PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 27 – 28 2019, This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization, Why does almost half of America’s food go to waste?

TED Talks: Claire Wardle how you can help transform the internet into a place of trust? and Yasmin Green How technology can fight extremism and online harassment

Project Unity: Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

BBC News: Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC?, and Homeless in spite of full-time job

The Secrets of Nature: Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat

Thisiscolossal: Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

PBS NewsHour full episode October 28, 2019

Oct 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi dies during a U.S. special forces raid in northwestern Syria. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on President Trump and impeachment, what al-Baghdadi’s death means for the threat of ISIS, California endures new wildfires and power outages, and our Politics Monday team, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter, analyzes the latest political news. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 27, 2019

Oct 27, 2019 PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 27, analysis on the death of the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and a look at what that may mean for the region, and a return to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania one year after 11 people were killed at the Tree of Life synagogue in the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Detroit is home to an unusual museum that draws on African history and customs, filling an entire city block with installations and sculptures. The MBAD African Bead Museum also allows visitors hands-on experiences — and acts as a stabilizing force in a distressed area of the city. Special correspondent Mary Ellen Geist reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jun 16, 2015  PBS NewsHour

Watch more from Making Sen$e: https://bit.ly/2D8w9kc Read more economic news: https://to.pbs.org/2PNUx19 Roughly 40 percent of food produced in America never makes it to the table. Whether it rots in the field, is trashed at the supermarket, or thrown out at home, NPR’s Allison Aubrey looks at why good food is being discarded, and what can be done to prevent it.

Category   News & Politics

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. “If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong,” Green says. “We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yasmin Green · Geopolitical technologist

Yasmin Green is the director of research and development for Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet Inc. focused on solving global security challenges through technology.

Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

Oct 7, 2014  Project Unity

Homelessness in society needs urgent action. This video documents the homeless people of mid-town New York to find out more about their world and what struggles and hardships they face. More and more people are facing homelessness and housing problems so we are putting out a call to action to stand for some of our most vulnerable members of society. Winter is approaching and without your help, many people who are homeless will die over the winter months in New York City. It is important that we unit to provide whats needed for people who are homeless to have the necessities, such as clothing, blankets, warm food, shelter and the support every human being deserves. Summary Project Unity, a non-profit organisation is committed to unifying communities for good causes. Finding out from grassroots what are the most effective ways to assist people in need, we empower communities with direct action to have a positive effect on the issues facing us. Unity overcomes everything, so transform your environment with the strength of unity.

Category   People & Blogs

Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC? – BBC News

Mar 9, 2015   BBC News

Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It has been one of the coldest winters on record in America’s north-east, and in New York City freezing temperatures have coincided with record numbers of homeless. BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant has been out onto the streets to meet those struggling to find shelter. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews

Category   News & Politics

Homeless in spite of full-time job – BBC News

Nov 18, 2016  BBC News

The acute shortage of housing in Britain has been underlined by figures obtained by BBC News. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Category   People & Blogs

Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Jul 15, 2014

Presents some of the animal kingdom’s strangest survival strategies. The most startling behaviour patterns aren’t found among the classic big animals such as lions or polar bears, but among nature’s smaller creatures: Poison dart frogs, chameleons, praying mantises and scorpions, to name only a few. These “Little Monsters” are masters of survival. Until recently, only a handful of scientists enjoyed the technical means to study them up close. But now, thanks to 3D visualization, large audiences can experience a chameleon thrusting out its tongue at close range, rattlesnakes striking at their targets to within fractions of an inch, praying mantises hunting and hummingbirds feeding, filmed from inside the flower! Rather than simply delivering a flat representation of these amazing stunts, modern 3D provides for an emotional experience. And with its ingenious combination of slow-motion-3D and timelapse-3D, “Little Monsters” even improves upon state of the art 3D for greater impact, yielding unbelievable scenes the world has never seen and “felt” before.

Category  Science & Technology

Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

August 15, 2019  Colossal

Photographer Rob Woodcox (previously) travels the world to bring athletes and dancers together in visually captivating locations and poses. The 29-year-old artist first picked up a camera about ten years ago and hasn’t looked back. Woodcox works with a diverse array of models both in studio environments and in deserts and metropolises. A combination of on-site practical effects and post-production editing create the fantastical final images.

Woodcox grew up in Michigan, and shares with Colossal that the lack of a robust local creative industry spurred his imaginative, DIY approach. Woodcox found creative community online, where he connected with likeminded photographers. The scale of his projects grew as his network expanded, and now Woodcox frequently works on client commissions in addition to his personal practice. As his professional identity has evolved over the past eight years, Squarespace has stayed Woodcox’s website platform of choice. Its seamless user experience allows his work to take center stage. “When you’re doing creative work, the website just needs to be simple, clean, and easy to use. And that’s Squarespace. If it’s inhibiting the user’s experience, then that’s a problem,” Woodcox shares with Colossal. 

“Pursuing projects with real people and being a part of things that matter” keeps Woodcox inspired. Teaching workshops has been a huge part of the photographer’s career: to date, he has taught over eighty workshops on five continents. Squarespace’s ecommerce integrations allow students to register for workshops (the next one is in Portland, Oregon) and collectors to purchase fine art prints. An embedded newsletter signup form lets Woodcox’s audience keep up with his latest projects.

“It’s fun to think about what people haven’t even seen yet. I have visions that are so much bigger even than anything I’ve done so far,” Woodcox tells Colossal. “That’s an exciting thing as an artist. I don’t think I’m ever going to run out of fuel. There’s so much that I want to do.”

Ready to show the world your creative potential? Head over to Squarespace.com for a free weeklong trial, and if you like what you see, use code COLOSSAL at checkout to save 10% on your purchase of a website or domain name.

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PBS News,TEDTalks, YVeritasium, BBC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 19 – 26, 2019

TED Talks: Ttara Djokic  An ancient rock suggests a new theory for how life started?, Prosanta Chakrabarty Four billion years of evolution in six minutes and David Druber Glow in the dark sharks and other stunning sea creatures

YVeritasium: World’s lightest solids

BBC News: Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor

Thisiscolossal: A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 26, 2019

Oct 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 26, rising winds and forced power outages stoke new fears as California wildfires continue to burn, a look at how Miami is tackling an affordable housing crisis, and the band Spoon is staying afloat in a transforming music industry. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 25, 2019

Oct 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, wildfires rake California, closing schools and forcing evacuations. Plus: Washington political figures say goodbye to Elijah Cummings, what’s behind protests in Lebanon and Chile, President Trump’s federal appeals court nominations, political analysis from Mark Shields and David Brooks, and legendary entertainer Julie Andrews on balancing films and family. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Judge rules House impeachment inquiry is legal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN1Jn… California crews race against the clock to contain fires https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5keXg… Congressman Elijah Cummings remembered in Baltimore https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yhgic… Across the globe, economic uncertainty is driving protest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIiXB… How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mdz7… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s judiciary, Taylor’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONaDc… Julie Andrews on fame, family and favorite movies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaaL3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 24, 2019

Oct 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Republicans step up criticism of the House impeachment inquiry after stunning testimony about President Trump’s handling of military aid to Ukraine. Plus: Rep. Jackie Speier on impeachment criticism, Andrew Brunson’s Turkish imprisonment ordeal, children held in Cambodian orphanages, how big data changes creativity and a brief but spectacular take on preventing blindness. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 23, 2019

Oct 23, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a group of GOP lawmakers storms an impeachment inquiry session, and President Trump lifts sanctions on Turkey amid controversy over its incursion into Syria. Plus: Mark Zuckerberg in the hot seat, Chicago teachers on strike, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet, Kurds caught in the Syrian crossfire and George Takei on making enemies of each other. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: GOP lawmakers disrupt Pentagon official’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3t-Ks… Violence has calmed in northeastern Syria, but at what cost? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7xlv… News Wrap: British police discover 39 bodies in cargo truck https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HePx7… Lawmakers grill Zuckerberg on cryptocurrency, political ads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i5BA… In Chicago teachers’ strike, how far apart are the 2 sides? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D6F6… Sen. Bennet on ‘incredible weakness’ of Trump’s Syria move https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFWWt… Northern Syrians who endured ISIS face new survival struggle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KL_I… George Takei on internment, immigration and ‘inhumanity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VULlQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 21, 2019

Oct 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump responds to mounting criticism over Syria, the site of the G-7 and an escalating impeachment inquiry. Also: The impact of the U.S. leaving Syria, a one-on-one interview with Bernie Sanders, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter break down the latest political news, a deal in a high-stakes opioid case and healing Flint with nutrition programs. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why Trump is facing weaker GOP support https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY9gM… ‘Trump betrayed us,’ say fleeing Kurds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz-WK… News Wrap: Lebanese government approves economic reforms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VY_Z… Sanders scores endorsement as centrist candidates gain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aBHd… Sanders: Spending a lot on Medicare for All will save money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR86R… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on impeachment public opinion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBCJp… What does a $260 settlement suggest for future opioid cases? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU8-c… Flint fights lead poisoning by improving nutrition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tsx5j… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 22, 2019

Oct 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine testifies that the Trump administration did make military aid to Ukraine contingent upon investigations of Trump’s political rivals, and the leaders of Russia and Turkey meet to determine control of northeastern Syria. Plus: Sen. Kamala Harris on her 2020 campaign, a conversation with Kirstjen Nielsen and training students as pilots. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How Taylor’s testimony could affect impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTheW… Erdogan ignores U.S. agreement for northeastern Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D11Zb… News Wrap: Canada’s Trudeau wins 2nd term but loses majority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yuqK… Kamala Harris defends health care plan from rival critics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn4sY… Kirstjen Nielsen on what she regrets about her tenure at DHS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W023g… Community colleges prepare students for careers in aviation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cVfp… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 20, 2019

Oct 20, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 20, President Trump pulls back on a plan to hold a meeting next year with G-7 leaders at his Florida golf resort, a preview of the high-stakes election for Canada’s prime minister, and in the second of our two-part series a look at ICE detentions in Louisiana and their economic impact on rural communities. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 19, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 19, another setback for a Brexit deal after the British Parliament postpones a vote, the first of a two-part series on ICE detention in rural Louisiana, and writer John Hodgman’s take on losing status. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker 

Tara Djokic · Astrobiologist

Tara Djokic discovered direct evidence that indicates some of Earth’s oldest life once thrived in hot springs on land.

Take Action

learn

Get informed about the affects of climate change on our only life support system, Earth.

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participate

Vote with your feet and protest for climate action.

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TEDxSydney | May 2019

Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we’re a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process — and not the end of the line. “We’re not the goal of evolution,” Chakrabarty says. “Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life — connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Prosanta Chakrabarty · Ichthyologist

Prosanta Chakrabarty studies fish to help explain the evolution of human beings and our planet.

Take Action

learn

Learn more about Prosanta Chakrabarty’s research and how to support his work on evolution and the Tree of Life.

Learn more ?

TED2018 | April 2018

Just a few meters below the waves, marine biologist and explorer-photographer David Gruber discovered something amazing — a surprising new range of sea creatures that glow in many colors in the ocean’s dim blue light. Join his journey in search of biofluorescent sharks, seahorses, sea turtles and more, and learn how these light-up creatures could illuminate a new understanding of our own brains.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

David Gruber · Marine biologist, explorer-photographer

David Gruber searches the undersea world for bioluminescent and biofluorescent marine animals.

More Resources

Further reading

Mission Blue II

Learn more about the TED-at-sea hosted by TED Prize winner Sylvia Earle.

More at www.ted.com ?

May 31, 2019  Veritasium

Aerogels are the world’s lightest (least dense) solids. They are also excellent thermal insulators and have been used in numerous Mars missions and the Stardust comet particle-return mission. The focus of this video is silica aerogels, though graphene aerogels are now technically the lightest. At one point Dr. Steven Jones literally held the Guinness World Record for making the lightest aerogel and therefore lightest solid. If you’re interested in learning more about aerogels, let me know in the comments as there is a potential trilogy in the works… Huge thanks to Dr. Stephen Steiner and the crew at Aerogel Technologies. To find out more or buy your own aerogel sample, check out: http://www.aerogeltechnologies.com/ Thanks to Dr. Steven Jones and Dr. Mihail Petkov at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory And thanks to FLIR for loaning us the awesome high definition thermal camera. The footage is amazing! https://www.flir.com Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme and everyone who provided feedback on an early draft of this video. Filming by Raquel Nuno Animations by Maria Raykova Drawings by Mariel Solsberg Music From http://epidemicsound.com “Seaweed” “Swagger Stagger”

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Caption author (Portuguese)  ARSamogin

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Category   Education

Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor 16 October 2019

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image caption More details about the discovery will be released at a news conference on Saturday

Archaeologists have found more than 20 ancient wooden coffins near the Egyptian city of Luxor, the country’s antiquities ministry says.

The coffins, whose brightly-coloured decorations are still visible, were uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, on the River Nile’s west bank.

They were in two layers, with the ones on top across those below.

The ministry described the discovery as “one of the largest and most important” in recent years.

More details will be released at a news conference on Saturday.

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry

Most of the tombs at Asasif, which is close to the Valley of the Kings, are from the Late Period (664-332BC) of ancient Egypt.

However, there are also tombs from the earlier 18th Dynasty (1550-1292BC), which was the first of the New Kingdom and included the famous pharaohs Ahmose, Hatshepsut, Thutmose III, Amenhotep III, Akhenaton and Tutankhamun.

Last week, the antiquities ministry announced that archaeologists had discovered an ancient “industrial area” in Luxor’s West Valley.

The area included “houses for storage and the cleaning of funerary furniture, with many potteries dated to the 18th Dynasty”, it said.

Media caption’Recipe’ for creating mummies in ancient Egypt revealed

For more information Please Visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50068575

A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

October 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

In the 1500’s self-taught artist and nun Plautilla Nelli created a life-size mural of Jesus and the twelve apostles at the Last Supper. Spanning 21 feet feet, the vibrantly colored painting includes carefully rendered details including wine chalices, salt cellars, wood panelling, and a rhythmically creased tablecloth. In addition to the inanimate objects depicted, Nelli demonstrated impressive facility with human anatomy in her renderings of the religious figures—at the time, women were barred from studying the field of anatomy.

Nelli’s masterpiece stayed for two centuries at her convent, Santa Caterina, and then changed locations a few times before being unstretched, rolled, and put in storage about a hundred years ago. After an initial restoration and then additional damage due to flooding in the 1960’s, The Last Supper has been undergoing restoration for the past four years. Brought back to life by an all-female team of curators, restorers, and scientists at Advancing Women Artists, it is now on permanent display at the Santa Maria Novella Museum in Florence, Italy. (via artnet, Smithsonian Magazine)

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Ing & John’s & International Street Art, TED Talks, Thisiscolossal, & More

Ing & John’s Street Art and International: Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 3 and International Street Art – Part 4 The Audubon Mural Project Attracts 314 Endangered Birds to the Facades of Manhattan and Figures of Birds Emerge from a Kinetic Flurry of Spray Paint

TED Talks: Abhishek_Gopalka_How_motivation_can_fix_public_systems?

Go the Fork to Sleep: 4K Blooming Flowers Time Lapse for Relaxation Soft Piano Music

Melania Anghel: Butterflies and Flowers – 1 Hour Nature Meditation with Soothing Music

 Thisiscolossal: All 435 Illustrations from John J Audubon’s ‘Birds of America’ Are Available for Free Download and Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 3

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 3

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

On Monday, August 28, 2019 John added his work to the display.  John’s artwork is on the far left, “Impossible Dreamer”.  “Gandhi Man of Peace”, in the middle is my artwork, which I produced in 2010.  The far right is John’s artwork “Beneath the Lake”. 

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I am very happy to have an opportunity to display our artworks in public.  There were people asking some questions about our artwork.  Some people took pictures of our artwork.   It seems to be a positive reaction from the people who view them.  People comment about the beautiful plants and unique artwork.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Tuesday, October 22, 2019

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 4

International Street Art – Part 4

The Audubon Mural Project Attracts 314 Endangered Birds to the Facades of Manhattan

December 14, 2015  Christopher Jobson

Endangered Harlem, by Gaia

Since October 2014, the streets of Upper Manhattan have become an unexpected destination for rare sightings of some 314 endangered birds. The Audubon Mural Project is a collaboration between the National Audubon Society and Gitler &_____ Gallery to commission murals of climate-threatened birds surrounding the old neighborhood of John James Audubon.

So far 20 artworks have been painted on storefronts, building facades, window panels, and retractable security grates. The number of species depicted isn’t arbitrary, it reflects a report from last year highlighting 314 birds most threatened by climate change. The growing list of involved artists includes Gaia, Iena Cruz, Hitnes, Lunar New Year, and many others. You can learn more about the artworks and the birds depicted in them, including a map of where to find them, on the Audubon Mural Project Website.

Photo: Mike Fernandez/Audubon

The Swallow-tailed Kite mural contains 12 other climate-threatened species. The church tower to the right of the mural is the location of John James Audubon’s final resting place.

Black-chinned Hummingbird, by Ashli Sisk. Photo: Mike Fernandez/National Audubon Society

Figures of Birds Emerge from a Kinetic Flurry of Spray Paint

May 2, 2016  Christopher Jobson

Brazilian artist L7M (previously) depicts owls, ducks, sparrows, and other birds materializing from a chaotic swirl of dripped paint and flourishes of spray. The graffiti birds not only contrast urban and natural elements, but also depict a distinct clash of both abstract and figurative techniques. According to Street Art News the artist was recently in Rome where he completed several of the pieces you see here. Check out more of his latest mural work on Facebook.

For more information please visit the following link:

How do you fix broken public systems? You spark people’s competitive spirit. In a talk about getting people motivated to make change, public sector strategist Abhishek Gopalka discusses how he helped improve the health system of Rajasthan, a state in India home to more than 80 million people, using the powers of transparency and public accountability. “Motivation doesn’t just appear,” Gopalka says. “Something needs to change to make you care.”

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with BCG. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

About the speaker

Abhishek Gopalka · Public sector strategist

BCG’s Abhishek Gopalka advises governments on innovative approaches to deliver better outcomes for citizens.

About TED Institute

Every year, TED works with a group of select companies and foundations to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. The culmination is an event produced, recorded, and hosted by TED, generating a growing library of valuable TED Talks that can spur innovation and transform organizations.

Learn more about TED Institute

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TED@BCG | September 2019

4K Blooming Flowers Time Lapse for Relaxation Soft Piano Music

Sep 4, 2018  Go the Fork to Sleep

Watching a flower bloom is peaceful and calming. Relax while watching a stunning 4K time lapse of blooming flowers, while listening to soft, gentle piano music. Blooming flowers are mesmerizing to watch, especially in 4K. Piano music is wonderful for stress relief, meditation, relaxation, and sleep.

Butterflies and Flowers – 1 Hour Nature Meditation with Soothing Music

Feb 27, 2014  Melania Anghel

Ho creato questo video con l’Editor video di YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/editor)///////… GORGEOUS BUTTERFLIES AND FLOWERS FOR MORE THAN 1 HOUR NATURE RELAX, JOY AND HAPPINESS ////////////////////////////////////// SOOTHING MUSICS FOR RELAX, YOGA, MEDITATION, TAI CHI, HEALING, REIKI, DEEP RELAX =

Category   Entertainment

All 435 Illustrations from John J Audubon’s ‘Birds of America’ Are Available for Free Download

October 22, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Pinnated Grouse, plate 186

If you’ve been looking for an opportunity to download free high resolution images of 435 bird illustrations, you’re finally in the right place. The National Audubon Society has recently made John James Audubon’s seminal Birds of America available to the public in a downloadable digital library (signing up for their email list is a prerequisite).

Birds of America was printed between 1827 and 1838, and was filled prints created from hand-engraved plates based on Audubon’s original watercolor paintings. In addition to the prints, each bird’s page also includes a recording of the animal’s call, plus extensive written texts from the period of the book’s printing.

Audubon is widely lauded as the individual who brought an awareness and appreciation of birds’ beauty and fragility; the National Audubon Society has been active since 1905. Explore more of the Society’s current conservation efforts, as well as ways to get involved, on their website. (via Open Culture)

Roseate Spoonbill, plate 321

American Magpie, plate 357

Sharp-tailed Finch, plate 149

Sooty Tern, plate 235

Summer, or Wood Duck, plate 206

Spotted Grouse, plate 176

American Flamingo, plate 431

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill

March 26, 2014  Christopher Jobson

A biochemist by training, photographer Linden Gledhill is fascinated by the beauty of infinitesimally small aspects of nature and science, from capturing the flight of insects to exploring the beauty of magnetic ferrofluid. Among his most jaw-dropping images are macro photographs of butterfly wings that reveal complex patterns that look like perfectly organized flower petals. These tiny protrusions are actually scales, similar to what you would find on reptile, though extremely small and fragile. Gledhill’s photography recently inspired an episode of Smarter Every Day where Destin Sandlin learns how to shoot similar photos. (via awkwardsituationist.tumblr.com)

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PBS News-October 14-18, 2019, BBC-Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters, CNN, TEDx and More

PBS News:October 14-18.2019, How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut, What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability, How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

CNN: SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

PBS NewsHour full episode October 18, 2019

Oct 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the battleground in northeastern Syria appears to be quieting, as a Turkish operation there pauses to allow Kurdish fighters to leave. Also: Violence in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, more questions about Boeing’s handling of the 737 MAX, former Gov. John Kasich on overcoming political divisions, Shields and Brooks, the art of Native American women and a historic spacewalk. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 17, 2019

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, U.S. and Turkish officials agree that Turkey’s military offensive in northern Syria will pause. Plus: Another U.S. diplomat testifies on Capitol Hill as President Trump’s acting chief of staff disputes wrongdoing around U.S. aid to Ukraine, remembering Rep. Elijah Cummings, a possible Brexit deal, resolution of the General Motors strike and using big data creatively. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Turkish official denies Erdogan agreed to a ‘cease-fire’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOENn… How impeachment inquiry and Senate trial could unfold https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpY3k… News Wrap: New England lashed by powerful nor’easter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEtD-… Remembering lawmaker, civil rights advocate Elijah Cummings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKwv… The EU approved Johnson’s Brexit plan. Will Parliament? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63Ay9… What tentative GM deal says about American organized labor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtU4f… How customers’ big data is transforming creative commerce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cs7Cg…

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

A bipartisan group of senators announced a bill to impose additional sanctions on Turkey in the wake of the country’s invasion in Syria. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Chris Van Hollen, who introduced the bill, were joined by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, Richard Blumenthal and Jeanne Shaheen. The lawmakers expressed concern about President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria. “History will haunt us,” Blumenthal said. “We are going to be complicit in the ethnic cleansing that occurs as a result of this absolutely abhorrent action.” Later in the day, Vice President Mike Pence announced a 120-hour cease-fire between Turkey and the Kurds. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 16, 2019

Oct 16, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump defends his decision to remove U.S. troops from Syria as violence escalates, and the U.S. House votes overwhelmingly to condemn the move. Also: Critical moments in last night’s Democratic debate, a new frontier in the fight against Alzheimer’s, a chef reintroducing Native American culinary traditions and a Brief but Spectacular take on opioid addiction. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Syria and impeachment put Trump on defensive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Cj1v… News Wrap: GM and UAW reach tentative deal to end strike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orBra… Warren becomes debate target as moderates vie for breakout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RnD5… Can ultrasound be used to fight Alzheimer’s? https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/can… Traditional Native foods are the Sioux Chef’s key ingredient https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yxxd… What tackling the opioid crisis will require https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srrtH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 15, 2019

Oct 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, revelations that John Bolton raised alarms about Rudy Giuliani and the Ukraine affair add fuel to the impeachment inquiry. Also: A Syrian city as microcosm of the larger fight, a Texas officer is charged with murder, what to watch in the Democratic debate, defining the criteria for impeachment, the soaring cost of student housing, and Elizabeth Strout’s new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Testimony reveals officials raised concerns about Giuliani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQ8VS… News Wrap: Hundreds charged in Barcelona protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EyQL… Syria’s Manbij embodies consequences of Trump’s decision https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7O3m… What makes officers more likely to use deadly force? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL9wC… Van Hollen: Sanctions ‘next best’ way to influence Turkey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0_0P… The hot topics 2020 Democrats could debate tonight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DHYE… How the founders defined impeachment-worthy crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTVPZ… How soaring housing costs are straining college students https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PbOG… How fiction draws Elizabeth Strout home to Maine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od2Lw… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 14, 2019

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, how U.S. withdrawal from northern Syria is reshaping the region’s conflict. Plus: President Trump’s former top Russia adviser is deposed, analysis of the Syrian battleground, House Democrats who aren’t supporting the impeachment inquiry, Politics Monday, Ronan Farrow on revelations in his latest book, a Detroit museum’s hands-on experiences and a “NewsHour” announcement. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: As U.S. leaves Syria, Kurds join Assad to fight a NATO ally https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E5YM… Former Russia adviser Fiona Hill speaks to House committees https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLx7U… News Wrap: Texas police officer resigns over fatal shooting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdVwS… What Trump’s Syria withdrawal means for the Middle East https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bBPE… House Democrats in Trump districts face impeachment quandary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT9we… Amy Walter and Domenico Montanaro on impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ImL3… Ronan Farrow on the systemic coverup of sexual assault https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttgIt… At this Detroit art museum, engagement on community terms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFa2K… PBS launches “NewsHour West,” based in Phoenix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B5o9… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut

Oct 10, 2019 PBS NewsHour

November marks the 50th anniversary of public television’s “Sesame Street,” a cultural landmark widely praised for its approach to children’s programming. But beyond the songs and fun, “Sesame Street” does some serious work for those in need, providing special support and guidance for military families and addressing topics like autism and addiction. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Turkey continued its military assault into northern Syria on Thursday. Aid agencies warn that nearly half a million people near the border are at risk from the violence, which is drawing criticism from many U.S. officials. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to Sinam Mohamad, U.S. representative for the Syrian Democratic Council, and Soner Cagaptay of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

In a new book, Pulitzer winner James B. Stewart explores two controversial recent investigations by the FBI and the Justice Department: Probes into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server when she was secretary of state and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Stewart talks to William Brangham about how his research contradicts President Trump’s “deep state” narrative. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

4 hours ago  Turkey offensive in Syria

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Up to 300,000 people are said to have fled the violence in northern Syria

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says that Turkey will “crush the heads” of Kurdish fighters if they do not withdraw from a planned safe zone area in northern Syria.

Turkey agreed on Thursday to suspend an offensive for five days to allow the Kurds to retreat from the area.

But on Saturday both sides accused the other of violating the ceasefire.

Ankara views the Kurdish forces as terrorists and wants to create a “safe zone” buffer inside Syria.

Despite the temporary ceasefire, some sporadic violence has continued – particularly around the border town of Ras Al-Ain.

What did Erdogan say?

Speaking at a televised event in the central Turkish province of Kayseri on Saturday, President Erdogan said that if Kurdish fighters did not withdraw by Tuesday evening – as agreed in the ceasefire – “we will start where we left off and continue to crush the terrorists’ heads”.

The Turkish leader is due to hold talks next week with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin. On Saturday he said that if those talks did not produce a solution, Turkey would “implement its own plans”.

Turkey’s defence ministry earlier accused Kurdish forces of carrying out 14 “provocative” attacks in the last 36 hours, mostly in Ras Al-Ain, but insisted Turkish forces were fully abiding by the agreement.

However, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) accused Turkey of violating the ceasefire.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Turkish-backed Syrian rebels are still active along the border

They also accuse Turkish troops of failing to create a safe corridor for the evacuation of civilians and wounded people from the besieged town.

On Saturday the SDF urged US Vice-President Mike Pence, who helped to broker the temporary ceasefire, to pressure Turkey to allow the passage of civilians.

“Despite the constant communication with the American side and the promise made by them to solve this problem, there has not been any tangible progress in this regard,” the SDF said in a statement.

Turkish presidency spokesman Ibrahim Kalin said they wanted the US to put pressure on Kurdish forces to withdraw.

“We have told our American colleagues to use their leverage, their connections, to make sure that they leave without any incidents,” he told AFP news agency.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) said deliveries of humanitarian aid had been prevented from entering Ras Al-Ain.

The monitor group said on Friday that the civilian death toll from the Turkish operation had now risen to 86.

Between 160,000 and 300,000 people have reportedly fled their homes since the offensive started 10 days ago.

What prompted the offensive?

Turkish forces first launched their assault on 9 October, following an announcement US troops would withdraw from the Syria-Turkey border region.

Media captionThe BBC’s Martin Patience explains what’s behind the conflict

The Turkish plan is to clear Kurdish fighters from a buffer zone extending more than 30km (20 miles) into Syria. It would run for about 440km along the border, President Erdogan said on Friday, and be monitored from observation posts.

Turkey also plans to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees, currently on its territory, in the buffer zone but critics warned the move could trigger the ethnic cleansing of the local Kurdish population.

The goal was to push back a Kurdish militia group – the People’s Protection Units (YPG) – that Turkey views as a terrorist organisation.

Since the offensive was launched, President Donald Trump has been accused by some, including senior Republicans, of abandoning a US ally. The SDF – a group dominated by the YPG – fought alongside the US against the Islamic State (IS) group in Syria.

There has been growing international concern about possible war crimes committed by Turkey and its allied militias during the offensive.

Media captionMike Pence announces Turkish ceasefire in Syria

Amnesty International says it has gathered “damning evidence” of war crimes and other violations by their side and the United Nations has called on Turkey to investigate the allegations.

Unconfirmed reports have also emerged that Turkish-allied forces have used white phosphorus, a chemical weapon which causes bad burns, in Syria.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) said it was aware of the claims and was gathering evidence.

What is the latest with the ceasefire?

The pause in hostilities followed talks in the Turkish capital Ankara between Mr Erdogan and Mr Pence on Thursday.

President Trump celebrated news of the ceasefire and claimed the pause in hostilities would lead to “millions of lives” being saved. He remained optimistic in comments made on Friday, despite reports the ceasefire was failing to hold.

Media captionPresident Trump on Turkish and Kurdish forces: “Sometimes you have to let them fight a little bit”

SDF spokesman Mustafa Bali tweeted on Friday morning to allege that Turkey was breaking the ceasefire near Ras al-Ain.

“Despite the agreement to halt the fighting, air and artillery attacks continue to target the positions of fighters, civilian settlements and the hospital,” he wrote.

President Erdogan dismissed reports of continuing clashes on Friday as “misinformation” but international news media recorded explosions in Ras al-Ain during the morning.

The SOHR said Saturday that the SDF had not yet started to pull back from the border region.

Local Kurdish media are reporting that five civilians and 13 Kurdish fighters in Ras-al-Ain have been killed since the ceasefire began, but the BBC has not been able to independently confirm that.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

Oct 19, 2019  CNN

SE Cupp says President Donald Trump’s Syria policy is one of the only issues that has prompted swift criticism from the Republican party, and argues it may be the one issue that could put his presidency in danger.

Category  News & Politics

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

May 18, 2016  TEDx Talks

The Kurds are an ancient and noble people who are now the primary “boots on the ground” against ISIS in the Middle East. They are 35 million strong worldwide, the largest people group on earth without their own homeland. In this stirring talk, Stephen Mansfield tells the story of the Kurds and does so, surprisingly, through the lives of three women. Stephen Mansfield is a New York Times bestselling author who first rose to global attention with his groundbreaking book, The Faith of George W. Bush, a bestseller that Time magazine credited with helping to shape the 2004 U.S. presidential election. He has written celebrated biographies of Barak Obama, Booker T. Washington, George Whitefield, Winston Churchill, Pope Benedict XVI, and Abraham Lincoln, among others. Mansfield’s latest book, The Miracle of the Kurds, is a timely introduction to the Kurdish people that reached bookstores just as Kurdish troops began standing heroically against the evils of ISIS in the Middle East. The book has been named “Book of the Year” by Rudaw, the leading Kurdish news service. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Sep 21, 2013  TEDx Talks

Nicholas Glastonbury is a graduate of the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study. His studies focused on the intersections of human rights law, nationalism, anthropology, political science, theories of representation, feminist theory and queer theory. About New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study Creativity, flexibility and rigor characterize the academic program of the Gallatin School of Individualized Study. At Gallatin, students have the opportunity to combine the best of a small college experience with the best of a large research university. A Gallatin education is unique. The individualized structure of the program and its relationship to the rest of NYU are part of what makes the school so special. For more information visit gallatin.nyu.edu/ About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) video produced by Charles Q. Drexler vfx animation by Michael J. Green opening music by Gabriel S. Beam Hyphenate Media www.hyphenatemedia.com

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Oct 10, 2017  TEDx Talks

Levi Clancy shares his experience in Kurdistan, the homeland of multi-cultures and many religions, showing the co-existence and peace it has. Levi was born and grew up in 1990 in Los Angeles in the United States. When he was still a kid, he started taking college courses and when he was only 13 years old he transferred to the University of California! At 15, he was abandoned by his family and had to leave university, and started working in medical research as well as web development and graphic arts in order to support himself and make it month to month. At 18, he received a scholarship to return to university, and reconnected with his family. After finishing his baccalaureate in Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics (MIMG) with a minor in Mesopotamian history, he moved to Erbil. Levi has worked for University of California as a researcher in electron microscopy, oncology and flow cytometry. He has also worked in marketing for clients including the LA Lakers, NCAA, Verizon and AT&T. Currently, he works as a software developer and as a freelance journalist. Levi has been featured on CBS News and LA Times. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Feb 10, 2015  TEDx Talks

Imagine Iraq. Then imagine pop music. Dashni Morad is now in her tenth year as the leading successful singer of modern pop in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. From the little girl whom fled Saddam Hussein’s tyranny to the strong woman whom challenged the status quo, Dashni tells us her heartbreaking coming of age tale. Born in the city of Sulaimanya, raised in Netherlands, lost between two cultures and struggling between accomplishing dreams. Dashni Morad, a Kurdish/Dutch Pop singer and a TV personality who was known for her show on Kurdistan TV “Bi Control”, flee Kurdistan at the age of eleven to become a refugee in Netherlands due to the unstable political situation in Iraq and Kurdistan. Since moving to the Netherlands, Dashni, worked hard to accomplish being a musician and a TV presenter to entertain the Kurdish audience since it was much needed at the time in Kurdistan. Today, she is recognized as a national and international artist who broke through the impossible to give the gift of modern music to Kurdistan and presenting it outside of the Middle East region. Her songs presented messages such as women empowerment, peace, and the love for Kurdistan. She, however, didn’t stop at making music and TV presenting, she also founded a small non-profit under the name “Green Kids” supporting education to the kids of Kurdistan, as well as, raising funds for refugees and IDPs in Kurdistan, and also many group and student participation to clean the mountains of Kurdistan. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Jul 9, 2013  TEDx Talks

Tara comes from one of the oldest living civilizations and indigenous people in the world, which today is under constant oppression and war, her ultimate goal is to make sure the Kurdish people don’t forget themselves so the world never forgets the Kurdish people. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

Dec 18, 2015  TEDx Talks

Joakim Medim is a freelance journalist who, among other things, documented the military coup in Honduras, covered the political development in Central America, Hungary and Turkey and specialized in the refugee crisis and the socio-political response in Lebanon. Medin tells the stories that have been untold and fight for media where it has been oppressed. In 2014, when he was covering the humanitarian crisis in Syria, Medin was arrested by the Syrian government and was kept in isolation in a 3-by-6-foot cell. After heavy interrogation he was moved to Damascus for further questioning. It was only after the intervention of Syrian Kurdish officials that Medin and his translator were finally released. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

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The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences from 1969 – 2019

The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences from 1969 – 2019

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, informally known as The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, is an award for outstanding contributions mainly to the … Wikipedia

Established: 1968

Reward: 9 million SEK (2017)

Presented by: Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

Category of: Nobel Prize

People also search for: Nobel Prize in Chemistry, MORE

Currently held by: Paul Romer, William Nordhaus (2018)

Duflo, Banerjee and Kremer Win 2019 Nobel Economics Prize

Oct 14, 2019  Bloomberg Markets and Finance

Oct.14 — Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Michael Kremer of Harvard University were awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics “for their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty.” Randall Kroszner, Chicago Booth School of Business deputy dean and former Federal Reserve governor, reacts to the announcement on “Bloomberg Surveillance.”

Category  News & Politics

Esther Duflo: “Hopefully, it’s onward and forward from now on.”

Oct 14, 2019  Nobel Prize

Esther Duflo reflects on the relative lack of women working in the field of economics and how to adapt the profession to attract a wider sphere of people. In this conversation with Adam Smith, recorded just after the public announcement of the 2019 Prize in Economic Sciences to her, her husband Abhijit Banerjee, and Michael Kramer, she also discusses the way that local experiments can often uncover general principles that can be applied to problems of poverty worldwide.

Category   Education

Economics Won By Trio Tackling Global Poverty

Forbes: Camilo Maldonado Senior Contributor

French economist Esther Duflo gives a press conference at the Reconquista Hotel in Oviedo on October 22, 2015, in the eve of the Princess of Asturias awards ceremony. Duflo is part of the trio that has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics.  AFP/Getty Images

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded to economists Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer for their pioneering work alleviating global poverty. The winners were announced on Monday morning.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the winners “considerably improved our ability to fight global poverty. In just two decades, their new experiment-based approach has transformed development economics, which is now a flourishing field of research”.

Duflo is the second woman and the youngest person to ever receive the prestigious award in the field of economics. The trio will evenly split the 9 million Swedish Krona prize ($916,474 USD).

“As a direct result of one of their studies, more than five million Indian children have benefitted from effective programs of remedial tutoring in schools. Another example is the heavy subsidies for preventive healthcare that have been introduced in many countries,” said the Swedish Academy of Sciences.

Today In: Money

Poor people are supposed to be either completely desperate or lazy or entrepreneurial but people don’t – we don’t try to … understand the deep root and interconnected root of poverty.

Esther Duflo

Their work, which tackles one of humanities most pressing issues, is based on the idea that to battle poverty, the issues should be broken down into smaller pieces and studied via small field experiments to answer precise questions within the communities who are most affected.

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“The essence of our research is to make sure that the fight against poverty is based on scientific evidence,” Duflo said. “Often the poor are reduced to caricatures, and often even people that try to help them often do not actually understand what are the deep root of the problems that are addressing the poor,” she added.

“Poor people are supposed to be either completely desperate or lazy or entrepreneurial but people don’t we don’t try to … understand the deep root and interconnected root of poverty,” said Duflo.

Even with all of the work focusing on reducing global poverty, it is still the most pressing issue for humanity. According to the Swedish Academy, five million children under the age of five still die annually from diseases or ailments that could be treated with inexpensive medical treatments. In total, more than 1.3 billion people live in extreme poverty. That is, they subsist on less than $1.25 per day. In total, 1 billion children worldwide are living in poverty. Here in the U.S., income inequality is growing.

While many of their field studies have taken place in developing parts of the world, their work is helping Americans as well. According to the Center for Poverty Research at the University of California, Davis, “the official poverty rate is 12.3 percent, based on the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2017 estimates. That year, an estimated 39.7 million Americans lived in poverty according to the official measure.”

Asked by the Nobel Prize committee how it feels to be the second woman to win the Nobel Prize in Economics, Duflo responded, “We are at a time when we are starting to realize in the profession that the way we conduct each other privately and publicly, is not conducive all the time to a very good environment for women. Showing that it is possible for a women to succeed, and to be recognized for success, I hope will inspire many many other women to continue working, and many many other men to give them the respect they deserve, like every single human being.”

Banerjee, born in Mumbai, India earned a Ph.D. in 1988 from Harvard University and is the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Duflo, born in Paris, France earned a Ph.D. in 1999 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Kremer, born in the U.S.A., earned a Ph.D. in 1992 from Harvard University, and is the Gates Professor of Developing Societies at Harvard University.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/camilomaldonado/2019/10/14/nobel-prize-in-economics-won-by-trio-tackling-global-poverty/#1ece797f1b5e

The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, officially known as The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Swedish: Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is an award funded by Sveriges Riksbank and is annually awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences to researchers in the field of economic sciences.[1] The first prize was awarded in 1969 to Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen.[2] Each recipient receives a medal, a diploma and a monetary award that has varied throughout the years.[3] In 1969, Frisch and Tinbergen were given a combined 375,000 SEK, which is equivalent to 2,871,041 SEK in December 2007. The award is presented in Stockholm at an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel’s death.[4]

As of the awarding of the 2019 prize, 51 Nobel Memorial Prizes in Economic Sciences have been given to 84 individuals.[5] Up to 2007, nine awards had been given for contributions to the field of macroeconomics, more than any other category.[6] As of October 2018, the institution with the most affiliated laureates in economic sciences is the University of Chicago, which has 32 affiliated laureates.[7]

List of Nobel Memorial Prize laureates in Economics 1969 – 2019

Year Laureate Country Rationale Ph.D. alma mater Institution(most significant tenure/at time of receipt)

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_Memorial_Prize_laureates_in_Economics

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, BBC News, TED Talks, Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Adam Grochowalski, & Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October, 6-13, 2019

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

BBC News: Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

BBC News: Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

TED Talks: Juan Enriquez a personal plea for humanity at the us Mexico border?,                     Jon Lowenstein Family hope and resilience on the migrant trail, Melanie Nezer The fundamental right to seek asylum and Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman What does it mean to be  a refugee jul 2018

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: Poem – Immigrants

Adam Grochowalski: Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Thisiscolossal: Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 13, 2019

Oct 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 13, U.S. troops withdraw in Syria as the Turkish offensive escalates against the Kurds, the latest on the Trump administration and a preview of Tuesday’s Democratic presidential debate. Also, a newly named North Macedonia sets its sights on membership in NATO and the European Union. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 12, 2019

Oct 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 12, the latest acting director of the Department of Homeland Security steps down, a longtime head of security at The Met discusses a new book about his extraordinary career, and in our “Future of Food” series, a look at what farmers in Iowa are doing to help grow more sustainable practices for the future. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 11, 2019

Oct 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, congressional testimony from the former Ukrainian ambassador further roils the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Why Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the Nobel Peace Prize, former United Nations ambassador Susan Rice talks U.S. foreign policy, Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the latest political news, and an unconventional outdoor art center in Montana. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 10, 2019

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, two associates of Rudy Giuliani’s are arrested on charges of violating campaign finance law. Plus: California residents face frustration over planned power outage amid wildfire risk, consequences of Turkey’s military assault in Syria, a new book about high profile FBI and Justice Department investigations, and how “Sesame Street” is serious about supporting families. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 9, 2019

Oct 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.42M subscribers

Wednesday on the NewsHour, As Turkey sends troops into Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo discusses international flashpoints such as China and Ukraine. Also: Returning to the Bahamas after the storm, the crisis caused by the White House refusing to cooperate with Congress, how Democrats are courting a key voting bloc, new details on the Black Sox scandal and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 8, 2019

Oct 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the White House blocks a key player in the Ukraine affair from appearing before House lawmakers. Also: The Supreme Court hears arguments on the rights of LGBTQ Americans, why Iraqi citizens are mobilizing in the face of gunfire, a conversation with Hillary and Chelsea Clinton, the life and struggles of college Dreamers and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump escalates impeachment battle, refusing to cooperate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdSeM… News Wrap: Turkish forces deploy to Syrian border https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SvnA… Supreme Court weighs protections for LGBTQ workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8UJ2… Iraqi protesters’ rage challenges government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln6wm… Clinton: Trump’s actions direct threat to national security https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4R7H… How fear of deportation affects DACA students’ dreams https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md0WZ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 7, 2019

Oct 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump comes under fire from both Republicans and Democrats for abruptly announcing the removal of U.S. troops from Syria. Also: The impeachment inquiry grows as a second whistleblower emerges, Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Politics Monday, a firestorm for the NBA about China, free speech and human rights, and Gary Clark Jr. on the tenor of the times.

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 6, 2019

Streamed live 8 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 6, a report of a second whistleblower is confirmed, and as Brexit looms, the Netherlands benefit from the “Brexodus.” Also, a visit to America’s most accessible playground. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2019/plundering-cambodias-forests/index.html

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia’s timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.

Under a rickety wooden stilt house near Cambodia’s Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary, one of the country’s leading environmental campaigners is preparing dinner.

Ouch Leng stuffs raw meat into an empty beer can and throws it into the fire. It’s a poor man’s feast for his team of investigators to fuel them through a night’s surveillance.

Chewing pork and buffalo, their infrared optics and cameras ready to record, they wait patiently for trucks to emerge from the darkness.

Their cargo? Timber logged illegally inside a wildlife sanctuary that is meant to be protected under Cambodian law.

“We went and saw eight trucks inside one sawmill and another timber truck was loaded with square logs,” he says, as he chops vegetables for dinner.

“It’s ready to export out tonight.”

Before long, two semi-trailers, a procession of tractors and four minivans, all loaded with logs, rumble out of the wildlife sanctuary, which is marked by a sign brandishing the logos of the European Union, USAID and Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment.

It is a significant haul but pales in comparison to the convoy Leng says he witnessed the night before.

“I saw 23 timber trucks transport [logs] from the Phnom Prich area,” says Leng.

Such stakeouts are part of Leng’s relentless pursuit of timber tycoons who pillage his country’s forests for profit, leading to some of the fastest rates of deforestation in the world.

In the 2000s, the Cambodian government began leasing millions of hectares of land – called concessions – to private companies, some of them inside protected forests.

It led to a nation-wide logging gold rush – one that Leng is determined to stop.

Land concessions by country (LICADHO, 2018)

In one of his more daring exploits, Leng disguised himself as a chef working at logging camps to infiltrate the network of notorious logging baron, Try Pheap, an adviser to Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen.

He lifted the lid on Pheap’s vast illegal logging operations in a 2013 report but the tycoon continued to expand his timber business across the country. This year, Leng filmed two major logging operations inside the protected area of Phnom Samkos Wildlife Sanctuary in the western Cardamon Mountains – both in concessions leased by Try Pheap.

What he discovered next is a scandal on an international scale.

Video footage from Try Pheap’s timber depot on the outskirts of Phnom Penh shows huge quantities of luxury wood being loaded into shipping containers.

Al Jazeera tracked these containers and confirmed they travelled from Cambodia’s Sihanoukville Port to northern Vietnam.

Try Pheap and his representatives have not responded to Al Jazeera’s requests for comment.

Leng, the activist, says timber smugglers use illegal crossings dotted across the border as part of a rampant industry, with Vietnam effectively laundering then exporting illegally logged wood from Cambodian forests.

Almost half a million cubic metres of timber were smuggled from Cambodia to Vietnam between 2016 and 2018, according to a series of reports by international non-government organisation, the Environmental Investigation Agency.

In official correspondence seen by Al Jazeera, the Cambodian government accuses Vietnam of issuing permits for illegally logged timber, despite repeated warnings.

“There is still timber going across the border because there is a black market in that area,” spokesman Neth Pheaktra tells Al Jazeera.

“These activities are illegal. That’s why the Ministry of Environment, as well as other relevant ministries, and border officials are cracking down on forest crimes.”

Vietnam’s government says it “strictly prohibits illegal timber harvesting, transportation, processing and trade” and is taking measures to stop it.

From 2001 to 2018, Cambodia lost 2.17 million hectares of tree cover, equivalent to a 25% decrease, according to data analysis by Global Forest Watch.

The timber feeds an insatiable demand for rare wood in China, where prices for luxury timber furniture have soared. One bed made from Siamese Rosewood – which has been almost eradicated in Cambodia – reportedly was on sale for $1 million.

“Sometimes I cry. I feel disappointed because I’m not able to protect the forest,” says Leng. “I see that the destruction is so big, but no one helps to protect it.

With huge profits to be made, Leng’s investigations are undertaken at great risk.

Another Cambodian forest activist, Chut Wutty, was murdered in 2012 while investigating a logging company. Several more forest patrollers have been killed since, including three who were shot at the Vietnamese border last year.

Leng himself has received numerous death threats and had his equipment smashed.

“I know that this is dangerous work… No one dares to challenge the companies,” says Leng. “Why do I challenge [them]? Because the companies have caused mass destruction to the forest.”

In some cases, protected areas have been completely destroyed – such as Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary in eastern Cambodia.

Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

The sanctuary was so severely damaged, the government removed its protected status in 2018 – conceding there was nothing left to protect.

Travelling in a four-wheel drive vehicle so old the rear brakes often erupt into plumes of smoke, Leng stops at the barren remains of the former sanctuary.

“Maybe 10 years ago there was jungle and a lot of forest and a lot of wildlife like elephants, tigers, rabbits…” he laments.

“The private companies came to destroy, to terminate the forest here.”

Other sanctuaries, like Boeung Per in the north, are rapidly heading towards the same fate.

Boeung Per Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

But despite the forces stacked against him, Leng continues to race off deep into the jungle every time he gets a new tip-off of potential illegal activity.

“This has happened for 10 to 20 years – not just this year, and no one has been able to prevent it,” he says.

But as long as there are precious forests to save in Cambodia, Leng will be on the frontline defending them.

WATCH THE DOCUMENTARY

© 2019 Al Jazeera Media Network.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50005790

Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

10 October 2019

Related Topics  Syrian civil war

Image copyright EPA Image caption Activists say tens of thousands of people have fled towns along the Syria-Turkey border

“It’s like hell. I am afraid for all my family and everyone I know.”

Sevinaz is from a town near Syria’s border with Turkey that immediately came under heavy bombardment when the Turkish military and allied Syrian rebels launched an assault on Kurdish-led forces there on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old Kurdish filmmaker and activist said repeated air and artillery strikes on the town – called Sere Kaniye by Kurds, and Ras al-Ain by Arabs – had forced her to flee with several members of her family.

“I am outside the town with my sick mother. My brother is inside. I have been informed that my cousin might have been martyred. There is no safe place for anybody,” she told the BBC on Thursday morning, hours before rebels said the town was surrounded.

“I’m concerned about it being the last time that I see my city,” she said.

‘Erdogan is a liar’

Turkey’s President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has said the aim of the military operation is to create a 32km (20-mile) deep “safe zone” along the Syrian side of the border and to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees there.

Media captionSome residents began to flee as smoke rose over the border town of Ras al-Ain

He has said he wants to push back from the Turkish border members of a Syrian Kurdish militia called the People’s Protection Units (YPG). He insists the YPG is an extension of a rebel group that has fought for Kurdish autonomy in Turkey and is designated a terrorist organisation by Turkey, the US and EU.

The YPG, which denies the claim, is the dominant force in an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias called the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). It has been the critical partner on the ground in Syria for the US-led multinational coalition against the jihadist group Islamic State (IS).

Sevinaz dismissed Mr Erdogan’s assertion that he wants “to prevent the creation of a terror corridor across our southern border, and to bring peace to the area”.

“He’s a liar and he wants the Kurds to be finished. And not just Kurds, because in Sere Kaniye and all the other cities it’s not just Kurds who are living here,” she said.

Sevinaz said she believed the SDF and YPG’s fighters would do all they could to repel the Turkish assault, and that ultimately they would be victorious.

“They are the children of this land. They are our brothers and sisters,” she explained. “Even with all the things that are happening and the silence from the world, I still believe that the right people will win.”

Azad Cudi, a British-Iranian Kurd who is a sniper for the YPG, told the BBC on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw US troops from the border area in anticipation of a Turkish offensive felt “like a stab in the back”.

The US military had previously attempted to avert a Turkish offensive on its Kurdish allies by setting up with the Turkish military a “security mechanism” in the border area. The YPG co-operated by dismantling fortifications.

“In August, we came to this ‘security mechanism’ agreement,” Mr Cudi said. “Based on that, we withdrew. We destroyed the fighting positions which were built to fight the Turkish in case of an invasion and we handed them over to the Americans.”

‘We have no friends but the mountains’

Mr Cudi said SDF forces were not equipped with the heavy machine-guns and anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapons that they would need to repel a Turkish assault.

“But if there is no choice, there is no choice. We will fight back at all costs.”

“There’s been many, many letting down and abandoning Kurds in the past. This is what we say: ‘We have no friends but the mountains,'” he added. “The United States, like any other state or any other government, will do whatever serves their own best interests. We know that.”

He said Mr Trump and other US politicians had been “lied to” about the war with IS, and he expressed concern about the risk of thousands of suspected IS militants being detained in SDF prisons escaping if their guards came under attack by Turkey.

Image copyright AFP Image caption US troops pulled back from the border on Monday in anticipation of the Turkish assault

“[The war] is not finished, it is not over. We wouldn’t do such a thing as losing prisoners, but imagine when things get tough and there is a war and you are fighting on many fronts. It will be practically difficult to control and manage these prisoners.”

He added: “The Kurds are the only people who have fought [IS]. The Iraqi government and the Syrian government couldn’t stand their attacks. We were the only ones who could resist them. With us being threatened, their hope for a new caliphate may grow again.”

Sevinaz said she believed Turkey was also in contact with IS sleeper cells inside north-eastern Syria and would ask them to target the Kurds. On Wednesday, several IS militants reportedly attacked SDF posts in the region.

“I’m worried and I think soon that there will be lots more movement from them. They already did one [attack] next to Sere Kaniye, and… in Raqqa, and I think there will be more soon.”

Turkey says it has made its military move in northern Syria to fight terrorism and that it wants to take the lead in fighting IS.

She also held out little hope of Mr Trump carrying out his threat to “totally destroy and obliterate” Turkey’s economy if it does anything he considers to be “off limits”.

Image copyright EPA Image caption The Syrian Democratic Forces has said it will defend its territory “at all costs”

“What does ‘off limits’ mean? They’re already attacking everywhere,” she said. “They don’t care about civilians. They don’t care about the middle of the cities.

“Donald Trump is going to do nothing. He cares about money. He doesn’t care about the 11,000 people who died while fighting and resisting against IS.”

Sevinaz insisted that she would not flee to another part of Syria. “I will not move from Rojava. I will never move,” she said, using the Kurdish name for the north-east of the country.

Instead, she called for people across the world to make clear to their governments their anger at the situation.

“The states do not care about us. The states didn’t care about bringing their [foreign] IS prisoners back to their countries. The states didn’t care about us being under threat for a long, long time,” she added. “It is the time for the voices of the people, who believe in freedom, who believe in human rights.”

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Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

13 October 2019

Related Topics  Typhoon Hagibis

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Helicopters rescued people trapped in their homes when the Chikuma river burst its banks

At least nine people are reported dead as Japan recovers from its biggest storm in decades.

Typhoon Hagibis triggered floods and landslides as it battered the country with wind speeds of 225km/h (140mph).

Rivers have breached their banks in at least 14 different places, inundating residential neighbourhoods.

The storm led to some Rugby World Cup matches being cancelled but a key fixture between Japan and Scotland will go ahead on Sunday.

Hagibis is heading north and is expected to move back into the North Pacific later on Sunday.

It made landfall on Saturday shortly before 19:00 local time (10:00 GMT), in Izu Peninsula, south-west of Tokyo and moved up the east coast. Almost half a million homes were left without power.

In the town of Hakone near Mount Fuji more than 1m (3ft) of rain fell on Friday and Saturday, the highest total ever recorded in Japan over 48 hours.

Media captionMore than seven million people were urged to leave their homes

Further north in Nagano prefecture, levees along the Chikuma river gave way sending water rushing through residential areas, inundating houses. Flood defences around Tokyo have held and river levels are now falling, reports the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Japan.

Officials said some of those killed were swept away by landslides while others were trapped in their cars as floodwaters rose. Another 15 people are listed as missing and dozens are reported injured.

What preparations were made?

More than seven million people were urged to leave their homes as the huge storm approached, but it is thought only 50,000 stayed in shelters.

Many residents stocked up on provisions before the typhoon’s arrival, leaving supermarkets with empty shelves.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Torrential rain has caused rivers to flood huge areas

Image copyright EPA Image caption A huge clean-up operation was under way in Kawasaki near Tokyo

“Unprecedented heavy rain has been seen in cities, towns and villages for which the emergency warning was issued,” Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) forecaster Yasushi Kajiwara told a press briefing.

Many bullet train services were halted, and several lines on the Tokyo metro were suspended for most of Saturday.

All flights to and from Tokyo’s Haneda airport and Narita airport in Chiba have been cancelled – more than 1,000 in total.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Bullet trains were half submerged in Nagano, central Japan

Two Rugby World Cup games scheduled for Saturday were cancelled on safety grounds and declared as draws – England-France and New Zealand-Italy. The cancellations were the first in the tournament’s 32-year history.

Sunday’s Namibia-Canada match due to take place in Kamaishi was also cancelled and declared a draw.

The US-Tonga fixture in Osaka and Wales-Uruguay in Kumamoto will go ahead as scheduled on Sunday, organisers said.

Meanwhile, a crunch game between Scotland and tournament hosts Japan on Sunday will now go ahead. The decision followed a safety inspection.

The Japanese Formula One Grand Prix is also taking place on Sunday.

‘A blanket and a biscuit’

Local resident James Babb spoke to the BBC from an evacuation centre in Hachioji, western Tokyo. He said the river near his house was on the brink of overflowing.

“I am with my sister-in-law, who is disabled,” he said. “Our house may flood. They have given us a blanket and a biscuit.”

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Tornado-like winds whipped up by the typhoon struck east of Tokyo

Andrew Higgins, an English teacher who lives in Tochigi, north of Tokyo, told the BBC he had “lived through a few typhoons” during seven years in Japan.

“I feel like this time Japan, generally, has taken this typhoon a lot more seriously,” he said. “People were out preparing last night. A lot of people were stocking up.”

Only last month Typhoon Faxai wreaked havoc on parts of Japan, damaging 30,000 homes, most of which have not yet been repaired.

“I evacuated because my roof was ripped off by the other typhoon and rain came in. I’m so worried about my house,” a 93-year-old man told NHK, from a shelter in Tateyama, Chiba.

Japan suffers about 20 typhoons a year, but Tokyo is rarely hit on this scale.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Shopkeepers tried to protect their stores from the powerful winds and rain

Image copyright AFP Image caption Many supermarket were left empty as people stocked up

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Juan Enriquez · Author, academic, futurist

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and brain research will bring about in business, technology, politics and society.

More Resources

The Untied States of America: Polarization, Fracturing, and Our Future

Juan Enriquez

Crown (2005)

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

For the past 20 years, photographer and TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein has documented the migrant journey from Latin America to the United States, one of the largest transnational migrations in world history. Sharing photos from his decade-long project “Shadow Lives USA,” Lowenstein takes us into the inner worlds of the families escaping poverty and violence in Central America — and pieces together the complex reasons people leave their homes in search of a better life.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jon Lowenstein · Documentary photographer, filmmaker, visual artist

TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and visual artist whose work reveals what the powers that be are trying to hide.

More Resources

Shadow Lives

Jon Lowenstein

PREORDER NOW (2020)

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Learn more about Jon Lowenstein’s work.

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Support Shadow Lives, a decade-long project documenting the experiences and lives of the millions of people along the migrant trail.

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1,216,641 views

TEDSummit 2019 | July 2019

Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMidAtlantic, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Melanie Nezer · Refugee and immigrants rights attorney

Melanie Nezer is a national leader in efforts to inform and educate individuals, institutions, elected officials and communities about refugees and asylum seekers.

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Donate to HIAS and help protect refugees.

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxMidAtlantic | March 2019

About 60 million people around the globe have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence and persecution. The majority have become Internally Displaced Persons, meaning they fled their homes but are still in their own countries. Others, referred to as refugees, sought shelter outside their own country. But what does that term really mean? Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman explain. [Directed by Biljana Labovic, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by David Obuchowski and Peter Linder].

Meet the educator

Benedetta Berti · Conflict and security researcher

Benedetta Berti studies how conflicts impact civilians.

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

664,084 views

TED-Ed | June 2016

Immigrants

Little ducks and big geese swimming in a pond

Where do you come from?

Don’t worry, wherever you come from

We welcome you

And glad to see you

Healthy and strong

You contribute your beauty to the pond

We all come from somewhere

As long as we are in harmony with nature

We add beauty to society as a whole

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Oct 26, 2014  Adam Grochowalski

Pa? królowej, Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Vidlochvost fenyklový. I present here the full development of this beautiful butterfly.

Category   Pets & Animals

Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

October 11, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Chris Perani uses macro photography to capture the microscopic details found on butterflies’ wings, such as multi-colored hairs and iridescent scales. To photograph with such precision, the photographer uses a 10x microscope objective attached to a 200mm lens, which presents an almost non-existent depth of field. “The lens must be moved no more than 3 microns per photo to achieve focus across the thickness of the subject which can be up to 8 millimeters,” Perani explains to Colossal. “This yields 350 exposures, each with a sliver in focus, that must be composited together.” In total this accounts for 2,100 separate exposures combined into a single image. For more detailed observations of butterfly wings, visit Perani’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali Wins the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019

The Nobel Peace Prize: The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali

Wikipedia: Abiy Ahmed

 DW News:  Nobel Peace Prize 2019: Who is Abiy Ahmed?

CAN: Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed wins Nobel Peace Prize

AFP: Africa Weekly – Nobel Prize for Abiy Ahmed and electricity in Madagascar

Nidhi Taneja @@nidhitaneja0795, New Delhi: EXPLAINED – Why Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded Nobel Peace Prize 2019, and not Greta Thunberg

https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2019/press-release/

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019

English, Norwegian

Announcement

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided to award the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea. The prize is also meant to recognise all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast African regions.

When Abiy Ahmed became Prime Minister in April 2018, he made it clear that he wished to resume peace talks with Eritrea. In close cooperation with Isaias Afwerki, the President of Eritrea, Abiy Ahmed quickly worked out the principles of a peace agreement to end the long “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries. These principles are set out in the declarations that Prime Minister Abiy and President Afwerki signed in Asmara and Jeddah last July and September. An important premise for the breakthrough was Abiy Ahmed’s unconditional willingness to accept the arbitration ruling of an international boundary commission in 2002.

Peace does not arise from the actions of one party alone. When Prime Minister Abiy reached out his hand, President Afwerki grasped it, and helped to formalise the peace process between the two countries. The Norwegian Nobel Committee hopes the peace agreement will help to bring about positive change for the entire populations of Ethiopia and Eritrea.

In Ethiopia, even if much work remains, Abiy Ahmed has initiated important reforms that give many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future. He spent his first 100 days as Prime Minister lifting the country’s state of emergency, granting amnesty to thousands of political prisoners, discontinuing media censorship, legalising outlawed opposition groups, dismissing military and civilian leaders who were suspected of corruption, and significantly increasing the influence of women in Ethiopian political and community life. He has also pledged to strengthen democracy by holding free and fair elections.

In the wake of the peace process with Eritrea, Prime Minister Abiy has engaged in other peace and reconciliation processes in East and Northeast Africa. In September 2018 he and his government contributed actively to the normalisation of diplomatic relations between Eritrea and Djibouti after many years of political hostility. Additionally, Abiy Ahmed has sought to mediate between Kenya and Somalia in their protracted conflict over rights to a disputed marine area. There is now hope for a resolution to this conflict. In Sudan, the military regime and the opposition have returned to the negotiating table. On the 17th of August, they released a joint draft of a new constitution intended to secure a peaceful transition to civil rule in the country. Prime Minister Abiy played a key role in the process that led to the agreement.

Ethiopia is a country of many different languages and peoples. Lately, old ethnic rivalries have flared up. According to international observers, up to three million Ethiopians may be internally displaced. That is in addition to the million or so refugees and asylum seekers from neighbouring countries. As Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed has sought to promote reconciliation, solidarity and social justice. However, many challenges remain unresolved. Ethnic strife continues to escalate, and we have seen troubling examples of this in recent weeks and months. No doubt some people will think this year’s prize is being awarded too early. The Norwegian Nobel Committee believes it is now that Abiy Ahmed’s efforts deserve recognition and need encouragement.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee hopes that the Nobel Peace Prize will strengthen Prime Minister Abiy in his important work for peace and reconciliation. Ethiopia is Africa’s second most populous country and has East Africa’s largest economy. A peaceful, stable and successful Ethiopia will have many positive side-effects, and will help to strengthen fraternity among nations and peoples in the region. With the provisions of Alfred Nobel’s will firmly in mind, the Norwegian Nobel Committee sees Abiy Ahmed as the person who in the preceding year has done the most to deserve the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019.

Oslo, 11 October 2019

To cite this section
MLA style: The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB 2019. Sun. 13 Oct 2019. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2019/press-release/

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Abiy Ahmed Ali: “I was so humbled and thrilled when I just heard the news.”

Oct 11, 2019  Nobel Prize

Listen to the call between Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali and Olav Njølstad, Secretary of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, recorded shortly after the public announcement of the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize.

Category   Education

Abiy Ahmed Ali: “Peace is a very expensive commodity in my country.”

Oct 11, 2019  Nobel Prize

Immediately after hearing news of the award of Nobel Peace Prize, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali answered two quick questions from Adam Smith. He describes the encouragement and energy that the prize will provide, both to his and others’ ongoing efforts towards achieving peace in their region, and to those who are trying to work for peace worldwide. Copyright Nobel Media

Category   Education

Announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize 2019

Streamed live on Oct 11, 2019

Nobel Prize

The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 was awarded to Abiy Ahmed Ali “for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation, and in particular for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.” The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 was announced at The Norwegian Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway. #nobelprize

Category   Education

Abiy Ahmed

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This article is about a person whose name ends in a patronymic rather than a family name. The article properly refers to the person by his given name, Abiy, and not as Ahmed.

Abiy Ahmed  ??? ???? ??
15th Prime Minister of Ethiopia
Incumbent
Assumed office
2 April 2018
President Mulatu Teshome
Sahle-Work Zewde
Deputy Demeke Mekonnen
Preceded by Hailemariam Desalegn
3rd Chairman of the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front
Incumbent
Assumed office
27 March 2018
Deputy Demeke Mekonnen
Preceded by Hailemariam Desalegn
Leader of the Oromo Democratic Party
Incumbent
Assumed office
22 February 2018
Deputy Lemma Megersa
Preceded by Lemma Megersa
Minister of Science and Technology
In office
6 October 2015 – 1 November 2016
Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn
Preceded by Demitu Hambisa
Succeeded by ???
Director of the Information Network Security Agency
Acting
In office
2008–2015
Preceded by Teklebirhan Woldearegay
Succeeded by ???
Personal details
Born 15 August 1976 (age 43)
Beshasha, Ethiopia
Political party Oromo Democratic Party
Other political
affiliations
Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front
Spouse(s) Zinash Tayachew
Children 3 daughters
1 adopted son
Education Microlink Information Technology College (BA)
University of Greenwich (MA)
Ashland University (MBA)
Addis Ababa University (PhD)
Awards Nobel Peace Prize (2019)
Website Official website
Military service
Allegiance   Ethiopia
Branch/service Ethiopian Army
Years of service 1991–2010
Rank     Lieutenant Colonel
Unit Army Signals Corps
Commands Information Network Security Agency
Battles/wars Ethiopian Civil War
United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda
Eritrean–Ethiopian War

Ethiopian Flag

Abiy Ahmed Ali[pronunciation?] (Amharic: ??? ???? ?? [?a.bij ?ah.mad ?a.li], Oromo: Abiyyii Ahimad Alii, often shortened to Abiy Ahmed or just Abiy; born 15 August 1976) is an Ethiopian politician serving since 2 April 2018 as the fourth[1] and current prime minister[2] of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. He is chairman of both the ruling EPRDF (Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front)[3] and the ODP (Oromo Democratic Party) (which is one of the four coalition parties of the EPRDF).[4] Abiy is also an elected member of the Ethiopian parliament, and a member of the ODP and EPRDF executive committees.

A former army intelligence officer, since becoming prime minister Abiy has launched a wide programme of political and economic reforms,[5] not all of which have met with favour by supporters of the federalism-based constitution/system of Ethiopia and in Tigray (in which Abiy’s shake-up of the Ethiopian state that has targeted Tigrayans is seen as selective).[6][7]

Abiy was awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize for his work in ending the 20-year post-war territorial stalemate between Ethiopia and Eritrea.[8]

Personal life and education – Early life

Abiy Ahmed was born in the town of Beshasha[9] in the historic Kaffa Province (in the present-day Jimma Zone, Oromia Region) of Ethiopia on 15 August 1976.[10][11] His deceased father, Ahmed Ali, was a Muslim Oromo[12] (and had four wives[13]), while his deceased mother, Tezeta Wolde,[14] was an Orthodox[15] Christian Amhara.[16][17]

Abiy is the 13th child of his polygamous father and the sixth and youngest child of his mother.[9][16] His childhood name was Abiyot (English: “Revolution”). The name was sometimes given to children in the aftermath of the Derg revolution of 1974.[9] The then Abiyot went to the local primary school and later continued his studies at secondary schools in Agaro town. Abiy, according to several personal reports, was always very interested in his own education and later in his life also encouraged others to learn and to improve.[9]

Education

While serving in the Ethiopian National Defense Force, Abiy received his first degree, a Bachelor’s degree in computer engineering[18] from the Microlink Information Technology College in Addis Ababa in 2001.[19]

Abiy holds a Master of Arts in Transformational Leadership[18] earned from the business school at Greenwich University, London, in collaboration with the International Leadership Institute, Addis Ababa, in 2011. He also holds a Master of Business Administration[18] from the Leadstar College of Management and Leadership in Addis Ababa in partnership with Ashland University in 2013.[19]

Abiy, who had started his Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) work several years ago as a regular student,[20] completed his Ph.D. in 2017 at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies, Addis Ababa University. He did his Ph.D. work on the Agaro constituency with the PhD thesis entitled “Social Capital and its Role in Traditional Conflict Resolution in Ethiopia: The Case of Inter-Religious Conflict In Jimma Zone State”. As a follow-up to his Ph.D. thesis, he published a research article on de-escalation strategies in the Horn of Africa in a special journal issue dedicated to countering violent extremism.[21]

Personal life

He met and married his wife, Zinash Tayachew, an Amhara woman from Gondar,[22][9][16] while both were serving in the Ethiopian Defense Forces.[23] They are the parents of three daughters and one recently adopted son.[23] Abiy is multilingual and speaks Afaan Oromo, Amharic, Tigrinya, and English.[24] He is a fitness aficionado and professes that physical health goes hand in hand with mental health and, as such, he frequents physical and gym activities in Addis Ababa.[23] Abiy is a devout Evangelical Pentecostal Christian of the Full Gospel Believers’ Church.[25]

Military career

As a teenager and in early 1991,[26] he joined the armed struggle against the Marxist–Leninist regime of Mengistu Haile Mariam after the death of his oldest brother. He did so as a member of ODP (Oromo Democratic Party), which at that time was a tiny organization of only around 200 fighters in the large coalition army of about 100,000 fighters that resulted in the regime’s fall later that year.[24][9][23] As there were only so few ODP fighters in an army with its core of about 90,000 Tigrayans, Abiy quickly had to learn the Tigrinya language. As a speaker of Tigrinya in a security apparatus dominated by Tigrayans, he could move forward with his military career.[24]

After the fall of the Derg, he took formal military training from Assefa Brigade in West Wollega and was stationed there. His military post was in intelligence and communications. Later on he became a soldier in the now Ethiopian National Defense Force in 1993 and worked mostly in the intelligence and communications departments. In 1995, after the Rwandan genocide, he was deployed as a member of the United Nations Peace Keeping Force (UNAMIR), Kigali, Rwanda.[27] In the Ethio-Eritrea War between 1998 and 2000, he led an intelligence team to discover positions of the Eritrean Defence Forces.[28]

Later on, Abiy was posted back to his home town of Beshasha, where he – as an officer of the Defense Forces – had to address a critical situation of inter-religious clashes between Muslims and Christians with a number of deaths.[24][29] He brought calm and peace in a situation of communal tensions accompanying the clashes.[24] In later years, following his election as an MP, he continued these efforts to bring about reconciliation between the religions through the creation of the Religious Forum for Peace.[28]

In 2008, Abiy was one of the co-founders of the Ethiopian Information Network Security Agency (INSA), where he worked in different positions.[9] For two years, he was acting director of INSA due to a leave of absence of the director assigned to the post.[9] In this capacity, he was board member of several government agencies working on information and communications, like Ethio Telecom and Ethiopian Television. In 2010, Abiy eventually decided to leave the military and his post as deputy director of INSA to become a politician. The highest rank he had achieved during his military career was that of a Lieutenant Colonel.[21][24]

Political career

Member of Parliament

He started his political career as a member of the ODP (Oromo Democratic Party).[30] The ODP is the ruling party in Oromia Region since 1991 and also one of four coalition parties of the ruling coalition in Ethiopia, the EPRDF (Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front). He became a member of the central committee of ODP and congress member of the Executive Committee of the EPRDF – in quick succession.[24]

Religious Forum for Peace with Abiy Ahmed (2010)

In the 2010 national election, Abiy represented the woreda of Agaro and became an elected member of the House of Peoples’ Representatives, the lower chamber of the Ethiopian Federal Parliamentary Assembly. Before and during his time of parliamentary service, there were several religious clashes among Muslims and Christians in Jimma zone. Some of these confrontations turned violent and resulted in the loss of life and property. Abiy, as an elected member of parliament took a proactive role in working with several religious institutions and elders to bring about reconciliation in the zone. He was then setting up a forum entitled “Religious Forum for Peace”, an outcome of the need to devise a sustainable resolution mechanism to restore peaceful Muslim-Christian community interaction in the region.[21]

In 2014, during his time in parliament, Abiy became the Director General of a new and in 2011 founded Government Research Institute called Science and Technology Information Center (STIC).[9][31] The year after, in 2015, Abiy became an executive member of ODP. The same year he was elected to the House of Peoples’ Representatives for a second term, this time for his home woreda of Gomma.[32]

Rise to power

Starting from 2015, Abiy became one of the central figures in the violent fight against illegal land grabbing activities in Oromia Region and especially around Addis Ababa. Although the Addis Ababa Master Plan at the heart of the land-grabbing plans was stopped in 2016, the disputes continued for some time resulting in injuries and deaths.[33] It was this fight against land-grabbing, that finally boosted Abiy’s political career, brought him into the spotlight and allowed him to climb the political ladder.[24]

Oromia Urban Development and Planning Office

In October 2015, Abiy became the Ethiopian Minister of Science and Technology (MoST), a post which he left after only 12 months. From October 2016 on, Abiy served as Deputy President of Oromia Region as part of the team of Oromia Region’s president Lemma Megersa while staying a member of the Ethiopian Federal House of Peoples’ Representatives.[34][35] Abiy also became the head of the Oromia Urban Development and Planning Office. In this role, Abiy was expected to be the major driving force behind Oromia Economic Revolution, Oromia Land and Investment reform, youth employment as well as resistance to widespread land grabbing in Oromia region.[36] As one of his duties in office, he took care of the displaced one million Oromo people from Somali region during the 2017 unrest.[37]

As head of ODP Secretariat from October 2017, Abiy crossed over religious and ethnic divides to facilitate the formation of a new alliance between Oromo and the Amhara groups, both making up two thirds of the 100 million Ethiopian population.[38]

In early 2018, a lot of political observers considered Abiy and Lemma as the most popular politicians within the majority of the Oromo community and other Ethiopian communities.[39][40] This came after several years of unrest in Ethiopia. But despite this favourable rating for Abiy and Lemma, young people from Oromia Region called for immediate action without delays to bring fundamental change and freedom to Oromia Region and Ethiopia – otherwise more unrest was to be expected.[33] According to Abiy himself, people are asking for a different rhetoric, with an open and respectful discussion in the political space to allow political progress and to win people for democracy instead of pushing them.[33]

Until early 2018, Abiy continued to serve as head of the ODP secretariat and of the Oromia Housing and Urban Development Office and as Deputy President of Oromia Region. Then he left all these posts after his election as Leader of EPRDF.[41][34]

EPRDF leadership election

Following three years of protest and unrest, on 15 February 2018 the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, announced his resignation – meaning that he also resigned from the post of EPRDF Chairman. Historically, the incoming EPRDF Chairman is the next Prime Minister. The EPRDF Chairman on the other hand is one of the heads of the four parties that make up the ruling coalition: ODP, ADP, SEPDM and TPLF.[42]

Hailemariam’s resignation triggered the first ever contested leadership election among EPRDF coalition members to replace him. A lot of political observers made Lemma Megersa (the ODP Chairman) and Abiy the front-runners to become the Leader of the ruling coalition and eventually Prime Minister of Ethiopia. Despite being the clear favourite for the general public, Lemma Megersa was not a member of the national parliament, a pre-condition to become Prime Minister as required by the Ethiopian constitution. Therefore, Lemma was excluded from the leadership race.[43] On 22 February 2018, Lemma’s party, ODP, called for an emergency executive committee meeting and replaced Lemma as Chairman of ODP with Abiy. Abiy had the advantage of being a Member of Parliament in contrast to Lemma, and some observers saw that as a strategic move by the ODP to retain its leadership role within the coalition and to promote Abiy to become Prime Minister.[32]

On 1 March 2018, the 180 EPRDF executive committee members started their meeting to elect the leader of the party. Each of the four parties sent in 45 members. The contest for the leadership was among Abiy of ODP, Demeke Mekonnen, the Deputy Prime Minister and ADP leader, Shiferaw Shigute as Chairman of SEPDM and Debretsion Gebremichael as the Leader of TPLF. Despite being the overwhelming favorite by the majority of Ethiopians, Abiy faced major opposition from TPLF and SEPDM members during the leadership discussions.[44]

On 27 March 2018, a few hours before the beginning of the leadership elections, Demeke Mekonnen, who had been seen as the major opponent to Abiy, dropped out of the race. Many observers saw this as an endorsement of Abiy. Demeke was then approved as Deputy Prime Minister and got another term in that post. Following Demeke’s exit, Abiy received a presumably unanimous vote from both the ADP and ODP executive members, with 18 additional votes in a secret ballot coming from elsewhere. By midnight, Abiy was declared Chairman of the ruling coalition in Ethiopia, the EPRDF, and was considered as the Prime Minister Designate of Ethiopia by receiving 108 votes while Shiferaw Shigute received 58 and Debretsion Gebremichael received 2 votes.[3] On 2 April 2018, Abiy was elected as Prime Minister of Ethiopia by the House of Representatives and sworn in.[2]

Prime Minister of Ethiopia

On 2 April 2018, Abiy was confirmed and sworn in by the Ethiopian parliament as Prime Minister of Ethiopia. During his acceptance speech, he promised political reform; to promote the unity of Ethiopia and unity among the peoples of Ethiopia; to reach out to the Eritrean government to resolve the ongoing Eritrean–Ethiopian border conflict after the Eritrean–Ethiopian War and to also reach out to the political opposition inside and outside of Ethiopia. His acceptance speech sparked optimism and received an overwhelmingly positive reaction from the Ethiopian public including the opposition groups inside and outside Ethiopia. Following his speech, his popularity and support across the country reached an historical high and some political observers argued that Abiy was overwhelmingly more popular than the ruling party coalition, the EPRDF.[3]

Domestic policy

Since taking office in April 2018, Abiy’s government has presided over the release of thousands of political prisoners from Ethiopian jails and the rapid opening of the country’s political landscape.[45][46][47] In May 2018 alone the Oromo region pardoned over 7,600 prisoners.[48] On 29 May Ginbot 7 leader Andargachew Tsege, facing the death penalty on terrorism charges, was released after being pardoned by President Mulatu Teshome, along with 575 other detainees.[49]

That same day, charges were dropped against Andargachew’s colleague Berhanu Nega and the Oromo dissident and public intellectual Jawar Mohammed, as well as their respectively affiliated US-based ESAT and OMN satellite television networks.[50] Shortly thereafter, Abiy took the “unprecedented and previously unimaginable” step of meeting Andargachew, who twenty-four hours previously had been on death row, at his office; a move even critics of the ruling party termed “bold and remarkable”.[51] Abiy had previously met former Oromo Liberation Front leaders including founder Lencho Letta, who had committed to peaceful participation in the political process, upon their arrival at Bole International Airport.[52]

On 30 May 2018, it was announced the ruling party would amend the country’s “draconian” anti-terrorism law, widely perceived as a tool of political repression. On 1 June 2018, Abiy announced the government would seek to end the state of emergency two months in advance of the expiration its six-month tenure, citing an improved domestic situation. On 4 June 2018, Parliament approved the necessary legislation, ending the state of emergency.[47] In his first briefing to the House of Peoples’ Representatives in June 2018, Abiy countered criticism of his government’s release of convicted “terrorists” which according to the opposition is just a name the EPRDF gives you if you are a part or even meet the “opposition”. He argued that policies that sanctioned arbitrary detention and torture themselves constituted extra-constitutional acts of terror aimed at suppressing opposition.[53] This followed the additional pardon of 304 prisoners (289 of which had been sentenced on terrorism-related charges) on 15 June.[54]

The pace of reforms has revealed fissures within the ruling coalition, with hardliners in the military and the hitherto dominant TPLF said to be “seething” at the end of the state of emergency and the release of political prisoners.[55] These hardliners, centered around TPLF chief Debretsion Gebremichael, had grown to deeply resent the leadership of Abiy’s predecessor Hailemariam (at times supposedly bringing him to the brink of tears), and had hoped to place a more assertive figure in the prime minister’s office willing to “act with an iron fist”, rather than a reformist.[56]

An editorial on the previously pro-government website Tigrai Online arguing for the maintenance of the state of emergency gave voice to this sentiment, saying that Abiy was “doing too much too fast”.[57] Another article critical of the release of political prisoners suggested that Ethiopia’s criminal justice system had become a revolving door and that Abiy’s administration had quite inexplicably been rushing to pardon and release thousands of prisoners, among them many deadly criminals and dangerous arsonists.[58] On 13 June 2018, the TPLF executive committee denounced the decisions to hand over Badme and privatize SOEs as “fundamentally flawed”, saying that the ruling coalition suffered from a fundamental leadership deficit.[59]

Constitutional reform

In his briefing to parliament of 18 June 2018, Abiy announced that he would set up a commission aimed at reviewing the divisive system of ethnic federalism, which he said was failing to adequately deal with the proliferation of localized disputes over which particular ethnicity was entitled to control certain towns and districts, potentially paving the way for sweeping constitutional reform.[60]

Economic reforms

Abiy has announced that state-owned enterprises such as Ethiopian Airlines are to be partially or wholly privatised.

In June 2018, the ruling coalition announced its intention to pursue the large-scale privatisation of state-owned enterprises and the liberalization of several key economic sectors long considered off-limits, marking a landmark shift in the country’s state-oriented development model.[61]

State monopolies in the telecommunications, aviation, electricity, and logistics sectors are to be ended and those industries opened up to private sector competition.[62] Shares in the state-owned firms in those sectors, including Ethiopian Airlines, Africa’s largest and most profitable, are to be offered for purchase to both domestic and foreign investors, although the government will continue to hold a majority share in these firms, thereby retaining control of the commanding heights of the economy.[63] State-owned enterprises in sectors deemed less critical, including railway operators, sugar, industrial parks, hotels and various manufacturing firms, may be fully privatised.[64]

Aside from representing an ideological shift with respect to views on the degree of government control over the economy, the move was seen as a pragmatic measure aimed at improving the country’s dwindling foreign-exchange reserves, which by the end of the 2017 fiscal year were equal in value to less than two months worth of imports, as well as easing its growing sovereign debt load.[63][61]

In June 2018, Abiy announced the government’s intention to establish an Ethiopian stock exchange in tandem with the privatization of state-owned enterprises.[60] As of 2015 Ethiopia was the largest country in the world, in terms of both population and gross domestic product, without a stock exchange.[65]

Foreign policy

In May 2018, Abiy visited Saudi Arabia, receiving guarantees for the release of Ethiopian prisoners including billionaire entrepreneur Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi, who was detained following the 2017 Saudi Arabian purge.[45]

In June 2018, he met with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi in Cairo and, separately, brokered a meeting in Addis Ababa between the South Sudanese president Salva Kiir and rebel leader Rieck Machar in an attempt to encourage peace talks.[66]

Djibouti and port agreements

Abiy with President Guelleh of Djibouti

Since taking power Abiy has pursued a policy of expanding landlocked Ethiopia’s access to ports in the Horn of Africa region. Shortly before his assumption of office it was announced that the Ethiopian government would take a 19% stake in Berbera Port in the unrecognized Republic of Somaliland as part of a joint venture with DP World.[67] In May 2018, Ethiopia signed an agreement with the government of Djibouti to take an equity stake in the Port of Djibouti, enabling Ethiopia to have a say in the port’s development and the setting of port handling fees.[68]

Two days later a similar agreement was signed with the Sudanese government granting Ethiopia an ownership stake in the Port of Port Sudan. The Ethio-Djibouti agreement grants the Djiboutian government the option of taking stakes in state-owned Ethiopian firms in return, such as the Ethiopian Airlines and Ethio Telecom.[69] This in turn was followed shortly thereafter by an announcement that Abiy and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta had reached an agreement for the construction of an Ethiopian logistics facility at Lamu Port as part of the Lamu Port and Lamu-Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport Corridor (LAPSSET) project.[70]

The potential normalization of Ethiopia-Eritrea relations likewise opens the possibility for Ethiopia to resume using the Ports of Massawa and Asseb, which, prior to the Ethio-Eritrean conflict, were its main ports, which would be of particular benefit to the northern region of Tigray.[61] All these developments would reduce Ethiopian reliance on Djibouti’s port which, since 1998, has handled almost all of Ethiopia’s maritime traffic.[71][69]

Eritrea

Main articles: Eritrea–Ethiopia relations and 2018 Eritrea–Ethiopia summit

Upon taking office, Abiy stated his willingness to negotiate an end to the Ethio-Eritrean conflict. In June 2018, it was announced that the government had agreed to hand over the disputed border town of Badme to Eritrea, thereby complying with the terms of the 2000 Algiers Agreement to bring an end to the state of tension between Eritrea and Ethiopia that had persisted despite the end of hostilities during the Ethiopia-Eritrea War.[61] Ethiopia had until then rejected the international boundary commission’s ruling awarding Badme to Eritrea, resulting in a frozen conflict (popularly termed a policy of “no war, but no peace”) between the two states.[72]

Abiy and President Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea

During the national celebration on 20 June 2018, the president of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki, accepted the peace initiative put forward by Abiy and suggested that he would send a delegation to Addis Ababa. On 26 June 2018, Eritrean Foreign Minister Osman Saleh Mohammed visited Addis Ababa in the first Eritrean high-level delegation to Ethiopia in over two decades.[73]

In Asmara, on 8 July 2018, Abiy became the first Ethiopian leader to meet with an Eritrean counterpart in over two decades, in the 2018 Eritrea–Ethiopia summit.[74] The very next day, the two signed a “Joint Declaration of Peace and Friendship” declaring an end to tensions and agreeing, amongst other matters, to re-establish diplomatic relations; reopen direct telecommunication, road, and aviation links; and facilitate Ethiopian use of the ports of Massawa and Asseb.[75][76][77] Abiy was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2019 for his efforts in ending the war.[8]

Religious harmony

Abiy with one of the Patriarchs of the Orthodox Tewahedo Church

Ethiopia is a country of various religious groups, primarily Christian and Muslim communities. Both inter-religious and intra-religious divisions and conflicts were a major concern, where both the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and the Ethiopian Islamic Council experienced religious and administrative divisions and conflicts.[78][79] In 2018, he was given a special “peace and reconciliation” award by the Ethiopian Church for his work in reconciliating rival factions within the church.[80]

Abiy with the Ethiopian Muslim Grand Mufti

Security sector reform

In June 2018, Abiy, speaking to senior commanders of the Ethiopian National Defense Force (ENDF) declared his intention to carry out reforms of the military to strengthen its effectiveness and professionalism, with the view of limiting its role in politics. This followed renewed calls both within Ethiopia and from international human rights groups, namely Amnesty International, to dissolve highly controversial regional militias such as the Liyyu force.[81] This move is considered likely to face resistance from TPLF hardliners, who occupy much of the military high command.[82]

Notably, he has also called for the eventual reconstitution of the Ethiopian Navy, dissolved in 1996 in the aftermath of Eritrea’s secession after an extraterritorial sojourn in Djibouti, saying that “we should build our naval force capacity in the future.”[83] It was reported that this move would appeal to nationalists still smarting from the country’s loss of its coastline 25 years prior. Ethiopia already has a maritime training institute on Lake Tana as well as a national shipping line.

On 7 June 2018, Abiy carried out a wide-ranging reshuffle of top security officials, replacing ENDF Chief of Staff Samora Yunis with Lieutenant General Se’are Mekonnen, National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS) director Getachew Assefa with Lieutenant General Adem Mohammed, National Security Advisor and former army chief Abadula Gemeda, and Sebhat Nega, one of the founders of the TPLF and director-general of the Foreign Relations Strategic Research Institute[84][85] Sebhat’s retirements had been previously announced that May.[86]

Grenade attack

A large peaceful demonstration was organized in Addis Ababa at Meskel Square on 23 June 2018 to show support for the new prime minister. Just after Abiy had finished addressing the crowd a grenade was thrown and landed just 17 metres away from where he and other top officials were sitting. Two people were killed and over 165 were injured. Following the attack, 9 police officials were detained, including the deputy police commissioner, Girma Kassa, who was fired immediately. Questions were asked as to how a police car carrying attackers got so close to the prime minister and soon after the car was set alight destroying evidence. After the attack the prime minister addressed the nation on national TV unhurt by the blast and describing it as an “unsuccessful attempt by forces who do not want to see Ethiopia united”. On the same day the prime minister made an unannounced visit to the Black Lion general hospital to meet victims of the attack.[87][88][89][90]

Cabinet reshuffle

In the parliamentary session held on 16 October 2018, Abiy proposed to reduce the number of ministries from 28 to 20 with half of the cabinet positions for female ministers, a first in the history of the country.[91] The new cabinet restructure included the first female president, Sahle-Work Zewde; the first female minister of the Ministry of Defense, Aisha Mohammed Musa;[92] the first female minister of the new Ministry of Peace, Muferiat Kamil responsible for the Ethiopian Federal Police and the intelligence agencies; the first female press secretary for the Office of the Prime Minister, Billene Seyoum Woldeyes.[93]

Increasing ethnic unrest

The internal political power shift has created fears for Tigrayans, and already “simmering anti-Tigrayan sentiments have led to violence” people told IRIN, “from barricading roads and forcibly stopping traffic to looting and attacks on Tigrayan homes and businesses in the Amhara and Oromia regions”. Tens of thousands Ethiopian Tigrayans have been displaced from their homes (or killed), due to ethnic based violence, since Abiy assumed office.[94][95][96][97]

Since the 2018 election of Abiy, around 1.5 million Ethiopians were forced from their homes by ethnic violence – the highest number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) of any country in 2018.[98][99][100][101][102]

Some of the worst calamities were in the south, where more than 800,000 Ethiopian Gedeos[103] have fled from the district of West Guji amid persecution by the Oromo Liberation Front. Abiy’s government has been accused by humanitarian groups of ignoring the ethnic violence and withholding of aid from Gedeon refugees.[104][105]

In the north of Ethiopia, and especially in Tigray which was the cradle of the successful revolt against the Derg that in 1991 put in place the current governing coalition, there are reports of increasing anger and ethnic tension as Abiy’s shake-up of the Ethiopian state, which has targeted Tigrayans in top positions, is widely seen as biased and vindictive.[6][106]

Government spokesmen have countered that there are many ex-officials accused of amassing billions in the past decades that are wanted by law enforcement on corruption charges and that many of these defendants come from the ruling Tigrayan elite of the past decades. These legal proceedings are sometimes conflated with ethnic persecution, especially by those ex-officials that fear persecution.[107]

Debretsion Gebremichael, the acting President of Tigray Region and currently chairman of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and part of the EPRDF ruling coalition, has been reported as having accused prime minister Abiy of “conducting ethnic profiling in the name of fighting corruption” and described “recent arrests of senior military officials as being politically motivated and implemented along ethnic lines”,[108] and his criticisms are echoed by other prominent TPLF members and people of Tigray.[109][110][111][7] A local University law professor that IRIN talked to, added and said “there is a lot of [lies] and propaganda, and the TPLF has been made the scapegoat for all vice”.[94] Abiy has also sacked around 160 Tigrayan army Generals and much more lower ranking army officers, in his reforms.[106]

In a March 2019 interview with the Financial Times of London, Debretsion Gebremichael said “concentrating on one ethnic group is dangerous”, when talking about Abiy’s crack-down on Tigrayan government workers and politicians, and the fact that Abiy is calling them “daytime hyenas” (a phrase being interpreted as an ethnic slur).[112]

Awards

Award Awarding institution Date
Most Excellent Order of the Pearl of Africa: Grand Master[113] Uganda 9 June 2018
Order of the Zayed Medal[114] UAE Crown Prince 24 July 2018
High Rank Peace Award[115] Ethiopian Orthodox Church 9 September 2018
Order of King Abdulaziz[116] Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 16 September 2018
Nominee for Tipperary International Peace Award alongside Mary Robinson (the eventual winner); Aya Chebbi; humanitarian worker in South Sudan Orla Treacy; the President of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki; Swedish student and climate change activist Greta Thunberg and Nigerian humanitarian activist Zannah Bukar Mustapha[117] Tipperary Peace Convention November 2018
100 Most Influential Africans of 2018[118] New African magazine 1 December 2018
African of the year[119] The African leadership magazine 15 December 2018
100 Most Influential People 2018[120] Time magazine 1 January 2019
100 Global Thinkers of 2019[121] Foreign Policy magazine 1 January 2019
Personality of the Year[122] AfricaNews.com 1 January 2019
African Excellence Award for Gender[123] African Union 11 February 2019
Humanitarian and Peace Maker Award[124] African Artists Peace Initiative 9 March 2019
Laureate of the 2019 edition of the Félix Houphouët-Boigny – UNESCO Peace Prize [125] UNESCO 2 May 2019
Peace Award for Contribution of Unity to Ethiopian Muslims[126] Ethiopian Muslim Community 25 May 2019
Chatham House Prize 2019 Nominee [127] Chatham House – The Royal Institute of International Affairs July 2019
World Tourism Award 2019[128] World Tourism Forum August 2019
Hessian Peace Prize[129] State of Hessen August 2019
African Association of Political Consultants Award[130] APCAfrica September 2019
Nobel Peace Prize[131] Nobel Foundation 11 October 2019

Nobel Peace Prize: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nobel_Peace_Prize

Ethiopia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopia

Nobel Peace Prize 2019: Who is Abiy Ahmed? | DW News

Oct 11, 2019  DW News

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has been announced as the winner of this prestigious award for his work to resolve the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea. Ahmed was up against around 300 nominees. The Norwegian Nobel Committee made the announcement in Oslo. Earlier this week, the Nobel prizes in the fields of Medicine, Physics, Chemistry and Literature were also awarded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #AbiyAhmed #NobelPeacePrize #DWNews

Category   News & Politics

Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed wins Nobel Peace Prize

Oct 11, 2019  CNA

The Nobel Peace Prize for 2019 has been awarded to Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. He was cited for his peacemaking efforts with Ethiopia’s rival, Eritrea. Henrik Urdal, Director of the Peace Research Institute Oslo, shared his views on Mr Abiy clinching the award. Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

Category   News & Politics

Africa Weekly: Nobel Prize for Abiy Ahmed and electricity in Madagascar | AFP

Oct 11, 2019  AFP news agency

This week on Africa Weekly, pride in Ethiopia, as Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is awarded the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize. We take a look at his first year and a half in office. We also head to Madagascar, where access to electricity is increasingly proving a luxury for the few who can afford it. Subscribe to AFP and activate your notifications to get the latest news ? http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC86db…

Category   News & Politics

https://www.indiatvnews.com/fyi/explained-why-ethiopian-pm-abiy-ahmed-ali-has-got-nobel-peace-prize-2019-and-not-greta-thunberg-555809

EXPLAINED: Why Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded Nobel Peace Prize 2019, and not Greta Thunberg

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize for 2019, defeating Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. The Norwegian Nobel Committee chose Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali as the Nobel Peace Prize winner 2019 for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 award has gone to the Ethiopian Prime Minister particularly for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.

Nidhi Taneja @@nidhitaneja0795
New Delhi Updated on: October 11, 2019 16:26 IST

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali has been awarded the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize for 2019, defeating Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg. The Norwegian Nobel Committee chose Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali as the Nobel Peace Prize winner 2019 for his efforts to achieve peace and international cooperation. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 award has gone to the Ethiopian Prime Minister particularly for his decisive initiative to resolve the border conflict with neighbouring Eritrea. The Nobel Peace Prize 2019 also recognises all the stakeholders working for peace and reconciliation in Ethiopia and in the East and Northeast Agrican regions. 

Story of Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali’s peacemaking efforts: 

Abiy Ahmed Ali assumed office as the Ethopian Prime Minister in April 2018, he was clear on resuming peace talks with Eritrea. In a bid to end the long “no peace, no war” stalemate between the two countries, Abiy Ahmed worked out certain principles of a peace agreement in close cooperation with President of Eritrea Isaias Afwerki. These principles are set out in the declarations that Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali and President Afwerki signed in Asmara and Jeddah last July and September. What came as a breakthrough was Abiy Ahmed’s unconditional willingness to accept the arbitration ruling of an international boundary commission in 2002.

Both Prime Minister Abiy and President Afwerki helped formalise the peace process between the two counties. Prime Minister Abiy has initiated important reforms in Ethiopia that give many citizens hope for a better life and a brighter future. In his first 100 days as Prime Minister, Abiy lifted the country’s state of emergency, granting amnesty to thousands of political prisoners, discontinuing media censorship, legalising outlawed opposition groups, dismissing military and civilian leaders who were suspected corruption, and significantly increasing the influence of women in Ethiopian political and community life. Prime Minister Abiy also engaged with other peace and reconciliation processes in East and Northeast Africa. The Norwegian Nobel Committee sees Abiy Ahmed as the person who in the preceding year has done the most to deserve the Nobel Peace Prize for 2019.

On a day when the Nobel Peace Prize 2019 is announced, we remember 16-year-old environmental activist Greta Thunberg too for her histrionics at the United Nations last month. The young Swedish activist furiously attacked world leaders at the United Nations with a fiery speech, and asked: “How dare you?”. Not just that. Greta’s stare at US President Donald Trump when he arrived to attend a meeting on religious freedom was also caught on camera. She was hailed by some, and criticised by some. A lot many had predicted Greta Thunberg as the Nobel Peace Prize winner, but that clearly didn’t happen.

ALSO READ | Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg wins Alternative Nobel

ALSO READ | ‘A very happy young girl…’: Greta Thunberg after Trump’s remark

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Ing, John’s and International Street Art- P1

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA Part 1

I love street art for many reasons. First of all, the artwork is there for the public.  It is for everyone who passes to their destination.  Without spending time visiting art galleries or museums, they can see art while they are going to work or getting lunch.  Some may pay attention to the artwork and some may not.  Some may ask questions about the artwork.  I hope, at least the artwork will activate the thought process of those passing by.

I love plants and flowers.  It makes me happy when I see the freshness of green leaves and beautiful flowers blooming.   Our shop is closed temporally, and the window gate is down. I thought that if I display our artwork and some of the plants from our backyard garden in front of the shop gate, it would make it more pleasant for the people who pass by.  I am happy to do it, and I hope the artwork and the plants will help the downtown office workers or others feel fresh and lively.       

My first day of Street art was on Friday, July 26, 2019.  I took some plants from our backyard garden to display in front of our shop.  I started my first display of artwork with “Elephants at the Water Lily Pond” I produced in 1999.  There are always people walking by our place, but more during lunch time.  Most of them are the office workers.  Also, in the evening, people walk by going home from work.  Some people are interested in the artwork, and ask questions, while others are oblivious to the artwork that I display.

One week later I changed my artwork to, “By the Water Lily Pond”, which produced in 1998.  I added more plants to my display, when the pink blossom flowers of Rose Queen were in full bloom.

This artwork of mine titled, “I Have A Dream – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr”, I displayed from, Wednesday, August 14, 2019, to August 21, 2019.  I produced this work in 2010.  I also added more plants to fill the front of shop space.

My Thai classical artwork was displayed on Thursday, August 22, 2019.  I produced this artwork in1994.

On Monday, August 28, 2019 John added his work to the display.  John’s artwork is on the far left, “Impossible Dreamer”.  “Gandhi Man of Peace”, in the middle is my artwork, which I produced in 2000.  The far right is John’s artwork “Beneath the Lake”.  Thanks to John Watts, my husband, for helping to display the artwork in a better presentation.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Thursday, October 10, 2019

International Street Art

New Works from Banksy at the The Jungle Refugee Camp in Calais

December 11, 2015  Christopher Jobson

“The Son of a Migrant from Syria”

Based on an update to his website this morning it appears Banksy visited the Jungle Refugee Camp in Calais, France, one of the largest refugee camps in western Europe. The artist left behind four new artworks, most notably a piece featuring Steve Jobs carrying an early Macintosh computer and a sack over his shoulder noting his background as a “son of a migrant from Syria,” (Jobs was adopted, but his biological father was from Syria). In another piece he references Géricault’s famous Raft of Medusa painting, depicting an imperiled group of people on a sinking raft as they hail a modern cruise ship just on the horizon. The artist previously brought attention to the refuge crisis in a piece at Dismaland earlier this year.

In addition to the artworks, part of Banksy’s team installed 12 permanent structures and a makeshift playground inside the squalid Jungle camp using materials left behind from Dismaland, a project he refers to as Dismal Aid.

One of the best ways you can help Syrian refugees is through donations to the UN Refugee Agency.

New Solo Exhibition by Seth Globepainter Fills a Historic Chateau in Bordeaux, France

September 1, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Collaboration with Pascal Vilcollet

French artist Julien Malland, aka Seth Globepainter (previously), has spent the summer exhibiting a large body of work inside and outside of the Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez. Located in Bordeaux, France, the historic chateau was built in the 18th century and now doubles as a cultural center.

Malland’s takeover includes dozens of paintings, installations, and sculptures that have transformed the castle into a colorful record of his travels and a look into his mind.

Titled 1,2,3, Soleil, the exhibition features over 50 of the artist’s faceless characters. Each room in the chateau has a theme that represents one of Malland’s previous projects in countries around the world. Vibrant colors and geometrical shapes are complicated by themes of conflict and loneliness. The exhibition includes site-specific installations as well as collaborative pieces made with artists Mono Gonzalez and Pascal Vilcollet.

The walk through Malland’s world will remain on view in France through October 7, 2019. In addition to his solo show, Malland also recently completed two murals in Denmark as part of Kirk Gallery‘s annual Out in the Open mural initiative. To keep up with the artist’s latest projects, follow him on Instagram.

Seth | ‘Jack in the Box’ | Østerbro 41 | Aalborg | Denmark

For more artwork and information please visit the following link:

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PBS News, TED Talks, BBC Click, DW Documentary, Dominique Lalonde Films Nature, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Photographs

 PBS News: 9.30-10.5.2019, The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film)  FRONTLINE,

TED Talks:  Tim Flannery Can seaweed help curb global warming?,  Safeena Husain A bold plan to empower 1 6 million out of school girls in india?, Ashweetha  Shetty H ow Education helped  me rewrite my life, How trees talk to each other- Suzanne Simard

BBC Click: Can Tech Solve the Opioid Crisis?

DW Documentary: By train across Sri Lanka,

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

Thisiscolossal: Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

Ing’s Photographs: Monarch Butterflies at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 5, 2019

Oct 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 5, the latest on the impeachment inquiry and the months-long battle between Beijing and protestors over the future of Hong Kong. Also, tourists flock to King’s Landing as “Game of Thrones” lives on in Croatia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live show October 4, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 3, 2019

Oct 3, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Donald Trump reiterates his desire for foreign involvement in investigating the Biden family, saying he might ask China about the idea. Plus: The implications of Trump’s recent actions, problematic water in Flint five years after the lead crisis, what’s at stake in the General Motors strike, a book on U.S. border policy and China’s booming art market. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 2, 2019

Oct 2, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Democrats threaten the White House with subpoenas if they don’t turn over documents related to the Ukrainian affair. Also: Former Sen. Jeff Flake on the GOP’s future, 2020 Democrats on addressing gun violence, China’s electric car market transforms the auto industry, wheelchair tennis players blaze a trail and a Brief but Spectacular take on picturing the possibilities. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Democrats to White House: Time is up to produce documents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFsNM… News Wrap: Sanders cancels events after heart procedure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=103G7… How Republicans see the impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb7uQ… Where 2020 Democrats stand on gun violence policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5317-… How China is driving the future of electric cars https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdQmi… How wheelchair tennis models success for adaptive sports https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhsra… Why seeing a role model who looks like you is so powerful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cqf5… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode October 1, 2019

Oct 1, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the president, attorney general and secretary of state are now at the heart of the impeachment inquiry that questions contacts with foreign leaders. Also: Officers in Hong Kong open fire on a young activist, fears of global surveillance as China exports its technology, an explosion of images of child sex abuse and what we’ve learned about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Pompeo, Democrats clash over whistleblower inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4ukc… News Wrap: Iraqi forces fire on protesters in Baghdad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VIhv… Report: Barr asked foreign leaders to help in probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPbQA… Hong Kong violence contrasts China’s anniversary pomp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JX0LS… Critics say this Chinese tech spreads authoritarianism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPV-h… Why it’s so hard to stop images of child sex abuse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L75D… How Khashoggi’s murder ‘haunts’ Saudi Arabia’s crown prince https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4z59… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 30, 2019

Sep 30, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump lashes out as the impeachment inquiry moves forward and his former Homeland Security adviser raises concerns. Also: Presidential candidate Cory Booker on his self-imposed fundraising deadline, analysis from Politics Monday, questions of a Chinese surveillance state amid a rapid tech boom, and author Sally Rooney answers readers’ questions. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump focuses on whistleblower as inquiry deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFrcs… News Wrap: Kremlin says it must O.K. Putin-Trump transcript https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOTYU… 2020 Democrats talk impeachment on the campaign trail https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRKkI… Booker: Impeachment inquiry ‘not about popularity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZgyv… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Democrats’ impeachment path https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pWSj… How China’s high-tech ‘eyes’ monitor behavior and dissent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bae3X… ‘Conversations with Friends’ author answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIGSM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film) | FRONTLINE

Sep 28, 2019

FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Note from FRONTLINE: This version of “The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia” has sporadic technical glitches with the audio. We have corrected the problem and posted a new version here: https://youtu.be/SVa2xqeIbkg One year after the murder of columnist Jamal Khashoggi, FRONTLINE investigates the rise and rule of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) of Saudi Arabia. In a never before seen or heard conversation featured in the documentary, the Saudi Crown Prince addresses his role in Khashoggi’s murder exclusively to FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith. Smith, who has covered the Middle East for FRONTLINE for 20 years, examines MBS’s vision for the future, his handling of dissent, and his relationship with the United States. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE films available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #MBS #SaudiArabia #Khashoggi Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category   News & Politics

It’s time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work that’s still needed to get there.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Tim Flannery · Environmentalist

Explorer and professor Tim Flannery seeks to grasp the big picture of planetary evolution and how humans can affect it — for better or for worse.

“Girls’ education is the closest thing we have to a silver bullet to help solve some of the world’s most difficult problems,” says social entrepreneur Safeena Husain. In a visionary talk, she shares her plan to enroll a staggering 1.6 million girls in school over the next five years — combining advanced analytics with door-to-door community engagement to create new educational pathways for girls in India. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Safeena Husain · Social entrepreneur

Safeena Husain has worked extensively with rural and urban underserved communities in South America, Africa and Asia. After returning to India, she chose the agenda closest to her heart — girls’ education — and founded Educate Girls.

More Resources

A new model to inspire change at scale

The Audacious Project

Learn more about The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to fund ambitious ideas for social good.

More at AudaciousProject.org ?

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learn

Learn more about how Educate Girls mobilizes communities for girls’ education in India.

Learn more ?

599,129 views

TED2019 | April 2019

There’s no greater freedom than finding your purpose, says education advocate Ashweetha Shetty. Born to a poor family in rural India, Shetty didn’t let the social norms of her community stifle her dreams and silence her voice. In this personal talk, she shares how she found self-worth through education — and how she’s working to empower other rural youth to explore their potential. “All of us are born into a reality that we blindly accept — until something awakens us and a new world opens up,” Shetty says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Ashweetha Shetty · Rural social worker

Through her nonprofit, Bodhi Tree Foundation, Ashweetha Shetty supports first-generation college students in rural India to explore their potential through education, life skills and opportunities.

Can Tech Solve The Opioid Crisis? – BBC Click

Sep 30, 2019  BBC Click

Seventy thousand Americans are dying each year from drug overdoses. Two-thirds are the result of opioid addiction. Technology companies have been accused of helping facilitate the illicit sale of drugs online, but are they really to blame? Warning: This programme contains people affected by drug abuse. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

By train across Sri Lanka | DW Documentary

Sep 20, 2017  DW Documentary

Asia’s most beautiful railway line? The “Main Line” cuts through tea plantations and jungle, then passes Buddhist temples and relicts of the British Empire. In the 19th century the British built a railway in what was then their colony of Ceylon. Their idea was to transport goods such as tea from the highlands to the port of Colombo. Today it’s mainly only locals and tourists who use the so-called “Main Line.” The route is considered one of the most picturesque in the whole of Asia. Our trip takes us from the capital, Colombo, to Ella in the highlands. Our first stop is one of the country’s largest elephant orphanages. And then on to Kandy, the former capital of the Singhalese kingdom. The city is home to the famous Temple of the Tooth, which is said to house the Buddha’s top left canine. The train then winds its way further up into the highlands. We watch tea pickers at work and go to a tea factory to discover where the aroma comes from. Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s highest town at an altitude of almost 1900 meters, where a racecourse still brings the colonial era back to life. The stations have also retained their own colonial charm: in 1901, a signaling system was set up to make the long journey safer. And those suffering from the altitude can catch their breath at the final stop, the spa in Ella. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

How trees talk to each other | Suzanne Simard

Aug 30, 2016 

“A forest is much more than what you see,” says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category  Science & Technology

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category   Pets & Animals

Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

June 8, 2013  Christopher Jobson

It is almost impossible these days to click around the web without running into the work of filmmaker and architectural photographer Rob Whitworth who spends months at a time filming immersive time-lapse videos in some of Asia’s largest cities. Whitworth is currently based in Shanghai where he recently completed his latest film, This is Shangai in conjunction with JT Singh. While often extremely fast-paced it’s amazing to see the filmmaker’s camera move so effortlessly through space, a trick he achieves with the use of extremely high-powered telephoto lenses and other filming techniques. I’ve included two additional videos above which you many have seen elsewhere but are certainly worth another view.

Update: You can read a great interview with Rob over at Asia Blog.

Ing’s Photographs: I captured these Monarch Butterflies with my camcorder at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019.  I saw four Monarch Butterflies this day.

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