) | HBO

Can Donald Trump retain the presidency? – BBC Newsnight

Jul 28, 2020  BBC Newsnight

With less than 100 days until the US Presidential election, coronavirus cases are still increasing, unrest continues on the streets and Donald Trump is lagging behind Joe Biden in the polls. Newsnight looks at the current state of America. Subscribe to our channel here: https://goo.gl/31Q53F In any other presidential election year, America would be dominating our screens. The November race has the power to define not just the future of our closest ally — but the direction of the UK’s foreign policy and trade deals. But much of this vital race has been swallowed up by the pandemic and the spike in cases has hit republican areas hard. What damage could this do to Trump’s chances of re-election? As Joe Biden seems to be ahead in all the key battlegrounds, how can Donald Trump retain the presidency? The US has also seen protests and riots taking place across the country in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death. Does this help or hinder Trump’s Donald law-and-order-focused re-election campaign? Emily Maitlis is joined by The Lincoln Project’s Rick Wilson, former senior adviser to the Trump campaign Barry Bennett and pollster Rachel Bitecofer. BBC’s North America Editor Jon Sopel reports. #BBC #Newsnight #USElection2020 Newsnight is the BBC’s flagship news and current affairs TV programme – with analysis, debate, exclusives, and robust interviews. Website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsnight Twitter: https://twitter.com/BBCNewsnight Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcnewsnight

Trump’s Tax Nightmare Comes True as NY D.A. Probes Fraud, Demands Taxes | MSNBC

Aug 3, 2020  MSNBC

The New York D.A. is moving quickly to compel Pres. Trump’s secret financial records after winning a blockbuster Supreme Court case, an outcome previewed by former U.S. Solicitor General Neal Katyal. The seasoned lawyer discusses the escalating criminal probe with MSNBC’s Chief Legal Correspondent Ari Melber. (This interview is from MSNBC’s “The Beat with Ari Melber, a news show covering politics, law and culture airing nightly at 6pm ET on MSNBC. http://www.thebeatwithari.com). Aired on 8/3/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

Acosta to Trump: Why does virus task force keep contradicting you?

Aug 3, 2020  CNN

When asked by CNN’s Jim Acosta why members of his coronavirus taskforce have contradicted him, President Donald Trump dodged the question and made inaccurate claims about hydroxychloroquine again. CNN’s Brianna Keilar fact-checks those claims. #Trump #CNN #News

Burnett: Trump calls Dr. Birx pathetic after she tells the truth

Aug 3, 2020 CNN

CNN’s Erin Burnett criticizes President Donald Trump for saying coronavirus task force member Deborah Birx was “pathetic” for caving to Democrats after she told the truth about the coronavirus. #Burnett #Trump #CNN #News

Jared Kushner’s Failed Testing Plan; Trump Threatens to Ban TikTok: A Closer Look

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Aug 3, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Seth takes a closer look at the Trump administration scrapping a nationwide testing plan because they wanted to blame Democrats for the coronavirus pandemic. Late Night with Seth Meyers is supporting City Harvest to help those in need during the COVID-19 pandemic. City Harvest is New York City’s largest food rescue organization, working to end hunger throughout its communities by rescuing 66 million pounds of food each year and delivering it, free of charge, to hundreds of food pantries, soup kitchens and other community partners across five boroughs. Click the button on the above/below to donate or visit https://www.cityharvest.org/. Late Night with Seth Meyers. Stream now on Peacock: https://bit.ly/3erP2gX Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se…

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/08/01/cfpb-once-defended-consumers-thanks-trump-it-now-helps-companies-prey-them-instead/?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most

The CFPB once defended consumers. Thanks to Trump, it now helps companies prey on them instead.

Kathleen Kraninger testifies in the Senate on her nomination to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington on July 19, 2018. (Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

Opinion by   Helaine Olen  Columnist   August 1, 2020

For two days this week, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Kathy Kraninger testified to Congress about protecting consumers during the coronavirus pandemic, first in the Senate and then in the House. It went about as well as could be expected, which is not particularly well at all. Kraninger, a thoroughly unqualified Trump appointee, has shown little interest in doing her purported job, which is protecting Americans from the financial services industry. Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez (D-N.Y.) said she lacked empathy, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) demanded she resign.

Kraninger’s main accomplishment since the start of the covid-19 pandemic has been the loosening of regulations on payday loans. Previously, regulations stopped people who couldn’t afford to repay the loans from taking them on, because borrowers seeking short-term relief instead often found themselves trapped in a cycle of quickly rising debt. Annual interest on payday loans can run above 500 percent.

When queried as to why she loosened regulations on payday loans, Kraninger said that consumers are showing a lot of interest in them. That’s quite possibly true, given that at least 1 million people have filed for unemployment every week since mid-March, but hardly the point of Kraninger’s critics, who believe payday loans are exploitative products that prey on the financially desperate.

Then there is the fact that, since the beginning of the shutdowns, tens of thousands of consumer complaints have poured into the CFPB about mortgage issues, inaccurate credit reports, hassles with debt collectors, you name it. Kraninger says she’s addressing them but her critics — such as Warren — disagree.

The CFPB was conceived by Warren while she was a professor at Harvard Law School. It was meant to give consumers leverage over the financial-services sector, which all too often saw them as so much prey. It scored major victories during the Obama administration. It called out lending institutions for racist auto loan lending standards and spearheaded the federal investigation into Wells Fargo for a decade of turning a blind eye to its employees opening fake accounts for customers in an attempt to keep up with unrealistic sales goals.

No surprise, the financial services sector, which hates the CFPB, cheered Kraninger’s appointment to the job. Their faith was well rewarded, and not just in the area of payday loans. Last year, a House Financial Services Committee investigation revealed that during Kraninger’s first six months on the job, the amount of money the bureau recovered for consumers fell to six percent of what it had been under the final months of Obama appointee Richard Cordray’s leadership. Instead, under Kraninger, the CFPB emphasizes “financial literacy,” despite the fact that, when put on the spot by Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) in 2019, Kraninger couldn’t even properly calculate an annual interest rate.

Of course, the sabotage — and make no mistake, that’s what it is — of the CFPB isn’t even a major story in the Trump era. On Thursday, Vanity Fair revealed that a White House initiative led by Jared Kushner (who else?) to devise a national policy to test for covid-19 was undermined from within, possibly because the disease initially hit politically expendable Democratic states. Millions of parents are suddenly realizing there will be no in-person public school for their children this fall and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos shows next to no concern. The U.S. Postal Service, systemically underfunded, is now falling behind on delivering mail, seemingly at the behest of its new head, Trump donor Louis DeJoy. That’s not just an annoyance, but something that could contribute to election chaos in November if ballots are not delivered or received on time.

In the face of all this, Kraninger’s inept management of the CFPB barely merits a moment of attention. But it should. Her tenure in the top role of the government’s most powerful consumer advocacy organization is a demonstration of the contempt Trump and Republicans hold for governance, not to mention their prioritization of the interests of the wealthiest segments of our economy over the well-being of everyone else. It’s an absolute shame and travesty that Kraninger, whose knowledge of personal finance appears limited to how she can best serve the all-powerful financial sector, is in charge of one of the government agencies best positioned to help Americans protect their money at a time of unprecedented economic carnage.

Read more:

Colbert I. King: Covid-19 relief programs are riddled with suspected fraud. What’s going on here?

Harvey Rosenfield and Laura Antonini: Data isn’t just being collected from your phone. It’s being used to score you.

Henry Olsen: Yes, federal debt is out of control. But this is not the time to pinch pennies.

Helaine Olen

Helaine Olen is a contributor to Post Opinions and the author of “Pound Foolish: Exposing the Dark Side of the Personal Finance Industry.” Her work has appeared in Slate, the Nation, the New York Times, the Atlantic and many other publications. She serves on the advisory board of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project. Follow

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BoredPanda: See How The “10 Billion Tree Tsunami” Tree Planting Campaign Transformed This Area Between 2019 And 2020

Robertas Lisickis  BoredPanda staff

Within the last year, planting trees was the thing to do in easing the negative effects of climate change. This is evident by the slew of various tree-planting initiatives that were organized, including Team Trees where 600 YouTubers pledged to plant 20 million trees, Ethiopia breaking the world record by planting over 350 million trees in half a day, and these 13 feel-good stories about saving our planet.

While the coronavirus has taken over airtime in recent months, the need for tree-planting never went away with many of these initiatives continuing to plant trees. And many are making good progress on their goals.

One such initiative is the 10 Billion Tree Tsunami, Pakistan’s largest ever tree plantation project, which recently had an update on its progress in the form of a before and after video that has been making people gasp in wonder.

It takes years for some of us to get simple things done, but nature is better at reaching its goals

Pakistan’s Advisor to the Minister of Climate Change shared an inspiring before-and-after video of how much the natural landscape in Balloki changed in a year

 Image credits: Malik Amin Aslam

Malik Amin Aslam, Pakistan’s Advisor to the Prime Minister and Federal Minister of Climate Change, shared a video on his Twitter of what the Balloki Nature Reserve near Lahore in the Punjab district looked like a year ago, and what it looks like now.

The video shows barren land with virtually no greenery for miles, a sight that was seen during Aslam’s visit to the area a year ago. Today, it is a luscious and prosperous area fully paved with grass and trees.

The caption read: “Was a treat to visit #BallokiNatureReserve #Lahore after a year – #PMIK @ImranKhanPTI inaugurated this in 2019 as part of #10BillionTreeTsunami and the plantation results in a year are phenomenal – #Change and #NayaPakistan IA”.

This change is a part of the 10 Billion Tree Tsunami project which aims to reforest Pakistan

Image credits: Malik Amin Aslam

10 Billion Tree Tsunami is a government launched and funded project to promote reforestation in Pakistan. The project hopes to plant 10 billion trees within the span of five years, and to achieve a number of other objectives, including to increase forest area, rehabilitate degraded forests, to protect green areas and its wildlife, to provide jobs, among many others.

You see, trees help to protect the soil from degradation and to regulate water on farms, mitigate floods, and enrich the soil and surrounding areas with biodiversity. Also, crops grown in forested areas are often more resilient to the impact of droughts, excessive rains, and extreme weather.

The project aims to increase forest area, rehabilitate degraded forests, and protect green areas and the wildlife living in it, among other objectives

Image credits: Malik Amin Aslam

So far in 2020, 20,798 hectares of plantations were planted to achieve these aims. The Redd Monitor reports that a total of 350,000 hectares of trees were already planted in both planting and natural regeneration form and that the project has also created around 3,500 green enclosures in state-owned forests.

Back in February, the ministry announced their plan to plant 250 million saplings this spring in hopes of populating the bare bits of land around cities. However, it is not clear whether this has been achieved because of the coronavirus and the subsequent lockdown.

The project includes 3 regions with 27 divisions and progress is seen in many locations across the country

Image credits: Malik Amin Aslam

So far, a total of 350,000 hectares were planted with trees, creating 3,500 green enclosures nation-wide

Image credits: Ten Billion Tree Tsunami

The project earned great recognition, including that from the World Economic Forum, WWF, and IUCN

The project has come under fire for a number of reasons. There have been alleged reports of bogus billing, fake plantation, poor quality earthwork, unauthorised payments, and other activities that hint at corruption.

Besides that, it was also reported by the Redd Monitor that the coronavirus lockdown has also led to planters earning around 500 rupees a day—half of what they could on a good day before the pandemic, meaning that they now earn less than minimum wage (which is approx. 800 per day).

Despite this, the project has managed to earn a number of awards and wider recognition over the years, including that from the World Economic Forum, WWF, IUCN, and was ranked 4th biggest initiative by the Plant for Planet Foundation (UNFCCC). And now that people can see more results of the initiative in Aslam’s video, it’s safe to say that the project is going somewhere and both the planet and, subsequently, humanity will benefit from it in the long run.

Besides restoring natural landscapes, the project also plans to create jobs and ensure greater wildlife security

With its 10 billion tree “tsunami”, Pakistan joins a number of other massive tree-planting projects, including the aforementioned Ethiopia’s record-breaking campaign that managed to plant 350 million saplings in 12 hours. Another attempt at breaking the record happened in India, where 1.5 million volunteers planted 66 million trees in the same timespan, showing just how much more natural the world has become over the recent years.

What did you think about this? Have you had a chance to plant a tree, and if so, which one? Let us know in the comment section below!

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After and Before Plantation sites under BTAP

Nov 21, 2017  Billion Trees Tsunami Project

Before and After Plantation site under Billion Trees afforestation project in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan

Massive Plantation Drive in KP

Dec 6, 2018  Billion Trees Tsunami Project

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PBS News: March 26  & 27, 2020

Washington Post: 1,581people have died from coronavirus in the U.S.

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Ninja Nerd Science: COVID-19 – Corona Virus: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnostics

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: Herald Square Park New York City, New York, Spring 2014 (Video on YouTube)

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 27, 2020

Mar 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the House approves the largest economic relief package in U.S. history as the country faces the rising spread of novel coronavirus. Plus: Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on the national shortage of ventilators, the UN secretary-general on global cooperation, Louisiana is a COVID-19 hot spot, Americans trapped abroad and the political analysis of David Brooks and Ruth Marcus. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS After voting drama, House passes $2.2 trillion relief bill https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZiQD… Whitmer glad Trump invoked DPA, says GM is ready to oblige https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7MMW… News Wrap: Maduro blasts Trump over drug-trafficking charges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5Iph… UN head: World not cooperating enough to beat pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDcup… Why Louisiana is emerging as a major coronavirus hot spot https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Arh9t… What will become of Americans stranded abroad? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y47fq… Brooks and Marcus on U.S. pandemic preparation failures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qn6OJ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 26, 2020

Mar 26, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Senate passes a huge economic relief package as U.S. coronavirus cases climb. Plus: Stories from Americans who have lost their jobs, details of the pandemic aid bill, hospitals urgently seek to ramp up capacity, COVID-19 strands migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, how staying home puts victims of domestic violence at greater risk and the latest from President Trump. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. now has the most confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmU_7… Stories from Americans the pandemic has left unemployed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UKYs… Summers: U.S. must spend ‘whatever it takes’ to manage virus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjA5v… News Wrap: DOJ announces indictment of Venezuela’s Maduro https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPbnk… Hospitals take extreme measures to boost capacity, supplies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuEIt… U.S.-Mexico border closure puts migrants in dangerous limbo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxD94… What ‘shelter at home’ means for those who aren’t safe there https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS8Mx… Trump says he’s eager to sign economic relief bill into law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8juWu… Should parents shield their kids from news amid pandemic? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZ_YA… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/national/coronavirus-us-cases-deaths/?utm_campaign=wp_to_your_health&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_tyh&wpmk=1

1,581people have died from coronavirus in the U.S.

By Joe FoxBrittany Renee MayesKevin Schaul and Leslie Shapiro

Data as of Mar. 27 at 6:44 PM. Published March 27, 2020

The Washington Post is providing this story for free so that all readers have access to this important information about the coronavirus. For more free stories, sign up for our daily Coronavirus Updates newsletter.

The disease caused by the new coronavirus has killed at least 1,581 people in the United States since Feb. 29, when a 58-year-old man near Seattle became the first announced U.S. death.

Deaths Cases

New deaths reported per day

0100200300Feb. 29Mar. 7Mar. 14Mar. 21Mar. 27

The death toll from covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, began to rise steadily in early March, then more sharply as the disease spread to every state and most U.S. territories. The virus has killed people in nearly every state.

Total deaths reported by county

[Mapping the spread of the coronavirus worldwide]

Because testing was slow to begin in the United States, health officials agree that the number of confirmed cases is much lower than the actual number of people who have the disease, and even the count of deaths is probably low because of differences in reporting by overwhelmed local jurisdictions.

Hotspots have erupted in a few places with large outbreaks, none more dire than in New York, where at least 44,876 cases have been confirmed and at least 527 have died since March 14, when Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) announced the death of an 82-year-old woman.

On Thursday, calls to 911 in New York City exceeded the number that occurred on Sept. 11, 2001.

Deaths Cases

New deaths reported per day in New York

Select a state:

New York

050100Feb. 29Mar. 7Mar. 14Mar. 21Mar. 27

State Confirmed cases Deaths Change from Wednesday
New York 44,876 527 242 deaths +85%
Washington 3,477 157 24 +18%
Louisiana 2,744 119 54 +83%
New Jersey 8,825 108 46 +74%
California 4,657 94 29 +45%
Michigan 3,634 92 49 +114%
Georgia 2,000 64 24 +60%
Florida 2,900 35 12 +52%
Massachusetts 3,240 35 20 +133%
Illinois 3,024 34 15 +79%
Colorado 1,433 27 11 +69%
Connecticut 1,291 27 8 +42%
Texas 1,937 26 11 +73%
Indiana 979 25 11 +79%
Pennsylvania 2,345 22 7 +47%
Ohio 1,137 19 8 +73%
Wisconsin 926 14 7 +100%
South Carolina 542 13 6 +86%
Arizona 665 13 7 +117%
Oregon 416 12 2 +20%
Virginia 607 10 1 +11%
Vermont 184 10 2 +25%
Nevada 536 10 4 +67%
Missouri 666 9
Mississippi 579 8
Oklahoma 322 8
Kentucky 301 7
Tennessee 1,318 6
Maryland 775 5
North Carolina 887 4
Minnesota 396 4
Alabama 587 4
Kansas 206 4
District of Columbia 271 3
Other 77 3
Idaho 205 3
Iowa 235 3
Puerto Rico 79 3
Arkansas 381 3
Delaware 163 2
North Dakota 68 1
Utah 472 1
New Mexico 136 1
Montana 109 1
Maine 168 1
Alaska 58 1
South Dakota 58 1
Guam 51 1
New Hampshire 158 1
Wyoming 70 0
Nebraska 82 0
U.S. Virgin Islands 19 0
Rhode Island 203 0
West Virginia 76 0
Hawaii 106 0
Northern Mariana Islands 0 0
American Samoa 0 0

But New York is far from the only area struggling to contain the disease and treat its victims.

Washington, where the first known U.S. outbreak began in early February, has had a high number of deaths among older people, particularly in the Seattle area. The disease took root early in several King County nursing homes and facilities that care for older, sicker people.

Most deaths worldwide have occurred among people older than 50 and those with underlying health problems, as they are often most vulnerable to respiratory disease.

[What you need to know about coronavirius]

Hard-hit Louisiana is facing a shortage of ventilators and protective equipment for health-care workers, according to Gov. John Bel Edwards (D). A breakout in New Orleans may have been fueled by the month-long Carnival celebration that drew more than a million people to the city in February and culminated in a raucous — and crowded — Mardi Gras.

[Rural areas may be most vulnerable to coronavirus]

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) was the first to issue a statewide stay-at-home order on March 19 in an attempt to contain the spread of the disease that had already infiltrated the San Francisco Bay area and greater Los Angeles. The next day, governors in New York and Illinois issued similar orders, and others soon followed.

Wayne County, Mich., which includes Detroit, has a high rate of infections per capita thanks in part, health officials told the Detroit Free Press, to economic disparities. People in areas of concentrated poverty tend to have higher rates of diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

About this story

Deaths and number of cases data from WHO and CDC, collected by Johns Hopkins University, and Post analysis.

Armand Emamdjomeh and Bonnie Berkowitz contributed to this report.

Joe Fox joined The Washington Post as a graphics reporter in 2018. He previously worked at the Los Angeles Times as a graphics and data journalist.

Leslie Shapiro has been a Graphics Reporter for The Washington Post since 2016, focusing on data visualization and new media storytelling.

Brittany Renee Mayes joined The Washington Post as a graphics reporter, focusing on sports and politics, in June 2018. She previously worked at NPR on the visuals team as a news applications developer.

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/national/coronavirus-us-cases-deaths/?utm_campaign=wp_to_your_health&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_tyh&wpmk=1

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/mapping-spread-new-coronavirus/

Mapping the worldwide spread of the coronavirus

By Washington Post Staff Updated March 27 at 6:44 p.m.

PLEASE NOTE

The Washington Post is providing this story for free so that all readers have access to this important information about the coronavirus. For more free stories, sign up for our daily Coronavirus Updates newsletter.

The epicenter of the covid-19 pandemic has moved from China, where it began late last year, to Europe and the United States. The World Health Organization declared covid-19 a pandemic on March 11 as the coronavirus that causes it infiltrated countries all over the world.

The disease, which can trigger severe respiratory symptoms, has been reported on every continent except Antarctica and in more than 170 countries. Some countries are confirming thousand of new cases each day, including the United States, where testing was slow to begin.

Confirmed cases                                                 Reported deaths

591,802                 26,996

Country Confirmed cases Change from Wednesday Deaths
U.S. 101,657  35,879 +55% 1,581
Italy 86,498  12,112 +16% 9,134
China 81,897  236 0% 3,296
Spain 64,285  14,770 +30% 4,940
Germany 50,871  13,548 +36% 342
France 33,402  7,802 +30% 1,997
Iran 32,332  5,315 +20% 2,378
Britain 14,743  5,103 +53% 761
Switzerland 12,928  2,031 +19% 231
South Korea 9,332  195 +2% 139
Netherlands 8,642  2,204 +34% 547
Austria 7,657  2,069 +37% 58
Belgium 7,284  2,347 +48% 289
Turkey 5,698  3,265 +134% 92
Canada 4,682  1,431 +44% 54
Portugal 4,268  1,273 +43% 76
Norway 3,755  671 +22% 19
Brazil 3,417  863 +34% 92
Australia 3,143  779 +33% 13
Sweden 3,069  543 +21% 105
Israel 3,035  666 +28% 12
Czechia 2,279  625 +38% 9
Denmark 2,200  338 +18% 52
Malaysia 2,161  365 +20% 26
Ireland 2,121  557 +36% 22
Chile 1,610  468 +41% 5
Luxembourg 1,605  272 +20% 15
Ecuador 1,595  422 +36% 36
Japan 1,468  161 +12% 49
Poland 1,389  338 +32% 16
Pakistan 1,331  268 +25% 10
Romania 1,292  386 +43% 26
South Africa 1,170  461 +65% 1
Thailand 1,136  202 +22% 5
Saudi Arabia 1,104  204 +23% 3
Indonesia 1,046  256 +32% 87
Finland 1,041  161 +18% 7
Russia 1,036  378 +57% 4
Greece 966  145 +18% 28
Iceland 890  153 +21% 2
India 887  230 +35% 20
Philippines 803  167 +26% 54
Singapore 732  101 +16% 2
Diamond Princess 712 0 0% 10
Panama 674  231 +52% 9
Peru 635  155 +32% 9
Slovenia 632  104 +20% 9
Argentina 589  202 +52% 13
Croatia 586  144 +33% 3
Mexico 585  180 +44% 8
Dominican Republic 581  189 +48% 20
Estonia 575  171 +42% 1
Qatar 562  25 +5% 0
Colombia 539  69 +15% 6
Egypt 536  80 +18% 30
Bahrain 466  47 +11% 4
Iraq 458  112 +32% 40
Serbia 457  73 +19% 1
Algeria 409  107 +35% 26
UAE 405  72 +22% 2
Lebanon 391  58 +17% 8
New Zealand 368  163 +80% 0
Lithuania 358  84 +31% 5
Morocco 345  120 +53% 23
Armenia 329  64 +24% 1
Ukraine 310  165 +114% 5
Hungary 300  74 +33% 10
Bulgaria 293  51 +21% 3
Latvia 280  59 +27% 0
Slovakia 269  53 +25% 0
Taiwan 267  32 +14% 2
Andorra 267  79 +42% 3
Costa Rica 263  62 +31% 2
Uruguay 238  49 +26% 0
Jordan 235  63 +37% 1
Bosnia 232  56 +32% 4
Tunisia 227  54 +31% 6
Kuwait 225  30 +15% 0
San Marino 223  15 +7% 21
North Macedonia 219  42 +24% 3
Moldova 199  50 +34% 2
Albania 186  40 +27% 8
Burkina Faso 180  34 +23% 9
Azerbaijan 165  72 +77% 3
Vietnam 163  22 +16% 0
Cyprus 162  30 +23% 5
Kazakhstan 150  69 +85% 1
Malta 139  10 +8% 0
Ghana 137  44 +47% 4
Oman 131  32 +32% 0
Senegal 119  20 +20% 0
Brunei 115  6 +6% 0
Afghanistan 110  26 +31% 4
Venezuela 107  16 +18% 1
Sri Lanka 106  4 +4% 0
Ivory Coast 101  21 +26% 0
Cambodia 99 0
Mauritius 94 2
Belarus 94 0
West Bank and Gaza 91 1
Cameroon 91 2
Uzbekistan 88 1
Kosovo 86 1
Georgia 83 0
Montenegro 82 1
Cuba 80 2
Nigeria 70 1
Honduras 68 1
Trinidad and Tobago 66 2
Bolivia 61 0
Kyrgyzstan 58 0
Liechtenstein 56 0
Rwanda 54 0
Paraguay 52 3
Dem. Rep. Congo 51 3
Bangladesh 48 5
Monaco 42 0
Kenya 31 1
Guatemala 28 1
Jamaica 26 1
Madagascar 26 0
Togo 25 0
Barbados 24 0
Uganda 23 0
Zambia 22 0
Maldives 16 0
Ethiopia 16 0
Tanzania 13 0
El Salvador 13 0
Djibouti 12 0
Eq. Guinea 12 0
Mali 11 0
Dominica 11 0
Mongolia 11 0
Niger 10 1
Eswatini 9 0
The Bahamas 9 0
Burma 8 0
Haiti 8 0
Suriname 8 0
Namibia 8 0
Guinea 8 0
Antigua and Barbuda 7 0
Seychelles 7 0
Grenada 7 0
Mozambique 7 0
Gabon 7 1
Laos 6 0
Eritrea 6 0
Benin 6 0
Fiji 5 0
Syria 5 0
Cabo Verde 5 1
Guyana 5 1
Zimbabwe 5 1
Nepal 4 0
Angola 4 0
Holy See 4 0
Congo 4 0
Mauritania 3 0
Sudan 3 1
Chad 3 0
Saint Lucia 3 0
Central African Rep. 3 0
Liberia 3 0
Bhutan 3 0
Gambia 3 1
Somalia 3 0
Saint Kitts and Nevis 2 0
Guinea-Bissau 2 0
Belize 2 0
Nicaragua 2 1
Papua New Guinea 1 0
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 1 0
Timor-Leste 1 0
Libya 1 0

See fewer ?

Last updated: March 27 at 6:44 p.m.

Canada

4,682 confirmed cases

54 deaths

[Tracking the U.S. coronavirus outbreak, state by state]

The U.S. total of confirmed cases has exceeded China’s and is now the highest in the world. Covid-19 has been reported in every state and in many U.S. territories. As more tests are performed, many states are seeing rapid growth in the number of known cases.

Confirmed cases                                                           Reported deaths

101,657                      1,581

Washington3,477 casesNew York44,876 casesCalifornia4,657 cases

Last updated: March 27 at 6:44 p.m.

Delaware

163 confirmed cases

2 deaths

[A more detailed look at the virus’s spread through U.S. counties and states]

For months, China had the most confirmed cases worldwide, but its tally of new reported infections peaked in mid-February and is now approaching zero.

Feb. 26March 26U.S.U.S.18,058 new cases18,058 new caseson March 26on March 26Feb. 26March 26ItalyItaly6,2036,203Feb. 26March 26ChinaChina121121

Feb. 26March 26SpainSpain8,271 new cases8,271 new caseson March 26on March 26Feb. 26March 26GermanyGermany6,6156,615Feb. 26March 26FranceFrance3,9513,951Feb. 26March 26IranIran2,3892,389Feb. 26March 26BritainBritain2,1722,172Feb. 26March 26SwitzerlandSwitzerland914914Feb. 26March 26AustriaAustria1,3211,321Feb. 26March 26BelgiumBelgium1,2981,298

 [What you need to know about coronavirus]

As the disease waned in China, it began to surge through Europe, and by late March, more people had died from the virus in Italy and Spain than in China.

Spain64,285France33,402Germany50,871Italy86,498 cases

Last updated: March 27 at 6:44 p.m.

The majority of China’s cases were reported in the Hubei province, where Chinese health officials said the new virus strain leaped to humans from wild animals that were sold at a market in the capital city of Wuhan.

Confirmed cases

0100,000200,000300,000400,000Jan. 22Mar. 26China81,782Othercountries447,809

Note: China total includes cases in Hong Kong and Macau

Last updated: March 27 at 6:44 p.m.

Coronaviruses range from some common cold viruses to those that cause much more serious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). Some strains spread more efficiently than others; the virus that causes covid-19 seems to spread easily from person to person, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

[Graphic: How epidemics like covid-19 end (and how to end them faster)]

Read more:

How to prepare for the coronavirus in the U.S.

How the coronavirus tanked the markets

Millions of tweets peddled conspiracy theories about coronavirus in other countries, an unpublished U.S. report says

White House preparing to ask Congress for more money to finance coronavirus response

Coronavirus came from bats or possibly pangolins amid ‘acceleration’ of new zoonotic infections

An earlier version of this graphic included Hong Kong cases that were being monitored.

About this story

Originally published Jan. 22, 2020.

Number of cases data WHOCDCNHC and Dingxiangyuan, collected by Johns Hopkins University.

*U.S. flu season estimates are preliminary and based on data from the CDC’s weekly influenza surveillance reports summarizing key influenza activity indicators.

Lauren TierneyJoe FoxTim MekoChris AlcantaraJohn MuyskensShelly TanAdrián BlancoArmand EmamdjomehYoujin ShinMonica UlmanuHarry StevensKevin Schaul and Bonnie Berkowitz contributed to this report.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/mapping-spread-new-coronavirus/

COVID-19 | Corona Virus: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Diagnostics

Premiered Mar 16, 2020   Ninja Nerd Science

Ninja Nerds, What is Corona virus? What is COVID-19? Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by SARS-COV2 is a new strain that was discovered in 2019 and has not been previously identified in humans. Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people.  Detailed investigations found that SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans. It is believed that COVID-19 was transmitted from pangolin to humans (current theory). Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death (WHO, 2020). Ninja Nerd Lectures has compiled the most up to date and recent data on COVID-19 as of March 15, 2020. Please follow along with this lecture to understand the origin and zoonosis of COVID-19, the routes of transmission, epidemiology (current as of 3/15/2020), pathophysiology, and diagnostic tests used to identify COVID-19. As new information and research is published we will continue to provide updates on COVID-19 and ensure all of our viewers are kept up to date on the most recent data. SUPPORT US! paypal.me/ninjanerdscience REFERENCES: World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Support us by purchasing apparel and donating to our PayPal or Patreon! ? –Become a Patron of ours and receive the final, high resolution photo of the lecture! FUNDING GoFundMe | https://www.gofundme.com/ninja-nerd-s… APPAREL | Amazon Prime Free Delivery | https://www.amazon.com/Ninja-Nerd-Sci… Teespring | https://teespring.com/stores/ninja-nerd PATREON | https://www.patreon.com/NinjaNerdScience SOCIAL MEDIA FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdSci… INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdsc… ALSO, check out our Medical channel | Ninja Nerd Medicine! https://www.youtube.com/ninjanerdmedi…

Category  Education

HeraldSquareParkNYCNewYorkSpring2014

Herald Square Park New York City, New York, Spring 2014

By Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Dec 26, 2014   naahblubiv

Herald Square Park, New York City, New York In Spring 2014 I am sitting in my art gallery and work room with comfort. It is nice and warm inside the house but outside at this time in late December the weather is cold and I see no flowers and green trees. It made me think of spring time. John and I went to New York City. We stopped at the park between 33rd and 35th Street. The weather was just right with bright sunshine. People enjoyed sitting on the chairs with tables for putting drinks or other items. John enjoyed the sun in a chair. As a flowers lover I gravitated to the bed of beautiful pink and white tulips, daffodils and other spring flowers. People young and old were enjoying spending time in the park. This small Park can give so much pleasure to humans. In general people love nature. Seeing the tall trees and the flowers bloom makes people happy. Thanks to New York City for creating this little oasis named Herald Square Park. For more pictures and information please visit the following link:

www.ingpeaceproject.com

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Friday, December 26, 2014

Category  Education

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 1, 2020

Jan 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a standoff outside the U.S. Embassy in Iraq ends — but tensions over American involvement in the country remain high. Plus: What North Korea’s nuclear decision means for relations with the U.S., new laws go into effect as 2020 begins, Antarctic penguins warn of climate change consequences, the decline of local newspapers and harvesting water from fog. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Death in Australian wildfires rises to 17 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LE2U… Crisis at Baghdad embassy is over, but tensions remain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vl9wR… Amid stalled U.S. talks, Kim Jong Un’s ‘major policy shift’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ocQU… How state laws are changing in 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAtFe… What America is losing as local newsrooms shutter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSVIX… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Dec 31, 2019

Streamed live on Dec 31, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: https://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Shields and Brooks on 2019 in review, 2020

Dec 27, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week’s political news, including the battle between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over rules for a Senate impeachment trial, how the presidential primary race is shaping up among 2020 Democrats and the year’s most surprising political developments. Sream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

At rare J.M.W. Turner show, the watercolors are as fragile as they are many

Dec 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

British painter J.M.W. Turner was both prolific and peripatetic, producing more than 30,000 watercolors during a lifetime in which he traveled throughout Europe. But these works are extremely susceptible to light damage and can be shown only once in a generation. Now, they’re on view at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut — their only North American stop. Jared Bowen of WGBH reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Despite extreme weather and surging activism, 2019 saw political paralysis on climate

Dec 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

By almost any measure, 2019 was a year of especially sobering news on climate change, with grim warnings about what could happen in the future along with extreme weather events occurring now. The year also saw a global protest movement, initiated by young people, arise to try to tackle the problem. But as Miles O’Brien reports, the call for action was often divorced from political reality. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The lies our culture tells us about what matters — and a better way to live | David Brooks

Jul 3, 2019   TED

Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy. Get TED Talks recommended just for you! Learn more at https://www.ted.com/signup. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You’re welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here: https://media-requests.ted.com/ Follow TED on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED

Category   People & Blogs

How to escape education’s death valley | Sir Ken Robinson

May 10, 2013  TED

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at https://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category   Education

Bring on the learning revolution! | Sir Ken Robinson

May 24, 2010  TED

In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning — creating conditions where kids’ natural talents can flourish. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at https://www.ted.com/translate. Follow us on Twitter https://www.twitter.com/tednews Checkout our Facebook page for TED exclusives https://www.facebook.com/TED

Category   Education

Sir Ken Robinson Keynote Speaker at the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit

Aug 13, 2018   Better Together: California Teachers Summit

At the 2018 Better Together: California Teachers Summit, Sir Ken Robinson, a leading education and creativity expert, delivered the keynote address from the Summit’s headquarters at Cal State Fullerton. Sir Ken’s thought-provoking speech challenged California’s teachers to transform our education system by building personal relationships and developing the appetite and curiosity of learners. Because, as he put it, “when the conditions are right, miracles happen everywhere.”

Category   Education

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Feeling burned out? You may be spending too much time ruminating about your job, says psychologist Guy Winch. Learn how to stop worrying about tomorrow’s tasks or stewing over office tensions with three simple techniques aimed at helping you truly relax and recharge after work.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Guy Winch · Psychologist, author

Guy Winch asks us to take our emotional health as seriously as we take our physical health — and explores how to heal from common heartaches.

More Resources

How to Fix a Broken Heart

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TED Books (2018)

Emotional First Aid

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Plume (2014)

Buy now ?

About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | November 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

2°C: Beyond the limit

On land, Australia’s rising heat is ‘apocalyptic.’ In the ocean, it’s worse.

By Darryl Fears  Photos by Bonnie Jo Mount
Graphics by John Muyskens and Harry Stevens Dec. 27, 2019

BRUNY ISLAND, Tasmania — Even before the ocean caught fever and reached temperatures no one had ever seen, Australia’s ancient giant kelp was cooked.

Rodney Dillon noticed the day he squeezed into a wet suit several years ago and dove into Trumpeter Bay to catch his favorite food, a big sea snail called abalone. As he swam amid the towering kelp forest, he saw that “it had gone slimy.” He scrambled out of the water and called a scientist at the University of Tasmania in nearby Hobart. “I said, ‘Mate, all our kelp’s dying, and you need to come down here and have a look.’

“But no one could do anything about it.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/img/1800/ECE6XKHZEMI6THQCDVC4WPP2R4.jpg

Strands of bull kelp at Shelly Point in Tasmania. The Tasman Sea is warming, and once plentiful giant kelp forests have rapidly declined. Indigenous artists rely on a kelp habitat for traditional jewelry and basket making.

Climate change had arrived at this island near the bottom of the world, and the giant kelp that flourished in its cold waters was among the first things to go.

Over recent decades, the rate of ocean warming off Tasmania, Australia’s southernmost state and a gateway to the South Pole, has climbed to nearly four times the global average, oceanographers say.

More than 95 percent of the giant kelp — a living high-rise of 30-foot stalks that served as a habitat for some of the rarest marine creatures in the world — died.

Giant kelp had stretched the length of Tasmania’s rocky east coast throughout recorded history. Now it clings to a tiny patch near Southport, the island’s southern tip, where the water is colder.

“This is a hot spot,” said Neil Holbrook, a professor who researches ocean warming at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “And it’s one of the big ones.”

Click any temperature underlined in the story to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit

Climate scientists say it’s essential to hold global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times to avoid irreversible damage from warming.

The Tasman Sea is already well above that threshold.

The Washington Post’s examination of accelerated warming in the waters off Tasmania marks this year’s final installment of its global series “2C: Beyond the Limit,” which identified hot spots around the world. The investigation has shown that disastrous impacts from climate change aren’t a problem lurking in the distant future: They are here now.

Nearly a tenth of the planet has already warmed 2 degrees Celsius since the late 19th century, and the abrupt rise in temperature related to human activity has transformed parts of the Earth in radical ways.

In the United States, New Jersey is among the fastest-warming states, and its average winter has grown so warm that lakes no longer freeze as they once did. Canadian islands are crumbling into the sea because a blanket of sea ice no longer protects them from crashing waves. Fisheries from Japan to Angola to Uruguay are collapsing as their waters warm. Arctic tundra is melting away in Siberia and Alaska, exposing the remains of woolly mammoths buried for thousands of years and flooding the gravesites of indigenous people who have lived in an icy world for centuries.

Australia is a poster child for climate change. Wildfires are currently raging on the outskirtsof itsmost iconic city and drought is choking a significant portion of the country.

Nearly 100 fires are burning in New South Wales, nearly half of them out of control. Residents of the state, where Sydney sits, wear breathing masks to tolerate the heavy smoke, which has drifted more than 500 miles south to the outskirts of Melbourne.

This is happening even though average atmospheric temperatures in Australia have yet to increase by 2 degrees Celsius.

The ocean is another story.

A stretch of the Tasman Sea right along Tasmania’s eastern coast has already warmed by just a fraction below 2 degrees Celsius, according to ocean temperature data from the Hadley Center, the U.K. government research agency on climate change.

Sea surface temperature change in a region off the coast of Tasmania

Trend

1900195019802018-202ºF above 1900-2018average-101ºC above 1900-2018average

+1.9ºCAnnual average for the region

Source: Met Office Hadley Center for Climate Science and Services

As the marine heat rises and the kelp simmers into goo, Dillon and other descendants of Tasmania’s first people are losing a connection to the ocean that has defined their culture for millennia.

Aboriginals walked to present-day Tasmania 40,000 years ago during the Stone Age, long before rising sea levels turned the former peninsula into an island.

Cut off from Aboriginals on the mainland, about a dozen nomadic tribes were the first humans to live so close to the end of the Earth, fishing amid the giant kelp for abalone, hunting kangaroo and mutton birds, turning bull kelp into tools, and fashioning pearlescent snail shells into jewelry for hundreds of generations.

But that was before British colonizers took their land and deployed an apartheid-like system to wipe them out.

Now, as descendants try to finally get full recognition as the first people and original owners of Tasmania, climate change is threatening to remove the marine life that makes so much of their culture special.

Two of the most severe marine heat waves ever recorded struck back to back in recent years.

In the first, starting in 2015, ocean temperatures peaked at nearly 3 degrees Celsius above normal in the waters between Tasmania and New Zealand. A blob of heat that reached 2 degrees Celsius was more than seven times the size of Tasmania, an island the size of Ireland.

The region’s past heat waves normally lasted as long as two months. The 2015-2016 heat wave persisted for eight months. Alistair Hobday, who studied the event, compared it to the deadly 2003 European heat wave that led to the deaths of thousands of people.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/world/climate-environment/climate-change-tasmania/heat-wave-map-2-medium.jpg?v=5

Marine heat waves, Feb. 1, 2016

MAINLAND

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

Mild heat wave

Moderate

TASMANIA

Severe

Extreme

100 MILES

Source: Robert Schlegel, Ocean Frontier Institute

“Except in this case, it’s the animals that are suffering,” said Hobday, a senior research scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, a government agency.

South of the equator, Australia’s summer stretches from December to February — and soaring temperatures turned the mainland deadly this year. An estimated 23,000 giant fruit bats — about a third of that species’s population in Australia — dropped dead from heat stress in Queensland and New South Wales in April.

The bats, called flying foxes, cannot survive temperatures above 42 degrees Celsius. Another 10,000 black flying foxes, a different species, also died. Bodies plopped into meadows, backyard gardens and swimming pools.

A month later, more than 100 ringtail possums fell dead in Victoria when temperatures topped 35 degrees Celsius for four consecutive days.

The warming waters off Tasmania are not just killing the giant kelp, but transforming life for marine animals.

Warm-water species are swimming south to places where they could not have survived a few years ago. Kingfish, sea urchins, zooplankton and even microbes from the warmer north near the mainland now occupy waters closer to the South Pole.

“There’s about 60 or 70 species of fish that now have established populations in Tasmania that used not to be here,” said Craig Johnson, who leads the ecology and biodiversity center at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania. “You might see them occasionally as sort of vagrants, but they certainly did not have established populations.”

But the region’s indigenous cold-water species have no place to go. Animals such as the prehistoric-looking red handfish are accustomed to the frigid water closer to the shore. They cannot live in the deep-water abyss between the bottom tip of Tasmania and Antarctica.

“It’s a geographic climate trap,” Johnson said. Marine animals unique to Australia — the wallabies and koalas of the deep — could easily vanish. “So there’s going to be a whole bunch of species here that we expect will just go extinct.

“You know, it’s not a happy story.”

Genocide

Every time he dives for abalone, Rodney Dillon plays his part in what is arguably Tasmania’s saddest story of all.

At 63, he’s getting too old for the occasional plunge. Before a dive on a windy day in September, two people had to wrestle his wet suit over a thick athlete’s body softened by time.

Dillon persists because diving puts a favorite food on the family table, and, more important, it carries on a dying Aboriginal custom nearly ended by the British crown and the Australian governors it appointed.

A Man Among Orcas – Wildlife Documentary

Jun 3, 2017  Best Documentary

Enduring raging winds and icy waters with minimal protection, he enters the intimacy of elephant seals and orcas using clever ethological analyses and gets them used to his presence. Then comes the extraordinary: meet a man who communicates with penguins with body language, calms young seals and turns them into live pillows, lies underwater with 8 ton orcas or mature male seals…

Category   Pets & Animals

In memoriam: those we lost in 2019

Dec 31, 2019  Global News

Global News looks back at the exceptional individuals we said goodbye to in 2019, with a retrospective produced by Global National’s Eric Sorensen and videographer Trevor Owens. For more info, please go to https://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: https://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: https://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: https://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #2019PeopleWeLost #GlobalNews #2019InMemoriam

Category   News & Politics

The Year 2019: Remembering those we lost l ABC News

Dec 23, 2019  ABC News

We lost many legends this year, from actress Valerie Harper to “Beverly Hills 90210” star Luke Perry, fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt and ABC News’ own Cokie Roberts. #ABCNews #ValerieHarper #BH90210 #LukePerry #CokieRoberts #GloriaVanderbilt

Category News & Politics

VTN Architects Designed a Vietnam Home With the Green Space on the Inside

March 24, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects / Hiroyuki Oki

Blurring the line between the interior and exterior, Vo Trong Nghia Architects designed and built a three-level residential home in Ho Chi Minh City that is overflowing from within with fiddle leaf fig plants, various palms, and winding vines. Going beyond arrangements of potted house plants, the architects integrated the flora into the physical structure. Corridors, staircases, and rooms are lined with natural dividers that add color, block sunlight, and ventilate the space.

The latest project in the firm’s “House for Trees” series, the Stepping Park House is a commentary on environmental issues in Vietnam caused by a lack of green spaces. Views of the exterior show that the driveway, balconies, and perimeter fence have also sprouted leaves. The top floor of the building has an open slatted design with spaces that are filled with even more greenery, which further connects the home with the surrounding environment, and in particular to the rare park nearby. (via Jeroen Apers)

The Twist: A New Gallery in Kistefos Sculpture Park Connects Two River Banks

September 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

A sinuous new gallery and bridge reaches across the Randselva River in Jevnaker, Norway. Designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), the aluminum-clad structure joins north and south river fronts on the campus of Kistefos Sculpture Park. 15,000 square feet of space allows visitors to explore Kistefos’s large art collection while also taking in the surrounding landscape through floor-to-ceiling windows. The Twist opened to the public on September 18th, with an exhibition featuring the work of conceptual artist Martin Creed and painter Howard Hodgkin. Kistefos Sculpture Park has  ticketed admission, which includes entry to The Twist, and is open seasonally from the end of May to mid-November. (via Design Milk)

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