PBS News, africanews, Sky News, CAN 24/7, Roylab Stats, Google News, The New York Times, Doctor Mike Hansen, TEDX & TED-ED, and Colossal

PBS News: May 20 – 24, 2020 and How Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Songs of Comfort’ are inspiring musical collaboration

 africanews Live

Sky News live

CNA 24/7 LIVE

Roylab Stats [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Google News: COVID-19 resources

The New York Times:  The Morning, May 21, 2020

 Doctor Mike Hansen: 12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19

 TEDX: Marah J Hardt The quirky sex lives of ocean creatures, and TED-Ed Aaron Reedy Sex determination more complicated than you thought

 Colossal: Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 24, 2020

May 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 24, a look at how contact tracing works in the fight against the coronavirus, how the federal stimulus is providing alternatives to layoffs through a work-sharing agreement, and climate activism pivots online amid COVID-19 concerns. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show May 23, 2020

Streamed live 9 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, May 23, federal policy is driving some immigrants to drop their healthcare coverage in the middle of the outbreak, Brazil is on track to become the newest hotspot in the global coronavirus pandemic, and some tips for getting back together as social distancing restrictions loosen up in the United States. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 22, 2020

May 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Americans prepare for Memorial Day while mourning the 95,000 people lost to the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus: Beijing seeks to limit pro-democracy activity in Hong Kong, the debate over the origins of the novel coronavirus, testing for COVID-19 antibodies, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering COVID-19 victims and a lifesaving British water mill. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Americans prepare for a Memorial Day transformed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4gkK… News Wrap: Passenger jet crashes in Pakistan  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t_KS… China is proposing to limit Hong Kong’s autonomy. Why now? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMuVe… Why virus research is a tension point for the U.S., China https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z41Ul… What we know about COVID-19 antibodies — and what we don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4PSk… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s call to reopen, mail-in voting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iltfg… Remembering 5 more victims of the COVID-19 pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxDTI… This medieval mill is providing a British county with bread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J40lr… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 21, 2020

May 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the U.S. sees millions more jobless claims, although they appear to be plateauing. Plus: Modeling the spread of COVID-19 if Americans had locked down earlier, Gov. Ralph Northam on reopening Virginia, U.S. plans to withdraw from another nuclear treaty, pandemic implications for retail, the risks faced by transportation workers and Ask Us about coronavirus transmission. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. sees another 2.4 million jobless claims amid pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJNa4… New COVID-19 model shows why early action matters https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmZ27… News Wrap: Powerful cyclone batters India, Bangladesh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Emun2… Why Gov. Ralph Northam delayed reopening parts of Virginia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCHDD… U.S. cites Russian treaty violations as cause for withdrawal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7OLT… How the pandemic has pushed U.S. retail to brink of collapse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epl6e… Can transit workers be kept safe among crowds of passengers? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6MTU… A virologist answers questions on coronavirus transmission https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQHiT… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 20, 2020

May 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, all 50 states have begun lifting restrictions put in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. Plus: The firing of a State Department inspector general investigating Mike Pompeo, a cyclone slams India and Bangladesh, child deportations during COVID-19, Brazil’s coronavirus crisis, modeling infectious disease, government preparation for pandemic and trucking through COVID-19. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS All 50 states have now begun the process of reopening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrNbg… Pompeo says he didn’t know fired IG was investigating him https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lncVV… Strongest cyclone in a decade slams India, Bangladesh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfBJV… News Wrap: Record floodwaters in Michigan are still rising https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yfp1s… How Trump is leveraging COVID-19 to tighten immigration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWq0e… Brazil’s Lula slams Bolsonaro for downplaying coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPxDE… The value — and the limitations — of COVID-19 models https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLa97… Why U.S. federal government was unprepared for pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gIPe… A truck-driving couple on surviving COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YNEP… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 5,435,789 699 2,184,995 345,442
United States 1,684,273 5,111 346,492 98,169
Brazil 365,213 1,728 149,911 22,746
Russia 353,427 2,408 118,798 3,633
United Kingdom 259,559 3,907 36,793
Spain 235,823 5,007 150,376 28,773
Italy 230,158 3,820 141,981 32,877
Germany 180,523 2,171 162,648 8,389
Turkey 156,827 1,886 118,694 4,340
France 144,921 2,161 64,617 28,367
India 138,845 102 57,721 4,021
Iran 137,724 1,653 107,713 7,451
Peru 119,959 3,733 49,795 3,456
Canada 85,104 2,241 44,207 6,453
Mainland China 82,985 59 78,268 4,634
Chile 73,997 3,873 29,302 761
Mexico 68,620 542 47,424 7,394
Belgium 57,342 4,976 15,297 9,312
Pakistan 56,349 257 17,482 1,167
Netherlands 45,445 2,604 5,830
Ecuador 36,756 2,106 3,560 3,108
Sweden 33,843 3,275 4,971 4,029
Portugal 30,788 2,996 17,822 1,333
Switzerland 30,746 3,581 28,100 1,642
Ireland 24,698 5,018 21,060 1,608
Indonesia 22,750 85 5,642 1,391
Poland 21,631 564 9,276 1,007
Ukraine 21,245 507 7,234 623
Colombia 21,175 429 5,016 727
Romania 18,283 942 11,630 1,193
Egypt 17,265 172 4,807 764
Philippines 14,319 132 3,323 873
Argentina 12,063 268 3,719 452
Denmark 11,360 1,951 9,900 562
Algeria 8,503 198 4,747 609

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected  COVID-19 resources

 

The New York Times   The Morning  May 21, 2020

Good morning. Vaccine research is making progress. Chinese leaders have regained their swagger. And a new study shows the severe costs of delayed U.S. action on the virus.
Inaction that cost lives
By the final days of February, many public health experts were sounding the alarm about the coronavirus, and some people were listening.
In the San Francisco area, major employers began directing their employees to stay home. Washington State declared a state of emergency. South Korea, Vietnam and other countries ordered aggressive measures.
President Trump did not.
On Feb. 26, he said — incorrectly — that the number of cases was “going very substantially down, not up.” As late as March 10, he promised: “It will go away. Just stay calm. It will go away.”
Some local leaders also continued to urge business as usual. In early March, Mayor Bill de Blasio told New Yorkers to “get out on the town despite coronavirus.”
This kind of advice appears to have cost tens of thousands of American lives, according to a new analysis by researchers at Columbia University.
If the U.S. had enacted social-distancing measures a week earlier than it did — in early March rather than mid-March — about 36,000 fewer Americans would have died, the study found. That’s more than one third of the current death toll, which is about 100,000.
If the measures had been in place two weeks earlier, on March 1, the death toll would be 54,000 lower.

By The New York Times
These are hypothetical estimates, of course, and they’re unavoidably imprecise. But they are consistent with real-world evidence from places that responded to the virus more quickly, including San Francisco, Washington State, South Korea and Vietnam — where per capita deaths have been much lower than the U.S. average.
Jeffrey Shaman, the leader of the Columbia research team, told The Times: “It’s a big, big difference. That small moment in time, catching it in that growth phase, is incredibly critical in reducing the number of deaths.”
Related: Trump and some top White House officials are arguing that the reported virus death toll is overstated, The Times reports. Public health experts overwhelmingly reject this view.
A simple way to understand why experts believe the official count is actually understated: The number of Americans who have died in recent weeks is much higher than normal.
FOUR MORE BIG STORIES
1. Hope for a coronavirus vaccine
Developing a vaccine usually takes years, sometimes decades. Yet many scientists around the world are now cautiously optimistic that a coronavirus vaccine could be ready by next year. One sign of progress: Researchers published a report yesterday showing that a prototype vaccine protected monkeys from infection.
In other virus developments:
2. Flooding in Michigan after dams burst

Tittabawassee River in Midland, Mich.Gregory Shamus/Getty Images
Days of torrential rainfall breached two privately owned dams in Central Michigan yesterday, sending water surging at least 10 feet high and forcing thousands of people to evacuate their homes. The floodwaters flowed into a Dow Chemical complex and threatened a Superfund toxic-cleanup site, raising concerns of environmental fallout.
The evacuations complicate the state’s social-distancing efforts. “It’s hard to believe that we’re in the middle of a 100-year crisis, a global pandemic, and we’re also dealing with a flooding event that looks to be the worst in 500 years,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said.
3. Pompeo defends firing of watchdog
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo defended his recommendation for Trump to fire the State Department’s inspector general and denied the firing was retaliation for investigations into potential misuses of government resources by Pompeo and his wife, Susan.
NBC News reported this week that the Pompeos had used taxpayer money to pay for lavish dinners that included Fox News hosts, a NASCAR driver and the chairman of Chick-fil-A.
“Trump’s purge of inspectors general is unprecedented,” Jen Kirby writes in a Vox article explaining the history and role of the job.
When a mask makes a statement

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on Capitol Hill in Washington.Erin Schaff/The New York Times
For public figures including Emmanuel Macron and Ivanka Trump, the act of wearing a mask — or not wearing one — has become political. Nowhere is this more visible than in Nancy Pelosi’s color-coordinated facial wardrobe, Vanessa Friedman, The Times’s fashion critic, writes.

12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19

May 14, 2020  Doctor Mike Hansen

This is the link to the main study in this video: https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.73… 12 Autopsy Cases Reveal TRUTH About How Patients Die From Coronavirus | COVID-19 #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19 Coronavirus | COVID-19 YouTube Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… In all 12 cases, the cause of death was found within the lungs or the pulmonary vascular system. For the ones who did not die of large pulmonary emboli, they died of the extensive inflammation within the lungs, meaning pneumonia with ARDS. In these cases, the lungs were wet and heavy, much like a sponge that is saturated with water. The surfaces of the lung often had a distinct patchy pattern, with pale areas alternating with slightly protruding and firm, deep reddish-blue hypercapillarized areas. This is indicative of areas of intense inflammation, with endothelial dysfunction that can be seen at the microscopic level. When they look at slices of the lungs under the microscope, they found diffuse alveolar damage in 8 cases. Specifically, they saw hyaline membrane formation, and tiny clots in the capillaries, and capillaries that were engorged with red blood cells, and other inflammatory findings. All these findings represent ARDS. They also found lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, infiltrated these areas of infiltration. This fits the picture of viral pathogenesis. They also looked at the pharynx of these patients, meaning in their throat. The lining of the throat, or mucosa, was hyperemic, meaning very red and irritated, and at the microscopic level, they saw lymphocytes invading there, which is consistent with a viral infection. In one case, a patient had lymphocytes invade his heart muscle, findings that are consistent with what we call viral myocarditis. More than half of the patients in this study had large blood clots. One-third of the patients had pulmonary embolism as the direct cause of death. All the others died of intense inflammation in their lungs related to pneumonia with ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome). Recently there’s been studies showing that about 1/3rd of patients with severe COVID have blood clots. Another study of 191 patients with coronavirus aka COVID-19, half of those who died had clots, compared with 7% of survivors. And levels of D-dimer that were greater than 1000 µg/L were associated with a fatal outcome. So it’s pretty clear now that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is causing a lot of clots to form in moderate to severe COVID disease. How is this happening? It’s likely a combination of reasons, that has to do with downregulation of the ACE2 receptor in the lung alveoli, with a subsequent shift towards having more angiotensin II in the lungs, and less angiotensin 1-7 and 1-9 in the lungs, and when this happens, this leads to more cytokine storm with more inflammation, more constriction of pulmonary arteries, and more clots that develop. That, in turn, leads to more endothelial dysfunction in the capillaries that surround the alveoli. Also, there is evidence that the virus attaches to the ACE2 receptors of those endothelial cells that line those capillaries, which further propagates inflammation and clotting. And in the cytokine storm that develops there, RANTES, a chemokine, binds to the CCR5 receptor of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, and that causes those lymphocytes to infiltrate those areas of inflammation, and in doing so, further contributes towards the inflammatory reaction. This is why we are seeing low levels of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in severe COVID. Endothelial damage can also lead to the development of antiphospholipid antibodies, and these antibodies are bad because they trigger the formation of blood clots. That’s why patients who have clots with the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome need to be on blood thinners. Also, 11 out of the 12 patients in this study had underlying heart disease and were obese. These are known risk factors not just for cardiovascular disease, but also known risk factors for endothelial dysfunction, and are known risk factors for COVID. So the big takeaways from the findings in this study are that most people who die of COVID, it’s primarily a lung problem. Either related to inflammation with ARDS and/or blood clots. Antiphospholipid syndrome might be a commonality among patients with thrombosis in COVID-19 patients. Dr. Mike Hansen, MD Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine Website: https://doctormikehansen.com/ Instagram Account: http://instagram.com/doctor.hansen/ #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19

Category  Education

The ocean plays host to a peculiar party of wild, marine sex life that’s perhaps quirkier (and kinkier) than you can fathom. But is human behavior interrupting these raunchy reproductive acts? Take a deep dive with marine biologist Marah J. Hardt to discover what exactly goes down under the sea — and why your own wellness depends on the healthy sex lives of fish.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMileHigh, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Marah J. Hardt · Marine scientist and storyteller

Marah J. Hardt keeps one foot wet in the field while the other wanders the crossroads of science, storytelling and strategy.

MORE RESOURCES

Sex in the Sea

Marah J. Hardt

St Martin’s Press (2016)

TAKE ACTION  LEARN

Find out the many ways we can help make the oceans more sex-friendly.

Learn more ?  ABOUT TEDX

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Find a TEDx event near you ?

From something as small and complex as a chromosome to something as seemingly simple as the weather, sex determination systems vary significantly across the animal kingdom. Biologist and teacher Aaron Reedy shows us the amazing differences between species when it comes to determination of gender. [Directed by Buzzco Associates, Inc., narrated by Aaron Reedy].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Aaron Reedy · Teacher

Aaron Reedy teaches at Thomas Kelly High School in Chicago, where he uses innovative projects to connect his classroom to the wider world of science.

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

How Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Songs of Comfort’ are inspiring musical collaboration

May 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The ‘Songs of Comfort’ project world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma launched on social media continues to expand in new directions. Jeffrey Brown looks at the growing collaboration in these mini performances, as tough times bring people together through music — and technology. It’s part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. Editor’s note: For the record,  one of the talented musicians shown in this piece singing harmony with herself is NewsHour producer Ali Rogin, at 3:11. Thanks to all of the performers for sharing with us. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

Fierce Feathered Portraits of Brooding Birds by Josie Morway

MAY 29, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Artist Josie Morway creates fierce portraits of wildlife set in abstracted apocalyptic environments and interspersed with geometric linework, colorful paint drips, and mysterious Latin text. Morway often features birds in her oil and enamel paintings, using the graceful shapes of the animals’ elongated necks and sweeping wings to draw the viewer’s eye around the artwork. Many of Morway’s works also interweave plants: ferns, succulents, and blossoming flowers emerge from around her animal subjects’ bodies.

The artist shares with Colossal that the Latin lettering that embellishes some of her paintings is heavily abstracted from old mottos. “I don’t mean for them to be read too literally, but rather hope they lend a certain feeling of portentousness to the pieces,” Morway explains. “I like referencing religious icon paintings and other forms of ‘serious’ historic painting, but using animals and birds in the place of saints, etc. I’m going for the feeling of narrative realism, but working with a narrative that’s mysterious, missing some information, open to the viewer’s interpretation.”

Morway will have a piece on view at Antler Gallery in Portland starting June 9, 2018, as part of PDX/LAX II, a collaborative exhibit with Los Angeles gallery Thinkspace Projects, as well as a two person show in October. You can also find her work in Australia at Beinart Gallery’s group show starting July 13. The artist shares updates on her work via Instagram.

This is the first large pink rose bloom in our garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA.  No matter how many unpleasant events happen in this world, if we are cultivating the garden, nature will always give us happiness.  I was trapped in our apartment for two months and thirteen days, due to COVIT-19 (Corona-virus).  But when I see flowers blooming in our garden, I feel more lively seeing the freshness and beauty comes alive.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, May 25, 2020

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, The New York Times, and BoredPanda

PBS News: May 15 – 19, 2020

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories, and Autopsies reveal: Coronavirus is more than a lung infection | COVID-19 Special

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The New York Times:   The Morning May 20, 2020 and A drive-by art show

BoredPanda: 10-Year-Old Designs A Plastic Curtain to Be Able to Hug Her Grandparents Safely During Quarantine

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 19, 2020

May 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Senate is divided over when to provide additional coronavirus aid — and to whom. Plus: Sens. Pat Toomey and Sherrod Brown on federal pandemic relief, California Gov. Gavin Newsom on COVID-19 trends in his state, coronavirus infections surge in Russia, grappling with COVID-19 in the most vulnerable facilities, and a NewsHour Bookshelf choice that seems to echo reality. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Senate divided over providing more coronavirus relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVxqS… Sen. Toomey on the need to get Americans back to work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=to4Zz… Sen. Brown on the risk of new workplace COVID-19 outbreaks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeRaN… News Wrap: India, Bangladesh brace for tropical cyclone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JgI5… Newsom: Calif. reopening based on ‘evidence, not ideology’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hElKa… In Russia, doctors treating COVID-19 pay a deadly price https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fmEJ… COVID-19 highlights systemic flaws of U.S. nursing homes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83cew… Lawrence Wright’s prescient novel about a global pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3zcK… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 18, 2020

May 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces he is taking a controversial drug unproven to treat COVID-19 as more states lift their restrictions. Plus: How U.S.-China tensions are affecting the global pandemic response, a medical view of when and how to reopen, the firing of a State Department watchdog, college admissions tests during COVID-19, Politics Monday and singing the pandemic blues. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS As states reopen, Trump says he’s taking hydroxychloroquine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUeDj… U.S.-China tensions take center stage at WHO summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRyp6… News Wrap: FBI says Pensacola gunman tied to al-Qaida https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pzF9… How to apply lessons from health care workers to daily life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZ1Yy… Trump’s ‘highly unusual’ politicization of government IGs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYnfi… What does COVID-19 mean for college admissions? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFwqm… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Obama speaking out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGsD7… Why this blues musician is now playing for an audience of 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUNg9… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 17, 2020

May 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 17, more stay-at-home orders are lifted and businesses start to reopen, concerns over COVID-19 as the Keystone pipeline construction continues, children’s literary titles reimagined for pandemic times, and a Chicago photographer captures the faces behind shuttered businesses. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 16, 2020

May 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, May 16, several states ease restrictions on businesses and public life, and how the pandemic is complicating the hard-fought voting rights for former felons. Also, a rare visit to Rose Atoll in American Samoa where scientists are studying the impact of climate change. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 15, 2020

May 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. House considers another round of coronavirus relief, but it could face major opposition. Plus: An inflammatory response in some children exposed to COVID-19, Bangladesh braces for the pandemic, investigating sexual assault allegations against former Vice President Joe Biden, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, in memoriam and messages for graduates. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump vows return to business, ‘vaccine or no vaccine’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4QCL… News Wrap: Khalilzad blames hospital attack on Islamic State https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMeq7… Why do some kids develop inflammatory response to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbk50… Bangladesh confronts dual challenges of poverty, pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6j5i… What we learned about Biden’s Senate offices in the 1990s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrKNA… Shields and Brooks on Tara Reade allegations, Burr probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=344Oi… Mourning 5 people killed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mba1s… Commencement messages for graduates in an age of uncertainty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5yHF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube

channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 4,931,057 634 1,710,337 324,240
United States 1,559,750 4,733 297,628 92,333
Russia 308,705 2,104 85,392 2,972
Brazil 275,382 1,303 106,794 18,130
United Kingdom 248,293 3,737 35,704
Spain 232,555 4,937 150,376 27,888
Italy 227,364 3,774 132,282 32,330
Germany 177,827 2,139 155,614 8,193
Turkey 152,587 1,835 113,987 4,222
France 143,845 2,145 63,354 28,132
Iran 126,949 1,523 98,808 7,183
India 106,750 78 42,298 3,303
Peru 99,483 3,096 36,524 2,914
Mainland China 82,965 59 78,244 4,634
Canada 80,081 2,109 40,670 6,027
Saudi Arabia 59,854 1,749 31,634 329
Belgium 55,983 4,858 14,847 9,150
Mexico 54,346 429 37,325 5,666
Chile 53,616 2,806 22,504 544
Pakistan 45,898 209 13,101 985
Netherlands 44,447 2,547 5,748
Qatar 35,606 12,960 5,634 15
Ecuador 34,151 1,956 3,433 2,839
Belarus 32,426 3,445 11,415 179
Sweden 31,523 3,051 4,971 3,831
Switzerland 30,618 3,566 27,700 1,614
Portugal 29,432 2,864 6,431 1,247
Singapore 29,364 5,148 11,207 22
Bangladesh 25,121 149 4,993 370
United Arab Emirates 25,063 2,534 10,791 227
Ireland 24,315 4,941 19,470 1,571
Poland 19,569 510 7,903 953
Ukraine 19,230 459 5,955 564
Indonesia 19,189 72 4,575 1,242
Romania 17,387 896 10,356 1,141
South Africa 17,200 293 7,960 312
Colombia 16,935 343 4,050 613
Kuwait 16,764 3,793 4,681 121
Israel 16,650 1,814 13,299 277
Japan 16,433 130 12,286 784

Source:Wikipedia·  About this data  Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Autopsies reveal: Coronavirus is more than a lung infection | COVID-19 Special

May 15, 2020  DW News

Coronavirus is more than just a lung infection. From the first known instance of Covid-19 nearly half a year ago in the Chinese city of Wuhan medical scientists are still learning all the ways the virus can cause harm. A research team at New York’s Irving Medical Center says it has never seen so many extreme, abnormal cases. In a new study, scientists say that thromboses and pulmonary embolisms were frequently found in the deceased, something intensive care medics have already suspected. Intensive care medics from China, North America, and Europe are seeing more and more thromboses caused by blood clots. These blood clots are not just dangerous for a patient’s limbs. They can break away and affect the lungs, the heart, or the brain in the form of pulmonary embolisms, heart attacks, or strokes. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts…

Category  News & Politics

The New York Times   The Morning May 20, 2020
By David Leonhardt

 

Good morning. Virus cases are surging in France and Iran. The U.S. is deporting children. And colleges are reopening. Let’s start with the debate over stimulus.
A struggling stimulus program
There have clearly been problems with the business loan programs in the federal government’s coronavirus stimulus.
Many companies, especially small businesses, have struggled to get loans. And in a high-profile hearing yesterday, several senators criticized Jerome Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, for those problems.
More quietly, though, there also seems to be a growing recognition in Congress — among members of both parties — that the execution of the stimulus program hasn’t been the main problem. The design of the program has been.
Much of the rest of the world — including Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Germany and South Korea — has followed one strategy on coronavirus stimulus. Governments have temporarily paid the salaries of workers in order to prevent millions of layoffs.
The United States has taken a different path. It created a complicated mix of different stimulus policies, including loans to businesses and checks for families. This approach doesn’t appear to be working: The U.S. has had a sharper rise in unemployment than other countries. Many jobless Americans have also lost their health insurance — in the midst of a pandemic.
Now Congress may be on the verge of changing its approach.
The stimulus bill that House Democrats passed last week includes a new paycheck subsidy program, similar to those in other countries. For businesses that have lost substantial revenue, it would cover — as grants, not loans — as much as 80 percent of payroll costs, up to $60,000 per worker in annual salary. The policy would be expensive, yet still cheaper than the previous stimulus plans.
The bill is only one sign of the idea’s growing popularity. Yesterday, almost 100 House Democrats introduced a more ambitious version of the program. And senators across the ideological spectrum — from Josh Hawley (a Missouri Republican) on the right to Doug Jones (an Alabama Democrat) in the center to Bernie Sanders (you know who he is) on the left — are pushing their own versions of the plans.
Janet Yellen, the former Fed chair, has praised the idea as a “smart, quick and effective way to channel aid to workers through their firms.”
It’s still not clear what will happen. Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, continues to speak skeptically about the need for any further stimulus. Regardless, any bill is likely to be more diffuse and complex than the approach of other countries, and any paycheck subsidy is likely to be less ambitious.
But the U.S. may soon be moving in the direction of those other countries.
FOUR MORE BIG STORIES
1.              Spikes in new virus cases in Iran and France
A crowded street in Tehran.Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times
Two countries are facing challenges after starting to reopen. French authorities shut some schools just a week after many students returned because of a spike in new cases. France’s education minister said that some new cases were “inevitable” and added, “The consequences of not going back to school are much more serious.”
In Iran, weeks after leaders began easing coronavirus restrictions to help the economy, cases are spiking in eight provinces. Health experts attributed the resurgence to the country’s reopening before cases were consistently falling and before Iran had established widespread testing and contact tracing.
A long read: When you have some extra time, I recommend a New Yorker article, by Dexter Filkins, on Iran. It’s a good way to understand the broader political turmoil there.
In the U.S.: As of today, all 50 states have reopened to some degree. The rules vary widely.
2. The U.S. is deporting children
American authorities have deported hundreds of migrant children and teenagers, without giving them the opportunity to speak to a social worker or to plead for asylum, The Times’s Caitlin Dickerson reports. Some children are being deported in the middle of night, without their families being notified.
In expelling the children, the Trump administration is abandoning protections that both Democratic and Republican presidents have granted to young migrants for decades. Federal officials are justifying the practices under a 1944 law that grants the president broad power to prevent the “serious threat” of a dangerous disease.
Live music lives on

Travis McCready on stage during the first socially-distanced concert in Ft. Smith, Ark.Kevin Mazur/Getty Images
On Monday, fans of the country musician Travis McCready experienced the nation’s first live concert in months. Some drove for hours to attend the Arkansas show, where they had their temperatures taken and wore masks. Four of every five seats were kept empty. The show offered a preview of what live music might look like for the foreseeable future.

BoredPanda:10-Year-Old Designs A Plastic Curtain To Be Able To Hug Her Grandparents Safely During Quarantine

Andželika Jasevi?i?t?   BoredPanda staff

To protect our loved ones from COVID-19, especially those who are in the risk group, we are forced to keep a distance from them. This means that we cannot even visit them for a brief minute and must refrain from hugs and kisses. However, we all know that nothing feels better than a hug from your grandparents, so a smart girl from Riverside created a walkaround.

This 10-year-old girl couldn’t wait for social distancing to end so she could hug her grandparents

After seeing a video of someone making a blanket that intended to allow people to give hugs to their family members while keeping them safe from the coronavirus, the 10-year-old girl, Paige, got an idea.

So she decided to create a curtain that allows to safely embrace them

She decided to construct a safe curtain that has sleeves to allow two people to hug each other.

With this creation, Paige and other family members were able to embrace each other without the threat of the virus.

Watch the video of the beautiful moment

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A Drive-By Art Show Turns Lawns and Garages Into Galleries

The outdoor exhibition on Long Island featured works installed at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, with social isolation as just one theme.

Paintings by Darius Yektai were part of the “Drive-By-Art” event. Its organizer, Warren Neidich, said the show grew out of the question: “How do we show empathy and solidarity in this new age?”Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

By Stacey Stowe  May 11, 2020

No one was supposed to get too close to each other over the weekend during a drive-by exhibition of works by 52 artists on the South Fork of Long Island — a dose of culture amid the sterile isolation imposed by the pandemic. But some people couldn’t help themselves.

“At least this one looks like art,” said one man, as he stepped out of a convertible BMW onto the driveway of a rustic home in Sag Harbor on Saturday. He and two others examined the paintings, a cheeky homage to old masters by Darius Yektai that were affixed to two-by-fours nailed to trees. “Not like the other stuff.”

“The other stuff” was on display on the lawns, porches, driveways and garage doors at properties from Hampton Bays to Montauk, some from prominent artists and others by those lesser known. On a windy, blue-skied weekend, most people drove but others came on foot or by bicycle for the show, “Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing).”

Sabina Streeter, in Sag Harbor, preparing for the show on the South Fork. She also had elegant portraits on her porch.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

The exhibition was conceived by Warren Neidich, an artist and theorist who lives in Los Angeles and Berlin. He has also planned a drive-by exhibition in Los Angeles for Memorial Day weekend.

“How do we show empathy and solidarity in this new age that is lacking in emotional solidarity?” asked Mr. Neidich, who put the show together in less than three weeks while living in a Wainscott cottage. “I was feeling a need to find a way to revisit and create a new vocabulary.”

The exhibition had a homespun air. Its signs, on thin yellow paper, sometimes pointed in the wrong direction. The map on the website lacked some detail; there was at least one mistaken address. But people showed up, some wearing masks, some not, in muddy pickup trucks and shiny S.U.V.s, sports cars and Subarus, snaking past the properties and looking, for a change, at something other than a television or computer screen.

The sculptor Monica Banks winked at the signature hedges of the Hamptons with “Brains in Our Arms,”  steel wool octopuses positioned in her own hedge.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Jeremy Dennis’s “Destinations,” wood silhouettes with photocopied images of Disney World, the Eiffel Tower, and the meeting of Elvis and President Richard M. Nixon.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Eric Fischl’s life-size sculptures of nymphs, titled “Young Dancers Dancing,” amid a grove of trees at his home in Sag Harbor.Credit…Eric Fischl/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY; Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

The artists included Jeremy Dennis, with a tart commentary on pop culture and politics with wood silhouettes papered over with images, like one of a meeting of Elvis and President Richard M. Nixon; the sculptor Monica Banks, whose work winked at the signature hedges of the Hamptons; and Joe Brondo, an interdisciplinary artist, who positioned three glowing orbs on the lawn of his East Hampton home. Under a chandelier strung from a tree, Dianne Blell presented “Table for Two/Separate Tables,” with furniture set for a spaced-apart restaurant meal, and in the same vein, Toni Ross and her daughter Sara Salaway positioned folding chairs along a fence in Wainscott, with dates and words, making a calendar of social isolation.

Stripped of the imprimatur of a gallery wall or an august museum setting, the works stood alone for better or worse. Eric Fischl’s life-size sculptures of nymphs dancing were amplified by a grove of trees in light leaf at his home in Sag Harbor, while a lone piece of driftwood propped on a driveway and painted by Joan Jonas to mark off six feet stood forlornly.

Bastienne Schmidt with her work “Grids and Threads” (2020), which has stakes six feet apart. She and her husband, Philippe Cheng, participated in the show.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

Mr. Cheng, working on “AirMail,” in the “Drive-By-Art” event.Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

There was spontaneous interaction. The artist Bastienne Schmidt, dressed in a bright blue pea coat and red pants, waved to those who checked out her installation of canvas-wrapped posts set six feet apart at the Bridgehampton home she shares with her husband, the photographer Philippe Cheng. Kathryn McGraw Berry, an architect sampling the tour in a champagne-colored Audi, chatted with Eric Dever, who was checking the wind resistance of his 12 paintings mounted on posts at his 18th-century Water Mill home.

“It’s nice seeing one’s work in the landscape when you’ve been cooped up in the house,” Mr. Dever said. “I grew up in Southern California so I appreciate the drive-through idea.”

Eric Dever’s “Áquas de Março (Waters of March).” “It’s nice seeing one’s work in the landscape when you’ve been cooped up in the house,” he said. Credit…Bryan Derballa for The New York Times

At the East Hampton home of Suzanne Anker, an artist who established the Bio-Art Laboratory at the School of Visual Arts in New York, three illuminated, galvanized boxes of seedlings sat atop pedestals. The boxes are part of a series of 31 to create part of the light process that produces photosynthesis in plants.

She said she participated in the drive-by show to give people something to do while cultural institutions have been shut down. “It’s a unique treasure trove where you follow the clues, see the art and see where artists live,” she said. “There is a whole diversity of places and the kind of intimacy that you don’t typically get to experience.”

 

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PBS News: May 4 – 8, 2020, and Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Scientific America: Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

TED Talks: Dianna Cohen Tough truths about plastic pollution, and Melati and Isabel Wijsen Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The New York Times: The Morning

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

DailyTop10s: This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

 Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 8, 2020

May 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, as U.S. unemployment rises to its highest level since the Great Depression, more states let businesses reopen. Plus: How the government can address the economic crisis, COVID-19 in the American West, Pulitzer honors for local news, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the pandemic, the 75th anniversary of VE-Day and flowers for the sick. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Can states reopen their economies safely? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycq4J… Why U.S. economic crisis is even worse than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6O8E… News Wrap: Suspects in Ahmaud Arbery killing appear in court https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oysat… The western U.S. counties COVID-19 has barely reached https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_ZKk… 2 Pulitzer winners on the changing landscape of local news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyhS1… Shields and Brooks on DOJ politics, Trump’s economic hopes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITSQU… Remembering Americans lost to the coronavirus pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzKKN… What these World War II veterans remember most about VE-Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ4Rl… How this Calif. artist is sharing ‘Flowers for Sick People’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMjO1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 7, 2020

May 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, facing lost tax revenue and budget shortfalls, more U.S. states start to reopen. Plus: The Justice Department wants to drop the case against Michael Flynn, a public health expert on U.S. testing for COVID-19, Americans lose health insurance along with their jobs, pandemic in India, outcry over Ahmaud Arbery’s death and Ask Us questions about working during the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Pandemic’s economic damage spreads to all corners of U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-ZK6… Why does DOJ want to drop its case against Michael Flynn? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMBqP… News Wrap: Supreme Court overturns ‘Bridgegate’ convictions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szGZi… Public health expert fears states are reopening too soon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dj1hZ… For many Americans, layoff means loss of health insurance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw1vx… How COVID-19 is inflaming India’s religious tensions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Q3i… Ahmaud Arbery’s shooting a ‘hate crime,’ says his father https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3STD… Viewer questions about workplace safety during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaCWf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 6, 2020

May 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, more countries lift pandemic restrictions in the face of historic economic loss. Plus: Outcry over a black man’s shooting death in Georgia, the Supreme Court hears major cases remotely, the political battle over funding states and cities, South Dakota Sen. John Thune on pandemic response, new rules around campus sexual assault, COVID-19 in conflict zones and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The new life emerging after pandemic restrictions expire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XG2R… News Wrap: New reports of pandemic fallout in North Korea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=866PE… Video appearing to show Ahmaud Arbery killing sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFmsd… 2 major cases come before a Supreme Court operating remotely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsX2p… State, local workers: Federal aid not ‘a red or blue issue’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XEB-… Sen. Thune on funding states, PPP and safety in the Senate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8y0h… What Trump’s Title IX rules mean for survivors, the accused https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooa3… Are people in medical crisis avoiding ER due to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7y0z… In Libya and Yemen war zones, COVID-19 adds a 2nd front https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwPsE… Southwest Airlines CEO on ‘worst economic environment’ ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01M7E… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 5, 2020

May 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump makes his first cross-country trip since the pandemic took hold of American life. Plus: Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on reopening his state, when critical COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter, the global competition for scarce protective medical gear, what the pandemic means for mental health, high mortality for British people of color and quarantine DIY. Correction: Due to an editing error in Malcolm Brabant’s segment on the United Kingdom, we incorrectly said that country was now second to the United States in per capita rate of deaths due to COVID-19. The UK is second in total deaths to the United States, per official counts. The NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Traveling to Arizona, Trump dismisses new death projections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXe0x… News Wrap: DNI pick Ratcliffe vows to avoid political bias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lra6W… Gov. Asa Hutchinson on he’s ready to reopen Arkansas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Bx8F… When lifesaving COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vCuA… Why the U.S. has struggled to source enough PPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0Dh7… The ominous impact of COVID-19 on American mental health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLYiM… An intimate portrait of a British family’s COVID-19 loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rJdU… Stuck at home, some Americans are mastering new skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deZal… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Apr 21, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

An investigation into the U.S. response to COVID-19, from Washington State to Washington, D.C. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate How did the U.S. become the country with the worst known coronavirus outbreak in the world? FRONTLINE and veteran science reporter Miles O’Brien investigate the American response to COVID-19, and examine what happens when politics and science collide. #Coronavirus #Documentary #COVID-19 Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,955,984 509 1,319,306 275,188
United States 1,318,289 4,000 182,930 78,244
Spain 223,578 4,747 133,952 26,478
Italy 217,185 3,605 99,023 30,201
United Kingdom 211,364 3,181 31,241
Russia 198,676 1,354 31,916 1,827
Germany 170,588 2,052 138,214 7,510
Brazil 145,894 690 59,297 10,017
France 138,421 2,064 55,782 26,230
Turkey 135,569 1,630 86,396 3,689
Iran 104,691 1,256 83,837 6,541
China 82,887 59 78,046 4,633
Canada 66,434 1,749 30,226 4,569
Peru 61,847 1,925 19,012 1,714
India 59,662 44 17,847 1,981

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/stopping-deforestation-can-prevent-pandemics/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=earth&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-05-06_top-stories&spMailingID=64678544&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1880744581&spReportId=MTg4MDc0NDU4MQS2

Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

By THE EDITORS on May 1, 2020

Credit: Taylor Callery

SARS, Ebola and now SARS-CoV-2: all three of these highly infectious viruses have caused global panic since 2002—and all three of them jumped to humans from wild animals that live in dense tropical forests.

Three quarters of the emerging pathogens that infect humans leaped from animals, many of them creatures in the forest habitats that we are slashing and burning to create land for crops, including biofuel plants, and for mining and housing. The more we clear, the more we come into contact with wildlife that carries microbes well suited to kill us—and the more we concentrate those animals in smaller areas where they can swap infectious microbes, raising the chances of novel strains. Clearing land also reduces biodiversity, and the species that survive are more likely to host illnesses that can be transferred to humans. All these factors will lead to more spillover of animal pathogens into people.

Stopping deforestation will not only reduce our exposure to new disasters but also tamp down the spread of a long list of other vicious diseases that have come from rain forest habitats—Zika, Nipah, malaria, cholera and HIV among them. A 2019 study found that a 10 percent increase in deforestation would raise malaria cases by 3.3 percent; that would be 7.4 million people worldwide. Yet despite years of global outcry, deforestation still runs rampant. An average of 28 million hectares of forest have been cut down annually since 2016, and there is no sign of a slowdown.

Societies can take numerous steps to prevent the destruction. Eating less meat, which physicians say will improve our health anyway, will lessen demand for crops and pastures. Eating fewer processed foods will reduce the demand for palm oil—also a major feedstock for biofuels—much of which is grown on land clear-cut from tropical rain forests. The need for land also will ease if nations slow population growth—something that can happen in developing nations only if women are given better education, equal social status with men and easy access to affordable contraceptives.

Producing more food per hectare can boost supply without the need to clear more land. Developing crops that better resist drought will help, especially as climate change brings longer, deeper droughts. In dry regions of Africa and elsewhere, agroforestry techniques such as planting trees among farm fields can increase crop yields. Reducing food waste could also vastly lessen the pressure to grow more; 30 to 40 percent of all food produced is wasted.

As we implement these solutions, we can also find new outbreaks earlier. Epidemiologists want to tiptoe into wild habitats and test mammals known to carry coronaviruses—bats, rodents, badgers, civets, pangolins and monkeys—to map how the germs are moving. Public health officials could then test nearby humans. To be effective, though, this surveillance must be widespread and well funded. In September 2019, just months before the COVID-19 pandemic began, the U.S. Agency for International Development announced it would end funding for PREDICT, a 10-year effort to hunt for threatening microbes that found more than 1,100 unique viruses. USAID says it will launch a new surveillance program; we urge it to supply enough money this time to cast a wider and stronger net.

In the meantime, governments should prohibit the sale of live wild animals in so-called wet markets, where pathogens have repeatedly crossed over into humans. The markets may be culturally important, but the risk is too great. Governments must also crack down on illegal wildlife trade, which can spread infectious agents far and wide. In addition, we have to examine factory farms that pack thousands of animals together—the source of the 2009 swine flu outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people in the U.S. and multitudes worldwide.

Ending deforestation and thwarting pandemics would address six of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals: the guarantee of healthy lives, zero hunger, gender equality, responsible consumption and production, sustainably managed land, and climate action (intact tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide, whereas burning them sends more CO2 into the atmosphere).

The COVID-19 pandemic is a catastrophe, but it can rivet our attention on the enormous payoffs that humanity can achieve by not overexploiting the natural world. Pandemic solutions are sustainability solutions.

Read more about the coronavirus outbreak here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

THE EDITORS

Recent Articles

Artist Dianna Cohen shares some tough truths about plastic pollution in the ocean and in our lives — and some thoughts on how to free ourselves from the plastic gyre.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dianna Cohen · Artist and activist

Dianna Cohen co-founded the Plastic Pollution Coalition, which is working to help end our cycle of plastics use.

Mission Blue Voyage | April 2010

Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they’re used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts — including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike — paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. “Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’re too young or you won’t understand,” Isabel says to other aspiring activists. “We’re not telling you it’s going to be easy. We’re telling you it’s going to be worth it.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melati and Isabel Wijsen · Activists

Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to ban plastic bags in Bali.

TEDGlobal>London | September 2015

The New York Times    The Morning      May 7, 2020

By David Leonhardt

Good morning. We’ve made some changes to this newsletter, and we welcome any feedback you have.
More kids are going hungry. States are reopening without a declining number of coronavirus cases. And mom and dad disagree about who’s doing the home schooling. Let’s start with President Trump’s climate agenda.
Dismantling the rules

A coal-fired generating station in Sidney, Mont. Janie Osborne for The New York Times

This newsletter will often start with coronavirus news. And you’ll always find plenty of news about it below. But the virus isn’t the only story we’re going to cover in depth.
Today, we’re going to start with another one of the world’s vital stories: the battle over climate policy.
Shortly after taking office, President Trump and congressional Republicans found an innovative way to reduce business regulations, one of their top policy priorities. They began using a 1996 law — called the Congressional Review Act, and rarely used before — that allowed them to reverse rules enacted by the Obama administration in its final few months.
Now that Trump’s first term is winding down, administration officials realize that the same law could undo some of their policies — if the Democrats win in November. So the administration has been hurrying to finish as many regulations as possible this spring, to make sure they are not vulnerable to reversal under the Review Act.
And the administration has been particularly focused on the environment. As Nadja Popovich, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Kendra Pierre-Louis of The Times report: Trump’s drive to dismantle major climate and environmental policies is now mostly complete.
This agenda, Trump and his aides say, helped to speed up economic growth (before the coronavirus lockdown) by giving companies more flexibility to behave as they want. Many climate and health experts counter that the rule changes are leading to more pollution-related illnesses and are accelerating climate change.
The Times, working with academic researchers, has created a graphic with all 64 of Trump’s environmental rollbacks, as well as an additional 34 in progress. Among the areas where rules have been loosened:
  • vehicle pollution
  • power-plant emissions
  • braking systems on trains hauling flammable liquids
  • dumping of coal-mining debris into streams
  • chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to developmental disabilities in children
  • species endangered by climate change
The larger debate: The Times editorial board has argued that Trump’s policy “imperils the planet,” while National Review has praised Trump for pursuing “American dominance in energy production.”
1. More kids are going hungry
A food distribution center in Queens.Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
The coronavirus pandemic is creating a hunger crisis: More than 17 percent of young children in the United States lack sufficient food, according to research — a rate three times higher than during the worst of the Great Recession.
The most likely explanations are the rise in unemployment and the interruption in school meal programs. “I’ve eaten a lot less just to make sure they get what they need,” said one Ohio woman, who is trying to make $170 in monthly food stamps go far enough to feed her grandchildren.
Here’s what else is happening

Ian Prasad Philbrick, Lara Takenaga, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com.

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

https://inhabitat.com/inspiring-rammed-earth-hospital-brings-affordable-care-to-rural-nepal/

written by Lucy Wang  on April 28,2020

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

An inspiring beacon of humanitarian architecture has arrived to one of the poorest and most remote regions of Nepal — the new Bayalpata Hospital in Accham. Opened earlier this month to replace an aged and overrun clinic, the new hospital is a model of sustainable rural health made possible through a collaboration between the government of Nepal and NGO Possible Health. New York City-based Sharon Davis Design crafted the 7.5-acre campus, which is built primarily from locally sourced rammed earth and powered by rooftop solar panels. oearth and powered by rooftop solar panels.

Located on a hilltop surrounded by the terraced slopes of the Seti River Valley, the new Bayalpata Hospital is expected to provide low-cost, high-quality care to more than 100,000 patients a year from Accham and its six surrounding districts — a number that’s more than eight times its original capacity. The hospital comprises five medical buildings with outpatient, inpatient, surgery, antenatal and emergency facilities for 70 beds as well as clinical functions such as pharmacy, radiology and laboratory spaces. The campus also includes an administration block for offices, a 60-seat cafeteria and 10 single-family houses plus an eight-bedroom dormitory to house the hospital staff and their families.

Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal”

Because of the site’s remote and mountainous location, the hospital is primarily built from rammed earth using a low-tech construction method and local labor. Soil from the site was mixed with 6% cement content for stabilization and seismic resistance. This mixture was then formed into blocks with reusable plastic formwork and set atop foundations constructed from local stone, which was also used for pathways and retaining walls.

Local Sal wood was used for built-in furniture, exterior doors and louvers. In addition to the thermal mass of the massive rammed earth walls, passive heating and cooling design strategies were used to keep the hospital comfortable year-round. The campus also includes a new water supply and storage, wastewater treatment facilities and bioswales to manage monsoon-driven erosion. The hospital’s south-facing roofs are topped with a grid-connected 100 kW photovoltaic array that is powerful enough to generate all of the campus’ electricity needs.

“We see this project as a model of how rammed earth, and other vernacular materials, can be utilized to create modern architecture,” said Sharon Davis, principal of Sharon Davis Design. “Without local materials, this project may not have been possible because of its incredibly remote location — a 10-hour drive from the nearest regional airport and a three-day drive on narrow, mountainous roads from the nearest manufacturing centers around Kathmandu.”

+ Sharon Davis Design

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

Aug 6, 2019  DailyTop10s

The world is home to thousands of species of caterpillars, and some of them are very unique indeed. These are the strangest caterpillars on the planet! DailyTop10s brings you fun and informative top ten lists in a variety of different topics. Join us and sub for regular posts. If you have a top ten topic you’d like us to do make a video on, let us know in the comments! We usually focus on top tens that bring educational / informational value to the viewer. Thanks for watching DailyTop10s!

Category  Entertainment

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015  Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Copyright Dominique Lalonde Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, Africanews, Sky News, CAN, Roylab Stats, Google news, BBC – Future, TED-Ed, The Guardian and Colossal  

 PBS News: April 28 – 30 & May 1, 2020, and Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

 Africanews Live

 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Washington Post: April 28, 2020 – Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic
BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

TED-Ed: Emma Bryce What really happens to the plastic you throw away

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Colossal: Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 1, 2020

May 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, with millions of Americans filing for unemployment and businesses desperate, more states lift pandemic restrictions. Plus: Rising tensions between the White House and China, a perspective on reopening restaurants, essential workers strike for their health, Joe Biden denies a sexual assault allegation, the analysis of Shields and Brooks, Jazz Fest goes quiet and in memoriam. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Economic strain drives more states to lift pandemic rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZzPh… The ongoing U.S.-China rhetorical battle over the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKamw… News Wrap: White House blocks Fauci from House testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4fJa… The CEO of Waffle House on adapting restaurants to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qd6uZ… How these essential workers feel about the risks they face https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58M4… What Biden said in 1st public response to assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ApNi… Shields and Brooks on Biden’s assault allegation denial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1I-up… Trombone Shorty on New Orleans’ quieted musical heartbeat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWULo… Mourning some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUNnk… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 30, 2020

Apr 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new jobs numbers emphasize the depths of the pandemic’s economic damage. Plus: What happens to Americans struggling to pay for housing, complications around accessing food stamps, viewer questions about the economic crisis, Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso on COVID-19, the World Health Organization under fire and a Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone. Correction: When discussing President Trump’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic during the interview with Sen. Barrasso, Judy Woodruff mistakenly said 15 Americans had died of the disease in late February. She meant that there were 15 confirmed U.S. cases of the disease then. We regret the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States ask for more federal aid as economic crisis deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1T_Xq… How to get help if you can’t pay your mortgage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo7RD… How COVID-19 is keeping food from America’s hungriest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7TvV… Michelle Singletary answers viewers’ financial questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXtif… News Wrap: Pelosi defends Biden over assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9weo… Sen. Barrasso: Early remdesivir results ‘very encouraging’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-mI2… 2 perspectives on the Trump administration’s clash with WHO https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyIcz… A Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEtvP… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 29, 2020

Apr 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, U.S. deaths from COVID-19 now exceed American fatalities incurred in the Vietnam War. Plus: The latest on testing and possible treatment, how the pandemic threatens U.S. food production, distance learning challenges for students with special needs, earning potential for collegiate athletes and a new book on community and relationships from a former U.S. surgeon general. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Amid economic gloom, is there hope for a COVID-19 treatment? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3TNr… What we know about remdesivir study and COVID-19 antibodies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWuPp… News Wrap: Navy widens investigation of Roosevelt outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkHat… Trump wants meat processing plants open. But are they safe? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elxBy… How distance learning is creating a special education crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgxRo… Does NCAA earnings decision mean a ‘new era’ for athletes? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oo31s… Could pandemic loneliness spark a ‘social revival?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIecV… What could a post-pandemic world look like? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJCs8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 28, 2020

Apr 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, more states start to lift restrictions put in place due to COVID-19, causing some health experts to worry. Plus: Small businesses struggle to obtain federal aid, Sen. Chuck Schumer on the federal response, New Zealand and Australia successfully battle virus spread, how the pandemic is changing religious observation and telling fact from fiction in a global health crisis. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lift restrictions, in bid for economic relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roc_a… News Wrap: Violent new protests in Lebanon turn deadly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YJVO… Why can’t more small businesses get federal pandemic aid? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgjoY… Schumer demands hearings on coronavirus relief oversight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Omuw6… How New Zealand and Australia have kept COVID-19 losses loz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… How religious leaders are keeping the faith during COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… The dangerous flood of misinformation surrounding COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xl9zg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

Apr 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

We mark this 50th anniversary of Earth Day with Jane Goodall, one of the world’s most renowned scientists and environmentalists. A new National Geographic documentary explores her life and work, teaching generations how interconnected we are with the natural world. Jeffrey Brown talks to Goodall about her career and mission — and the pandemic that has brought modern civilization to its knees. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,424,254 440 1,092,715 243,674
United States 1,157,782 3,513 150,934 67,046
Spain 216,582 4,598 117,248 25,100
Italy 209,328 3,475 79,914 28,710
United Kingdom 182,260 2,743 28,131
Germany 164,967 1,984 121,014 6,812
France 130,979 1,953 50,562 24,760
Turkey 124,375 1,496 58,259 3,336
Russia 124,054 845 15,013 1,222
Brazil 96,559 457 40,973 6,750
Iran 96,448 1,157 77,350 6,156
China 84,388 60 77,713 4,643
Canada 56,714 1,493 23,801 3,566
       

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Washington Post                                          April 28, 2020
Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Goldman Sach
By Angela Fritz
 Email

The latest

The United States surpassed 1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus Tuesday, which is around a third of all the world’s reported infections. More than 55,000 deaths in the United States have been reported since February, according to tracking by The Washington Post. Health experts say that both cases and deaths are likely being undercounted.

The pandemic is endangering the U.S. beef, chicken and pork supply chains, as worker infection has shut down at least 20 plants and forced those still open to slow production. President Trump is expected to sign an executive order to force meat production plants to keep operating, despite mounting reports of employee deaths due to covid-19. Read about the risks for workers and what it means for your grocery store, then check out answers to your questions below.

A Federal Reserve program to begin within weeks will provide $500 billion in emergency aid to large American corporations without requiring them to protect workers or limit payments to executives and shareholders. Since it’s exempt from rules passed by Congress for other aid, critics say it would allow large companies to take federal help without saving any jobs.

Meanwhile, despite pressure from the Trump administration, some larger businesses — including cruise line operators — are refusing to return their small business Paycheck Protection Program money. The program ran out of funds in just weeks, and several businesses have already said they would return money because they realize they weren’t the intended small-business recipients. Read about the companies that are keeping their loans. 

This couple got married in the middle of the friendliest street in town — and the neighbors all came to help create their outdoor, socially distant wedding. The bride wore a white lace jumpsuit with a peach tulle skirt. Big chalk hearts were drawn on the sidewalks. The neighbors hung flowers on the trees, and the neighborhood kids constructed a dogwood bouquet.

More important news

Will summer kill coronavirus? Cities fear heat waves will quickly become deadly.

Patients with three certain cancers are at a much higher risk of death or severe complications from covid-19, according to a new study.

U.S. intelligence agencies issued warnings about the coronavirus in more than a dozen classified briefings prepared for Trump in January and February.

Attorney General William P. Barr told prosecutors to ‘be on the lookout’ for state and local coronavirus orders that could violate the Constitution.

Across the political spectrum, leaders are warning of financial calamity if Congress and the White House don’t help struggling states.

BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200422-how-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

By Martha Henriques – 23rd April 2020

We know that carbon emissions have sharply fallen during lockdown. But will all these changes actually be good for the environment in the long run?

There’s clear water in the Venice canals, blue skies over Delhi and wild animals are roaming boldly in locked-down cities. The oil industry and airlines are floundering in this new world, and carbon emissions are falling fast.

But there are also mountains of food going to waste that our supply chains aren’t set up to deal with. And, what’s more, the radical changes to daily life that we’re seeing now are not – thankfully – going to be permanent.

History tells us that when emissions have fallen sharply in the past, as they do after recessions, there’s often a rocketing rebound that wipes out any short-term cut in emissions. (Read more about Covid-19’s lasting impact on the environment.)

Is this pandemic any different?

Future Planet talks to BBC Minute about the close ties between lockdown and carbon emissions. In a nutshell: we could see long-lasting positive environmental change after the pandemic. But it’s all down to how we move on after lockdown.

You can watch the video above.

As an award-winning science site, BBC Future is committed to bringing you evidence-based analysis and myth-busting stories around the new coronavirus. You can read more of our Covid-19 coverage here.

TED-Ed

We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Emma Bryce traces the life cycles of three different plastic bottles, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. [Directed by Sharon Colman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Peter Gosling].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Coronavirus outbreak

Plenty of countries with male leaders have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly

Jon Henley and Eleanor Ainge Roy

Sat 25 Apr 2020 00.00 EDT Last modified on Sat 25 Apr 2020 19.15 EDT

12,643

On 1 April, the prime minister of Sint Maarten addressed her nation’s 41,500 people. Coronavirus cases were rising, and Silveria Jacobs knew the small island country, which welcomes 500,000 tourists a year, was at great risk: it had two ICU beds.

Jacobs did not want to impose a strict lockdown, but she did want physical distancing observed. So she spelled it out: “Simply. Stop. Moving,” she said. “If you don’t have the bread you like in your house, eat crackers. Eat cereal. Eat oats. Eat … sardines.”

The 51-year-old Caribbean premier may not have the global profile of Angela Merkel or Jacinda Ardern, but her blunt message exemplified firm action, effective communication – and showed another female leader getting the job done.

From Germany to New Zealand and Denmark to Taiwan, women have managed the coronavirus crisis with aplomb. Plenty of countries with male leaders – Vietnam, the Czech Republic, Greece, Australia – have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly.

Ardern, 39, New Zealand’s premier, has held Kiwis’ hands through the lockdown, delivering empathetic “stay home, save lives” video messages from her couch and communicating daily through non-combative press conferences or intimate Facebook Live videos, her favourite medium.

Her insistence on saving lives and her kindness-first approach – urging New Zealanders to look after their neighbours, take care of the vulnerable, and make sacrifices for the greater good – has won her many fans, while her emphasis on shared responsibility has united the country.

Choosing to “go hard and go early”, Ardern imposed a 14-day quarantine on anyone entering the country on 14 March and implemented a strict lockdown two weeks later, when fewer than 150 people had been infected and none had died. New Zealand has recorded just 18 deaths; public trust in Ardern’s government is greater than 80%.

In Germany, Angela Merkel has been hailed for direct but uncharacteristically personal public interventions, warning that up to 70% of people would contract the virus – the country’s “greatest challenge” since 1945 – and lamenting every death as that of “a father or grandfather, a mother or grandmother, a partner …”

Thanks to extensive testing from the outset, plenty of intensive care beds, and the chancellor’s periodic forthright reminders that Covid-19 was “serious – so take it seriously”, Germany has so far recorded fewer than 5,000 deaths, a far lower figure than most EU countries.

With a doctorate in quantum chemistry, Merkel’s clear, calm expositions – a clip of her explaining the scientific basis behind the government’s lockdown exit strategy was shared thousands of times online – have also helped propel public approval of the fourth-term chancellor’s handling of the crisis above 70%.

1:38

Merkel sets out clear explanation of how coronavirus transmission works – video

In nearby Denmark, meanwhile, the prime minister, Mette Frederiksen, acted equally firmly, closing the Scandinavian country’s borders as early as 13 March, and following up a few days later by shutting all kindergartens, schools and universities and banning gatherings of more than 10 people.

That decisiveness appears to have spared Denmark the worst of the pandemic, with fewer than 8,000 confirmed cases and 370 deaths. Frederiksen’s no-punches-pulled speeches and clear instructions to the nation have been widely praised.

She even managed to show a sense of fun, posting a clip on Facebook of herself doing the dishes while singing along to the 1980s Danish popsters Dodo and the Dodos during the nation’s weekly TV lockdown singalong. The Scandinavian country’s youngest-ever prime minister, whose approval ratings have doubled to more than 80%, has now begun easing its lockdown.

Taiwan’s president Tsai Ing-wen responded equally fast, activating the country’s central epidemic command centre in early January and introducing travel restrictions and quarantine measures. Mass public hygiene measures were rolled out, including disinfecting public areas and buildings.

In all, Taiwan adopted 124 control and contain measures in weeks, making a full lockdown unnecessary. It has reported just six deaths, and is now dispatching millions of face masks to the worst-struck parts of the US and Europe. Tsai’s warm, authoritative style has won her plaudits, even from political opponents.

Norway, with 7,200 cases and 182 deaths, this week began relaxing its restrictions by reopening kindergartens. The prime minister, Erna Solberg, told CNN she had made a point of “letting scientists make the big medical decisions”, adding that she thought her country’s early lockdown and thorough testing programme had been key.

Following an example set earlier by Frederiksen, Solberg also took the unusual step of directly addressing the country’s children, telling them in two press conferences – from which adult journalists were banned – that it was “permitted to be a little bit scared” and that she, too, missed being able to hug her friends.

Meanwhile, Iceland, under the prime minister, Katrín Jakobsdóttir’s, leadership, has offered free testing to all citizens, not only those with symptoms, and has recorded 1,800 cases and 10 deaths. Some 12% of the population has taken up the offer, and an exhaustive tracing system has meant the country has not had to close schools.

The world’s youngest head of government, Finland’s prime minister, Sanna Marin, also moved decisively to impose a strict lockdown, including a ban on all non-essential travel in and out of the Helsinki region. This has helped her country contain the spread of the virus to just 4,000 cases and 140 deaths, a per-million toll 10 times lower than that of neighbouring Sweden.

Not all the women who have excelled in the corona crisis are national leaders. Jeong Eun-kyeong, the unflappable head of South Korea’s centre for disease control, has become a national icon after overseeing a “test, trace, contain” strategy that has made the country the world’s coronavirus role-model, with daily infections in single digits and a death toll of less than 250.

Jeong, a former rural doctor dubbed “the world’s best virus hunter”, has delivered no-nonsense daily press conferences, including demonstrating the ideal way to cough. While these have won praise, her work ethic – she has left an emergency operations bunker only for quick visits to a food truck – has prompted concern for her health.

5:06

Why South Korea’s coronavirus death toll is comparatively low – video explainer

Whatever conclusions we may draw from these leaders’ performances during the pandemic, experts caution that while women are “disproportionately represented to a rather startling degree” among countries managing the crisis well, dividing men and women heads of state and government into homogenous categories is not necessarily useful.

Complicating factors may be at play. Kathleen Gerson, a professor of sociology at New York University, notes, for example, that women leaders are more likely to be elected in “a political culture in which there’s a relative support and trust in the government – and that doesn’t make stark distinctions between women and men. So you’ve already got a head start”.

In addition, it may be harder for men to escape “the way they are expected to behave” as leaders, Gerson told The Hill website. And since the very best leaders are both strong and decisive and capable of displaying feeling, women could, perhaps, “lead the way in showing that these are not competing and conflicting attributes, but complementary – and necessary for good leadership”, she said.

America faces an epic choice …

… in the coming year, and the results will define the country for a generation. These are perilous times. Over the last three years, much of what the Guardian holds dear has been threatened – democracy, civility, truth. This administration has cleared out science and scientists across all departments. America’s reputation as a competent global leader is in peril. Truth is being chased away. But with your help we can continue to put it center stage.

Rampant disinformation, partisan news sources and social media’s tsunami of fake news are no bases on which to inform the American public in 2020. We believe every one of us deserves equal access to fact-based news and analysis. So we’ve decided to keep Guardian journalism free for all readers, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. This would not be possible without the generosity of readers, who now support our work from across America in all 50 states.

Our journalism relies on our readers’ generosity – your financial support has meant we can keep investigating, disentangling and interrogating. It has protected our independence, which has never been so critical. We are so grateful.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/25/why-do-female-leaders-seem-to-be-more-successful-at-managing-the-coronavirus-crisis?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

OCTOBER 22, 2018  SASHA BOGOJEV

After taking a much-needed break over the summer following his successful presentation in Paris in June, Pejac is now back in his studio, developing new works for his U.S. debut in New York City and preparing a special limited edition that will be released toward the end of the year. Mixing his most recognizable techniques and mediums, he’s been sharing some of the alluring new pieces via his Instagram, including most recent drawings and works on pressed wood panels.

The Spanish artist first introduced the captivating works on wooden chipboard from the Redemption series back in January 2017, and eventually had an entire showcase focused on these pieces back in September 2017 in Venice. Known for revisiting his ideas and concepts, he recently finished this poignant new piece titled Safari. Mixing some of the previously seen imagery, such as patrolling helicopters with a spotlight, or a lonely stag, Pejac combines these visuals into a dynamic image that depicts a wild animal caught in the open by an unknown authority. Using fastidious shading and light effects, he uses the unorthodox composite wood medium to create a powerful effect of objects flying around the animal as its surrounding crumble around it. Once again putting a focus on the careless and ignorant bearing of humans towards nature, the artist constructed a gripping image utilizing an original technique he developed.

With similar thematic content, Pejac’s most recent solo exhibition on an old waterway barge on the Seine in Paris included three masterful large-scale drawings, along with other works on paper. Portraying a post-apocalyptic, surreal future, these meticulously rendered drawings mounted on thick frames were matched the quality of his paintings while depicting the hefty subject with a direct and delicate technique. Showing a lone character diving deep to retrieve a sinking lifebuoy ring in between plastic waste, or a helicopter removing a lighthouse over a desert, these images showcase Pejac’s poetic vision and his ability to pass a sharp and weighty message in the most poetic way.

A great example of such narrative is his canvas Le Bateau Ivre (The drunken boat) from 2015, titled after a poem written by Arthur Rimbaud, describing the drifting and sinking of a boat lost at sea in a fragmented first-person narrative saturated with vivid imagery and symbolism. Making an analogy with poem’s verbal saturation, the image shows two boys finishing from a small boat drifting through a sea densely polluted with garbage. Originally exhibited at his 2016 London solo show “Law of the Weakest,” this troubling vision from only three years ago is repeatedly becoming an alarming reality around the globe. You can see Pejac’s works in progress and stay up to date on show and print release announcements by following him on Instagram.

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PBS News: April 21 – 24, 2020, and

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

BBC Click: Inspiring Communities During the Pandemic

TED Talks: Oliver Jeffers An ode to living on earth?

 Colossal: Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 24, 2020

Apr 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. death toll from the novel coronavirus pandemic hits 50,000, but some states begin to lift restrictions. Plus: Medical facts vs. fiction, an ICU nurse shares his fears, Sen. Amy Klobuchar on responding to crisis, Navajo Nation’s virus vulnerability, Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week’s news and remembering some of those lost to COVID-19. Correction: Judy Woodruff misspoke during the interview with Sen. Amy Klobuchar and referred to Stacey Abrams as former lieutenant governor in the state of Georgia. That is incorrect. Abrams was a candidate for governor in that state. We regret the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More than 50,000 have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zpi6b… Separating fact from fiction in Trump’s COVID-19 briefings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQTbS… News Wrap: U.S. Navy wants to reinstate fired ship captain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biUeE… An ICU nurse on wavering between confidence and fear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gc1U… Amy Klobuchar on her COVID-19 fears for rural America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTiMJ… Why Navajo Nation is especially vulnerable to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jh55… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s briefings, coronavirus aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tlyN… Remembering Americans killed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRIEH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 23, 2020

Apr 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the House passes $484 billion in pandemic relief aimed specifically at small employers and hospitals. Plus: Americans share their economic pain, protests about pandemic restrictions, two views on reopening Georgia businesses, the long road to economic recovery, Europe’s pandemic response, job losses in the arts and Montana’s unusual sounds of support for health workers. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS What’s in the latest federal pandemic relief package https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gg7FU… News Wrap: Severe storms across the South kill at least 7 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQGGU… For many, pandemic’s economic crisis is 2nd financial blow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOz74… The politics behind protests of stay-at-home orders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKPh_… What 2 Georgia mayors think about reopening their state https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVaYI… Why the pandemic is making U.S. economic inequality worse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Zgmn… EU is united in response to pandemic, says ambassador https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH3eN… Why pandemic is ‘existential crisis’ for performing arts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3fYb… These appreciative neighbors howl for health care workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnyDB… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 22, 2020

Apr 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, new data indicates the novel coronavirus was spreading in the U.S. weeks earlier than previously thought. Plus: A timeline of COVID-19 in the U.S., the pandemic worsens global hunger, New York’s shocked health care system, the U.S.-China battle over COVID-19 blame, mental health during the pandemic, a White House update and an Earth Day conversation with Jane Goodall. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Some states to begin relaxing rules, as U.S. deaths rise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBXq2… Why contact tracing is critical to containing COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOJOm… News Wrap: Reduced pollution on Earth Day’s 50th anniversary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hF1q_… What COVID-19 pandemic means for global starvation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kix1… Why New York health care is still ‘in a state of shock’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZRW3… The U.S.-China battle over COVID-19 narrative and blame https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRI1w… Mental health advice from a New York psychiatrist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0Jb7… Why was a top federal vaccine expert forced out of his job? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La83v… Jane Goodall on lessons from the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1D_-… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 21, 2020

Apr 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the U.S. Senate reaches a deal on a new $500 billion COVID-19 relief package. Plus: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the pandemic response, what the collapse in oil prices means for other economic sectors, kidney damage among some COVID-19 patients, why Uganda has a low number of virus cases, the hunt for a vaccine, a White House update and scenes from a world on pause. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,858,489 367.61 809,923 199,874
United States 932,031 2,828.14 101,538 52,608
Spain 223,759 4,750.68 95,708 22,902
Italy 195,351 3,242.7 63,120 26,384
Germany 155,418 1,869.14 99,962 5,805
United Kingdom 148,377 2,233.4 20,319
France 122,577 1,827.43 43,493 22,245
Turkey 107,773 1,296.05 25,582 2,706
Iran 89,328 1,071.97 68,193 5,650
China 84,311 60.13 77,346 4,642
Russia 74,588 508.28 6,250 681
Brazil 52,995 250.76 27,655 3,670
Belgium 45,325 3,932.94 10,417 6,917
Canada 44,364 1,168.12 15,963 2,350
Netherlands 37,190 2,131.11 4,409
Switzerland 28,541 3,323.92 21,000 1,593
India 24,942 18.33 5,210 779

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Inspiring Communities During The Pandemic – BBC Click

Apr 24, 2020  BBC Click

We look at how care homes around Europe are using technology to provide some contact for isolated and elderly people. And in Australia we look at newly introduced smart traffic cams to combat the worst driver behaviour during lockdown. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

If you had to explain to a newborn what it means to be a human being living on Earth in the 21st century, what would you say? Visual artist Oliver Jeffers put his answer in a letter to his son, sharing pearls of wisdom on existence and the diversity of life. He offers observations of the “beautiful, fragile drama of human civilization” in this poetic talk paired with his original illustrations and animations.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Oliver Jeffers · Artist, storyteller

With a style that crackles with wry wit, writer and artist Oliver Jeffers captivates audiences of all ages.

MORE RESOURCES

The Fate of Fausto

Oliver Jeffers

Harper Collins Children’s Books (2019)

Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth

Oliver Jeffers

Philomel Books (2017)

Learn more about how the International Rescue Committee responds to some of the world’s worst crises, delivering aid that saves lives while paving the way for long-term recovery.

TED2020: The Prequel | April 2020

Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

APRIL 19, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

SOUP – Refused © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic oceanic debris affected by chewing and attempted ingestion by animals. Includes a toothpaste tube. Additives; teeth from goats.

Photographer Mandy Barker creates deceptively eye-catching images to document the pandemic of plastic debris in the world’s waterways. Barker, who is based in Leeds, UK, works closely with scientists to collect trash from our oceans and beaches on the edges of nearly every continent. One research expedition covered the debris field (stretching to Hawaii) that resulted from Japan’s 2011 tsunami and earthquake; she has also explored the Inner Hebrides in Scotland with Greenpeace.

Barker manipulates her findings in Photoshop, mimicking the manner in which ocean water holds these objects in suspension. Swirls of colors and patterns draw in the viewer’s eye, only to realize that these visually appealing compositions consist of garbage that animals have attempted to chew, plastic pellets, tangles of fishing line, and water-logged soccer balls. The artist describes her work in a statement on her website:

The aim of my work is to engage with and stimulate an emotional response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction along with the subsequent message of awareness. The research process is a vital part of my development as the images I make are based on scientific fact which is essential to the integrity of my work.

Barker is currently a recipient of a 2018 National Geographic Society grant. Her work is on display through April 22nd at Mexico City’s Museum of Modern Art, at Photo London Art Fair in May 2018, at the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg in June, 2018, and at BredaPhoto in The Netherlands in September 2018. The artist’s book, Beyond Drifting: Imperfectly Known Animals, was named one of the ten best books of 2017 by Smithsonian. You can see more of Barker’s photographs on her website as well as on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

EVERY… snowflake is different (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

EVERY… snowflake is different © Mandy Barker. Ingredients: white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Lighter © Mandy Barker. Discarded cigarette lighters make reference to our single-use throw away society. The panda, a national emblem of China represents endangered species and faces away from the group symbolizing mother nature turning its back on man’s inability to take ownership of its waste.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Spilt © Mandy Barker. 150 tonnes of pre-production plastic pellets (nurdles) spilt from a cargo container during Typhoon Vincente on 23rd July 2012 adds to Hong Kong’s waste issues in its seas and on its beaches.

PENALTY – Europe © Mandy Barker. 633 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) recovered from 23 countries and islands within Europe, from 104 different beaches, and by 62 members of the public, in just 4 months.

PENALTY – The World © Mandy Barker. 769 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) collected from 41 countries and islands around the world, from 144 different beaches and by 89 members of the public in just 4 months.

PENALTY – 24 Footballs © Mandy Barker.

SHOAL – 30.41N, 157.51E © Mandy Barker.Included in trawl: child’s ball and Japanese character – fridge magnet found on the tsunami shoreline. Fishing buoy found in trawl sample, North pacific Ocean

SHOAL 33.15N, 151.15E © Mandy Barker. Included in trawl: tatami mat from the floor of a Japanese home, fishing related plastics, buoys, nylon rope, buckets, fish trays, polystyrene floats, shampoo bottle, caps, balloon & holder, petrol container.

SOUP – Alphabet © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic debris that includes surface text. Ironic random arrangement of 4 pieces of plastic that suggest a warning; ‘Sea’ ‘AND’ ‘HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES’ ‘FOUL’

SOUP: Bird’s Nest © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; discarded fishing line that has formed nest-like balls due to tidal and oceanic movement. Additives; other debris collected in its path.

SOUP – Ruinous Remembrance © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic flowers, leaves, stems, and fishing line. Additives; bones, skulls, feathers, and fish.

SOUP: Turtle © Mandy Barker.

WHERE © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

WHERE (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

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PBS News: April 17 – 20, 2020, Washington Week, and In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

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 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

92nd Street Y: Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

The New York Times: Morning Briefing, April 19, 2020

 Miumiu Guitargril – [ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old

 boredpanda: 29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 20, 2020

Apr 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, protesters demand U.S. government restrictions be lifted despite the continued spread of COVID-19. Plus: The price of oil tanks, evaluating the risks of reopening the U.S., the pandemic’s effect on agriculture, Brazil’s president minimizes the public health threat, a fragile Afghanistan confronts COVID-19, Politics Monday and an essential worker on taking out the trash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Crowds protest restrictions as health experts warn of risks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQApS… Troubled global oil market tanks amid pandemic’s demand drop https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DPob… News Wrap: Nova Scotia reels as mass shooting kills 18 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PeRr… The ‘fantasy’ that normal American life will resume in weeks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nn52p… How COVID-19 is causing chaos for American agriculture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zlpx2… Brazil’s people fear COVID-19 threat their president denies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kl2xm… Can politically fragile Afghanistan combat COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDdtn… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on U.S. pandemic response polls https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBT9V… The special hazards of collecting garbage during a pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeJYU… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 19, 2020

Apr 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 19, states weigh-in on re-opening for business, the coronavirus exposes the need for programmers for outdated unemployment systems, the popularity of animal fostering during a pandemic, and a breakdown of the debate for the latest federal relief package as millions of small businesses languish. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April, 18, 2020

Apr 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 18, the latest on the coronavirus, what scientists are finding out about antibody testing, some big companies are redeploying their employees during the outbreak, and the impact of the pandemic on a cultural cornerstone in Portland, Oregon. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 17, 2020

Apr 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, President Trump offers states guidance on reopening, but some governors fear it’s too soon. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on COVID-19 testing and PPE, why testing remains slow, an assault allegation against former Vice President Joe Biden, the latest from Congress on funding economic relief, Shields and Brooks, in memory of those lost to COVID-19 and a Broadway triumph. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States try to balance economic crisis, public health threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e_S9… Pence: Health care ‘has not been overwhelmed’ by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQow7… News Wrap: Ukraine wildfires cause surge in air pollution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waqx5… The supply chain fiasco has derailed U.S. COVID-19 testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piPGT… What we know about sexual assault allegation against Biden https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hblpN… What’s holding up additional funding for U.S. small business https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TS3m7… Shields and Brooks on Trump vs. states on COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYqYr… Remembering some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvORW… This Broadway cast ‘Ain’t Too Proud’ for digital performance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrErM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

 

Apr 17, 2020  Washington Week

President Trump unveiled his plan for states to shoulder the brunt of the burden on deciding when to reopen. The panel also discussed the effort among congressional Republicans and Democrats and the White House to negotiate more funding for the small business lending program, which has maxed out. Panel: Kimberly Atkins, Senior News Correspondent, WBUR, Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent, The New York Times, Paula Reid, White House Correspondent, CBS News, Kristen Welker, White House Correspondent, NBC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,478,634 318.76 651,736 170,389
United States 799,456 2,425.86 72,368 42,604
Spain 200,210 4,250.71 80,587 20,852
Italy 181,228 3,008.26 48,877 24,114
Germany 147,065 1,768.69 84,717 4,862
United Kingdom 124,743 1,877.65 16,509
France 114,657 1,709.36 37,409 20,265
Turkey 90,980 1,094.1 13,430 2,140
Iran 83,505 1,002.09 59,273 5,209
China 82,758 59.03 77,123 4,632
Russia 47,121 321.11 3,446 405
Brazil 40,581 192.02 22,130 2,575
Belgium 39,983 3,469.41 8,895 5,828
Canada 36,831 969.77 12,586 1,690
Netherlands 33,405 1,914.21 3,751
Switzerland 27,673 3,222.83 18,600 1,429

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Bob Woodward’s “FEAR: Trump in The White House”

Sep 17, 2018  92nd Street Y

Watergate journalist Bob Woodward’s new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House, announced as the most acute and penetrating portrait of a sitting president ever published during the first years of an administration, is unprecedented. Talking with Jacob Weisberg, Bob Woodward gives a front-row-seat view of life inside Donald Trump’s White House, as revealed in his new book, FEAR: Trump in the White House. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, an associate editor at The Washington Post, shows how the president makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Drawing from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, contemporaneous meeting notes, files, documents, and personal diaries, FEAR brings to light the most explosive debates that drive decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence. It’s the inside story on President Trump as only Bob Woodward can tell it. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear first-hand as the legendary journalist sits down with the chairman and editor-in-chief of Slate. Recorded on September 12, 2018 at 92nd Street Y. Subscribe for more videos like this: http://bit.ly/1GpwawV Your support helps us keep our content free for all. Donate now: http://www.92y.org/donatenow?utm_sour… Facebook: http://facebook.com/92ndStreetY Instagram: http://Instagram.com/92ndStreetY Twitter: https://twitter.com/92Y Tumblr: http://92y.tumblr.com/ On Demand: http://www.92yondemand.org

Category  Nonprofits & Activism

The New York Times – Morning Briefing

By Remy Tumin and Elijah Walker

 

Here are the week’s top stories, and a look ahead.  April 19, 2020

Mark Felix/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

1. Demonstrators across the country violated social-distancing orders to call for the reopening of states and the American economy.

The rallies, like the one outside the state Capitol in Austin, Texas, above, rode a wave of similar protests this past week. On Saturday alone, people also gathered in Indianapolis, Ind.; Carson City, Nev.; Annapolis, Md.; Salt Lake City, Utah, and Brookfield, Wis.

President Trump on Friday openly encouraged the right-wing protests in states with stay-at-home orders, even after officially and publicly conceding that reopening was up to governors.

2. What does the year ahead look like?
There will be no quick return to normal American life, but there is hope for managing the outbreak now and in the long term. Our global health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. spoke to over 20 experts on what to expect in the coming months.
Some of their predictions:
  • The lockdowns will end haltingly. Putting safety first could mean reopening only after coronavirus cases declined for 14 days, 90 percent of contacts of infected people could be traced, infections of health care workers were eradicated, recuperation sites existed for mild cases — and many other hard-to-reach goals.
  • It is not clear whether recovery from the virus and antibodies confer immunity. If they do, or are believed to, America could be split into two classes: those protected (or thought to be) and those still vulnerable.
  • The virus can be kept in check, but only with expanded resources like widespread testing. And treatments are likely to arrive before a vaccine.
3. The U.S. needs to triple the number of coronavirus tests it is currently administering before the country can reopenexperts say. Above, a testing line in the Bronx.
An average of 146,000 people per day have been tested for the virus nationally so far this month, according to the COVID Tracking Project. A total of 3.6 million tests have been administered. But to reopen the U.S. by mid-May, the number of daily tests performed should be 500,000 to 700,000, according to researchers at Harvard University.
Continue reading the main story
Germany was the first large democracy to contain the spread of the virus, and is now the first to methodically go about reopening its economy: It is aiming to test the entire population for antibodies in the coming months to assess the virus’s spread.
And in Africa, limited testing is only part of the problem. Basic supplies like oxygen and soap are needed first.
4. Access to food is changing.
Many U.S. school cafeterias are now operating more like soup kitchens, sending days’ worth of food home for entire families even though the federal school meals program will not reimburse them.
Slaughterhouses have turned out to be the weakest link in the nation’s food supply chain. Some of the country’s highest-producing meat plants have closed because workers are getting sick.
But shutting down a plant backs up production, crushes prices paid to farmers and eventually leads to months of shortages.
5. In normal times, men are a majority of the overall work force. The pandemic has flipped that.
One in three jobs held by women has been designated as essential, according to a Times analysis of census data. Nonwhite women are more likely to have essential jobs — cashier, emergency room nurse, home health aide and more — than anyone else. Above, Constance Warren, who works the cold cuts counter in a New Orleans grocery.

No matter their sex, race or income level, most Americans are united on one thing, according to a Times survey: a sense of deep pessimism about the economy.

6. Republicans think blaming China for the coronavirus is a winning strategy for the November elections. But President Trump keeps going off message.
Republican senators locked in difficult races are preparing commercials that will condemn China. Party officials are brandishing polling data in hopes that Mr. Trump will confront Beijing. But with a reliance on China’s manufacturers for lifesaving medical supplies as well as trade talks and unstable markets to consider, Mr. Trump has repeatedly muddied those efforts.

We also spoke to Bernie Sanders’s supporters about whether they’ll be voting for Joe Biden. They weren’t unenthusiastic.

7. The latest threat to Indonesia’s wildlife: bird-singing competitions.
Officials and conservationists say wild songbirds are disappearing at a tremendous rate across the vast archipelago. One bird protection organization estimates that poachers capture more than 20 million songbirds a year.

Much of the demand is fueled by the growing craze for high-stakes bird singing contests at which government officials frequently preside. To build a bird’s stamina, one poacher said that he would slap the sides of its 20-foot-cage to make it fly 500 laps a day.

[ I wish you love ] by A girl six years old INS @miumiuguitargril

Feb 24, 2020  Miumiu Guitargirl

INS @miumiuguitargril Thank you for your encouragement.I will continue to study hard. To fulfill my dream to be an excellent guitarist. Please forgive me for my poor English. This is not my native language. I’ve tried my best to do it well. Because of my English level, I can’t Reply every message. If you have any good suggestions, please email me. My mother will help me reply. 234361800@qq.com

Category  Music

In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home

Apr 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

During a period when art lovers can’t simply visit a museum or gallery, a new social media phenomenon has arisen as a creative outlet. Participants isolating at home amid the pandemic are encouraged to recreate a prominent work of art using everyday objects. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of our ongoing arts and culture series, Canvas. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

29 Paintings By My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

29 Paintings by My 5-Year-Old Son With Autism

Tristan and V?j?n? Rimaši?t?

Tristan is my five-year-old son who was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder at the age of three. Despite this life-changing diagnosis, he is still a very and playful child.

One day Tristan saw his older sister painting. After a while, he showed great interest and asked us, his parents, if he could also paint sometimes. I found myself in a little awkward situation because I didn’t know what to answer to my beloved son who’s having difficulty with fine motor skills.

Then, I came up with the idea that Tristan could paint but in a different way and style. The next day, Tristan got his first acrylic color set and right away started splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures.

After he had created a few paintings, we realized that they were unique and rather special. We decided to create an Instagram profile to show off his works. During his painting sessions, I record him and after he’s finished, Tristan watches and analyses his creations back with a big smile on his face.

For Tristan as an autistic child, creating these paintings in his own unique style and for us to enjoy, is priceless and we believe very therapeutic for him. His movements and actions when he is expressing himself and his thoughts through his art are really quite magical.

We want to share these happy moments with you so we’ve created this Bored Panda profile to show the world our cute and special artist and his amazing works.

More info: Instagram

Tristan

Splashing, dripping and spraying the pictures

His artwork

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.boredpanda.com/boy-with-autism-paintings-tristan/

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats, TED-Ed,  Google News, The Washington Post, and Colossal

PBS News: April 13 – 16, 2020, and Plastic Wars (full film) | FRONTLINE

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 TED-Ed: How pandemics spread

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Colossal: Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 16, 2020

Apr 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces guidelines for ending pandemic shutdowns, as officials continue to debate when it will be safe to reopen businesses. Plus: Stories from Americans suffering the pandemic’s economic fallout, aid dries up for small businesses, can the airline industry survive COVID-19, ongoing debate over the origins of the novel coronavirus and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Virus has taken millions of U.S. jobs, over 32,000 lives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d36tL… Personal stories of the pandemic’s economic fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl4tP… Why congressional relief for small business ran out so fast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQ3wh… Pandemic’s economic devastation even broader than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ6xH… Evaporation of travel sector threatens airlines’ survival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO2SK… News Wrap: Election victory for South Korea’s ruling party https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjVi8… Debate resurfaces over origins of novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tyc5P… A Brooklyn ICU nurse on not feeling like a superhero https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZ8jB… Desperate for N95 masks, researchers test decontamination https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88ANm… Testing still a roadblock for Trump plan to reopen economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-MId… A Brief But Spectacular take on surviving COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSyU7… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 15, 2020

Apr 15, 2020 PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump seeks to reopen the U.S. economy soon, but state and local officials have concerns. Plus: Behind Trump’s criticism of the WHO, why the U.S. needs better COVID-19 testing, health care workers are stressed by PPE, how South Korea has controlled its outbreak, viewer COVID-19 questions, a White House update, life imitating art and teens cope with quarantine. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump says working groups planning U.S. economic resurgence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBLYH… News Wrap: Notre Dame Cathedral marks 1 year since fire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6bF_… Why Trump is criticizing WHO’s pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sX6HZ… Testing, treatment progress key to resuming American life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5n7S… Preparing to care for COVID-19 patients takes physical toll https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6fBN… How South Korea became a global leader in pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqcru… A doctor answers viewer questions about COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5DPO… Trump says he’s confident U.S. is past the peak of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ycPe… In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVXuu… How these teenagers are coping with social distancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2fWE… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 14, 2020

Apr 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump clashes with some state governors about when and how the U.S. economy should reopen. Plus: The damage COVID-19 has wrought in nursing homes, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont, a business view on lifting pandemic restrictions, college students struggle with an interrupted school year, locusts ravage East Africa, a White House update and #SongsOfComfort. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump, governors clash over path to reopening U.S. economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XsSA… News Wrap: Obama endorses Biden for president  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TF01u… ‘Incredibly alarming’ rise in nursing home COVID-19 deaths https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvD0J… How Gov. Ned Lamont says he’ll decide when to reopen Conn. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ty4u… After COVID-19, businesses will have to adapt to a new world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ueky… What interrupted school year means for some college students https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLRnk… East Africa faces dual threats of COVID-19 and locust swarms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO775… Trump says U.S. won’t fund WHO during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzO7F… Accentuating the positive with #SongsOfComfort https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Hb_O… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 13, 2020

Apr 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, officials in the U.S. and across the globe weigh the risks of easing COVID-19 restrictions as the pandemic grinds on. Plus: Poor families suffer more from COVID-19, on the medical front lines in Detroit, how Spain is coping with coronavirus devastation, the Trump administration’s preparedness for crisis, a White House update, Politics Monday and a New Orleans grocery store. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Officials worldwide weigh risks of easing COVID-19 rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9Lsr… COVID-19 is exacerbating Detroit’s poverty and inequality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoVB3… Some encouraging signs emerge in Detroit’s coronavirus fight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ddjl… News Wrap: At least 30 dead as severe storms rake Deep South https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrAMj… How Spain is coping with the devastation of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNvcR… What new reports reveal about Trump’s response to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GD3rn… Trump defends his initial pandemic response amid criticism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dSjq… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sanders’ Biden endorsement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tZ8_… A New Orleans grocery store trying to sustain its community https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwAkC… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

How pandemics spread

Mar 11, 2012  TED-Ed

Dig into the history of pandemics to learn how viruses and disease spreads and what we can do to stop future outbreaks. — In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a plane and spread a virus across continents. Mark Honigsbaum describes the history of pandemics and how that knowledge can help halt future outbreaks. Lesson by Mark Honigsbaum, directed by Patrick Blower. Animator’s website: http://www.patrickblower.com Educator’s website: http://www.markhonigsbaum.co.uk Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemi…

Category  Education

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Worldwide cases

Cases
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,157,108 277.41 543,519 144,047
United States 675,243 2,048.95 55,561 34,562
Spain 185,309 3,934.34 74,797 19,516
Italy 168,941 2,804.31 40,164 22,170
Germany 137,698 1,656.03 66,500 4,052
France 108,847 1,622.74 32,812 17,920
United Kingdom 103,093 1,551.77 13,729
China 82,367 58.75 77,944 3,342
Iran 77,995 935.97 52,229 4,869
Turkey 74,193 892.23 7,089 1,643
Belgium 34,809 3,020.45 7,526 4,857
Brazil 30,683 145.19 14,026 1,947

 Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Plastic Wars (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Mar 31, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Have efforts to solve the plastic pollution problem made it worse? Go inside the battle over plastics, recycling and what’s at stake. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #RecyclingDocumentary #PlasticWars #frontlinePBS Despite efforts spreading across America to reduce the use of plastic and the crisis of ocean pollution growing, the plastics industry is rapidly scaling up new production and promoting a familiar solution: recycling. But it’s estimated that no more than 10% of plastic produced has ever been recycled. The documentary “Plastic Wars,” from FRONTLINE and NPR, reveals how plastic makers for decades have publicly promoted recycling, despite privately expressing doubts that widespread plastic recycling would ever be economically viable. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack

 

 

  By Angela Fritz
with Avi Selk
 Email

The latest

Covid-19 kills by inflaming and clogging the tiny air sacs in the lungs, choking off the body’s oxygen supply until it causes organ failure. But doctors are seeing that the virus may be causing heart inflammation, acute kidney disease, neurological malfunction, blood clots, intestinal damage and liver problems. Read about the new observations, which complicate treatment and make recovery less certain.

Trump on Tuesday ordered a halt on payments to the World Health Organization for what he called mismanagement of the pandemic. Although some countries have also been critical of the WHO, close U.S. allies said they vehemently disagreed with a suspension of payments and were not planning to follow suit. Bill Gates called the decision dangerous. “Halting funding for the World Health Organization during a world health crisis is as dangerous as it sounds,” he tweeted. “The world needs @WHO now more than ever.”

President Trump has been adamant in private discussions that he wants to lift distancing restrictions on May 1In response, FEMA and the CDC created a public health strategy to reopen parts of the country. Read what’s in the plan and how it would work.

As U.S. leaders discouraged mask use for the public in mid-March, the White House was racing to secure face coverings from Taiwan for senior staff. National Security Council officials worried that there were not enough masks at the White House complex, so they turned to a foreign government for help.

Now that billions of people all over the world are isolating in their homes, animals are roaming free. Wild boar has descended onto the streets of Barcelona. Mountain goats have overtaken a town in Wales. Whales are chugging into Mediterranean shipping lanes. And turtles are finally getting some peace. Read (and check out photos and video) about how the outbreak has allowed animals to take back what was once theirs.

A small-business program intended to swiftly fuel struggling companies has all but collapsed due to the enormous number of applications and the shortage of federal funds. The office usually assists businesses with geographically contained disasters such as hurricanes, but the coronavirus is widespread, which has it overwhelmed. Here’s what we know about the backlog and the proposals to keep the program afloat.

More than 9,000 health-care workers in the United States have tested positive for covid-19, the CDC found. They are mostly white, female and in their 40s, and although most were not sick enough to be hospitalized, 27 died. But the numbers could be a gross undercount, since some facilities are no longer testing their own employees due to lack of capability. Read the latest on how the outbreak is affecting the people on the front lines.

More important reads

In an unprecedented move, the Treasury Department ordered President Trump’s name to be printed on stimulus checks, a process that could slow their delivery by a few days, senior IRS officials said. 

Covid-19 checkpoints at state borders for non-residents are drawing complaints and legal scrutiny.

Grocery delivery was supposed to be the ultimate pandemic lifeline. But customers are reporting weeks-long waits on leading platforms.

The U.S. Postal Service needs a bailout if it’s going to survive in its current form after the coronavirus.

‘I’m a miracle walking’: A woman gave birth in a coma while fighting the covid-19. 

One tip: Arduous exercise can lower immunity, so don’t overdo it during the pandemic.

Banksy’s wife hates when he works from home

Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

APRIL 13, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Images © Eric Dinardi and Ernest Theofilus

Realrich Architecture Workshop, aka RAW Architecture, completed Guha Bambu just this year, but the cascading vines, luxuriant shrubs, and grass-covered facades on the new project make it appear as an old building overtaken by nature. Each room of the nearly 6,500 square-foot complex has at least two entrances that often face north and south to exhibit the overflowing greenery.

Spanning three upper floors and two basement levels, the multi-use structure incorporates modern and traditional techniques like the fish mouth joint, which cuts the end of wood-like substance in a U-shape and positions another piece on top. It’s constructed using a combination of steel, wood, glass, metal, gypsum, bamboo, plastic, stone, and concrete.

Located in Tangerang, Indonesia, the new project is actually a renovation of the firm’s existing building named The Guild. It continues to house Omah Library, a dentist’s office, a private apartment, and RAW Architecture’s studio, which are separated at the entrance to prohibit the public from entering the private spaces. Each space is designed to be converted and reused for new tenants.

Follow RAW Architecture on Facebook for updates on its projects that merge lush botanicals and nature-based materials.  (via designboom)

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PBS News, Africanews, ABC (Australia), Sky News, Roylab Stats, Google, Nucleus Medical Media, The Washington Post and Late Night with Seth Meyers

 PBS News: April 11 – 12, 2020

 Africanews Live

 ABC (Australia) Live

 Sky News Live

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Nucleus Medical Media: COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Late Night with Seth Meyers: The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition

NewsHour Weekend full episode April 12, 2020

Apr 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 12, worshippers observe Easter Sunday from a distance as stay-at-home orders remain in place globally, and the coronavirus spreads in central Africa, just as the region nearly hit a milestone by defeating the Ebola virus. Also, social “dis-dancing” and the global disco that’s bringing people together. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April 11, 2020

Apr 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 11, coronavirus cases in the U.S. grow to more than half a million, some people are turning to social media for financial help during the outbreak, what the data is telling us about being asymptomatic, and keeping the faith during the holidays in changing times. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch ABC News live

Started streaming on Mar 19, 2020  ABC News (Australia)

ABC News channel provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad. Including the latest coronavirus updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: http://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

  • Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 1,846,680 237.49 421,497 114,090
United States 559,409 1,697.46 33,115 22,071
Spain 166,831 3,542.03 62,391 17,209
Italy 156,363 2,595.52 34,211 19,899
Germany 127,854 1,537.64 52,889 3,022
France 95,403 1,422.31 27,186 14,393
United Kingdom 84,279 1,268.58 10,612
China 82,160 58.6 77,663 3,341
Iran 71,686 860.26 43,894 4,474
Turkey 56,956 684.94 3,446 1,198
Belgium 29,647 2,572.53 6,463 3,600
Netherlands 25,587 1,466.22 2,737
Switzerland 25,398 2,957.88 12,100 1,103
Canada 24,366 641.56 7,172 717
Brazil 22,169 104.9 1,223

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic

Presented by Slack
Friday, April 10, 2020 

By Avi Selk   Email

The latest

The economy is deteriorating “with alarming speed,” Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome H. Powell said Thursday, as nationwide quarantines have caused more than 17 million people to file jobless claims and some economists believe we are in a depressionWe report that “the nation has not experienced this magnitude of layoffs and economic contraction since the Great Depression, many experts say, and recovery is unlikely to be swift.”

The collapse is manifesting itself in eye-popping financial reports from states and cities: Illinois owes $8.3 billion in unpaid bills. New York could lose billions in tax revenue. Pennsylvania has stopped paying 9,000 quarantined state employees. Find further details on shortages in other parts of the country, as well as on the split in Congress over what to do about it.

Worried about the economy’s effect on his reelection prospects, President Trump is pushing to send Americans back to work before many health experts believe is safe. He has publicly suggested the worst of the outbreak will soon be over, and has privately asked aides for a strategy to resume business activity by May 1. Read about the White House push to reopen the country.

Lifting quarantines just as they are showing signs of reducing infections would lead to disaster, experts warn, because the United States still lacks the testing capabilities needed to identify and contain new outbreaks. It’s also unclear how Trump would force governors to relax stay-at-home orders in their states.

Ohio is emerging as a model example of how to manage the virus: identify it early, plan for the worst and hope for the best. Gov. Mike DeWine (R) shut down a major convention in early March, before the state had a single confirmed infection, and the Cleveland Clinic began planning to add hundreds of new hospital beds even earlier. That head start appears to be paying off, with Ohio reporting dramatically lower infection and death rates than similarly sized states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Illinois. More on its aggressive strategy here. Then check out a video from the state’s Department of Health that has gone viral as a crystal-clear visualization of how social distancing is meant to fight the virus’s spread.

More important reads

·  One chart puts this week’s awful unemployment numbers in perspective

·  Apple, Google debut major effort to help people track if they’ve been in contact with virus

·  Analysis: How advocates of a return to normal misrepresent death tolls

·  Rare voices from Iran’s outbreak tell of stumbling government, deluged hospitals

·  The European Union struck a deal to help its worst-hit countries, but still risks fracturing

·  “Speak the truth,” Obama tells mayors in coronavirus address. The biggest mistake any [of] us can make in these situations is to misinform. 

If you or someone you know would like to read Post coverage on the pandemic in Spanish, sign up for the Post Opinión, Edición Coronavirus newsletter to get updates and commentary straight to your inbox on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Your questions, answered

“The coronavirus started in bats, traveled around the world in people and has also infected felines. Could the corona end up infecting and spreading in our own bat population?”  — Susan Wetmore in Nebraska

Yes it could, and thank you for asking about the bats, which have been unfairly demonized for their role in the virus’s origin story.

The novel coronavirus is a species-hopper. Scientists believe it first incubated inside horseshoe bats in China — which have amazing immune systems that makes them unwitting hosts for many pathogens — and mutated to spread to humans last year.

Since then, the virus has infected at least 1.5 million people, but also some dogs, cats — even a tiger at the Bronx Zoo.

Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is worried the coronavirus could spread to North American bats such as the vesper bat, which last shared a common ancestor with the horseshoe bats of China approximately 50 million years ago. “They are about as different as bats get from one another,” Bruce Patterson, a curator of mammals at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, told The Post.

The chance is fairly low of the virus going full circle — from bats to people then back into bats on the other side of the planet. But, as The Post reports, it would be bad for bats and non-bats alike if it happened.

The North American bat population is already being decimated by an unrelated fungal disease, and their long-distance flight patterns could spread the coronavirus over a huge area if they became incubators.

There could even be a spill-back of [the novel coronavirus] from bats back into humans … which would make eradication of [the virus] unlikely,” U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service veterinarian Samantha Gibbs wrote in a notice to researchers, asking them to suspend all bat fieldwork, lest an infected scientist sicken a bat. Read the whole story for more.

Saturday, April 11, 2020 The latest

The United States has more confirmed covid-19 deaths than any other nationwith nearly 19,000 fatal cases, including more than 2,000 reported on Friday alone. The country also accounts for nearly 30 percent of the world’s known infections: about 500,000 out of more than 1.7 million, although all these figures are probably too low due to a general scarcity of coronavirus testing and suspect reports from such countries as China.

U.S. governors have asked Congress for $500 billion in rescue funds, as many states face massive budget shortfalls after paying for the public health responses at the outbreak’s front lines. The economic crisis has also pushed the Postal Service to the brink of collapse, we report in a story about President Trump’s refusal to bail out the mail service.

The IRS has created an online tool to help people who don’t file taxes, such as many Social Security recipients, get their stimulus payments sooner. Payments of up to $1,200 a person will be sent to most people’s bank accounts starting next week, according to the tax agency. Find out more about how you can track your payment.

Another stimulus program to loan $349 billion to small businesses is faltering, The Post reports: “Banks, tasked with disbursing the money, have been confused about the rules, which has delayed lending. Entrepreneurs are reporting troubles applying. And even some who make it through the application process say they’re facing dilemmas about how to use the money.” Read more here.

Concerned that last month’s stimulus package was too generous with unemployment benefits, Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia has tweaked rules to make it more difficult for gig workers to get money and easier for businesses to avoid paying workers sick and family leave. The full report can be found here.

The pandemic has turbocharged a movement to eliminate SAT and ACT testing requirements for college applicants. Advocates have argued for years that the tests penalize freshmen who lack access to good teachers and prep courses. We report that a record number of schools have made the tests optional in the past few weeks — “actions that could presage a broad shift away from admissions testing in higher education.”

A psychologist explains why the pandemic is making you dream about organizing a duck boat tour at an eerily deserted shopping mall where all the stores are shrouded in wrapping paper, or, you know, whatever’s on your subconscious.

Sunday, April 12, 2020 The latest

The brain trust behind the federal government’s war on the coronavirus is “a bureaucratic nesting doll” of oft-competing task forces that have produced no clear plan to end the crisis, The Washington Post reports. There is the official task force led by Vice President Pence; the “shadow task force” led by presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner; the new “Opening Our Country Council”; and a splinter group of medical professionals. And then there is President Trump, who often overrides and undermines whatever decisions these groups manage to make. Read our story on the problems with this system, based on interviews with 22 White House insiders.

Live updates

Track deaths and confirmed cases in the United States at the county level.

Follow the spread of the outbreak worldwide with our updating map.

Post reporters across the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day.

Read the latest about the cases and impact in the D.C. area.

How you can help people in need The Washington Post Helping Hand covid-19 relief campaign

Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.

Your questions, answered

I have heard that pollution has greatly decreased recently as a result of reduced air and vehicular traffic. Is this so? Is the impact large enough to convince those who do not ‘believe’ in global warming to see the wisdom in reducing emissions? — Christine in California

We can’t predict how people will respond to the evidence, but yes, the global economic shutdown appears to be significantly reducing all the muck in the atmosphere.

The notoriously smoggy Los Angeles region has seen marked drops in nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate pollution since residents were ordered to stay at home  — “the longest stretch of ‘good’ air quality in March seen since at least 1995,” The Post writes.

Similar improvements have been mapped in the Mid-Atlantic, Northeast, Ohio Valley and Southwest — and across the world as far away as China. And carbon dioxide emissions that drive global warming have temporarily relented, somewhat, after many flights were grounded.

It’s still unclear what this data means for the long-term health of the planet, but if there is any silver lining to the global crisis, it’s been the chance for scientists to study a drastic reduction in pollution in real time. Read our story for more details and check out maps comparing March 2019 to March 2020.

COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

Mar 28, 2020  Nucleus Medical Media

This video animation on COVID-19 and the coronavirus is a collaboration between Nucleus Medical Media and our friends at the What If Channel. To watch super interesting hypothetical scenarios on the human body, humanity, the planet and the cosmos, please visit the What If Channel at https://www.youtube.com/WhatIfScience….

Category   Education

The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition

Apr 8, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Seth steps away from bleak and depressing news to share news stories about a Rhode Island liquor distillery making free hand sanitizer, a bagpipe player celebrating St. Patrick’s Day and a socially distant wedding. Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se… LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/ Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. GET MORE NBC Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbctv The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/aamLkhipjjg Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenight…

Category   Comedy

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats, Google, The Washington Post, and Thisiscolossal  

PBS News: April 7 – 10, 2020, The potential consequences of the auto emissions rollback, and As the world stays home, will the environment improve?

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Thisiscolossal: Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest, and An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 10, 2020

Apr 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the global death toll from coronavirus passes the 100,000 mark. Plus: Sen. Bernie Sanders on ending his presidential campaign and responding to the pandemic, small business owners struggle for economic relief, sacred sites are empty and quiet during Holy Week, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and how Ina Garten is cooking through social distancing. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Global deaths top 100,000; Trump talks of reopening economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN5zX… Bernie Sanders on how he will support Joe Biden’s campaign https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHkim… News Wrap: Oil producers agree to cut global supply https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zvaL… Why it’s difficult for small businesses to get federal aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bhrz… Pandemic turns Holy Week celebrations empty and silent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWSA-… Shields and Brooks on COVID-19 suffering, Sanders’ exit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8aok… How Ina Garten is cooking through social distancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbmQD… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Apr 9, 2020

Streamed live 9 hours ago

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 8, 2020

Apr 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the human cost of the novel coronavirus pandemic continues to rise worldwide, but there are some signs of hope. Plus: Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., ends his presidential bid, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on his state’s pandemic response, an ER doctor in New York on treating and surviving COVID-19, homeless in a pandemic, U.S. Navy upheaval and coronavirus in Scandinavia. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 7, 2020

Apr 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, although U.S. coronavirus deaths keep rising, there are signs of hope in the New York epicenter. Plus: A conversation with Bill Gates about responding to COVID-19, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on the effort to find PPE, EMTs on the front lines of the health crisis and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on what early COVID-19 data tells us about racial disparities in health care. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS New York sees signs of virus plateau; Wuhan lockdown lifted https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cio3J… Bill Gates on where the COVID-19 pandemic will hurt the most https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3qz9… News Wrap: Acting Navy secretary resigns after controversy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tw4AX… Md. Gov. Larry Hogan on efforts to catch up to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wqrwt… What 2 EMTs are seeing as they respond to NY virus outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAZEK… Chicago’s mayor on racial disparities in COVID-19 data https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9t0j… 2 views on Wisconsin’s holding in-person voting Tuesday  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s98nF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The potential consequences of the auto emissions rollback

Apr 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Earlier this week, in the midst of the global coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration relaxed automobile fuel efficiency standards that were put in place under the Obama administration to combat climate change. Coral Davenport, energy and environment policy reporter for The New York Times, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on the potential consequences of the decision. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

As the world stays home, will the environment improve?

Apr 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

As more and more people stay at home during the pandemic, millions of vehicles are no longer on the roads and the skies are comparatively free of airplanes. Many other human activities that cause air pollution also have been scaled back. But will this lull in activity make a difference in the air we breathe or the future of climate change? NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Worldwide cases

 Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 1,696,139 218.13 376,200 102,669
United States 504,780 1,531.7 28,993 18,763
Spain 158,273 3,360.33 55,668 16,081
Italy 147,577 2,449.68 30,445 18,849
Germany 122,215 1,469.83 42,155 2,707
France 90,676 1,351.84 24,932 13,197
China 81,953 58.45 77,525 3,339
United Kingdom 73,758 1,110.22 8,958
Iran 68,192 818.33 35,465 4,232

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack
Saturday, April 4, 2020

By Avi Selk   Email
The latest

This newsletter usually opens with the U.S. death toll, but today let’s spend a moment on the day toll: The early days of the spread of the coronavirus in which crucial opportunities to respond were squandered by systemic federal government failures, as chronicled in several new stories.

Seventy days elapsed from the first time the White House was formally notified of the outbreak in China on Jan. 3 until President Trump began to treat the virus “as a lethal force that had outflanked America’s defenses and was poised to kill tens of thousands of citizens,” according to Washington Post reporting based on 47 interviews with administration officials, public health experts, intelligence officers and others.

Twenty-one days in February were lost as the administration relied on a coronavirus test known to be flawed and prevented private labs from deploying better ones, blinding doctors and scientists as the virus spread across the country. Read our deep dive into scientists’ alarm and exasperation during that period.

Eighteen months ago — long before the outbreak — “the Trump administration received detailed plans for a new machine designed to churn out millions of protective respirator masks at high speed during a pandemic,” we report in another story. It was never built, and the U.S. government is now so desperate for masks it has asked 3M to stop sending them to Canada and other countries, prompting Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to warn the United States would be “hurting itself as much as Canada” because essential goods and services flow both ways.

Eleven days from now, the country will need 32,000 ventilators, far more than are in the government stockpile, according to an estimate by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Because U.S. officials played down the virus for so long, Ford and General Motors only recently overhauled their factories to make the machines, and the bulk of their production won’t come on line until May. Read more here.

These cumulative problems mean “the United States will likely go down as the country that was supposedly best prepared to fight a pandemic but ended up catastrophically overmatched by the novel coronavirus, sustaining heavier casualties than any other nation,” we write in our story on the 70 lost days.

Other numbers: The U.S. has suffered more than 7,800 deaths and more than 290,000 confirmed infections from the virus. The jobless rate jumped to 4.4 percent in March, its sharpest one-month rise since 1975. Millions of Americans have been laid off or furloughed, more than 60,000 stores have shuttered, and analysts say many of them will never open again. A week after Trump signed a $2.2 trillion stimulus bill, key Democrats are already talking about another one.

And new signs of dysfunction: After a behind-the-scenes debate between officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and White House officials, Trump unenthusiastically announced the agency’s recommendation that Americans start wearing face coverings in public. Even as he shared the guidance, Trump said he would not follow it himself. Read more about that here.

Live updates

Track deaths and confirmed cases in the U.S. at the county level.

Follow the spread of the outbreak worldwide with our updating map.

Post reporters across the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day.

Read live updates about the cases and impact in the D.C. area.

How you can help people in need The Washington Post Helping Hand covid-19 relief campaign

Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.

 

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack

Sunday, April 5, 2020

By Avi Selk   Email

 

The latest

“This is going to be the hardest and saddest week of most Americans’ lives, Surgeon General Jerome M. Adams said on Fox News today, as hospitals in the New York region and other high-infection areas brace for an expected surge in patients and deaths. “This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment, only it’s not going to be localized. It’s going to be happening all over the country.”

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) said his state could run out of ventilators as soon as Thursday, and ICU beds two days later. Some other states are projecting the crisis to peak in late April or May.

We sent reporters to the front lines: two rarely-seen treatment centers in New York, which already accounts for almost half the nation’s 9,000-plus coronavirus deaths. Read what it’s like inside Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, where 80 percent of patients have the virus, visitors are banned and an ICU nurse sings to the dying, though most can no longer hear her.

Then read about the surreal scene in Manhattan, where a 2.1 million-square-foot convention center has been turned into a militarized hospital: “Here, if someone ‘pops hot,’ as one soldier said, they’ll be descended upon by medics and rushed to an isolation tent.”

President Trump said 1,000 military doctors and nurses will deploy to New York City, and urged states to share any spare ventilators with others amid a national shortage. Oregon has pledged to donate most of its reserve supply of ventilators to New York — though those 140 machines will still leave the nation’s coronavirus epicenter far short of what state officials say are needed.

A Post analysis of more than 3,600 deaths in 13 states found evidence of a strange pattern that doctors have been reporting anecdotally: The virus appears to be killing significantly more men than women, for reasons no one can explain. The U.S. death toll is almost certainly being undercounted due to a shortage of tests, federal health officials acknowledge. Read about what that means here.

We have another insider piece, in the form of a column by David Ignatius, on the unusual ouster of Navy Capt. Brett Crozier, who was removed from command of a virus-stricken aircraft carrier in Guam after he wrote a plea for help to his superiors that leaked to the media. “Breaking news: Trump wants him fired,” Acting Navy secretary Thomas Modly reportedly told a colleague the day before he personally removed Crozier from the ship.

Mental health check: It’s not easy for any of us to contend with all the grim news while we watch everything that was familiar about our daily lives fade away. It can actually be dangerous, if we fail to recognize signs of serious maladies amid the chaos. We talked with mental health professionals about how you can take an honest look at yourself and determine what type of help you might need. Please read it, and be safe.

Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

OCTOBER 17, 2019  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Land of the eagle by Audun Rikardsen, Norway. Winner 2019, Behaviour: Birds. All images © their respective photographers, and shared courtesy of Natural History Museum, London

This week, London’s Natural History Museum announced the winners of its 55th Wildlife Photographer of the Year showcase. More than 48,000 amateur and professional photographers from 100 countries shared their best shots and a jury of nine experts selected the winners. Some of this year’s jurors included Kathy Moran, Senior Editor for Natural History at National Geographic Magazine; nature photographer Theo Bosboom; Melissa Dale, Acting Director of Photography at The Nature Conservancy; conservation photojournalist Paul Hilton; and writer and editor Rosamund ‘Roz’ Kidman Cox OBE, who chaired the committee.

The nineteen winners were selected across categories including animal behavior of mammals, birds, and invertebrates, along with animal portraits, plants and fungi, earth’s environment, and special categories for youth and emerging photographers. We’ve included 10 of our favorites here, including a golden eagle about to land by Audun Rikardsen, a life-or-death duel between a marmot and a fox by Yongqing Bao, and a hummingbird hawkmoth caught mid-sip by Thomas Easterbrook. To see more of the top finishers, check out our September coverage of this year’s finalists, and see the full show at the Natural History Museum in London now through May 31, 2020. Submissions for the 2020 competition open on October 21, 2019.

The architectural army by Daniel Kronauer, USA. Winner 2019, Behaviour: Invertebrates

The equal match by Ingo Arndt, Germany. Joint Winner 2019, Behaviour: Mammals

Tapestry of life by Zorica Kovacevic, Serbia/USA. Winner 2019, Plants and Fungi

Snow-plateau nomads by Shangzhen Fan China. Winner 2019, Animals in Their Environment

The moment by Yongqing Bao, China. Joint Winner 2019, Behaviour: Mammals

Early riser by Riccardo Marchgiani, Italy. Winner 2019, 15-17 years old

Face of deception by Ripan Biswas, India. Winner 2019, Animal Portraits

The huddle by Stefan Christmann, Germany. Winner 2019, Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio Award

Humming surprise by Thomas Easterbrook, UK. Winner 2019, 10 years and under

Pennsylvania man captures all walks of life crossing log bridge

Aug 30, 2019  WSLS 10

The video, taken year-round, shows bears, deer, bobcats, grouse, beavers and many other wildlife crossing the bridge, or swimming underneath in their natural habitats. Credit: Robert Bush.

Category  Pets & Animals

An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

MARCH 3, 2020  GRACE EBERT

A log in Pennsylvania has gotten a lot of foot—and talon and paw—traffic during the last year. In trail camera footage captured by photographer Robert Bush Sr., local wildlife is shown crossing the downed tree throughout 2018 and 2019. A black bear frequents the location, in addition to grouse, bobcats, deer, squirrels, and beavers, which all are caught scurrying over the log or wading through the water. Despite their regular visits, though, none of the species seem to run into each other. For more clips of the animals’ travel routines, head to Bush’s Facebook and YouTube pages. (via Laughing Squid)

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PBS News, Africanews, ABC (Australia), Sky News, Roylab Stats, Google, and BBC News-In Pictures

PBS News: April 3-6, 2020, and Why Trump wants to relax automotive fuel efficiency standards now

 Africanews Live

 ABC (Australia) Live

 Sky News Live

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

BBC News: In Pictures Coronavirus: Photos show deserted lockdown locations at high noon

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 6, 2020

Apr 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the coronavirus continues its deadly spread across the globe, with U.S. fatalities from the disease surpassing 10,000. Plus: What hospitals across the country are dealing with, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear, pregnancy amid a pandemic, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, the Middle East’s fragile health systems brace for COVID-19 and Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. death toll passes 10,000; British prime minister in ICU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCCOv… HHS survey reveals major COVID-19 challenges for hospitals https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4YZx… COVID-19 ‘is a test of our humanity,’ says Kentucky governor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biuAA… News Wrap: Atkinson urges other watchdogs not to be silenced https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtOwZ… What it’s like to be pregnant during a global pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PO2Z2… Pritzker says he hates bidding against other states for PPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FihsV… Middle East’s fragile health care systems brace for COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POJe_… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on postponed 2020 primaries https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqWKQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April 5, 2020

Apr 5, 2020   PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 5, President Trump predicts tough weeks ahead as the death toll from the coronavirus mounts, how the outbreak has forced the medical community to use telehealth, a look at the impact the outbreak may have on science skeptics, and should parents lower the bar while working and caring for their children at home? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April 4, 2020

Apr 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 4, the latest on the coronavirus, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis issues a statewide stay-at-home order in response to the pandemic, the potential consequences of the Trump administration’s rollback of automobile efficiency standards, and what the global slowdown means for air pollution and climate change. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full show, Apr 3, 2020

Apr 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, coronavirus deaths across the U.S. are still accelerating, as economic conditions grow dire. Plus: A conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci, Sen. Chuck Schumer on congressional response to the pandemic, the desperate need for more medical professionals, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks and how these Maryland residents are sewing hope for health care workers. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS U.S. economic losses mount, but virus peak still lies ahead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvjJU… Fauci on face masks and staying home as virus spreads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXjRf… News Wrap: 2 members of Kennedy family missing in Maryland https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cr2pO… Schumer on how to control pandemic-induced recession https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHmae… Medical students, retired doctors heed call to service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQQ3E… Shields and Brooks on political lessons from COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXYaT… Mask shortage spurs Americans to take action — by sewing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ymbpn… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Why Trump wants to relax automotive fuel efficiency standards now

Mar 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The Trump administration wants to roll back another federal regulation intended to reduce global warming. Obama-era automobile fuel efficiency rules require U.S. vehicles to increase mileage standards by an average of 5 percent per year from 2021 through 2026. Tuesday’s move would reduce the improvement threshold to 1.5 percent. The Washington Post’s Juliet Eilperin joins John Yang to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch ABC News live

Started streaming on Mar 19, 2020  ABC News (Australia)

ABC News channel provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad. Including the latest coronavirus updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: http://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Worldwide cases

Location Confirmed Recovered Deaths

 

 

Worldwide 1,341,907 276,259 74,565

United States

366,153 19,522 10,831

Spain

136,675 40,437 13,341

 

Italy

132,547 22,837 16,523

Germany

103,375 25,280 1,810

China

81,740 77,167 3,331

France

74,390 17,250 8,911

Iran

60,500 24,236 3,739

United Kingdom

51,608 5,373

Turkey

30,217 1,326 649

Switzerland

21,657 8,056 765

Belgium

20,814 3,986 1,632

Netherlands

18,803 1,867

Canada

16,653 3,616 323

Austria

12,297 3,441 220

Brazil

12,056 127 553

Portugal

11,730 140 311

South Korea

10,284 6,598 186

Israel

8,904 670 57

US cases

Location Confirmed Recovered Deaths

 

United States

366,153 19,522 10,831
New Jersey 41,090 92 1,003
New York 130,689 13,000 4,758
Michigan 17,221 5 727
Louisiana 14,867 512
Massachusetts 13,837 3,218 260
California 13,438 307 319
Pennsylvania 12,980 162
Florida 12,925 236
Illinois 11,256 274
Washington 7,984 338
Georgia 7,314 229
Texas 7,276 140
Connecticut 5,675 189
Colorado 4,950 140
Indiana 4,944 139
Maryland 4,045 184 91
Ohio 4,043 119

Updated less than 10 mins ago·

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-52127945?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/in_pictures&link_location=live-reporting-story

BBC News: In Pictures

Coronavirus: Photos show deserted lockdown locations at high noon

    2 April 2020

Related Topics  Coronavirus pandemic

Image copyright ALAA AL-MARJANI / REUTERS Image caption

A market near the Imam Ali shrine in Najaf, Iraq.

Reuters photographers have captured the silent streets and stations of the world amid the lockdown, with each photo taken at midday.

Transport hubs and high streets that were once some of the world’s busiest places are shown nearly deserted amid the many lockdowns happening around the globe owing to the coronavirus pandemic.

All photos were taken at midday on 31 March and feature a wristwatch or clock showing the time.

Image copyright MOHAMED AZAKIR / REUTERS Image caption

Martyrs’ Square in Beirut, Lebanon

Image copyright MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY / REUTERS Image caption

Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.

Image copyright HANNIBAL HANSCHKE / REUTERS Image caption

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin, Germany.

Image copyright TOBY MELVILLE / REUTERS Image caption

The Houses of Parliament on Westminster Bridge, London, UK.

Image copyright ANDREW KELLY / REUTERS Image caption

Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan, New York, US

Image copyright MAXIM SHEMETOV / REUTERS Image caption

The Kremlin and St Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia.

Image copyrightMANAURE QUINTERO / REUTERS Image caption

Bolivar Avenue in Caracas, Venezuela.

 Image copyright JONATHAN ERNST / REUTERS Image caption

United States Capitol, Washington, DC

 Image copyright MUHAMMAD HAMED / REUTERS Image caption

A Roman theatre in Amman, Jordan.

Image copyright GLEB GARANICH / REUTERS Image caption                                  Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) in Kyiv, Ukraine.

Image copyright MOHAMMED SALEM / REUTERS Image caption

 A beach in the northern Gaza Strip, Palestinian Territories Palestinian Territories.

 Image copyright ANTON VAGANOV / REUTERSImage caption

 The State Hermitage Museum in front of Palace Square in St Petersburg, Russia.

 Image copyright JORGE SILVA / REUTERS Image caption

Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram (the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, also known as the Grand Palace) in Bangkok, Thailand

Image copyright ISSEI KATO / REUTERS Image caption

Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo, Japan.

All photographs subject to copyright

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-52127945?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/in_pictures&link_location=live-reporting-story

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