The Last Day Posts of Ing on Google+ Site April 1,2019 Part 1

 The Last Day Posts of Ing on Google+ Site April 1,2019 Part 1

Google + closed their operation on April 2, of this year, 2019.  It is more than one week now.  The more time goes by, the more I miss people who followed my google + site, and people that contributed their time to post their work in different communities.  I decided to present on my website, the contents of last day of posts on my Google+ site, which I had been shared from other members of my community and other Google+ communities.    

It is to remind me of human interaction and relationships around the world.  Even though I did not see them in person, communication and participation with their ideas, and work, can interconnect our feeling of kinship.  I wish all of them the best, and hope we may meet again in the future.  The lesson one learns is that we need more interactions and communications between all humans around the world to be able to find kinship with one another.  This communication can help reduce human conflict and war that occurs around the world, now, and in the future.

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, April 12, 2019

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts  Gandhi Peace and Nonviolence for the World

The Solar-Powered Floating Schools in Bangladesh

Little Bare Feet Go To School

Tip toe, tip toe

Our little bare feet are marching to school
Faces smiling with happiness
We are going to school

“Where is your older sister?”
Is she coming to school too?”

“Oh, she has to stay home taking care of our baby sister.
But I will bring some story books for her.
She will come next week and I will stay home taking care of our sister.”

“Did you read Cinderella?
She lost her shoe.”

“I wish I had her Godmother
Then she can give me a pair of nice shoes.”

“Watch out!
Don’t step on that sharp rock; it will hurt your foot.”

“I can jump over it.
Come on, let’s jump over the rocks.
Oh it’s fun, fun, fun!”

“I wish I can come to school every day
I love to learn and read books.”

“I love our teacher.
She is so nice.”

“Let’s go, I don’t want to be late”

Tip toe, tip toe

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, November 27, 2012, 12:02 A.M.

 I usually visit BBC news, reading the news.  I enjoy seeing the, In Pictures, section.  I was so glad to see the pictures of the, Solar-Powered Floating Schools.  As I examined one of the pictures showing a group of children walking to the Solar-Powered Floating School, I noticed that none of the children had shoes.  They were all walking bare foot.  I felt so sad.  When I showed the picture to John I said, “Children here (USA) have so many pairs of shoes, some with fancy designs with light and other luxury shoes.  But some of the children here are still not satisfied and are unhappy with their lifestyle.  Kids here should see the children in this picture that have no normal school and even have no shoes.  I hope they have enough food to survive.”  John’s commented that, “But kids in the picture are smiling, they probably are happier than some of the kids here.” 
“A project that provides solar-powered floating schools in Bangladesh has been nominated for an award at the world Innovation Summit in Education in Doha,Qatar.  This year’s shortlisted projects not only “transform education”, but also provide innovative financing of primary education.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-20340184

After Scott Kelly Spent A Year In Space, This Is The Torture His Body Went Through Back On Earth

Let Me Know Published on Mar 27, 2019
After Scott Kelly Spent A Year In Space, This Is The Torture His Body Went Through Back On Earth Astronaut Scott Kelly became the first American astronaut to spend a year in space. But when he returned, he realized that the mission had been the least of his worries. It’s March 2, 2016, and Scott Kelly has just arrived back on Earth. He’s spent the past 340 days aboard the International Space Station –… ?Image credits: Image: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images Image: NASA via Getty Images Image: Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images Image: Brian Ach/Getty Images for LocationWorld 2016 Image: Joel Kowsky/NASA via Getty Images Image: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images Image: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images ? SUBSCRIBE US: https://goo.gl/CAyFbx ? Like us Our Facebook Page: https://goo.gl/SBs38W ? Follow On Twitter: https://goo.gl/nvhzU6 ? Follow Us On Instagram : https://goo.gl/3UXcnx ? Audio by Scott Leffler — scottleffler.com For copyright matters relating to our channel please contact us directly at : letmeknowoff@gmail.com #let_me_know #Space
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqzehNr9F3c

NASA Live: Official Stream of NASA TV
Started streaming on Dec 28, 2018
Direct from America’s space program to YouTube, watch NASA TV live streaming here to get the latest from our exploration of the universe and learn how we discover our home planet. NASA TV airs a variety of regularly scheduled, pre-recorded educational and public relations programming 24 hours a day on its various channels. The network also provides an array of live programming, such as coverage of missions, events (spacewalks, media interviews, educational broadcasts), press conferences and rocket launches. In the United States, NASA Television’s Public and Media channels are MPEG-2 digital C-band signals carried by QPSK/DVB-S modulation on satellite AMC-3, transponder 15C, at 87 degrees west longitude. Downlink frequency is 4000 MHz, horizontal polarization, with a data rate of 38.86 Mhz, symbol rate of 28.1115 Ms/s, and ¾ FEC. A Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) compliant Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD) is needed for reception.
Category Science & Technology

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21X5lGlDOfg

To Google+ Family: Thank you for sharing all your creative and wonderful posts. Good luck for the future. May peace be with you and your family always.
All the best,
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
ingpeaceproject.comIngPeaceProject.com | Let there be peace on Earth
Finished “Peace” artwork 16
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

Finished Second Artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School Students’ Peace Comments | IngPeaceProject.com

ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 16
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 16
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 16

Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

Finished Second Artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School Students’ Peace Comments | IngPeaceProject.com

ingpeaceproject.com

 Finished “Peace” artwork 16
Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

Finished Second Artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School Students’ Peace Comments | IngPeaceProject.com

 

ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 16
Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Tuesday, August 4, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 1 and 3, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/08/04/finished-second-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

 Finished Second Artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School Students’ Peace Comments | IngPeaceProject.com

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

In a chase for ultimate freedom of being, we live through neo occult transformations in a world ruled by digital alchemy. Pushed to this limit, in the Kowloon of the heart, where things are no longer things, they’re vices…
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.mk/2016/01/kowloon-of-heart.html
#artist joe iurato #streetart #urban #urbandecay #art #urbanart #urbanphotography #urbandecay #urbanfantasy #wallart #streetphotography #streetstyle #street #graffiti #graffitiart #anonymous #feelings #emotions #emotionalintelligence #edge #freedom #cctv #love #humanity

 

 Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

The full satisfaction of not knowing, and the curiosity of taking another path, just because I can, a path more secret and less known…
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.mk/2015/07/twenty-tens.html
#alcrego #urbanart #streetart #graffiti #perfectloop #gif #blog #blogger #blogpost

 Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

… forms imprinted on the inside easily converted into a nasty outbreak. Some kind of contagion, an experiment turning into an incident.
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.mk/2015/09/forms-imprinted-in-us.html

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

Liberating, satisfying and loving… Where are the end boundaries of our waters?
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2015/05/wiser-than-dreams.html

Originally shared by Colossal

Check out these quirky new GIFs from photographer Romain Laurent who loops unexpected moments in his photos.

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/11/new-animated-portraits-by-romain-laurent/

designwrld.com

Originally shared by Designwrld

An Early Valentine’s ‘GIF(T)’ from Lonac

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/01/an-early-valentines-gift-from-lonac/

Mind-Blowing Art Project You Have to See in Motion

Please Follow: +Creative Ideas

Originally shared by Colossal

Watch a few clips of ‘2001:A Space Odyssey’ as if it were… painted by Picasso? No, really. Google’s neural network uses a database of Picasso paintings to ‘paint’ the iconic Kubrick film.

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/06/2001-a-space-odyssey-viewed-through-picassos-dreams/

 Originally shared by Colossal

Colourflow: Dizzying Experimental Particle Animations and Renderings by David McLeod

https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2016/06/colourflow-particles-david-mccleod/

ingpeaceproject.com

 Finished “Peace” artwork 15
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, and Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015) Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Friday, January 30, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/01/30/finished-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 15
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, and Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015) Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Friday, January 30, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/01/30/finished-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

 Finished “Peace” artwork 15
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, and Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015) Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Friday, January 30, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/01/30/finished-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

  ingpeaceproject.com

Finished “Peace” artwork 15
 Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?”
Organize by Linda Leonard-Nevels (School Library Media Specialist), Malcolm X Shabazz High School, and Ms. Bongiovanni (English IV, 2014-2015) Newark, New Jersey, December 2014
 Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts on Friday, January 30, 2015
Link to Finished artwork of Malcolm X Shabazz High School’s Students’ comments, poster 2, on “What does Peace mean to you?” page:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/2015/01/30/finished-artwork-of-malcolm-x-shabazz-high-school-students-peace-comments/

… my heresy is toward any cage attempting to free us from choice. Not to waste resources on hope, but to create and improve overall alchemy of life.
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2015/07/twenty-tens.html
#bansky #graffiti #urbanart #wallart #gif by #abvh

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

Perfection is yet another dissipation of reality. A ruin built from an ancient one. Cages made of freedom, a contradiction in terms – us…
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2014/03/cages-made-of-freedom.html
#art by #banksy

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

“I need someone to protect me from all the measures they take in order to protect me. ”
#banksy #streetart #urbanart #graffiti #graffitistreetart #wallart #quoteoftheday #truthhurts #truth

I feel draft on my neck… it makes me shiver, like a touch I had already forgotten. I can taste it in the air…
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2013/09/a-smile-of-thousand-colors.html
#charliechaplin #chaplin #blackandwhitephotography #blackandwhitephotos #blackandwhite #1920s #autumn

  Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

We love because we feel like it, don’t need a special reason for that…
#love
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2014/05/an-impression.html

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

He feels that these questions are eroding the soul, pushing him outwards, on the margins, where everything is so blank and silent… the world is never enough!
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.com/2015/04/emotional-intelligence.html
#art by #banksy #hypocrisy #compassion #humanity #human

Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy’s work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]

Banksy displays his art on publicly visible surfaces such as walls and self-built physical prop pieces. Banksy no longer sells photographs or reproductions of his street graffiti, but his public “installations” are regularly resold, often even by removing the wall they were painted on.[5] A small number of Banksy’s works are officially, non-publicly, sold through Pest Control.[6] Banksy’s documentary film Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010) made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[7] In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary for the film.[8] In 2014, he was awarded Person of the Year at the 2014 Webby Awards.[9]

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banksy

Originally shared by Dejan Kordoski

And who we truly are and where we’re headed, has always depended on our ability to dream, or even better, the ability to expedite dreams into reality. Human soul thrives in liberty and freedom, it is not a region of conquest or enslavement!
https://naturaprincipia.blogspot.mk/2013/01/the-man.html
#peace #love #freedom #happiness #liberty #dreams #reality #humanity

Google+ is no longer available for consumer (personal) and brand accounts

From all of us on the Google+ team,
thank you for making Google+ such a special place.

What happened to Google+?

In December 2018, we announced our decision to shut down Google+ for consumers in April 2019.

Other Google products (such as Gmail, Google Photos, Google Drive, YouTube) were not shut down as part of the consumer Google+ shutdown and you can continue using those products. The Google Account you use to sign in to these services will remain. Note that photos and videos already backed up in Google Photos will not be deleted. Learn more

What happened to my Google+ content?

We are in the process of deleting content from consumer Google+ accounts and Google+ pages. This process will take a few months to complete, and content may remain through this time. In the meantime, if you previously created content on Google+, you may be able to download and save your remaining Google+ content and delete your Google+ profile. You may also be able to view and delete your remaining Google+ activity.

If I also use Google+ with my G Suite account, for example at work or school, how will I be impacted?

Google+ for G Suite will continue as a way for people across an organization to have discussions. Learn more about how we’re continuing our investment in Google+ for G Suite.

If you’re not sure if your organization uses G Suite, you can check here. G Suite customers may see some changes to Google+ features related to the consumer Google+ shutdown. You can find more details here or you can talk to your G Suite administrator to learn more.

See the full FAQ for more details about the consumer Google+ shutdown.”

https://plus.google.com/collection/EUWcKB

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Remembering Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon

Remembering Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon

Died on Monday, January 16, 2017

Eugene Cernan in Lunar Module

Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene Cernan inside the lunar module on the moon after his second moonwalk of the mission. His spacesuit is covered with lunar dust

“We leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.” — Cernan’s closing words on leaving the moon at the end of Apollo 17

Eugene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, died Monday, Jan. 16, surrounded by his family.

Cernan, a Captain in the U.S. Navy, left his mark on the history of exploration by flying three times in space, twice to the moon. He also holds the distinction of being the second American to walk in space and the last human to leave his footprints on the lunar surface.

He was one of 14 astronauts selected by NASA in October 1963. He piloted the Gemini 9 mission with Commander Thomas P. Stafford on a three-day flight in June 1966. Cernan logged more than two hours outside the orbiting capsule.

In May 1969, he was the lunar module pilot of Apollo 10, the first comprehensive lunar-orbital qualification and verification test of the lunar lander. The mission confirmed the performance, stability, and reliability of the Apollo command, service and lunar modules. The mission included a descent to within eight nautical miles of the moon’s surface.

In a 2007 interview for NASA’s oral histories, Cernan said, “I keep telling Neil Armstrong that we painted that white line in the sky all the way to the Moon down to 47,000 feet so he wouldn’t get lost, and all he had to do was land. Made it sort of easy for him.”

 Apollo 17 Commander Eugene A. Cernan and the U.S. flag on the lunar surface.

Apollo 17 commander Eugene A. Cernan is holding the lower corner of the American flag during the mission’s first EVA, December 12, 1972. Photograph by Harrison J. “Jack” Schmitt.   Image Credit: NASA

 

Cernan and Evans in Apollo 17  Credits: NASA

Cernan concluded his historic space exploration career as commander of the last human mission to the moon in December 1972. En route to the moon, the crew captured an iconic photo of the home planet, with an entire hemisphere fully illumnitated — a “whole Earth” view showing Africa, the Arabian peninsula and the south polar ice cap. The hugely popular photo was referred to by some as the “Blue Marble,” a title in use for an ongoing series of NASA Earth imagery.

Apollo 17 established several new records for human space flight, including the longest lunar landing flight (301 hours, 51 minutes); longest lunar surface extravehicular activities (22 hours, 6 minutes); largest lunar sample return (nearly 249 pounds); and longest time in lunar orbit (147 hours, 48 minutes).

Cernan and crewmate Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt completed three highly successful excursions to the nearby craters and the Taurus-Littrow mountains, making the moon their home for more than three days. As he left the lunar surface, Cernan said, “America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow. As we leave the moon and Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.”

 

 Apollo 17 astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt sing while walking on the moon during the last Apollo lunar landing mission.  NASA.gov Video “I Was Strolling on the Moon One Day” the link on YouTube is as the following: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl_VdN6rfrQ

“Apollo 17 built upon all of the other missions scientifically,” said Cernan in 2008, recalling the mission as the agency celebrated its 50th Anniversary. “We had a lunar rover, we were able to cover more ground than most of the other missions. We stayed there a little bit longer. We went to a more challenging unique area in the mountains, to learn something about the history and the origin of the moon itself.”

On their way to the moon, the Apollo 17 crew took one of the most iconic photographs in space-program history, the full view of the Earth dubbed “The Blue Marble.” Despite it’s fame, the photograph hasn’t really been appreciated, Cernan said in 2007.

This classic photograph of the Earth was taken on December 7, 1972.

Credits: NASA

“What is the real meaning of seeing this picture? I’ve always said, I’ve said for a long time, I still believe it, it’s going to be — well it’s almost fifty now, but fifty or a hundred years in the history of mankind before we look back and really understand the meaning of Apollo. Really understand what humankind had done when we left, when we truly left this planet, we’re able to call another body in this universe our home. We did it way too early considering what we’re doing now in space. It’s almost as if JFK reached out into the twenty-first century where we are today, grabbed hold of a decade of time, slipped it neatly into the (nineteen) sixties and seventies (and) called it Apollo.”

On July 1, 1976, Cernan retired from the Navy after 20 years and ended his NASA career. He went into private business and served as television commentator for early fights of the space shuttle.

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2017

Editor: Brian Dunbar

Tags:  NASA History

 Jan. 16, 2017

RELEASE 17-007

NASA Administrator Reflects on Legacy of Last Man to Walk on Moon

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on the passing of Gemini and Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan:

“Gene Cernan, Apollo astronaut and the last man to walk on the moon, has passed from our sphere, and we mourn his loss. Leaving the moon in 1972, Cernan said, ‘As I take these last steps from the surface for some time into the future to come, I’d just like to record that America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow.’ Truly, America has lost a patriot and pioneer who helped shape our country’s bold ambitions to do things that humankind had never before achieved.

“Gene first served his country as a Naval Aviator before taking the pilot’s seat on the Gemini 9 mission, where he became the second American to walk in space and helped demonstrate rendezvous techniques that would be important later. As a crew member of both the Apollo 10 and 17 missions, he was one of three men to have flown twice to the moon. He commanded Apollo 17 and set records that still stand for longest manned lunar landing flight, longest lunar surface extravehicular activities, largest lunar sample return, and longest time in lunar orbit.

“Gene’s footprints remain on the moon, and his achievements are imprinted in our hearts and memories. His drive to explore and do great things for his country is summed up in his own words:

We truly are in an age of challenge. With that challenge comes opportunity. The sky is no longer the limit. The word impossible no longer belongs in our vocabulary. We have proved that we can do whatever we have the resolve to do. The limit to our reach is our own complacency.’

“In my last conversation with him, he spoke of his lingering desire to inspire the youth of our nation to undertake the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) studies, and to dare to dream and explore. He was one of a kind and all of us in the NASA Family will miss him greatly.”

For more information about Cernan’s NASA career, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/cernan

-end-

Bob Jacobs
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1600
bob.jacobs@nasa.gov

Last Updated: Jan. 16, 2017

Editor: Allard Beutel

Tags:  NASA History

Read Full Article

Gemini IXA Splashes Down

The Gemini IXA spacecraft, with command pilot Tom Stafford and pilot Eugene Cernan aboard, splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean on June 6, 1966, less than one mile from the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier USS Wasp. It was the first time a spacecraft descending on its parachute was shown on live television

 Looking Back at the Gemini IX Spacecraft                         “What a beautiful spacecraft,” said Gemini IX pilot Eugene Cernan during his two hour, eight minute spacewalk on June 5, 1966. He took this wide-angle photograph looking back at the window where command pilot Tom Stafford was watching.

 

 Gemini IXA Pilot Eugene Cernan Spacewalk

During his two hour, eight minute spacewalk on June 5, 1966, Gemini IXA pilot Eugene Cernan is seen outside the spacecraft. His experience during that time showed there was still much to be learned about working in microgravity.

 

 Gemini IXA Astronauts at Launch Pad 19                                                                               

After two postponements, Gemini IXA astronauts Eugene Cernan, left, and Tom Stafford, center, arrive in the white room atop Launch Pad 19 at Cape Kennedy Air Force Station on June 3, 1966. Stafford is presenting a large match to McDonnell Aircraft Corporation’s pad leader Gunter Wendt, far right.

 

 Apollo 10 Launch                                                                                                                         The Apollo 10 (Spacecraft 106/Lunar Module 4/Saturn 505) space vehicle with crew members Eugene Cernan, John Young and Thomas Stafford on board is launched from Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center at 12:49 p.m., May 18, 1969.

 

Apollo 10 Rollout                                                                                                                     Apollo 10 rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Complex 39B. This mission launched on May 18, 1969. The crew of Tom Stafford, Gene Cernan and John Young  

flew the “dress rehearsal” for the first human landing on the moon.

 

 Apollo 10 Lunar Module Ascends                                                                                                     After dropping down to 47,400 feet above the moon’s surface, Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan aboard the ascent stage of Apollo 10 lunar module, return to John Young in the command module on May 22, 1969.

 

Apollo 10 Crew

The crew of Apollo 10, from the left, Eugene Cernan, John Young and Thomas Stafford are photographed while at the Kennedy Space Center. In the background is the Apollo 10 space vehicle on Launch Pad 39 B, The three crewmen had just completed a Countdown Demonstration Test exercise on May 13, 1969.

41 Years Ago this Week – Apollo 17

During the second spacewalk on December 12, 1972, Apollo 17 Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan is standing near the lunar rover designed by Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Apollo 17 Launch

The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A., Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 12:33 a.m. (EST), Dec. 7, 1972.

Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission in NASA’s Apollo program, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V launch vehicle.

 

 Apollo 17 Mission Commander Eugene Cernan Drives Lunar Roving Vehicle                     

Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene Cernan drives the lunar roving vehicle during the early part of the first moonwalk at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Lunar Module is in the background.

 

  Gene Cernan at Armstrong Memorial  

 Apollo 17 mission commander Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, looks skyward during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong at the Washington National Cathedral, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82.

 

 Gene Cernan Speaks at Armstrong Memorial Service                                                                                                    Apollo 17 astronaut Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, speaks during a memorial service celebrating the life of Neil Armstrong at the Washington National Cathedral, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82.

 

 Apollo 17 Splashdown                                                                                                                          The Apollo 17 spacecraft, containing astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt, glided to a safe splashdown at 2:25 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 1972, 648 kilometers (350 nautical miles) southeast of American Samoa.

House Hearing on NASA Human Spaceflight Plan

Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong, left, and retired Navy Captain and commander of Apollo 17 Eugene Cernan, confer prior to testifying at a hearing before the House Science and Technology Committee, Tuesday, May 26, 2010, at the Rayburn House office building on Capitol Hill in Washington. The hearing was to review proposed human spaceflight plans.

 Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference                           On July 20, 2009, Apollo astronauts from left, Walt Cunningham (Apollo 7), James Lovell (Apollo 8 Apollo 13), David Scott (Apollo 9 Apollo 15), Buzz Aldrin (Apollo 11), Charles Duke (Apollo 16), Thomas Stafford (Apollo 10) and Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17) are seen during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission press conference.

 

Apollo 10 40th Anniversary Program                                   NASA Apollo 10 Astronaut Gene Cernan, right, answers questions from the Newseum’s distinguished journalist-in-residence, Nick Clooney during a Newseum TV program celebrating the 40th anniversary of Apollo 10, Monday, May 18, 2009, in Washington.

Suited Up for Apollo 10 Mission – May 1969                            Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 10 lunar module pilot, is suited up at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a Countdown Demonstration Test during preparations for his scheduled lunar orbit mission. The other two crew members are astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander, and John W. Young, command module pilot.

Apollo 17 Launch                                                                                                                     A Saturn V rocket streaks toward space on the night of December 17, 1972, carrying the Apollo 17 crew, the last astronauts to explore the moon. Leaving the lunar surface, Commander Gene Cernan said “we leave as we came, and, God willing, we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.”              

Apollo 17 Launch                                                                                                    The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 17 (Spacecraft 114/Lunar Module 12/Saturn 512) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, at 12:33 a.m. (EST), Dec. 7, 1972. Apollo 17, the final lunar landing mission in NASA’s Apollo program, was the first nighttime liftoff of the Saturn V.

Apollo 17’s Moonship                                                                                    Awkward and angular looking, Apollo 17’s lunar module Challenger was designed for flight in the vacuum of space. This picture, taken from the command module America, shows Challenger’s ascent stage in lunar orbit. Small reaction control thrusters are at the sides of the moonship with the bell of the ascent rocket engine itself underneath.

Apollo 17 Crew                                                                                                                          On Dec. 19, 1972, the Apollo 17 crew returned to Earth. Apollo 17 was the sixth and last Apollo mission in which humans walked on the lunar surface. On Dec. 11, Lunar Module Pilot Harrison H. Schmitt and Commander Eugene A. Cernan, landed on the moon’s Taurus-Littrow region in the Lunar Module. 

 Driving on the Moon                                                                                                          Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene A. Cernan makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the early part of the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. This view of the lunar rover prior to loadup was taken by Harrison H. Schmitt, Lunar Module pilot.

Apollo 17 – The Last Moon Shot

In 1865, Jules Verne wrote a science fiction story entitled, “From the Earth to the Moon.” The story outlined the author’s vision of a cannon in Florida so powerful that it could shoot a “Projectile-Vehicle” carrying three adventurers to the moon. More than 100 years later NASA produced the Saturn V rocket and from a spaceport in Florida.

Reflections of the Moon                                                                                                             The surface of the moon is reflected in the command and service module as it prepares to rendezvous with the lunar module in this December 1972 image from the Apollo 17 mission.

  Training for the Apollo 17 Mission                                       Two members of the prime crew of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission participate in training at the Kennedy Space Center. Scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt (foreground), lunar module pilot, simulates scooping up lunar sample material. Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (background), commander, holds a sample b

 Blue Marble – Image of the Earth from Apollo 17                                           

View of the Earth as seen by the Apollo 17 crew — astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, commander; astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot; and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot — traveling toward the moon. This translunar coast photograph extends from the Mediterranean Sea area to the Antarctica South polar ice cap.

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