PBS News, TED Talks, Pocket Worthy, New Small Joys, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: November12-17, 2019, Why Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line to fight climate change, Blockbuster da Vinci exhibition showcases the master’s ‘endless curiosity’, and Why German divisions remain, 30 years after fall of the Berlin Wall

TED Talks: Paul A Kramer Our immigration conversation is broken here’ s how to have a better one?, Juan Enriquez A personal plea for humanity at the us Mexico border, Jon Lowenstein Family hope and resilience on the migrant trail, and Will Hurd A wall won’t solve America’s border problems

Pocket Worthy:  How Einstein Learned Physics

New Small JoysSand Sculptures

Ing’s Peace Project: Peace artwork 2 – The Peace and Art Parade and festival run by the Barat Foundation in Newark on 10.23.2011, organized by Chandri and Gary Barat.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 17, 2019

Nov 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 17, public hearings in the ongoing impeachment inquiry enter a second week, a long-awaited project in Italy that could help keep Venice afloat, and how Australia is trying to save the almost-extinct koalas. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 16, 2019

Nov 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 16, key takeaways from hearings in the impeachment inquiry. Also, a look at Kernza, a little-known grain with several environmental benefits. Karina Mitchell anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 15, 2019

Nov 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a second day of public impeachment hearings, featuring former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. Plus: President Trump’s longtime associate Roger Stone is found guilty of witness tampering and lying to Congress, protests in Hong Kong enter a new phrase, analysis of the latest political news with Shields and Brooks and rebuilding Notre Dame Cathedral. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 14, 2019

Nov 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accuses President Trump of committing bribery with his handling of Ukraine policy. Plus: Controversial emails from presidential adviser Stephen Miller, an exclusive look behind Taliban lines, fighting superbugs, businesses try to retain older employees, a book on elitism, artist Delano Dunn and student letters to the late Gwen Ifill. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 13, 2019

Nov 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a historic day in Washington with the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, featuring witnesses William Taylor and George Kent. Plus: Reaction to the diplomats’ testimonies from House members as well as legal and foreign policy experts, and why Turkish President Erdogan was welcomed at the White House despite U.S.-Turkey tensions over Syria. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What Taylor and Kent said in public impeachment hearings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5BPx… Collins says ‘nothing new’ in 1st public impeachment hearing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqFks… Speier says Mulvaney, Bolton should testify on Ukraine saga https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Z5fG… Experts analyze testimonies of William Taylor, George Kent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFvj3… Despite Syria tensions, Trump offers Erdogan a warm welcome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXM9t… News Wrap: Israeli airstrikes kill dozens in Gaza https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSspQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 12, 2019

Nov 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Supreme Court hears arguments around President Trump’s move to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. Plus: Impeachment hearings go public, holding gun manufacturers liable for mass shootings, how we got to impeachment, life on Israel’s Lebanon and Gaza borders, and how media giants are competing for Americans’ streaming entertainment dollars. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Supreme Court considers whether DACA termination was legal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrSdO… News Wrap: Bolivia’s Morales goes into exile in Mexico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyNVV… Democratic and Republican messages as public hearings begin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDuWj… Could Remington lawsuit shape state consumer protections? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrBPT… The key events that led to the Trump impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6sXq… For Israelis along the border, violence is a constant threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1QNh… Why more media companies want in on ‘streaming revolution’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=217_t… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Why Jane Fonda is putting herself on the line to fight climate change

Nov 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Jane Fonda has been a household name for decades due to her prolific acting career, both on-screen and on stage. She has also drawn sustained attention for her enduring — and sometimes controversial — activism. Judy Woodruff sits down with Fonda to discuss her climate advocacy, what it’s like to spend the night in jail and how young activists like Greta Thuneberg are shaping a new movement. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Blockbuster da Vinci exhibition showcases the master’s ‘endless curiosity’

Nov 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The blockbuster exhibit of the year celebrates Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years after his death. People are flocking to the Louvre Museum in Paris to see the work of the master, who was born in Italy, died in France and personified the expression Renaissance man. Jeffrey Brown went to see firsthand why da Vinci’s art is drawing massive crowds. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Why German divisions remain, 30 years after fall of the Berlin Wall

Nov 8, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

It’s been 30 years since one of the 20th century’s biggest historic events: the fall of the Berlin Wall. Although the East German dictatorship subsequently collapsed, cultural and political divisions remain, more than a generation after reunification. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant reports on the wall’s legacy, the polarizing issue of immigration and the lingering stain of anti-Semitism. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How did the US immigration debate get to be so divisive? In this informative talk, historian and writer Paul A. Kramer shows how an “insider vs. outsider” framing has come to dominate the way people in the US talk about immigration — and suggests a set of new questions that could reshape the conversation around whose life, rights and thriving matters.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Paul A. Kramer · Historian, writer

Paul A. Kramer’s work focuses on the changing relationships between the United States and the wider world.

More Resources

The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines

Paul A. Kramer

The University of North Carolina Press (2006)

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762,372 views

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Juan Enriquez · Author, academic, futurist

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and brain research will bring about in business, technology, politics and society.

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The Untied States of America: Polarization, Fracturing, and Our Future

Juan Enriquez

Crown (2005)

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

For the past 20 years, photographer and TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein has documented the migrant journey from Latin America to the United States, one of the largest transnational migrations in world history. Sharing photos from his decade-long project “Shadow Lives USA,” Lowenstein takes us into the inner worlds of the families escaping poverty and violence in Central America — and pieces together the complex reasons people leave their homes in search of a better life.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jon Lowenstein · Documentary photographer, filmmaker, visual artist

TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and visual artist whose work reveals what the powers that be are trying to hide.

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Shadow Lives

Jon Lowenstein

PREORDER NOW (2020)

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Support Shadow Lives, a decade-long project documenting the experiences and lives of the millions of people along the migrant trail.

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TEDSummit 2019 | July 2019

“Building a 30-foot-high concrete structure from sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” says Congressman Will Hurd, a Republican from Texas whose district encompasses two times zones and shares an 820-mile border with Mexico. Speaking from Washington, DC in a video interview with former state attorney general Anne Milgram, Hurd discusses the US government’s border policy and its controversial detention and child separation practices — and lays out steps toward a better future at the border. (Recorded at the TED World Theater in New York on September 10, 2019)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speakers

Will Hurd · Politician

Congressman Will Hurd represents the 23rd District of Texas in the U.S. House of Representatives, serving constituents across 29 counties and two time zones from San Antonio to El Paso.

Anne Milgram · Criminal justice reformer

Anne Milgram is committed to using data and analytics to fight crime.

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-einstein-learned-physics?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy Stories to fuel your mind.

How Einstein Learned Physics

Einstein was a student long before he became a celebrity. There is a lot to glean from his education and unique approach to learning.

Scott Young

Wanting to understand how Einstein learned physics may, at first, seem as pointless as trying to fly by watching birds and flapping your arms really hard. How do you emulate someone who is synonymous with genius?

However, I think the investigation can still bear fruits, even if you or I might not have the intellectual gifts to revolutionize physics. Whatever Einstein did to learn, he clearly did something right, so there’s merit in trying to figure out what that was.

How Smart Was Einstein? (Did He Really Fail Elementary Mathematics?)

One of the most common stories about Einstein is that he failed grade school math. I think this is one of those ideas that sounds so good it has to get repeated, regardless of whether it is true or not.

Unfortunately, it’s not true. Einstein was a strong math student from a very young age. He himself admits:

“I never failed in mathematics. Before I was fifteen, I had mastered differential and integral calculus.”

While the story about Einstein being an early dullard is certainly false, it’s not the case that he was universally regarded as a genius, either.

Einstein’s grades (highest grade = 6).

In college, Einstein often struggled in math, getting 5s and 6s (out of a possible 6) in physics, but getting only 4s in most of his math courses (barely a passing grade). His mathematics professor, and future collaborator, Hermann Minkowski called him a “lazy dog” and physics professor, Jean Pernet, even flunked Einstein with a score of 1 in an experimental physics course.

At the end of college, Einstein had the dubious distinction of graduating as the second-to-worst student in the class.

The difficulty Einstein had was undoubtedly due in part to his non-conformist streak and rebellious attitude, which didn’t sit well in an academic environment. This would follow him in his future academic career, when he was struggling to find teaching jobs at universities, even after he had already done the work which would later win him the Nobel prize.

Einstein’s discoveries in physics were truly revolutionary, which certainly earns him the title of “genius” by any reasonable standard. However, the early picture of Einstein is more complicated than that. All of this indicates to me, at least, that it can often be very easy to judge the genius of someone after the fact, but perhaps harder to predict in advance.

How Did Einstein Learn Math and Physics?

Given Einstein’s enormous contributions to physics, I think it’s now worthwhile to ask how he learned it.

Throughout the biography, I took notes whenever his methods of learning and discovery were mentioned. Then, I tried to synthesize these observations into several methods or behaviors that appeared to have enabled both Einstein’s revolutionary discoveries and his deep understanding of the subject matter.

1. Learning comes from solving hard problems, not attending classes.

One thing that becomes apparent when looking at Einstein’s early schooling was both his distaste for rote memorization and attending classes. The physics professor that flunked him, did so, in no small part, because Einstein often skipped class. As he claims, “I played hooky a lot and studied the masters of theoretical physics with a holy zeal at home.”

Einstein as a boy.

This habit of skipping classes to focus on solving hard problems in his spare time was one cultivated by his uncle, Jakob Einstein, who first introduced him to algebra. By the time he was 12, Einstein already had a, “predilection for solving complicated problems in arithmetic,” and his parents bought him an advanced mathematical textbook he could study from during the summer.

Einstein learned physics, not by dutifully attending classes, but by obsessively playing with the ideas and equations on his own. Doing, not listening, was the starting point for how he learned physics.

2. You really know something when you can prove it yourself.

How do you know when you really understand something? Einstein’s method was to try prove the proposition himself! This began at an early age, when Uncle Jakob, challenged him to prove Pythagoras’s Theorem:

“After much effort, I succeeded in ‘proving’ this theorem on the basis of the similarity of triangles,” Einstein recalled.

Isaacson explains that Einstein, “tackled new theories by trying to prove them on his own.” This approach to learning physics, which came naturally to Einstein, was driven by a strong curiosity both to know how things actually work, and a belief that, “nature could be understood as a relatively simple mathematical structure.”

What’s important to note here is not only the method of proving propositions to learn physics, but also the drive to do so. It’s clear that Einstein’s curiosity wasn’t merely to perform adequately, but to develop a deep understanding and intuition about physical concepts.

3. Intuition matters more than equations.

Einstein was a better intuitive physicist than he was a mathematician. In fact, it was only when he struggled for years in developing general relativity, that he became more enamored with mathematical formalisms as a way of doing physics.

An early influence which encouraged this intuitive approach to physics was a series of science books by Aaron Bernstein. These books presented imaginative pictures to understand physical phenomenon, such as, “an imaginary trip through space,” to understand an electrical signal and even discussing the constancy of the speed of light, a matter which would later underpin Einstein’s discovery of special relativity.

Swiss education reformer Pestalozzi emphasized learning through images, not by rote.

Einstein’s later education in Aarau, Switzerland, was heavily influenced by the philosophy of Swiss educational reformer, Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi. Pestalozzi claimed, “Visual understanding is the essential and only true means of teaching how to judge things correctly,” adding, “the learning of numbers and language must definitely be subordinated.”

Were these early influences causal factors in Einstein’s later preferred style of visualization to solve physics problems, or were they merely a welcome encouragement for a mind that was already predisposed to reasoning in this way? It’s hard to tell. Whatever the case, I think it can be argued that developing intuitions of ideas, particularly visual intuitions, has an invaluable role in physics.

How does one develop those intuitions? Einstein’s own thoughts were that “intuition is nothing but the outcome of earlier intellectual experience.” Einstein’s hard work building understanding through proofs and solving problems undoubtedly supported his ability to visualize as much as it benefited from it.

4. Thinking requires a quiet space and deep focus.

Einstein was a master of deep work. He had an incredible ability to focus, his son reporting:

“Even the loudest baby-crying didn’t seem to disturb Father,” adding, “He could go on with his work completely impervious to noise.”

Although overlooked for academic positions, it was his intellectually unstimulating job at the Bern patent office, which gave him time and privacy to unravel the mysteries of relativity. Einstein remarks:

“I was able to do a full day’s work in only two or three hours. The remaining part of the day, I would work out my own ideas.”

Einstein in his home office.

The obsessive focus Einstein applied to solving problems as a young boy, eventually served him well in cracking general relativity, culminating in an “exhausting four-week frenzy.” This intensity sometimes impacted his health, with him developing stomach problems in his strain to unravel the difficult mathematics of tensor field equations.

Einstein’s ability to focus, combined with a reverence for solitude, allowed him to do some of his best work in physics. Even as he aged, he still spent many hours on his boat, idly pushing the rudder seemingly lost in thought, interrupted by bursts of scribbling equations in his notebook.

5. Understand ideas through thought experiments.

Einstein’s most famous method for learning and discovering physics has to be the thought experiment.

Books such as this were Einstein’s first introduction to the power of thought experiments.

One of his most famous was imagining riding on a beam of light. What would happen to the light beam as he rode alongside it at the same speed? Well, it would have to freeze. This, to Einstein, seemed impossible by his faith in Maxwell’s electromagnetic equations. But if the light doesn’t freeze, what must happen?

These thought experiments were built on his intuitive understanding of physics, which in turn was built on his experience with working through theories and problems. Their strength, however, was to draw attention to contradictions or confusions that may have been missed by a less intuitive physicist.

His ability to engage in thought experiments even served him when he ended up being wrong about the underlying physics. It was exactly this type of thought experiment that he suggested to refute the current understanding of quantum physics in what is now known as the ERP paper, which showed that quantum mechanics could create changes in a system instantaneously, violating the speed of light. In this case, however, Einstein’s intuition was wrong—quantum mechanical systems do behave in such bizarre ways—which is now known as quantum entanglement.

6. Overturn common sense … with more common sense.

Special and general relativity stand out as being some of the most mind-bending scientific discoveries of all time. With special relativity, Einstein discovered that there is no absolute time—that two people moving at different speeds can disagree about the passage of time—with neither being right or wrong. With general relativity, Einstein went further, showing that gravity bends space and time.

Einstein at age 42, the year he won the Nobel prize.

It would be reasonable to assume, therefore, that to overturn such commonsense principles would require some departure from common sense. However, Einstein’s genius was to reconcile two commonsense principles—relativity and the constancy of the speed of light—by discarding a third (the idea of absolute measurements of space and time).

Einstein’s talent, it would seem, lay in his ability to defend what he thought were the most reasonable ideas, even if that meant discarding ones which had a longer tradition of being thought to be correct.

This skill of overturning commonsense with other intuitions may have also eventually been behind his inability to accept quantum mechanics, a very successful theory of physics that he himself helped create. His intuitions about strict determinism, led him to champion an unsuccessful and quixotic quest to overturn the theory for much of his life.

This practice also suggests a method for learning the many, counter-intuitive principles of math and physics—start by building off of a different commonsense premise.

7. Insights come from friendly walks.

While solitude and focus were essential components of how Einstein learned and did physics, it was often conversations with other people that provided his breakthroughs.

Albert Einstein with Michele Besso.

The most famous example of this was a walk with longtime friend Michele Besso. During his struggles with special relativity, he walked with his friend trying to explain his theory. Frustrated, he declared that, “he was going to give up,” working on the theory. Suddenly, however, the correct insight came to him and the next day he told Besso that he had, “completely solved the problem.”

Discussing ideas aloud, sharing them with others, can often put together insights that were previously unconnected. Einstein made great use of this technique of discussing tricky problems with friends and colleagues, even if they were merely a sounding board rather than an active participant in the discussion.

8. Be rebellious.

Einstein was never much of a conformist. While his rebellious streak probably hurt his earlier academic career when he was struggling to find work in physics, it is also probably what enabled his greatest discoveries and accentuated his later celebrity.

This rebelliousness likely helped him in learning physics as he pushed against the traditions and orthodoxy he didn’t agree with. He hated the German educational system, finding in Isaacson’s words, “the style of teaching—rote drills, impatience with questioning—to be repugnant.” This rejection of the common educational method encouraged him to learn physics on his own through textbooks and practice.

Later, the same rebelliousness would be essential in revolutionizing physics. His research on the quantization of light, for instance, had been first discovered by Max Planck. However, unlike the older Planck, Einstein saw the quantization as being a physical reality—photons—rather than a mathematical contrivance. He was less attached to the predominant theory of the time that light was a wave in the ether.

Where many students would have been happy to conform to predominant educational and theoretical orthodoxies, Einstein wasn’t satisfied unless something made sense to him personally.

9. All knowledge starts with curiosity.

“Curiosity has its own reason for existing,” Einstein explains. “One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality.”

Einstein, curious until the end.

This curiosity is probably Einstein’s most defining quality, after his intelligence. His love of physics started as a boy when he was given a compass and fascinated by the idea that the needle moved because of an unseen force.

Curiosity was his motivation for learning physics. Einstein, who could be quite lazy and obstinate when a matter didn’t interest him, nonetheless had an intense passion for understanding the things, “the ordinary adult never bothers his head about.” Curiosity was also, in his own mind, the greatest reason for his accomplishments.

Einstein believed that, “love is a better teacher than a sense of duty.” Love of learning and knowledge is, perhaps, a more important skill to cultivate than discipline.

Learning as Einstein Did

Einstein’s approach towards learning cannot be entirely separated from who he was. Was his obsessive focus a result of his intelligence or his curiosity? Did his ability to easily visualize thought experiments come from encouragement in an unusual Swiss education system, extensive practice or natural ability? Was his revolution in physics a product of genius, rebelliousness, luck or maybe all three? I’m not sure there are clear answers to any of those questions.

What is clear, however, was Einstein’s reverence for nature and the humbled attitude to which he approached investigating it. As he wrote:

“A spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe—a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble.”

And, so even if Einstein’s genius may lay outside the reach of most of us, his curiosity, humility and tenacity are still worth emulating.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/how-einstein-learned-physics?utm_source=pocket-newtab

40+ Amazing Sand Sculptures That Breathes Life Into Sand

If you’re at the beach and done with swimming what can you do? Most will build sand castles and sculptures, but some decide to go ahead and create art.

Sand art, or sand sculptures, in particular, have been quite popular and competitions and exhibitions are regularly held across the world. Of course, sand castles are the most known form of sand sculptures as kids just love building them.

It turns out to create more professional looking and detailed sand sculptures, just sand, and water will suffice – but it’s important that special sculpture sand is being used in order to maintain a stable structure.

Below is a list of 55 most amazing sand sculptures across the world that will probably give you a whole new perspective on using sand to build art.

1) Wonderland

With a beautiful sand castle like this, people would immediately want to jump in and accompany Alice on her journey to Wonderland.

Source: Octopodart

2) Rebel, rebel

Sometimes, statues are just a little bit too mainstream. Sand statues are just so much cooler! Someone made this amazing sculpture in David Bowie’s honor. The king of pop rock would definitely be proud.

Source: mcelliot_travel

3) Sand Dragon

Just look at the details of this wonderfully crafted dragon! Everything has been meticulously created, from his teeth up to his eyes and even the woman standing before the dragon’s very eyes. A true work of art.

Source: See The World With Green Eyes

4) Arabian Nights

This beautiful sculpture of Sheherazade was built in the Netherlands. The story of 1001 Nights or Arabian Nights has been told over many centuries, and this is an amazing representation of that story, created with sand.

Source: Svenpunt

5) Hey Mickey

Every year, the coastal city of Ostend in Belgium organizes a summer sand sculpture festival. One year, the main theme was Disney, so this welcoming Mickey Mouse was standing near the entry to say hello to all visitors!

Source: Happy_Love_Life_24

6) Welcoming hands

There is only one word to describe this sand sculpture: beautiful. The details are incredible, as you can see the ridges of the fingerprints, for example. And who wouldn’t want to welcome a cute baby like this with both hands?

Source: dehaenmichelle

7) Ready to ride

This picture was taken at an Oktoberfest event in Germany. Aside from drinking lots of beer during the festivities, you can apparently also spot great sand sculptures such as this one!

Source: Carl, Flickr

8) Sandglobes

These balls of sand are known as ‘sandglobes’, and putting them in formations such as these makes for a really appealing structure. This particular work of art was created by sand artist Naija Fatima.

Source: Sandglobes

9) For the GoT fans

If you’ve ever watched Game of Thrones, you’ll immediately recognize these two. The sand sculpture version of Daenerys Targaryen and her dragon looks amazing!

Source: Realalexander

10) Miniature city

Not every sand sculpture needs to be humongous and imposing, smaller pieces such as this one manage to capture the finesse of sand art perfectly too. This small and charming sand city in Australia looks like a real-life painting!

Source: georgie_girl_by_sandra

Ing’s Peace Project: Peace artwork 2   

The Peace and Art Parade and festival run by the Barat Foundation in Newark on 10.23.2011, organized by Chandri and Gary Barat.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

It took me a while to be able to complete this project.  I spent some time to compose this second finished artwork for the Peace Project.  The writings were the comments from the people on “What does Peace mean to you?” at the Washington Park and some of the people who participated in the Creation Nation Art and Peace Parade on Sunday, October 23, 2011, Newark, New Jersey, USA.

Link to Peace Project and Creation Art Peace Parade Page:

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PBS News, BBC News, TED Talks, Unexplained Mysteries, My Modern Met, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: November 5-11, 2019

BBC News: Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager, and Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

TED Talks: Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck the price of a clean internet, Claire Wardle How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust, and Misha Glenny Hire the hackers,

Unexplained Mysteries: 5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

My Modern Met: Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

Ing’s Peace Project: Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland

PBS NewsHour full episode November 11, 2019

Nov 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.47M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, embattled Bolivian President Evo Morales resigns, leaving the country with a vacuum of power. Plus: Violence grips Hong Kong protests, an impeachment inquiry update, how Rudy Giuliani became involved with Ukraine, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, the Supreme Court takes up DACA “Dreamers,” rural arts in Minnesota and a Veterans Day commemoration. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 10, 2019

Nov 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, November 10, three officials will testify in public hearings this week as part of the impeachment inquiry, and humanitarian workers along the U.S.-Mexico border face prosecution under federal law for helping undocumented migrants. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 9, 2019

Nov 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 9, Republicans release their witness wishlist, why Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Graham Nash is performing his lesser-known tracks, and Marie Kondo’s tidying tricks for kids. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 8, 2019

Nov 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, House committees release transcripts from two more witnesses in the impeachment inquiry — and President Trump expresses anger toward the whistleblower. Plus: The 30th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s collapse, Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week’s political news, a brief but spectacular take on comedy and the year’s blockbuster Leonardo da Vinci exhibition. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How depositions link Mulvaney to Ukraine impeachment saga https://youtu.be/Km8TDlhoUGg News Wrap: Anonymous staffer’s book says Trump unfit to lead https://youtu.be/0qQHD_IvDEk 30 years after Berlin Wall, why German divisions remain https://youtu.be/zdif8sKubJM Shields and Brooks on impeachment hearings, state elections https://youtu.be/e664ih4ByQ8 Scott Aukerman on the origins of ‘Between Two Ferns’ https://youtu.be/UQQGS7TJCIg Louvre exhibition showcases da Vinci’s ‘endless curiosity’ https://youtu.be/eblCEzB0M0c Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 7, 2019

Nov 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

Thursday on the NewsHour, how far did President Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, go to circumvent normal U.S. diplomatic channels with Ukraine? Plus: Saudi Arabia uses Twitter to target dissent, California fire fallout for utility PG&E, the latest on the health care marketplace, privacy issues around DNA testing, toxic pollution over India and Jane Fonda’s climate change crusade. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 6, 2019

Nov 6, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, election results from high-profile races in Kentucky, Mississippi and Virginia. Plus: The latest revelations from the impeachment inquiry, a conversation with Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the risks and benefits of genetic genealogy in solving crimes, the launch of NewsHour’s Broken Justice podcast and Ben Crump’s new book about the racist flaws of American criminal justice. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode November 5, 2019

Nov 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour   

Tuesday on the NewsHour, transcripts are released from the testimonies of two figures central to the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Analysis of and reaction to the newly released transcripts, U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate deal, criminal justice reform in Oklahoma, standardized tests in higher education admissions, rejecting white supremacy and a new film from actor and director Edward Norton. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Vaping nearly killed me, says British teenager

By James Gallagher Health and science correspondent

Image copyright Ewan Fisher

A teenage boy nearly died after vaping caused a catastrophic reaction in his lungs, doctors in Nottingham say.

Ewan Fisher was connected to an artificial lung to keep him alive after his own lungs failed and he could not breathe.

Ewan told BBC News e-cigarettes had “basically ruined me” and urged other young people not to vape.

His doctors say vaping is “not safe”, although health bodies in the UK say it is 95% safer than tobacco.

Listen: Beyond Today – Can vaping kill you?

What happened?

Ewan started vaping in early 2017. He was 16 at the time and wanted to quit smoking to improve his boxing.

Despite being under age, he said, “it was easy” to buy either cigarettes or e-cigarettes.

In May that year, Ewan was finding it harder and harder to breathe.

His mother took Ewan to accident and emergency on the night before his GCSE exams, because he was coughing and choking in his sleep.

His lungs were failing and he very quickly ended up on life-support in intensive care in Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham.

“I thought I was going to die,” Ewan told BBC News.

Ewan was getting worse. Even ventilation could not get enough oxygen into his body and his life was in the balance.

Image copyright Ewan Fisher Image caption Ewan was attached to an ECMO machine to keep him alive

He was taken to Leicester and attached to an artificial lung or ECMO (extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) machine.

“This machine saved my life,” he said.

Large tubes took blood out of Ewan, removed the carbon dioxide, added oxygen and pumped the blood back into his body.

“He had very serious respiratory failure, he had to go to ECMO and that is a very big deal,” Dr Jayesh Bhatt, a consultant at Nottingham University Hospitals, told BBC News.

“He got as ill as anyone can get.”

The case – from May 2017 – has just come to light in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

How is Ewan now?

Ewan, who is 19 on Tuesday, had a long recovery. It was six months before he was properly up and, on his feet, again.

“I’m still not back to normal, I’d say 75-80%, it’s in the last six months that I’m feeling a bit stronger in myself,” he said.

“Vaping has basically ruined me, I try to tell everyone and they think I’m being stupid, I tell my mates and they don’t listen.

“They still do it, they all still vape, but they’ve seen what I’ve been through.

“Is it worth risking your life for smoking e-cigs?

“I don’t want you to end up like me and I don’t want you to be dead, I wouldn’t wish [that] on anyone.”

Ewan also fears being around other vapers – everywhere from the pub to High Street – could damage his lungs again.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-50377256

Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxCERN, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speakers

Hans Block · Filmmaker, theater director, musician

Under the label Laokoon, Hans Block develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

Moritz Riesewieck · Author, scriptwriter, theater and film director

Under the label Laokoon, Moritz Riesewieck develops films, theatre productions, essays, lecture performances and radio plays that deal with the question of how our idea of humans and society change or can be transformed in the digital era.

More Resources

The Cleaners

Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck

Gebrueder Beetz Filmproduktion (2018)

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxCERN | November 2018

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

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Learn more skills to help you navigate the online world.

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TED2019 | April 2019

Journalist Andrew Marantz spent three years embedded in the world of internet trolls and social media propagandists, seeking out the people who are propelling fringe talking points into the heart of conversation online and trying to understand how they’re making their ideas spread. Go down the rabbit hole of online propaganda and misinformation — and learn we can start to make the internet less toxic.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Andrew Marantz · Writer

Andrew Marantz writes narrative journalism about politics, the internet and the way we understand our world.

More Resources

Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation

Andrew Marantz

Viking (2019)

Despite multibillion-dollar investments in cybersecurity, one of its root problems has been largely ignored: who are the people who write malicious code? Underworld investigator Misha Glenny profiles several convicted coders from around the world and reaches a startling conclusion.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Misha Glenny · Underworld investigator

Journalist Misha Glenny leaves no stone unturned (and no failed state unexamined) in his excavation of criminal globalization.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

5 Mind Blowing NASA Discoveries Made In 2019

May 30, 2019

Unexplained Mysteries

5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. We take a look at these 5 mind blowing NASA discoveries made in 2019. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been at the center of a number of public discoveries. So today, here at unexplained mysteries, we will be highlighting the incredible breakthroughs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to help show the overwhelming support the agency has provided for the fields of science and technology. Thank you for watching! Thank you to CO.AG for the background music!

BBC News: “If I see someone with the same disability as I have, I encourage them to show the world what you can do.”

Manners from Zimbabwe makes artwork using thrown away cans.

bbc.in/36NEaqZ (via BBC News Africa

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-africa-47975425/zimbabwean-manners-mukuwiri-recycles-rubbish-into-art?fbclid=IwAR3UQdowWVDz-5Lp6g_06dVFUJUpMb90OBjsIVAgTEVMFFfttoPPA2CeZgU

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri recycles rubbish into art

Zimbabwean Manners Mukuwiri was struggling to earn a living until he started turning rubbish into art.

People with disabilities can often find it difficult to find work in the country, but his creations sell for up to $800 (£615) and Manners is hoping to turn his hobby into a full-time career.

Video journalists: Ashley Ogonda and Anthony Irungu.  22 Apr 2019

Striking Winners of the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition Show the Artistry of Science

By Jessica Stewart on October 23, 2019

Fluorescent turtle embryo. Teresa Zgoda & Teresa Kugler (Campbell Hall, New York, USA). First Place. Stereomicroscopy, Fluorescence. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

For forty-five years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the microscopic world and, in the process, allowed scientists and enthusiasts to show off the artistry of scientific imagery. Passionate micro-photographers from nearly 100 countries submitted over 2000 stunning pieces of microphotography to the competition. In the end, the expert judging panel narrowed the field to the top 20 images with a photo of a turtle embryo taking the top prize.

The colorful image, taken by microscopy technician Teresa Zgoda and recent university graduate Teresa Kugler, is the result of painstaking work done with precision and skill. Extensive image-stitching was necessary to create the final photograph, as the size and thickness of the turtle embryo meant that only a small portion of the turtle could be photographed at one time. By stacking and stitching together hundreds of photographs, the duo was able to create an image that is both scientifically and artistically satisfying.

“Microscopy lets us zoom in on the smallest organisms and building blocks that comprise our world–giving us a profound appreciation for the small things in life that far too often go unnoticed,” shared Kugler, “It allows me to do science with a purpose.”

The turtle wasn’t the only embryo in the winning selection. Reproduction was a topic for many photographers. An alligator and a California two-spot octopus embryo, as well as a pregnant planktonic crustacean and mosquito larva also joined the top twenty. Away from the animal kingdom, something as simple as a frozen drop of water was transformed into a mesmerizing, abstract photograph. At the same time, a close view of different flora helps us marvel at the beauty and precision of how nature develops.

Whether using focus stacking, image stacking, or confocal microscopy, the techniques employed help these scientists bring their vision to life. And as technology continues to grow and evolve, we can only expect even richer results. Take a look at the rest of the top 20 photos from the 2019 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition below and view more finalists via their online gallery.

For 45 years, the Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition has celebrated the artistry of scientific imagery.

Alligator embryo developing nerves and skeleton. Daniel Smith Paredes & Dr. Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar (Yale University, Department of Geology and Geophysics, New Haven, Connecticut, USA). Third Place. Immunofluorescence. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Small white hair spider. Javier Rupérez (Almáchar, Málaga, Spain). Sixth Place. Reflected Light, Image Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Housefly compound eye pattern. Dr. Razvan Cornel Constantin (Bucharest, Romania). 16th Place. Focus Stacking, Reflected Light. 50x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Tulip bud cross section. Andrei Savitsky (Cherkassy, Ukraine). Ninth Place. Reflected Light. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Female Oxyopes dumonti (lynx) spider. Antoine Franck (CIRAD – Agricultural Research for Development, Saint Pierre, Réunion). 14th Place. Focus Stacking. 1x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Male mosquito. Jan Rosenboom (Universität Rostock, Rostock, Mecklenburg Vorpommern, Germany). Fourth Place. Focus Stacking. 6.3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Octopus bimaculoides embryo. Martyna Lukoseviciute & Dr. Carrie Albertin (University of Oxford, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom). 19th Place. Confocal, Image Stitching. 5x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Snowflake. Caleb Foster (Caleb Foster Photography, Jericho, Vermont, USA). Fifth Place. Transmitted Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Chinese red carnation stamen. Dr. Guillermo López López (Alicante, Spain). Seventh Place. Focus Stacking. 3x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cuprite (mineral composed of copper oxide). Dr. Emilio Carabajal Márquez (Madrid, Spain). Focus Stacking. 20x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Vitamin C. Karl Deckart (Eckental, Bavaria, Germany). 17th Place. Brightfield, Polarized Light. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification)

Depth-color coded projections of three stentors (single-cell freshwater protozoans). Dr. Igor Siwanowicz (Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, Virginia, USA). Second place. Confocal. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Frozen water droplet. Garzon Christian (Quintin, Cotes-d’Armor, France). Eighth Place. Incident Light. 8x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Pregnant Daphnia magna (small planktonic crustacean). Marek Mi? (Marek Mi? Photography, Suwalki, Podlaskie, Poland). 15th Place. Modified Darkfield, Polarized Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Cristobalite crystal suspended in its quartz mineral host. E. Billie Hughes (Lotus Gemology, Bangkok, Thailand). 18th Place. Darkfield. 40x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Mosquito larva. Anne Algar (Hounslow, Middlesex, United Kingdom). 12th Place. Darkfield, Polarizing Light, Image Stacking. 4x (Objective Lens Magnification).

A pair of ovaries from an adult Drosophila female stained for F-actin (yellow) and nuclei (green); follicle cells are marked by GFP (magenta). Dr. Yujun Chen & Dr. Jocelyn McDonald (Kansas State University, Department of Biology, Manhattan, Kansas, USA). 11th Place. Confocal. 10x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Blood vessels of a murine (mouse) heart following myocardial infarction (heart attack). Simon Merz, Lea Bornemann & Sebastian Korste (University Hospital Essen, Institute for Experimental Immunology & Imaging, Essen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany). 20th Place. Tissue Clearing, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy. 2x (Objective Lens Magnification).

BPAE cells in telophase stage of mitosis. Jason M. Kirk (Baylor College of Medicine, Optical Imaging & Vital Microscopy Core, Houston, Texas, USA). 10th Place. Confocal with Enhanced Resolution. 63x (Objective Lens Magnification).

Nikon Small World: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Nikon Small World.

Finished “Peace” artwork 13

Shadow of Peace and the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland, comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” on during May and June 2014, organized by Joseph Giacalone Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Links to the finished Peace Project of the International CranioSacral Therapists 2014, Iceland artwork page:

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PBS News, TED Talks, Scientific America, Bright Side, Inspiration Grid, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: November1-4, 2019, How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect the 2020 race, Why Cambodian orphanages house so many children whose parents are still alive, and George Takei on challenging the ‘mindless inhumanity’ of U.S. history’s darker chapters

TED Talks: Why I love a country that once betrayed me – George Takei,

Scientific America: Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

BRIGHT SIDE: 10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist

Inspiration Grid: Pop Portraits: Illustration Series by Alessandro Pautasso

Thisiscolossal: Meticulously Painted Portraits by Miho Hirano Fuse Introspective Women with Plants and Animals

November 4, 2019 – PBS NewsHour full episode

Nov 4, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

Monday on the NewsHour, transcripts of some closed-door impeachment inquiry depositions are publicly released. Plus: Rep. Jamie Raskin on the latest developments in the impeachment inquiry, what Kentucky’s gubernatorial race means for President Trump, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, how wavering U.S. support has affected the war in Ukraine and music for Nashville seniors. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 3, 2019

Nov 3, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.46M subscribers

On this edition for Sunday, November 3, the impeachment inquiry goes public this week, why protests have erupted across the globe, and a first-of-its- kind campaign finance experiment in Seattle. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode November 2, 2019

Nov 2, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, November 2, the president fires back at the impeachment inquiry, fire warnings continue in California, the Democratic presidential candidates stump in Iowa, a Massachusetts state law puts men with addictions in jail for rehab, and a Washington Post writer criticizes a small Minnesota community, then moves there. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode November 1, 2019

Streamed live on Nov 1, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Category   News & Politics

How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect the 2020 race

Oct 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

President Trump has made plenty of headlines for his policies and personality. But in the background, he is cementing a long-lasting legacy through his judicial nominations to federal appeals courts. Lisa Desjardins reports on how this little-noticed effort could influence the 2020 presidential election — and federal courts for decades to come. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews

Why Cambodian orphanages house so many children whose parents are still alive

Oct 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

The concept of orphanages has long been considered outdated in developed countries. In the developing world, however, these institutions still house hundreds of thousands of children. But the surprising reality is that the parents of most of these children are actually still alive. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Cambodia as part of his series Agents for Change. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

George Takei on challenging the ‘mindless inhumanity’ of U.S. history’s darker chapters

Oct 23, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

“Star Trek” actor, civil rights activist and social media maven George Takei has now written a graphic novel, “They Called Us Enemy,” about the trauma of his family’s being rounded up by the U.S. government and sent to internment camps during World War II. Takei talks to William Brangham about why his story still resonates today. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category News & Politics

Why I love a country that once betrayed me | George Takei

Jul 4, 2014  TED

When he was a child, George Takei and his family were forced into an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, as a “security” measure during World War II. 70 years later, Takei looks back at how the camp shaped his surprising, personal definition of patriotism and democracy. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category  People & Blogs

Scientific America

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/undying-cells-speedy-ants-and-a-deep-sea-ghost-science-gifs-to-start-your-halloween-week/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=sciences&utm_content=link&utm_term=2019-11-01_top-stories&spMailingID=60882351&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1760136422&spReportId=MTc2MDEzNjQyMgS2

Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

Enjoy and spooky loop on

By Kelso Harper on October 28, 2019

Credit: Nautilus Live, Ocean Exploration Trust

You probably know the GIF as the perfect vehicle for sharing memes and reactions. We believe the format can go further, that it has real power to capture science and explain research in short, digestible loops.

Here is your special Halloween edition of GIF-able science. Enjoy and spooky loop on.

Terrifyingly Fast Ants

Credit: Sarah Pfeffer and Harald Wolf

Not many organisms can survive the harsh climate of the Sahara, where daytime temperatures can reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit. And yet Saharan silver ants thrive, feasting on carcasses of less fortunate, sun-cooked insects. But how do they avoid suffering the same fate as their lunch? Speed.

Credit: Bo Cheng and Pan Liu Pennsylvania State University

When chasing after pesky flies, we may wonder how they manage to land on the ceiling just out of reach. As it turns out, upside-down landings require complex acrobatics. Researchers studied how these tiny creatures pull off the maneuver, hoping it will help roboticists program a tiny robot to do the same.

The scientists expected flies to slow down and reach out to the surface but found that they speed up, complete a split-second cartwheel, extend their legs and pull their body into a firm plant on the ceiling. Such actions require rapid computation of visual cues and a perfectly timed physical response—an impressive feat for a very small nervous system. And yet flies do it effortlessly (though clearly not every time). 

It’s ALIVE! Still.

Credit: Matthew J. Tyska

This cell is immortal. Well, sort of. Unlike most types, the HeLa cell has no off switch for reproduction—it can continue to divide indefinitely. In fact, its line is so resilient, it has lived since the 1950s, when the first such cells were taken from the cancerous tumor of Henrietta Lacks (hence the name HeLa). The cells have a long and controversial history but have been crucial to many medical advancements, from vaccines to genome mapping.

Sadly, they aren’t actually rainbow-colored. Cell biologist Matthew J. Tyska added the hues to illustrate depth: warmer colors show parts farther from the viewer, and cooler ones show nearer bits. The scraggly arms reaching out from the cell, called filopodia, help it sense the physical and chemical properties of its environment. In reality, they don’t squirm around quite so quickly; Tyska sped up the video to be 200 times quicker. Makes for a lovely GIF, though, doesn’t it?

One Spooky Jellyfish

Credit: Nautilus Live, Ocean Exploration Trust

No, it’s not a ghost. You’re witnessing the undulation of a Deepstaria jelly filmed by the E/V Nautilus just in time for #spookyseason. The team spotted this deep-sea specter near Baker Island, a half-mile below sea level.

This jelly may look a bit different than what you would expect. Instead of a fringe of tentacles, it sports an oversize bell that can flexibly stretch and contract. The bell passively captures critters floating by, trapping them inside by cinching closed like a gelatinous trash bag. Stinging cells on the inside of the bell then stun the prey, and hairlike structures called cilia shuttle it to Deepstaria’s stomach.

Scientists don’t spot these deep-dwelling jellies often, but whenever they do, they find other critters, too: pill-bug-like crustaceans called isopods. These typically parasitic animals latch onto the inside of the jelly for a free ride, protection and a portion of its food. They may even munch on Deepstaria itself, but scientists don’t yet fully understand the isopod-jelly relationship.

From this ghoulish jelly and all of us at Scientific American: happy Halloween!

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Kelso Harper  Recent Articles

10 Unique Animals You Won’t Believe Exist

Sep 24, 2017  BRIGHT SIDE

10 strange and amazing animals that you have probably never heard of. Nature is truly full of surprises! We live in the twenty-first century, and all continents have already been discovered, all secrets of our planet revealed, all mountain peaks conquered. Just when you think you have seen it all, some new bizarre creature makes an appearance instantly restoring your faith in the impossible! TIMESTAMPS Mangalitsa Pig, a.k.a. “a pig in sheep’s clothing” 0:50 Rhinopithecus or golden snub-nosed monkey 1:33 Emperor tamarin 2:13 Patagonian Mara 3:04 Fluffy cow 3:52 Markhor Goat 4:44 Raccoon dog 5:23 Blue Footed Booby 6:25 Malayan Colugo 7:13 Venezuelan Poodle Moth 8:09 BONUS 8:56 SUMMARY – The birthplace of this curly-haired pig is Hungary where it was discovered in the mid-19th century. Due to the fleece covering this animal, it resembles a sheep, therefore, such a name! – The name of this species is roxellana, and there is a story behind it. It is believed that they were called this way after the supposedly snub-nosed courtesan of Suleiman the Magnificent (a 16th century Sultan of the Ottoman Empire). – They were called like this because of the resemblance of their mustache to that of German Emperor Wilhelm II. – Patagonia Mara is the fourth largest rodent on our planet. There are several interesting facts about them. Females often put offsprings into crèches for safety. – Fluffy cows are looked after by people whose work is to wash, dry and use products to style these animals, so they look as fluffy as they do! It is necessary to maintain them daily, and it will take months of regular grooming until they get this lovely look of kids toys. – If you see a creature which looks as if it’s trying to catch an alien radio signal from space, it’s most likely Markhor Goat. They can grow as long as 6 ft from head to tail! – If you can’t decide if you want to have a dog or a raccoon as a pet, we have just the thing for you – raccoon dog! Despite having raccoon-like markings on their fur, they are not very closely related to the North American raccoon. – Blue Footed Booby are to catch your eye if you ever visit the Galapagos Islands. They can look a bit clumsy and comical on land, but they are excellent at flying and swimming. – Colugo has a large gliding membrane (like a flying squirrel), and they can glide for long distances between trees standing far apart. – Even if the Poodle Moth may look as if it lives in Antarctica with all this fur, in fact, it comes from Venezuela, a tropical country. Its hairs don’t serve for heating. BONUS Cloud Antelope! This species lives in the clouds (that’s why such a name)! Its bright blue fur is the reflection of cloudless blue skies in the area of its habitat. Its diet consists of sun rays and candies… Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz

Inspiration Grid

https://theinspirationgrid.com/pop-portraits-illustration-series-by-alessandro-pautasso/

ArtIllustrationPop Culture

Pop Portraits: Illustration Series by Alessandro Pautasso

Published Oct 14, 2019

Created by Italian artist and graphic designer Alessandro Pautasso, ‘Pop Portraits’ is a fantastic ongoing series of digital collage portraits of celebrities, combining vivid colors, geometric shapes and interesting patterns.

You can view more of Alessandro’s work here.

More illustrations via Behance




Meticulously Painted Portraits by Miho Hirano Fuse Introspective Women with Plants and Animals

October 21, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Solitary female figures command the canvas in oil paintings by artist Miho Hirano. The Japanese artist creates detailed portraits of her human protagonists, who avoid direct eye contact with the viewer. Hirano’s women stare off into the distance as fish and butterflies swarm and flower blossoms and vines seem to grow from the figures’ hair. In a statement on Gallery Sumire’s website, Hirano describes the mission of her work as “to express the changing situation of life’s ugliness and maturity.”

Hirano draws inspiration from her upbringing, noting that her mother cared for plants and animals, and those motifs have continued in her work even though she does not currently reside in a nature-filled place. She also explained to WOW x WOW that she has long found painting a resonant medium to express her thoughts, explore ideas, and escape reality.

Hirano graduated from Musashino Art University’s department of Oil Painting and currently resides in Chiba, Japan. The artist had her first solo show in the U.S. at Corey Helford Gallery in 2017. Hirano’s newest body of work, Recollection, is on view in a two-person show at Corey Helford in Los Angeles from November 2 to December 9, 2019. See more of Hirano’s ethereal paintings on Instagram.

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PBS News, PBS Eons, TED Talks, I.S.S., Thisiscolossal, and Ing’s Peace Project

PBS News: October 29 – 31, 2019, How a proposed rule change could affect free lunch for some kids in need,

PBS Eons: When Giant Fungi Ruled

TED Talks: Toby Kiers Lessons from fungi on markets and economics?, and Suzanne Simard  How trees talk to each other

I.S.S.: Chris Hadfield and Barenaked Ladies | I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing)

Thisiscolossal: Lightning Scribbles Across the Sky in Dramatic Footage of Extreme Storms Around the U.S.

Ing’s Peace Project: Finished “Peace” artwork 6, 4-H Youth Development RCE of EssexCounty 162 Washington Street, Newark, NJ during May and June, 2012, Organized by Marissa Boldnik Project Coordinator RCE of EssexCounty, Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

PBS NewsHour full episode October 31, 2019

Oct 31, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.45M subscribers

Thursday on the NewsHour, the House approves rules for the impeachment process. Plus: New wildfires burn in California, impeachment discussions with Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff and Republican strategist Michael Steel, Twitter decides to ban political ads, how 39 migrants died in a British truck, pursuing entrepreneurship as an older adult and the Washington Nationals win the World Series. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 30, 2019

Oct 30, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, fires burn in multiple regions of California, as dry, windy conditions keep the risk of new blazes high. Plus: The factors making wildfires worse, the record number of child migrants detained at the U.S.-Mexico border, a conversation with Julián Castro, mass protests in Lebanon and Iraq, racial and ethnic inequity in clinical medical trials and author Adam Winkler. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 29, 2019

Oct 29, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, a witness to President Trump’s controversial Ukraine phone call testifies as part of the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Wildfires and power outages continue in California, Boeing faces criticism for deadly 737 Max mistakes, an American TV show revives interest in Chernobyl, Baltimore students challenge educational expectations, paying college athletes and Twyla Tharp. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: House releases impeachment inquiry rules amid new testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHw0W… Windy conditions keep California burning–and its power out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHJPh… News Wrap: Protests, deadly violence continue in Iraq https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68Vrs… Boeing CEO faces tough questioning in hearing on 737 Max https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T86JI… Why Chernobyl is suddenly a hotspot for global tourists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVaqe… How this Baltimore charter school puts students to work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FH4c… NCAA takes ‘small first step’ toward pay for its athletes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnA2T… Why Twyla Tharp wants us to ‘shut up’ and do what we love https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJ4J… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/how-a-proposed-rule-change-could-affect-free-lunch-for-some-kids-in-need

How a proposed rule change could affect free lunch for some kids in need

Health Oct 31, 2019 6:02 PM EDT

For years, the Trump administration has prioritized efforts to scale back food stamp benefits to combat alleged fraud and abuse, despite a “historic high” in pay accuracy, according to the federal government’s own assessment. But after tremendous public pushback, the Trump administration reopened the comment period for a proposed rule that could alter categorical eligibility for food stamp benefits and cut off aid for an estimated 3 million Americans.

The revised comment period ends Nov. 1, after which federal officials will review the public’s input before issuing a final rule. If these potential cuts go into effect, as many as 1 million children could lose access to free or reduced price school lunch as a result.

An estimated 40 million Americans, including 12.5 million children, have trouble paying for enough nutritious food to eat. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is the nation’s largest federal food insecurity program and feeds more than 37 million people in the U.S. — not all of whom are citizens. Enrollees receive a monthly average benefit of $127, or $1.39 per meal, according to calculations from the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. Two-thirds of SNAP recipients are children, people who are elderly and those who live with disabilities, said Colleen Heflin, senior research associate at Syracuse University’s Center for Policy Research. According to a recent county-level analysis from the Urban Institute, higher concentrations of food insecurity are found across southern and western states.

The PBS NewsHour asked policy experts about the Trump administration’s aim in proposing this change, and the consequences of these actions on schoolchildren’s access to food.

How the Trump administration wants to tighten limits on SNAP

Nationwide, 39 states and the District of Columbia, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands use “broad-based categorical eligibility” to offer SNAP benefits to residents. That means states and territories have discretion to offer food stamps to people even if their household income or asset value surpasses congressionally defined limits. For example, a low-income family may earn money but not enough to cover high rent or child care costs. Some states can take those expenses into consideration and decide that household qualifies for food assistance.

The Trump administration says states have become too lax in doling out food stamp benefits, and wants to put an end to that practice.

Instead of using categorical eligibility, a more “principled approach” is necessary to maintain the system’s integrity, said Angela Rachidi, a research fellow in poverty studies for the American Enterprise Institute.

“States shouldn’t be allowed to go around the intent of Congress,” Rachidi said. “If Congress wants to expand income eligibility, they should legislate that.”

Congress did weigh in on these issues in December, said Elaine Waxman, who studies food insecurity as a senior fellow with the Urban Institute’s Income and Benefits Policy Center. That’s when lawmakers rejected similar legislation to Trump’s proposed rule in the farm bill. The rules proposed by the administration, she said, are “the opposite of congressional intent.”

How might these changes affect free and reduced price school lunch?

Established in 1946, the National School Lunch Program served 30.4 million children free or reduced-price meals in 2016. Children qualify to receive these meals if their household earnings amount to or are less than 185 percent of the federal poverty line. They also can receive these meals if they benefit from federal assistance programs, such as SNAP, or if they are homeless, migrants or in the foster care system.

Food policy advocates pushed back on the Trump administration’s proposed rule, saying it would undermine children’s access to food. The criticism was so forceful, the federal government reopened the comment period for this rule change, giving the public a chance to weigh in. The last day to comment is Friday.

If the proposed rule goes into effect, USDA analysis says 982,000 school children could see disruption in their access to free-or-reduced school meals. When it revised its proposal due to pushback, the federal government pointed out that most children would still have access to free-or-reduced school breakfast and lunch under the change. However, the government said an estimated 40,000 children — roughly the size of all public school children enrolled in Lincoln, Nebraska, would lose those meals because they lived in homes that reported too much in income and assets.

This proposal is “not taking benefits away from the most needy families,” Rachidi said, stressing that “there’s a debate to be had about whether those levels of income eligibility are the right level. Allowing states to determine how to give federally funded food benefits, she said, “is not the way to address that.”

Waxman warned that changing one intertwined social policy can send unintended shockwaves through others. Over the years, policymakers during both Republican and Democratic administrations have carved out different paths to open access to SNAP benefits in an effort to reduce hunger with categorical eligibility being used as a way to lower administration paperwork. Shutting down one route to food stamps could expose adults and children in vulnerable households to other consequences, Waxman said.

“It’s really, really important for all these things to come together, and unfortunately they come in pieces,” she said. “It’s hard for us to know what’s happening to the SNAP program if we’re not talking about the ways these things interact.”

Left: Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

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Laura Santhanam is the Data Producer for the PBS NewsHour. Follow @LauraSanthanam

When Giant Fungi Ruled

Dec 18, 2017  PBS Eons

Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you ?) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/DonateEONS 420 million years ago, a giant feasted on the dead, growing slowly into the largest living thing on land. It belonged to an unlikely group of pioneers that ultimately made life on land possible — the fungi. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Thanks to Franz Anthony of 252mya.com and Jon Hughes of jfhdigital.com for their tremendous reconstructions of Prototaxites. Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter – https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram –

Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.

This talk was presented at a TED Institute event given in partnership with BCG. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about the TED Institute.

About the speaker

Toby Kiers · Evolutionary biologist

Toby Kiers investigates cooperation and punishment in nature.

“A forest is much more than what you see,” says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Suzanne Simard · Forest ecologist

Suzanne Simard studies the complex, symbiotic networks in our forests.

3,907,664 views

TEDSummit | June 2016

Chris Hadfield and Barenaked Ladies | I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing)

Chris Hadfield and Barenaked Ladies | I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing)

•Feb 12, 2013

I.S.S. Commander Chris Hadfield joins The Barenaked Ladies and the Wexford Gleeks in the first space-to-earth musical collaboration. The song, “I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing) was commissioned by CBCMusic.ca and The Coalition for Music Education with the Canadian Space Agency to celebrate music education in schools across Canada. Subscribe to our channel! https://youtube.com/cbcmusic CBC Music is your hub for coast-to-coast-to-coast Canadian music. Watch exclusive performances, candid interviews, and behind-the-scenes content featuring your favourite artists. Visit http://cbcmusic.ca for the full story! Follow us on Facebook: https://facebook.com/CBCMusic Or Twitter: https://twitter.com/cbcmusic Or Instagram: https://instagram.com/cbc_music ————————————————– Get more music, film and arts interviews at CBC’s q: https://youtube.com/Qtv And learn a thing or two about music at: https://youtube.com/cbcmusiclab

Caption authors (French)  LéonLeon192   Category  Music

Lightning Scribbles Across the Sky in Dramatic Footage of Extreme Storms Around the U.S.

September 23, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

Arizona-based storm chaser and videographer Dustin Farrell just released “Transient 2”, the sequel to his 2017 film. For roughly three and a half minutes, the skies open up to reveal flashes of lightning and billowing clouds rolling across open plains. Farrell shares that he traveled 35,000 miles over two years to shoot the raw footage, and spent about 300 hours editing. To capture the brief but powerful flashes of lightning, Farrell relied on his Phantom Flex 4K, shooting at very high speeds. The short film’s music is by Harry Lightfoot. You can tag along with Farrell’s travels from the safety of your couch via Instagram and YouTube.

Lightning Scribbles Across the Sky in Dramatic Footage of Extreme Storms Around the U.S.

Ing’s Peace Project: Finished “Peace” artwork 6

4-H Youth Development RCE of EssexCounty 162 Washington Street, Newark, NJ during May and June, 2012, Organized by Marissa Boldnik Project Coordinator RCE of EssexCounty, Finished artwork, after the written comments by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to 4-H Youth Development RCE of Essex County page:

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PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News, TED Talks, Project Unity, BBC News, The Secrets of Nature, Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 27 – 28 2019, This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization, Why does almost half of America’s food go to waste?

TED Talks: Claire Wardle how you can help transform the internet into a place of trust? and Yasmin Green How technology can fight extremism and online harassment

Project Unity: Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

BBC News: Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC?, and Homeless in spite of full-time job

The Secrets of Nature: Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat

Thisiscolossal: Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

PBS NewsHour full episode October 28, 2019

Oct 28, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi dies during a U.S. special forces raid in northwestern Syria. Plus: Vice President Mike Pence on President Trump and impeachment, what al-Baghdadi’s death means for the threat of ISIS, California endures new wildfires and power outages, and our Politics Monday team, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter, analyzes the latest political news. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 27, 2019

Oct 27, 2019 PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 27, analysis on the death of the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and a look at what that may mean for the region, and a return to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania one year after 11 people were killed at the Tree of Life synagogue in the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Detroit bead museum honors an African legacy while modeling revitalization

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Detroit is home to an unusual museum that draws on African history and customs, filling an entire city block with installations and sculptures. The MBAD African Bead Museum also allows visitors hands-on experiences — and acts as a stabilizing force in a distressed area of the city. Special correspondent Mary Ellen Geist reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jun 16, 2015  PBS NewsHour

Watch more from Making Sen$e: https://bit.ly/2D8w9kc Read more economic news: https://to.pbs.org/2PNUx19 Roughly 40 percent of food produced in America never makes it to the table. Whether it rots in the field, is trashed at the supermarket, or thrown out at home, NPR’s Allison Aubrey looks at why good food is being discarded, and what can be done to prevent it.

Category   News & Politics

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. “Together, let’s rebuild our information commons,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Claire Wardle · Misinformation expert

Claire Wardle is an expert on user-generated content and verification working to help improve the quality of information online.

Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment — including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. “If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong,” Green says. “We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Yasmin Green · Geopolitical technologist

Yasmin Green is the director of research and development for Jigsaw, a unit within Alphabet Inc. focused on solving global security challenges through technology.

Homelessness in New York City – Documentary

Oct 7, 2014  Project Unity

Homelessness in society needs urgent action. This video documents the homeless people of mid-town New York to find out more about their world and what struggles and hardships they face. More and more people are facing homelessness and housing problems so we are putting out a call to action to stand for some of our most vulnerable members of society. Winter is approaching and without your help, many people who are homeless will die over the winter months in New York City. It is important that we unit to provide whats needed for people who are homeless to have the necessities, such as clothing, blankets, warm food, shelter and the support every human being deserves. Summary Project Unity, a non-profit organisation is committed to unifying communities for good causes. Finding out from grassroots what are the most effective ways to assist people in need, we empower communities with direct action to have a positive effect on the issues facing us. Unity overcomes everything, so transform your environment with the strength of unity.

Category   People & Blogs

Why are there 60,000 homeless in NYC? – BBC News

Mar 9, 2015   BBC News

Subscribe to BBC News www.youtube.com/bbcnews It has been one of the coldest winters on record in America’s north-east, and in New York City freezing temperatures have coincided with record numbers of homeless. BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant has been out onto the streets to meet those struggling to find shelter. Subscribe to BBC News HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog Check out our website: http://www.bbc.com/news Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/bbcworldnews Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/bbcworld Instagram: http://instagram.com/bbcnews

Category   News & Politics

Homeless in spite of full-time job – BBC News

Nov 18, 2016  BBC News

The acute shortage of housing in Britain has been underlined by figures obtained by BBC News. Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog World In Pictures https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Big Hitters https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Just Good News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Category   People & Blogs

Little Monsters – Hide & Cheat – The Secrets of Nature

The Secrets of Nature   Published on Jul 15, 2014

Presents some of the animal kingdom’s strangest survival strategies. The most startling behaviour patterns aren’t found among the classic big animals such as lions or polar bears, but among nature’s smaller creatures: Poison dart frogs, chameleons, praying mantises and scorpions, to name only a few. These “Little Monsters” are masters of survival. Until recently, only a handful of scientists enjoyed the technical means to study them up close. But now, thanks to 3D visualization, large audiences can experience a chameleon thrusting out its tongue at close range, rattlesnakes striking at their targets to within fractions of an inch, praying mantises hunting and hummingbirds feeding, filmed from inside the flower! Rather than simply delivering a flat representation of these amazing stunts, modern 3D provides for an emotional experience. And with its ingenious combination of slow-motion-3D and timelapse-3D, “Little Monsters” even improves upon state of the art 3D for greater impact, yielding unbelievable scenes the world has never seen and “felt” before.

Category  Science & Technology

Dynamic Photographs of Interconnected Figures by Rob Woodcox Take Center Stage With a Squarespace Portfolio Site

August 15, 2019  Colossal

Photographer Rob Woodcox (previously) travels the world to bring athletes and dancers together in visually captivating locations and poses. The 29-year-old artist first picked up a camera about ten years ago and hasn’t looked back. Woodcox works with a diverse array of models both in studio environments and in deserts and metropolises. A combination of on-site practical effects and post-production editing create the fantastical final images.

Woodcox grew up in Michigan, and shares with Colossal that the lack of a robust local creative industry spurred his imaginative, DIY approach. Woodcox found creative community online, where he connected with likeminded photographers. The scale of his projects grew as his network expanded, and now Woodcox frequently works on client commissions in addition to his personal practice. As his professional identity has evolved over the past eight years, Squarespace has stayed Woodcox’s website platform of choice. Its seamless user experience allows his work to take center stage. “When you’re doing creative work, the website just needs to be simple, clean, and easy to use. And that’s Squarespace. If it’s inhibiting the user’s experience, then that’s a problem,” Woodcox shares with Colossal. 

“Pursuing projects with real people and being a part of things that matter” keeps Woodcox inspired. Teaching workshops has been a huge part of the photographer’s career: to date, he has taught over eighty workshops on five continents. Squarespace’s ecommerce integrations allow students to register for workshops (the next one is in Portland, Oregon) and collectors to purchase fine art prints. An embedded newsletter signup form lets Woodcox’s audience keep up with his latest projects.

“It’s fun to think about what people haven’t even seen yet. I have visions that are so much bigger even than anything I’ve done so far,” Woodcox tells Colossal. “That’s an exciting thing as an artist. I don’t think I’m ever going to run out of fuel. There’s so much that I want to do.”

Ready to show the world your creative potential? Head over to Squarespace.com for a free weeklong trial, and if you like what you see, use code COLOSSAL at checkout to save 10% on your purchase of a website or domain name.

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PBS News,TEDTalks, YVeritasium, BBC News, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October 19 – 26, 2019

TED Talks: Ttara Djokic  An ancient rock suggests a new theory for how life started?, Prosanta Chakrabarty Four billion years of evolution in six minutes and David Druber Glow in the dark sharks and other stunning sea creatures

YVeritasium: World’s lightest solids

BBC News: Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor

Thisiscolossal: A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 26, 2019

Oct 26, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 26, rising winds and forced power outages stoke new fears as California wildfires continue to burn, a look at how Miami is tackling an affordable housing crisis, and the band Spoon is staying afloat in a transforming music industry. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 25, 2019

Oct 25, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, wildfires rake California, closing schools and forcing evacuations. Plus: Washington political figures say goodbye to Elijah Cummings, what’s behind protests in Lebanon and Chile, President Trump’s federal appeals court nominations, political analysis from Mark Shields and David Brooks, and legendary entertainer Julie Andrews on balancing films and family. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: News Wrap: Judge rules House impeachment inquiry is legal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN1Jn… California crews race against the clock to contain fires https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5keXg… Congressman Elijah Cummings remembered in Baltimore https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yhgic… Across the globe, economic uncertainty is driving protest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIiXB… How GOP efforts to reshape federal courts could affect 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mdz7… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s judiciary, Taylor’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONaDc… Julie Andrews on fame, family and favorite movies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaaL3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 24, 2019

Oct 24, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Republicans step up criticism of the House impeachment inquiry after stunning testimony about President Trump’s handling of military aid to Ukraine. Plus: Rep. Jackie Speier on impeachment criticism, Andrew Brunson’s Turkish imprisonment ordeal, children held in Cambodian orphanages, how big data changes creativity and a brief but spectacular take on preventing blindness. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 23, 2019

Oct 23, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a group of GOP lawmakers storms an impeachment inquiry session, and President Trump lifts sanctions on Turkey amid controversy over its incursion into Syria. Plus: Mark Zuckerberg in the hot seat, Chicago teachers on strike, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Michael Bennet, Kurds caught in the Syrian crossfire and George Takei on making enemies of each other. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: GOP lawmakers disrupt Pentagon official’s testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3t-Ks… Violence has calmed in northeastern Syria, but at what cost? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7xlv… News Wrap: British police discover 39 bodies in cargo truck https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HePx7… Lawmakers grill Zuckerberg on cryptocurrency, political ads https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i5BA… In Chicago teachers’ strike, how far apart are the 2 sides? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D6F6… Sen. Bennet on ‘incredible weakness’ of Trump’s Syria move https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFWWt… Northern Syrians who endured ISIS face new survival struggle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KL_I… George Takei on internment, immigration and ‘inhumanity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VULlQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 21, 2019

Oct 21, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump responds to mounting criticism over Syria, the site of the G-7 and an escalating impeachment inquiry. Also: The impact of the U.S. leaving Syria, a one-on-one interview with Bernie Sanders, Tamara Keith and Amy Walter break down the latest political news, a deal in a high-stakes opioid case and healing Flint with nutrition programs. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why Trump is facing weaker GOP support https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kY9gM… ‘Trump betrayed us,’ say fleeing Kurds https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz-WK… News Wrap: Lebanese government approves economic reforms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VY_Z… Sanders scores endorsement as centrist candidates gain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aBHd… Sanders: Spending a lot on Medicare for All will save money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QR86R… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on impeachment public opinion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBCJp… What does a $260 settlement suggest for future opioid cases? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU8-c… Flint fights lead poisoning by improving nutrition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tsx5j… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 22, 2019

Oct 22, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine testifies that the Trump administration did make military aid to Ukraine contingent upon investigations of Trump’s political rivals, and the leaders of Russia and Turkey meet to determine control of northeastern Syria. Plus: Sen. Kamala Harris on her 2020 campaign, a conversation with Kirstjen Nielsen and training students as pilots. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: How Taylor’s testimony could affect impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTheW… Erdogan ignores U.S. agreement for northeastern Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D11Zb… News Wrap: Canada’s Trudeau wins 2nd term but loses majority https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yuqK… Kamala Harris defends health care plan from rival critics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn4sY… Kirstjen Nielsen on what she regrets about her tenure at DHS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W023g… Community colleges prepare students for careers in aviation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cVfp… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 20, 2019

Oct 20, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 20, President Trump pulls back on a plan to hold a meeting next year with G-7 leaders at his Florida golf resort, a preview of the high-stakes election for Canada’s prime minister, and in the second of our two-part series a look at ICE detentions in Louisiana and their economic impact on rural communities. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 19, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 19, another setback for a Brexit deal after the British Parliament postpones a vote, the first of a two-part series on ICE detention in rural Louisiana, and writer John Hodgman’s take on losing status. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker 

Tara Djokic · Astrobiologist

Tara Djokic discovered direct evidence that indicates some of Earth’s oldest life once thrived in hot springs on land.

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TEDxSydney | May 2019

Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we’re a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process — and not the end of the line. “We’re not the goal of evolution,” Chakrabarty says. “Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life — connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Prosanta Chakrabarty · Ichthyologist

Prosanta Chakrabarty studies fish to help explain the evolution of human beings and our planet.

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learn

Learn more about Prosanta Chakrabarty’s research and how to support his work on evolution and the Tree of Life.

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TED2018 | April 2018

Just a few meters below the waves, marine biologist and explorer-photographer David Gruber discovered something amazing — a surprising new range of sea creatures that glow in many colors in the ocean’s dim blue light. Join his journey in search of biofluorescent sharks, seahorses, sea turtles and more, and learn how these light-up creatures could illuminate a new understanding of our own brains.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

David Gruber · Marine biologist, explorer-photographer

David Gruber searches the undersea world for bioluminescent and biofluorescent marine animals.

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Further reading

Mission Blue II

Learn more about the TED-at-sea hosted by TED Prize winner Sylvia Earle.

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May 31, 2019  Veritasium

Aerogels are the world’s lightest (least dense) solids. They are also excellent thermal insulators and have been used in numerous Mars missions and the Stardust comet particle-return mission. The focus of this video is silica aerogels, though graphene aerogels are now technically the lightest. At one point Dr. Steven Jones literally held the Guinness World Record for making the lightest aerogel and therefore lightest solid. If you’re interested in learning more about aerogels, let me know in the comments as there is a potential trilogy in the works… Huge thanks to Dr. Stephen Steiner and the crew at Aerogel Technologies. To find out more or buy your own aerogel sample, check out: http://www.aerogeltechnologies.com/ Thanks to Dr. Steven Jones and Dr. Mihail Petkov at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory And thanks to FLIR for loaning us the awesome high definition thermal camera. The footage is amazing! https://www.flir.com Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme and everyone who provided feedback on an early draft of this video. Filming by Raquel Nuno Animations by Maria Raykova Drawings by Mariel Solsberg Music From http://epidemicsound.com “Seaweed” “Swagger Stagger”

Caption authors (English)   ?? Chop Suey nav

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Caption author (Portuguese)  ARSamogin

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Category   Education

Egypt archaeologists find 20 ancient coffins near Luxor 16 October 2019

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image caption More details about the discovery will be released at a news conference on Saturday

Archaeologists have found more than 20 ancient wooden coffins near the Egyptian city of Luxor, the country’s antiquities ministry says.

The coffins, whose brightly-coloured decorations are still visible, were uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, on the River Nile’s west bank.

They were in two layers, with the ones on top across those below.

The ministry described the discovery as “one of the largest and most important” in recent years.

More details will be released at a news conference on Saturday.

Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry Image copyright Egypt Antiquities Ministry

Most of the tombs at Asasif, which is close to the Valley of the Kings, are from the Late Period (664-332BC) of ancient Egypt.

However, there are also tombs from the earlier 18th Dynasty (1550-1292BC), which was the first of the New Kingdom and included the famous pharaohs Ahmose, Hatshepsut, Thutmose III, Amenhotep III, Akhenaton and Tutankhamun.

Last week, the antiquities ministry announced that archaeologists had discovered an ancient “industrial area” in Luxor’s West Valley.

The area included “houses for storage and the cleaning of funerary furniture, with many potteries dated to the 18th Dynasty”, it said.

Media caption’Recipe’ for creating mummies in ancient Egypt revealed

For more information Please Visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50068575

A 21 Foot-Long Painting of The Last Supper by 16th Century Nun and Artist Plautilla Nelli Has Just Been Painstakingly Restored

October 24, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

In the 1500’s self-taught artist and nun Plautilla Nelli created a life-size mural of Jesus and the twelve apostles at the Last Supper. Spanning 21 feet feet, the vibrantly colored painting includes carefully rendered details including wine chalices, salt cellars, wood panelling, and a rhythmically creased tablecloth. In addition to the inanimate objects depicted, Nelli demonstrated impressive facility with human anatomy in her renderings of the religious figures—at the time, women were barred from studying the field of anatomy.

Nelli’s masterpiece stayed for two centuries at her convent, Santa Caterina, and then changed locations a few times before being unstretched, rolled, and put in storage about a hundred years ago. After an initial restoration and then additional damage due to flooding in the 1960’s, The Last Supper has been undergoing restoration for the past four years. Brought back to life by an all-female team of curators, restorers, and scientists at Advancing Women Artists, it is now on permanent display at the Santa Maria Novella Museum in Florence, Italy. (via artnet, Smithsonian Magazine)

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PBS News-October 14-18, 2019, BBC-Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters, CNN, TEDx and More

PBS News:October 14-18.2019, How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut, What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability, How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

CNN: SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

PBS NewsHour full episode October 18, 2019

Oct 18, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the battleground in northeastern Syria appears to be quieting, as a Turkish operation there pauses to allow Kurdish fighters to leave. Also: Violence in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, more questions about Boeing’s handling of the 737 MAX, former Gov. John Kasich on overcoming political divisions, Shields and Brooks, the art of Native American women and a historic spacewalk. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 17, 2019

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, U.S. and Turkish officials agree that Turkey’s military offensive in northern Syria will pause. Plus: Another U.S. diplomat testifies on Capitol Hill as President Trump’s acting chief of staff disputes wrongdoing around U.S. aid to Ukraine, remembering Rep. Elijah Cummings, a possible Brexit deal, resolution of the General Motors strike and using big data creatively. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Turkish official denies Erdogan agreed to a ‘cease-fire’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOENn… How impeachment inquiry and Senate trial could unfold https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpY3k… News Wrap: New England lashed by powerful nor’easter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEtD-… Remembering lawmaker, civil rights advocate Elijah Cummings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKwv… The EU approved Johnson’s Brexit plan. Will Parliament? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63Ay9… What tentative GM deal says about American organized labor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtU4f… How customers’ big data is transforming creative commerce https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cs7Cg…

WATCH: ‘History will haunt us’ if U.S. fails to act in Syria, Sen. Blumenthal says

Oct 17, 2019  PBS NewsHour

A bipartisan group of senators announced a bill to impose additional sanctions on Turkey in the wake of the country’s invasion in Syria. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Chris Van Hollen, who introduced the bill, were joined by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, Richard Blumenthal and Jeanne Shaheen. The lawmakers expressed concern about President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria. “History will haunt us,” Blumenthal said. “We are going to be complicit in the ethnic cleansing that occurs as a result of this absolutely abhorrent action.” Later in the day, Vice President Mike Pence announced a 120-hour cease-fire between Turkey and the Kurds. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 16, 2019

Oct 16, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump defends his decision to remove U.S. troops from Syria as violence escalates, and the U.S. House votes overwhelmingly to condemn the move. Also: Critical moments in last night’s Democratic debate, a new frontier in the fight against Alzheimer’s, a chef reintroducing Native American culinary traditions and a Brief but Spectacular take on opioid addiction. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Syria and impeachment put Trump on defensive https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Cj1v… News Wrap: GM and UAW reach tentative deal to end strike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orBra… Warren becomes debate target as moderates vie for breakout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RnD5… Can ultrasound be used to fight Alzheimer’s? https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/can… Traditional Native foods are the Sioux Chef’s key ingredient https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yxxd… What tackling the opioid crisis will require https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srrtH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 15, 2019

Oct 15, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, revelations that John Bolton raised alarms about Rudy Giuliani and the Ukraine affair add fuel to the impeachment inquiry. Also: A Syrian city as microcosm of the larger fight, a Texas officer is charged with murder, what to watch in the Democratic debate, defining the criteria for impeachment, the soaring cost of student housing, and Elizabeth Strout’s new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Testimony reveals officials raised concerns about Giuliani https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQ8VS… News Wrap: Hundreds charged in Barcelona protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EyQL… Syria’s Manbij embodies consequences of Trump’s decision https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7O3m… What makes officers more likely to use deadly force? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL9wC… Van Hollen: Sanctions ‘next best’ way to influence Turkey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0_0P… The hot topics 2020 Democrats could debate tonight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DHYE… How the founders defined impeachment-worthy crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTVPZ… How soaring housing costs are straining college students https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PbOG… How fiction draws Elizabeth Strout home to Maine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=od2Lw… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 14, 2019

Oct 14, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, how U.S. withdrawal from northern Syria is reshaping the region’s conflict. Plus: President Trump’s former top Russia adviser is deposed, analysis of the Syrian battleground, House Democrats who aren’t supporting the impeachment inquiry, Politics Monday, Ronan Farrow on revelations in his latest book, a Detroit museum’s hands-on experiences and a “NewsHour” announcement. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: As U.S. leaves Syria, Kurds join Assad to fight a NATO ally https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E5YM… Former Russia adviser Fiona Hill speaks to House committees https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLx7U… News Wrap: Texas police officer resigns over fatal shooting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdVwS… What Trump’s Syria withdrawal means for the Middle East https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bBPE… House Democrats in Trump districts face impeachment quandary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QT9we… Amy Walter and Domenico Montanaro on impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ImL3… Ronan Farrow on the systemic coverup of sexual assault https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttgIt… At this Detroit art museum, engagement on community terms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFa2K… PBS launches “NewsHour West,” based in Phoenix https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B5o9… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Sesame Street’ is still supporting families, 50 years after its debut

Oct 10, 2019 PBS NewsHour

November marks the 50th anniversary of public television’s “Sesame Street,” a cultural landmark widely praised for its approach to children’s programming. But beyond the songs and fun, “Sesame Street” does some serious work for those in need, providing special support and guidance for military families and addressing topics like autism and addiction. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What Turkey’s assault on northern Syria means for civilians, regional stability

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Turkey continued its military assault into northern Syria on Thursday. Aid agencies warn that nearly half a million people near the border are at risk from the violence, which is drawing criticism from many U.S. officials. Amna Nawaz reports and talks to Sinam Mohamad, U.S. representative for the Syrian Democratic Council, and Soner Cagaptay of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How ‘Deep State’ book disputes accusations of Trump bias at FBI, DOJ

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

In a new book, Pulitzer winner James B. Stewart explores two controversial recent investigations by the FBI and the Justice Department: Probes into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server when she was secretary of state and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Stewart talks to William Brangham about how his research contradicts President Trump’s “deep state” narrative. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

BBC: Turkey’s Erdogan vows to ‘crush heads’ of Kurdish fighters

4 hours ago  Turkey offensive in Syria

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Up to 300,000 people are said to have fled the violence in northern Syria

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says that Turkey will “crush the heads” of Kurdish fighters if they do not withdraw from a planned safe zone area in northern Syria.

Turkey agreed on Thursday to suspend an offensive for five days to allow the Kurds to retreat from the area.

But on Saturday both sides accused the other of violating the ceasefire.

Ankara views the Kurdish forces as terrorists and wants to create a “safe zone” buffer inside Syria.

Despite the temporary ceasefire, some sporadic violence has continued – particularly around the border town of Ras Al-Ain.

What did Erdogan say?

Speaking at a televised event in the central Turkish province of Kayseri on Saturday, President Erdogan said that if Kurdish fighters did not withdraw by Tuesday evening – as agreed in the ceasefire – “we will start where we left off and continue to crush the terrorists’ heads”.

The Turkish leader is due to hold talks next week with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin. On Saturday he said that if those talks did not produce a solution, Turkey would “implement its own plans”.

Turkey’s defence ministry earlier accused Kurdish forces of carrying out 14 “provocative” attacks in the last 36 hours, mostly in Ras Al-Ain, but insisted Turkish forces were fully abiding by the agreement.

However, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) accused Turkey of violating the ceasefire.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Turkish-backed Syrian rebels are still active along the border

They also accuse Turkish troops of failing to create a safe corridor for the evacuation of civilians and wounded people from the besieged town.

On Saturday the SDF urged US Vice-President Mike Pence, who helped to broker the temporary ceasefire, to pressure Turkey to allow the passage of civilians.

“Despite the constant communication with the American side and the promise made by them to solve this problem, there has not been any tangible progress in this regard,” the SDF said in a statement.

Turkish presidency spokesman Ibrahim Kalin said they wanted the US to put pressure on Kurdish forces to withdraw.

“We have told our American colleagues to use their leverage, their connections, to make sure that they leave without any incidents,” he told AFP news agency.

The UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) said deliveries of humanitarian aid had been prevented from entering Ras Al-Ain.

The monitor group said on Friday that the civilian death toll from the Turkish operation had now risen to 86.

Between 160,000 and 300,000 people have reportedly fled their homes since the offensive started 10 days ago.

What prompted the offensive?

Turkish forces first launched their assault on 9 October, following an announcement US troops would withdraw from the Syria-Turkey border region.

Media captionThe BBC’s Martin Patience explains what’s behind the conflict

The Turkish plan is to clear Kurdish fighters from a buffer zone extending more than 30km (20 miles) into Syria. It would run for about 440km along the border, President Erdogan said on Friday, and be monitored from observation posts.

Turkey also plans to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees, currently on its territory, in the buffer zone but critics warned the move could trigger the ethnic cleansing of the local Kurdish population.

The goal was to push back a Kurdish militia group – the People’s Protection Units (YPG) – that Turkey views as a terrorist organisation.

Since the offensive was launched, President Donald Trump has been accused by some, including senior Republicans, of abandoning a US ally. The SDF – a group dominated by the YPG – fought alongside the US against the Islamic State (IS) group in Syria.

There has been growing international concern about possible war crimes committed by Turkey and its allied militias during the offensive.

Media captionMike Pence announces Turkish ceasefire in Syria

Amnesty International says it has gathered “damning evidence” of war crimes and other violations by their side and the United Nations has called on Turkey to investigate the allegations.

Unconfirmed reports have also emerged that Turkish-allied forces have used white phosphorus, a chemical weapon which causes bad burns, in Syria.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) said it was aware of the claims and was gathering evidence.

What is the latest with the ceasefire?

The pause in hostilities followed talks in the Turkish capital Ankara between Mr Erdogan and Mr Pence on Thursday.

President Trump celebrated news of the ceasefire and claimed the pause in hostilities would lead to “millions of lives” being saved. He remained optimistic in comments made on Friday, despite reports the ceasefire was failing to hold.

Media captionPresident Trump on Turkish and Kurdish forces: “Sometimes you have to let them fight a little bit”

SDF spokesman Mustafa Bali tweeted on Friday morning to allege that Turkey was breaking the ceasefire near Ras al-Ain.

“Despite the agreement to halt the fighting, air and artillery attacks continue to target the positions of fighters, civilian settlements and the hospital,” he wrote.

President Erdogan dismissed reports of continuing clashes on Friday as “misinformation” but international news media recorded explosions in Ras al-Ain during the morning.

The SOHR said Saturday that the SDF had not yet started to pull back from the border region.

Local Kurdish media are reporting that five civilians and 13 Kurdish fighters in Ras-al-Ain have been killed since the ceasefire began, but the BBC has not been able to independently confirm that.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50108417

SE Cupp: Don’t be surprised if this is what undoes Trump

Oct 19, 2019  CNN

SE Cupp says President Donald Trump’s Syria policy is one of the only issues that has prompted swift criticism from the Republican party, and argues it may be the one issue that could put his presidency in danger.

Category  News & Politics

The Kurds: The Most Famous Unknown People in the World | Stephen Mansfield | TEDxNashville

May 18, 2016  TEDx Talks

The Kurds are an ancient and noble people who are now the primary “boots on the ground” against ISIS in the Middle East. They are 35 million strong worldwide, the largest people group on earth without their own homeland. In this stirring talk, Stephen Mansfield tells the story of the Kurds and does so, surprisingly, through the lives of three women. Stephen Mansfield is a New York Times bestselling author who first rose to global attention with his groundbreaking book, The Faith of George W. Bush, a bestseller that Time magazine credited with helping to shape the 2004 U.S. presidential election. He has written celebrated biographies of Barak Obama, Booker T. Washington, George Whitefield, Winston Churchill, Pope Benedict XVI, and Abraham Lincoln, among others. Mansfield’s latest book, The Miracle of the Kurds, is a timely introduction to the Kurdish people that reached bookstores just as Kurdish troops began standing heroically against the evils of ISIS in the Middle East. The book has been named “Book of the Year” by Rudaw, the leading Kurdish news service. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Turkey, Kurds, Language: Nicholas Glastonbury at TEDxGallatin

Sep 21, 2013  TEDx Talks

Nicholas Glastonbury is a graduate of the NYU Gallatin School of Individualized Study. His studies focused on the intersections of human rights law, nationalism, anthropology, political science, theories of representation, feminist theory and queer theory. About New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study Creativity, flexibility and rigor characterize the academic program of the Gallatin School of Individualized Study. At Gallatin, students have the opportunity to combine the best of a small college experience with the best of a large research university. A Gallatin education is unique. The individualized structure of the program and its relationship to the rest of NYU are part of what makes the school so special. For more information visit gallatin.nyu.edu/ About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) video produced by Charles Q. Drexler vfx animation by Michael J. Green opening music by Gabriel S. Beam Hyphenate Media www.hyphenatemedia.com

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Kurdistan: Homeland of Diversity | Levi Clancy | TEDxDuhok

Oct 10, 2017  TEDx Talks

Levi Clancy shares his experience in Kurdistan, the homeland of multi-cultures and many religions, showing the co-existence and peace it has. Levi was born and grew up in 1990 in Los Angeles in the United States. When he was still a kid, he started taking college courses and when he was only 13 years old he transferred to the University of California! At 15, he was abandoned by his family and had to leave university, and started working in medical research as well as web development and graphic arts in order to support himself and make it month to month. At 18, he received a scholarship to return to university, and reconnected with his family. After finishing his baccalaureate in Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics (MIMG) with a minor in Mesopotamian history, he moved to Erbil. Levi has worked for University of California as a researcher in electron microscopy, oncology and flow cytometry. He has also worked in marketing for clients including the LA Lakers, NCAA, Verizon and AT&T. Currently, he works as a software developer and as a freelance journalist. Levi has been featured on CBS News and LA Times. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Bombs, mountains and an unlikely female voice | Dashni Morad | TEDxErbil

Feb 10, 2015  TEDx Talks

Imagine Iraq. Then imagine pop music. Dashni Morad is now in her tenth year as the leading successful singer of modern pop in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. From the little girl whom fled Saddam Hussein’s tyranny to the strong woman whom challenged the status quo, Dashni tells us her heartbreaking coming of age tale. Born in the city of Sulaimanya, raised in Netherlands, lost between two cultures and struggling between accomplishing dreams. Dashni Morad, a Kurdish/Dutch Pop singer and a TV personality who was known for her show on Kurdistan TV “Bi Control”, flee Kurdistan at the age of eleven to become a refugee in Netherlands due to the unstable political situation in Iraq and Kurdistan. Since moving to the Netherlands, Dashni, worked hard to accomplish being a musician and a TV presenter to entertain the Kurdish audience since it was much needed at the time in Kurdistan. Today, she is recognized as a national and international artist who broke through the impossible to give the gift of modern music to Kurdistan and presenting it outside of the Middle East region. Her songs presented messages such as women empowerment, peace, and the love for Kurdistan. She, however, didn’t stop at making music and TV presenting, she also founded a small non-profit under the name “Green Kids” supporting education to the kids of Kurdistan, as well as, raising funds for refugees and IDPs in Kurdistan, and also many group and student participation to clean the mountains of Kurdistan. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Advocate for the Kurdish community: Tara Fatehi at TEDxAdelaideChange

Jul 9, 2013  TEDx Talks

Tara comes from one of the oldest living civilizations and indigenous people in the world, which today is under constant oppression and war, her ultimate goal is to make sure the Kurdish people don’t forget themselves so the world never forgets the Kurdish people. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Communication in a mass communication society | Joakim Medin | TEDxUppsalaUniversity

Dec 18, 2015  TEDx Talks

Joakim Medim is a freelance journalist who, among other things, documented the military coup in Honduras, covered the political development in Central America, Hungary and Turkey and specialized in the refugee crisis and the socio-political response in Lebanon. Medin tells the stories that have been untold and fight for media where it has been oppressed. In 2014, when he was covering the humanitarian crisis in Syria, Medin was arrested by the Syrian government and was kept in isolation in a 3-by-6-foot cell. After heavy interrogation he was moved to Damascus for further questioning. It was only after the intervention of Syrian Kurdish officials that Medin and his translator were finally released. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, BBC News, TED Talks, Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Adam Grochowalski, & Thisiscolossal

PBS News: October, 6-13, 2019

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

BBC News: Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

BBC News: Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

TED Talks: Juan Enriquez a personal plea for humanity at the us Mexico border?,                     Jon Lowenstein Family hope and resilience on the migrant trail, Melanie Nezer The fundamental right to seek asylum and Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman What does it mean to be  a refugee jul 2018

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: Poem – Immigrants

Adam Grochowalski: Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Thisiscolossal: Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 13, 2019

Oct 13, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 13, U.S. troops withdraw in Syria as the Turkish offensive escalates against the Kurds, the latest on the Trump administration and a preview of Tuesday’s Democratic presidential debate. Also, a newly named North Macedonia sets its sights on membership in NATO and the European Union. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 12, 2019

Oct 12, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 12, the latest acting director of the Department of Homeland Security steps down, a longtime head of security at The Met discusses a new book about his extraordinary career, and in our “Future of Food” series, a look at what farmers in Iowa are doing to help grow more sustainable practices for the future. Megan Thompson anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 11, 2019

Oct 11, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, congressional testimony from the former Ukrainian ambassador further roils the impeachment inquiry. Plus: Why Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the Nobel Peace Prize, former United Nations ambassador Susan Rice talks U.S. foreign policy, Mark Shields and David Brooks analyze the latest political news, and an unconventional outdoor art center in Montana. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 10, 2019

Oct 10, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, two associates of Rudy Giuliani’s are arrested on charges of violating campaign finance law. Plus: California residents face frustration over planned power outage amid wildfire risk, consequences of Turkey’s military assault in Syria, a new book about high profile FBI and Justice Department investigations, and how “Sesame Street” is serious about supporting families. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 9, 2019

Oct 9, 2019  PBS NewsHour

1.42M subscribers

Wednesday on the NewsHour, As Turkey sends troops into Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo discusses international flashpoints such as China and Ukraine. Also: Returning to the Bahamas after the storm, the crisis caused by the White House refusing to cooperate with Congress, how Democrats are courting a key voting bloc, new details on the Black Sox scandal and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 8, 2019

Oct 8, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the White House blocks a key player in the Ukraine affair from appearing before House lawmakers. Also: The Supreme Court hears arguments on the rights of LGBTQ Americans, why Iraqi citizens are mobilizing in the face of gunfire, a conversation with Hillary and Chelsea Clinton, the life and struggles of college Dreamers and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump escalates impeachment battle, refusing to cooperate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdSeM… News Wrap: Turkish forces deploy to Syrian border https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SvnA… Supreme Court weighs protections for LGBTQ workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8UJ2… Iraqi protesters’ rage challenges government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln6wm… Clinton: Trump’s actions direct threat to national security https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4R7H… How fear of deportation affects DACA students’ dreams https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md0WZ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 7, 2019

Oct 7, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump comes under fire from both Republicans and Democrats for abruptly announcing the removal of U.S. troops from Syria. Also: The impeachment inquiry grows as a second whistleblower emerges, Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Politics Monday, a firestorm for the NBA about China, free speech and human rights, and Gary Clark Jr. on the tenor of the times.

PBS NewsHour Weekend live show October 6, 2019

Streamed live 8 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, October 6, a report of a second whistleblower is confirmed, and as Brexit looms, the Netherlands benefit from the “Brexodus.” Also, a visit to America’s most accessible playground. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

https://interactive.aljazeera.com/aje/2019/plundering-cambodias-forests/index.html

Al Jazeera: Plundering Cambodia’s Forest-2019

Meet the man on a mission to take down Cambodia’s timber tycoons and expose a rampant illegal cross-border trade.

Under a rickety wooden stilt house near Cambodia’s Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary, one of the country’s leading environmental campaigners is preparing dinner.

Ouch Leng stuffs raw meat into an empty beer can and throws it into the fire. It’s a poor man’s feast for his team of investigators to fuel them through a night’s surveillance.

Chewing pork and buffalo, their infrared optics and cameras ready to record, they wait patiently for trucks to emerge from the darkness.

Their cargo? Timber logged illegally inside a wildlife sanctuary that is meant to be protected under Cambodian law.

“We went and saw eight trucks inside one sawmill and another timber truck was loaded with square logs,” he says, as he chops vegetables for dinner.

“It’s ready to export out tonight.”

Before long, two semi-trailers, a procession of tractors and four minivans, all loaded with logs, rumble out of the wildlife sanctuary, which is marked by a sign brandishing the logos of the European Union, USAID and Cambodia’s Ministry of Environment.

It is a significant haul but pales in comparison to the convoy Leng says he witnessed the night before.

“I saw 23 timber trucks transport [logs] from the Phnom Prich area,” says Leng.

Such stakeouts are part of Leng’s relentless pursuit of timber tycoons who pillage his country’s forests for profit, leading to some of the fastest rates of deforestation in the world.

In the 2000s, the Cambodian government began leasing millions of hectares of land – called concessions – to private companies, some of them inside protected forests.

It led to a nation-wide logging gold rush – one that Leng is determined to stop.

Land concessions by country (LICADHO, 2018)

In one of his more daring exploits, Leng disguised himself as a chef working at logging camps to infiltrate the network of notorious logging baron, Try Pheap, an adviser to Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen.

He lifted the lid on Pheap’s vast illegal logging operations in a 2013 report but the tycoon continued to expand his timber business across the country. This year, Leng filmed two major logging operations inside the protected area of Phnom Samkos Wildlife Sanctuary in the western Cardamon Mountains – both in concessions leased by Try Pheap.

What he discovered next is a scandal on an international scale.

Video footage from Try Pheap’s timber depot on the outskirts of Phnom Penh shows huge quantities of luxury wood being loaded into shipping containers.

Al Jazeera tracked these containers and confirmed they travelled from Cambodia’s Sihanoukville Port to northern Vietnam.

Try Pheap and his representatives have not responded to Al Jazeera’s requests for comment.

Leng, the activist, says timber smugglers use illegal crossings dotted across the border as part of a rampant industry, with Vietnam effectively laundering then exporting illegally logged wood from Cambodian forests.

Almost half a million cubic metres of timber were smuggled from Cambodia to Vietnam between 2016 and 2018, according to a series of reports by international non-government organisation, the Environmental Investigation Agency.

In official correspondence seen by Al Jazeera, the Cambodian government accuses Vietnam of issuing permits for illegally logged timber, despite repeated warnings.

“There is still timber going across the border because there is a black market in that area,” spokesman Neth Pheaktra tells Al Jazeera.

“These activities are illegal. That’s why the Ministry of Environment, as well as other relevant ministries, and border officials are cracking down on forest crimes.”

Vietnam’s government says it “strictly prohibits illegal timber harvesting, transportation, processing and trade” and is taking measures to stop it.

From 2001 to 2018, Cambodia lost 2.17 million hectares of tree cover, equivalent to a 25% decrease, according to data analysis by Global Forest Watch.

The timber feeds an insatiable demand for rare wood in China, where prices for luxury timber furniture have soared. One bed made from Siamese Rosewood – which has been almost eradicated in Cambodia – reportedly was on sale for $1 million.

“Sometimes I cry. I feel disappointed because I’m not able to protect the forest,” says Leng. “I see that the destruction is so big, but no one helps to protect it.

With huge profits to be made, Leng’s investigations are undertaken at great risk.

Another Cambodian forest activist, Chut Wutty, was murdered in 2012 while investigating a logging company. Several more forest patrollers have been killed since, including three who were shot at the Vietnamese border last year.

Leng himself has received numerous death threats and had his equipment smashed.

“I know that this is dangerous work… No one dares to challenge the companies,” says Leng. “Why do I challenge [them]? Because the companies have caused mass destruction to the forest.”

In some cases, protected areas have been completely destroyed – such as Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary in eastern Cambodia.

Snuol Wildlife Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

The sanctuary was so severely damaged, the government removed its protected status in 2018 – conceding there was nothing left to protect.

Travelling in a four-wheel drive vehicle so old the rear brakes often erupt into plumes of smoke, Leng stops at the barren remains of the former sanctuary.

“Maybe 10 years ago there was jungle and a lot of forest and a lot of wildlife like elephants, tigers, rabbits…” he laments.

“The private companies came to destroy, to terminate the forest here.”

Other sanctuaries, like Boeung Per in the north, are rapidly heading towards the same fate.

Boeung Per Sanctuary Data: NASA Landsat / USGS

But despite the forces stacked against him, Leng continues to race off deep into the jungle every time he gets a new tip-off of potential illegal activity.

“This has happened for 10 to 20 years – not just this year, and no one has been able to prevent it,” he says.

But as long as there are precious forests to save in Cambodia, Leng will be on the frontline defending them.

WATCH THE DOCUMENTARY

© 2019 Al Jazeera Media Network.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-50005790

Turkey Syria offensive: ‘The Kurds have no friends but the mountains’

10 October 2019

Related Topics  Syrian civil war

Image copyright EPA Image caption Activists say tens of thousands of people have fled towns along the Syria-Turkey border

“It’s like hell. I am afraid for all my family and everyone I know.”

Sevinaz is from a town near Syria’s border with Turkey that immediately came under heavy bombardment when the Turkish military and allied Syrian rebels launched an assault on Kurdish-led forces there on Wednesday.

The 27-year-old Kurdish filmmaker and activist said repeated air and artillery strikes on the town – called Sere Kaniye by Kurds, and Ras al-Ain by Arabs – had forced her to flee with several members of her family.

“I am outside the town with my sick mother. My brother is inside. I have been informed that my cousin might have been martyred. There is no safe place for anybody,” she told the BBC on Thursday morning, hours before rebels said the town was surrounded.

“I’m concerned about it being the last time that I see my city,” she said.

‘Erdogan is a liar’

Turkey’s President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has said the aim of the military operation is to create a 32km (20-mile) deep “safe zone” along the Syrian side of the border and to resettle up to two million Syrian refugees there.

Media captionSome residents began to flee as smoke rose over the border town of Ras al-Ain

He has said he wants to push back from the Turkish border members of a Syrian Kurdish militia called the People’s Protection Units (YPG). He insists the YPG is an extension of a rebel group that has fought for Kurdish autonomy in Turkey and is designated a terrorist organisation by Turkey, the US and EU.

The YPG, which denies the claim, is the dominant force in an alliance of Kurdish and Arab militias called the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). It has been the critical partner on the ground in Syria for the US-led multinational coalition against the jihadist group Islamic State (IS).

Sevinaz dismissed Mr Erdogan’s assertion that he wants “to prevent the creation of a terror corridor across our southern border, and to bring peace to the area”.

“He’s a liar and he wants the Kurds to be finished. And not just Kurds, because in Sere Kaniye and all the other cities it’s not just Kurds who are living here,” she said.

Sevinaz said she believed the SDF and YPG’s fighters would do all they could to repel the Turkish assault, and that ultimately they would be victorious.

“They are the children of this land. They are our brothers and sisters,” she explained. “Even with all the things that are happening and the silence from the world, I still believe that the right people will win.”

Azad Cudi, a British-Iranian Kurd who is a sniper for the YPG, told the BBC on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw US troops from the border area in anticipation of a Turkish offensive felt “like a stab in the back”.

The US military had previously attempted to avert a Turkish offensive on its Kurdish allies by setting up with the Turkish military a “security mechanism” in the border area. The YPG co-operated by dismantling fortifications.

“In August, we came to this ‘security mechanism’ agreement,” Mr Cudi said. “Based on that, we withdrew. We destroyed the fighting positions which were built to fight the Turkish in case of an invasion and we handed them over to the Americans.”

‘We have no friends but the mountains’

Mr Cudi said SDF forces were not equipped with the heavy machine-guns and anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapons that they would need to repel a Turkish assault.

“But if there is no choice, there is no choice. We will fight back at all costs.”

“There’s been many, many letting down and abandoning Kurds in the past. This is what we say: ‘We have no friends but the mountains,'” he added. “The United States, like any other state or any other government, will do whatever serves their own best interests. We know that.”

He said Mr Trump and other US politicians had been “lied to” about the war with IS, and he expressed concern about the risk of thousands of suspected IS militants being detained in SDF prisons escaping if their guards came under attack by Turkey.

Image copyright AFP Image caption US troops pulled back from the border on Monday in anticipation of the Turkish assault

“[The war] is not finished, it is not over. We wouldn’t do such a thing as losing prisoners, but imagine when things get tough and there is a war and you are fighting on many fronts. It will be practically difficult to control and manage these prisoners.”

He added: “The Kurds are the only people who have fought [IS]. The Iraqi government and the Syrian government couldn’t stand their attacks. We were the only ones who could resist them. With us being threatened, their hope for a new caliphate may grow again.”

Sevinaz said she believed Turkey was also in contact with IS sleeper cells inside north-eastern Syria and would ask them to target the Kurds. On Wednesday, several IS militants reportedly attacked SDF posts in the region.

“I’m worried and I think soon that there will be lots more movement from them. They already did one [attack] next to Sere Kaniye, and… in Raqqa, and I think there will be more soon.”

Turkey says it has made its military move in northern Syria to fight terrorism and that it wants to take the lead in fighting IS.

She also held out little hope of Mr Trump carrying out his threat to “totally destroy and obliterate” Turkey’s economy if it does anything he considers to be “off limits”.

Image copyright EPA Image caption The Syrian Democratic Forces has said it will defend its territory “at all costs”

“What does ‘off limits’ mean? They’re already attacking everywhere,” she said. “They don’t care about civilians. They don’t care about the middle of the cities.

“Donald Trump is going to do nothing. He cares about money. He doesn’t care about the 11,000 people who died while fighting and resisting against IS.”

Sevinaz insisted that she would not flee to another part of Syria. “I will not move from Rojava. I will never move,” she said, using the Kurdish name for the north-east of the country.

Instead, she called for people across the world to make clear to their governments their anger at the situation.

“The states do not care about us. The states didn’t care about bringing their [foreign] IS prisoners back to their countries. The states didn’t care about us being under threat for a long, long time,” she added. “It is the time for the voices of the people, who believe in freedom, who believe in human rights.”

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Typhoon Hagibis: Japan suffers deadly floods and landslides from storm

13 October 2019

Related Topics  Typhoon Hagibis

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Helicopters rescued people trapped in their homes when the Chikuma river burst its banks

At least nine people are reported dead as Japan recovers from its biggest storm in decades.

Typhoon Hagibis triggered floods and landslides as it battered the country with wind speeds of 225km/h (140mph).

Rivers have breached their banks in at least 14 different places, inundating residential neighbourhoods.

The storm led to some Rugby World Cup matches being cancelled but a key fixture between Japan and Scotland will go ahead on Sunday.

Hagibis is heading north and is expected to move back into the North Pacific later on Sunday.

It made landfall on Saturday shortly before 19:00 local time (10:00 GMT), in Izu Peninsula, south-west of Tokyo and moved up the east coast. Almost half a million homes were left without power.

In the town of Hakone near Mount Fuji more than 1m (3ft) of rain fell on Friday and Saturday, the highest total ever recorded in Japan over 48 hours.

Media captionMore than seven million people were urged to leave their homes

Further north in Nagano prefecture, levees along the Chikuma river gave way sending water rushing through residential areas, inundating houses. Flood defences around Tokyo have held and river levels are now falling, reports the BBC’s Rupert Wingfield-Hayes in Japan.

Officials said some of those killed were swept away by landslides while others were trapped in their cars as floodwaters rose. Another 15 people are listed as missing and dozens are reported injured.

What preparations were made?

More than seven million people were urged to leave their homes as the huge storm approached, but it is thought only 50,000 stayed in shelters.

Many residents stocked up on provisions before the typhoon’s arrival, leaving supermarkets with empty shelves.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Torrential rain has caused rivers to flood huge areas

Image copyright EPA Image caption A huge clean-up operation was under way in Kawasaki near Tokyo

“Unprecedented heavy rain has been seen in cities, towns and villages for which the emergency warning was issued,” Japan’s Meteorological Agency (JMA) forecaster Yasushi Kajiwara told a press briefing.

Many bullet train services were halted, and several lines on the Tokyo metro were suspended for most of Saturday.

All flights to and from Tokyo’s Haneda airport and Narita airport in Chiba have been cancelled – more than 1,000 in total.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Bullet trains were half submerged in Nagano, central Japan

Two Rugby World Cup games scheduled for Saturday were cancelled on safety grounds and declared as draws – England-France and New Zealand-Italy. The cancellations were the first in the tournament’s 32-year history.

Sunday’s Namibia-Canada match due to take place in Kamaishi was also cancelled and declared a draw.

The US-Tonga fixture in Osaka and Wales-Uruguay in Kumamoto will go ahead as scheduled on Sunday, organisers said.

Meanwhile, a crunch game between Scotland and tournament hosts Japan on Sunday will now go ahead. The decision followed a safety inspection.

The Japanese Formula One Grand Prix is also taking place on Sunday.

‘A blanket and a biscuit’

Local resident James Babb spoke to the BBC from an evacuation centre in Hachioji, western Tokyo. He said the river near his house was on the brink of overflowing.

“I am with my sister-in-law, who is disabled,” he said. “Our house may flood. They have given us a blanket and a biscuit.”

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Tornado-like winds whipped up by the typhoon struck east of Tokyo

Andrew Higgins, an English teacher who lives in Tochigi, north of Tokyo, told the BBC he had “lived through a few typhoons” during seven years in Japan.

“I feel like this time Japan, generally, has taken this typhoon a lot more seriously,” he said. “People were out preparing last night. A lot of people were stocking up.”

Only last month Typhoon Faxai wreaked havoc on parts of Japan, damaging 30,000 homes, most of which have not yet been repaired.

“I evacuated because my roof was ripped off by the other typhoon and rain came in. I’m so worried about my house,” a 93-year-old man told NHK, from a shelter in Tateyama, Chiba.

Japan suffers about 20 typhoons a year, but Tokyo is rarely hit on this scale.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Shopkeepers tried to protect their stores from the powerful winds and rain

Image copyright AFP Image caption Many supermarket were left empty as people stocked up

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Juan Enriquez · Author, academic, futurist

Juan Enriquez thinks and writes about the profound changes that genomics and brain research will bring about in business, technology, politics and society.

More Resources

The Untied States of America: Polarization, Fracturing, and Our Future

Juan Enriquez

Crown (2005)

TED Salon: Border Stories | September 2019

For the past 20 years, photographer and TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein has documented the migrant journey from Latin America to the United States, one of the largest transnational migrations in world history. Sharing photos from his decade-long project “Shadow Lives USA,” Lowenstein takes us into the inner worlds of the families escaping poverty and violence in Central America — and pieces together the complex reasons people leave their homes in search of a better life.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Jon Lowenstein · Documentary photographer, filmmaker, visual artist

TED Fellow Jon Lowenstein is a documentary photographer, filmmaker and visual artist whose work reveals what the powers that be are trying to hide.

More Resources

Shadow Lives

Jon Lowenstein

PREORDER NOW (2020)

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Learn more about Jon Lowenstein’s work.

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Support Shadow Lives, a decade-long project documenting the experiences and lives of the millions of people along the migrant trail.

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1,216,641 views

TEDSummit 2019 | July 2019

Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxMidAtlantic, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Melanie Nezer · Refugee and immigrants rights attorney

Melanie Nezer is a national leader in efforts to inform and educate individuals, institutions, elected officials and communities about refugees and asylum seekers.

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Donate to HIAS and help protect refugees.

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About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

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TEDxMidAtlantic | March 2019

About 60 million people around the globe have been forced to leave their homes to escape war, violence and persecution. The majority have become Internally Displaced Persons, meaning they fled their homes but are still in their own countries. Others, referred to as refugees, sought shelter outside their own country. But what does that term really mean? Benedetta Berti and Evelien Borgman explain. [Directed by Biljana Labovic, narrated by Susan Zimmerman, music by David Obuchowski and Peter Linder].

Meet the educator

Benedetta Berti · Conflict and security researcher

Benedetta Berti studies how conflicts impact civilians.

About TED-Ed

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

664,084 views

TED-Ed | June 2016

Immigrants

Little ducks and big geese swimming in a pond

Where do you come from?

Don’t worry, wherever you come from

We welcome you

And glad to see you

Healthy and strong

You contribute your beauty to the pond

We all come from somewhere

As long as we are in harmony with nature

We add beauty to society as a whole

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, April 09, 2013

Papilio machaon – Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Pa? królowej

Oct 26, 2014  Adam Grochowalski

Pa? królowej, Schwalbenschwanz, Swallowtail, Vidlochvost fenyklový. I present here the full development of this beautiful butterfly.

Category   Pets & Animals

Macro Photography Reveals the Dazzling Scales and Multi-Colored Hairs That Cover Butterfly Wings

October 11, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Chris Perani uses macro photography to capture the microscopic details found on butterflies’ wings, such as multi-colored hairs and iridescent scales. To photograph with such precision, the photographer uses a 10x microscope objective attached to a 200mm lens, which presents an almost non-existent depth of field. “The lens must be moved no more than 3 microns per photo to achieve focus across the thickness of the subject which can be up to 8 millimeters,” Perani explains to Colossal. “This yields 350 exposures, each with a sliver in focus, that must be composited together.” In total this accounts for 2,100 separate exposures combined into a single image. For more detailed observations of butterfly wings, visit Perani’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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PBS News, TED Talks, BBC Click, DW Documentary, Dominique Lalonde Films Nature, Thisiscolossal, Ing’s Photographs

 PBS News: 9.30-10.5.2019, The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film)  FRONTLINE,

TED Talks:  Tim Flannery Can seaweed help curb global warming?,  Safeena Husain A bold plan to empower 1 6 million out of school girls in india?, Ashweetha  Shetty H ow Education helped  me rewrite my life, How trees talk to each other- Suzanne Simard

BBC Click: Can Tech Solve the Opioid Crisis?

DW Documentary: By train across Sri Lanka,

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

Thisiscolossal: Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

Ing’s Photographs: Monarch Butterflies at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode October 5, 2019

Oct 5, 2019  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, October 5, the latest on the impeachment inquiry and the months-long battle between Beijing and protestors over the future of Hong Kong. Also, tourists flock to King’s Landing as “Game of Thrones” lives on in Croatia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live show October 4, 2019

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 3, 2019

Oct 3, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Donald Trump reiterates his desire for foreign involvement in investigating the Biden family, saying he might ask China about the idea. Plus: The implications of Trump’s recent actions, problematic water in Flint five years after the lead crisis, what’s at stake in the General Motors strike, a book on U.S. border policy and China’s booming art market. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode October 2, 2019

Oct 2, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, Democrats threaten the White House with subpoenas if they don’t turn over documents related to the Ukrainian affair. Also: Former Sen. Jeff Flake on the GOP’s future, 2020 Democrats on addressing gun violence, China’s electric car market transforms the auto industry, wheelchair tennis players blaze a trail and a Brief but Spectacular take on picturing the possibilities. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Democrats to White House: Time is up to produce documents https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFsNM… News Wrap: Sanders cancels events after heart procedure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=103G7… How Republicans see the impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qb7uQ… Where 2020 Democrats stand on gun violence policy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5317-… How China is driving the future of electric cars https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdQmi… How wheelchair tennis models success for adaptive sports https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhsra… Why seeing a role model who looks like you is so powerful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cqf5… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode October 1, 2019

Oct 1, 2019  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the president, attorney general and secretary of state are now at the heart of the impeachment inquiry that questions contacts with foreign leaders. Also: Officers in Hong Kong open fire on a young activist, fears of global surveillance as China exports its technology, an explosion of images of child sex abuse and what we’ve learned about the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Pompeo, Democrats clash over whistleblower inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4ukc… News Wrap: Iraqi forces fire on protesters in Baghdad https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VIhv… Report: Barr asked foreign leaders to help in probe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPbQA… Hong Kong violence contrasts China’s anniversary pomp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JX0LS… Critics say this Chinese tech spreads authoritarianism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPV-h… Why it’s so hard to stop images of child sex abuse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2L75D… How Khashoggi’s murder ‘haunts’ Saudi Arabia’s crown prince https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4z59… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

PBS NewsHour full episode September 30, 2019

Sep 30, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump lashes out as the impeachment inquiry moves forward and his former Homeland Security adviser raises concerns. Also: Presidential candidate Cory Booker on his self-imposed fundraising deadline, analysis from Politics Monday, questions of a Chinese surveillance state amid a rapid tech boom, and author Sally Rooney answers readers’ questions. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Trump focuses on whistleblower as inquiry deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFrcs… News Wrap: Kremlin says it must O.K. Putin-Trump transcript https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOTYU… 2020 Democrats talk impeachment on the campaign trail https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRKkI… Booker: Impeachment inquiry ‘not about popularity’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZgyv… Amy Walter and Tamara Keith on Democrats’ impeachment path https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pWSj… How China’s high-tech ‘eyes’ monitor behavior and dissent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bae3X… ‘Conversations with Friends’ author answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIGSM… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category   News & Politics

The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia (full film) | FRONTLINE

Sep 28, 2019

FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Note from FRONTLINE: This version of “The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia” has sporadic technical glitches with the audio. We have corrected the problem and posted a new version here: https://youtu.be/SVa2xqeIbkg One year after the murder of columnist Jamal Khashoggi, FRONTLINE investigates the rise and rule of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) of Saudi Arabia. In a never before seen or heard conversation featured in the documentary, the Saudi Crown Prince addresses his role in Khashoggi’s murder exclusively to FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith. Smith, who has covered the Middle East for FRONTLINE for 20 years, examines MBS’s vision for the future, his handling of dissent, and his relationship with the United States. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE films available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #MBS #SaudiArabia #Khashoggi Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category   News & Politics

It’s time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work that’s still needed to get there.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Tim Flannery · Environmentalist

Explorer and professor Tim Flannery seeks to grasp the big picture of planetary evolution and how humans can affect it — for better or for worse.

“Girls’ education is the closest thing we have to a silver bullet to help solve some of the world’s most difficult problems,” says social entrepreneur Safeena Husain. In a visionary talk, she shares her plan to enroll a staggering 1.6 million girls in school over the next five years — combining advanced analytics with door-to-door community engagement to create new educational pathways for girls in India. (This ambitious plan is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Safeena Husain · Social entrepreneur

Safeena Husain has worked extensively with rural and urban underserved communities in South America, Africa and Asia. After returning to India, she chose the agenda closest to her heart — girls’ education — and founded Educate Girls.

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A new model to inspire change at scale

The Audacious Project

Learn more about The Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to fund ambitious ideas for social good.

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Learn more about how Educate Girls mobilizes communities for girls’ education in India.

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TED2019 | April 2019

There’s no greater freedom than finding your purpose, says education advocate Ashweetha Shetty. Born to a poor family in rural India, Shetty didn’t let the social norms of her community stifle her dreams and silence her voice. In this personal talk, she shares how she found self-worth through education — and how she’s working to empower other rural youth to explore their potential. “All of us are born into a reality that we blindly accept — until something awakens us and a new world opens up,” Shetty says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Ashweetha Shetty · Rural social worker

Through her nonprofit, Bodhi Tree Foundation, Ashweetha Shetty supports first-generation college students in rural India to explore their potential through education, life skills and opportunities.

Can Tech Solve The Opioid Crisis? – BBC Click

Sep 30, 2019  BBC Click

Seventy thousand Americans are dying each year from drug overdoses. Two-thirds are the result of opioid addiction. Technology companies have been accused of helping facilitate the illicit sale of drugs online, but are they really to blame? Warning: This programme contains people affected by drug abuse. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category   Science & Technology

By train across Sri Lanka | DW Documentary

Sep 20, 2017  DW Documentary

Asia’s most beautiful railway line? The “Main Line” cuts through tea plantations and jungle, then passes Buddhist temples and relicts of the British Empire. In the 19th century the British built a railway in what was then their colony of Ceylon. Their idea was to transport goods such as tea from the highlands to the port of Colombo. Today it’s mainly only locals and tourists who use the so-called “Main Line.” The route is considered one of the most picturesque in the whole of Asia. Our trip takes us from the capital, Colombo, to Ella in the highlands. Our first stop is one of the country’s largest elephant orphanages. And then on to Kandy, the former capital of the Singhalese kingdom. The city is home to the famous Temple of the Tooth, which is said to house the Buddha’s top left canine. The train then winds its way further up into the highlands. We watch tea pickers at work and go to a tea factory to discover where the aroma comes from. Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s highest town at an altitude of almost 1900 meters, where a racecourse still brings the colonial era back to life. The stations have also retained their own colonial charm: in 1901, a signaling system was set up to make the long journey safer. And those suffering from the altitude can catch their breath at the final stop, the spa in Ella. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category  Education

How trees talk to each other | Suzanne Simard

Aug 30, 2016 

“A forest is much more than what you see,” says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery — trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new eyes. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksD…

Category  Science & Technology

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015

Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category   Pets & Animals

Frenetic Urban Time-lapse Videos of Shanghai, Vietnam and Kuala Lumpur by Rob Whitworth

June 8, 2013  Christopher Jobson

It is almost impossible these days to click around the web without running into the work of filmmaker and architectural photographer Rob Whitworth who spends months at a time filming immersive time-lapse videos in some of Asia’s largest cities. Whitworth is currently based in Shanghai where he recently completed his latest film, This is Shangai in conjunction with JT Singh. While often extremely fast-paced it’s amazing to see the filmmaker’s camera move so effortlessly through space, a trick he achieves with the use of extremely high-powered telephoto lenses and other filming techniques. I’ve included two additional videos above which you many have seen elsewhere but are certainly worth another view.

Update: You can read a great interview with Rob over at Asia Blog.

Ing’s Photographs: I captured these Monarch Butterflies with my camcorder at my backyard garden downtown Newark, New Jersey on Saturday, September 28, 2019.  I saw four Monarch Butterflies this day.

If you have more time please visit the following link:

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PBS News, TED Talks, Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy, Talltanic, Thisiscolossal, United Nations and Guardian News

PBS News: September24-28, 2019 and Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?,

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires,

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

TED Talks: Patrick Chappatte the power of cartoons, and A free world needs satire,  Kristie  Ebi How climate change could make our food less nutritious?

Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy:  AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

 Talltanic: 16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

The Secrets of Nature: The Black Mountain

Thisiscolossal: Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman, and The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

United Nations and  Guardian News: Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode September 28, 2019

•Sep 28, 2019

PBS NewsHour  

On this edition for Saturday, September 28, the latest on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump, and low turnout as Afghans vote in the presidential election amid Taliban violence. Also, a look at the underlying issues of U.S.-China trade relations. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 27, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, new details emerge about President Trump’s controversial phone call with Ukraine’s president and how the White House tried to suppress it. Plus: A historic Chinese infrastructure campaign builds the country’s global influence, courting black voters in South Carolina, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and a new film on the tragic life of Judy Garland. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Why House is moving so quickly on Trump impeachment inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrKMt… News Wrap: House votes to end Trump’s border emergency https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxCpK… How huge Belt and Road project is building Chinese influence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xl_kw… How South Carolina’s black voters feel about 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHxxr… Shields and Brooks on the politics of impeachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kPVN… How ‘Judy’ captures the triumph and tragedy of Judy Garland https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ta2_U…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYzrHbS7Kd0

PBS NewsHour full episode September 26, 2019

Sep 26, 2019 

PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new details of the whistleblower complaint involving President Trump’s interactions with a foreign leader further roil Capitol Hill. Plus: Reaction to the allegations of presidential misconduct from Rep. Adam Schiff and Kellyanne Conway, legal and political analysis of the incident, the growing power of Chinese President Xi Jinping and a look at South Korean politics. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode September 25, 2019

Sep 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the White House releases a memo of the call between President Trump and the Ukranian president, now at the heart of the impeachment investigation. Also: the staggering damage of climate change on the world’s oceans, struggles to root out Taliban fighters in Afghanistan, plus a look at the power and prosperity of modern China. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: What lawmakers learned from Trump’s Ukraine call memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k8vw… How DOJ is involved in the whistleblower complaint https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tf7ZT… Murphy: Trump’s call underscores need for House inquiry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPWTv… How a president’s call to a foreign leader becomes a memo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWxIR… News Wrap: Rouhani calls U.S. sanctions ‘economic terrorism’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7vPl… Future of ocean life is bleak if we don’t cut emissions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tt22B… Afghan forces constantly fighting to root out Taliban https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mgin… POWER AND PROSPERITY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAiH5…

PBS NewsHour full episode September 24, 2019

Published on Sep 24, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces a formal impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s actions with Ukraine. Also: Trump’s address at the United Nations, what’s next in the Brexit saga, a survivor of sexual assault reclaims her voice, Ta-Nehisi Coates on his first novel and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS: Impeachment calls grow as Trump defends withholding aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0qRT… Spanberger: ‘So many troubling threads’ in Trump allegations https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sc-4N… Harris: Releasing Trump call transcript ‘right thing to do’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XijaU… What spurred House Democrats to ramp up impeachment efforts? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ORqv… News Wrap: Tropical Storm Karen soaks U.S. Virgin Islands https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzhLJ… Trump denounces globalism, calls out China on trade at UN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViU6E… UK court ruling leaves Johnson with fewer options on Brexit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-oEJ… How Chanel Miller took her story back https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpQUC… In Ta-Nehisi Coates’ new novel, memory is a superpower https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuq6O… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Gen Z has spoken, are world leaders listening?

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

1.38M subscribers

Young leaders gathered on Saturday at the United Nations for the Youth Climate Summit, where they voiced concerns and offered solutions for a warming planet, a day after millions of young people participated in a global climate strike. Megan Thompson spoke with producer Maya Navon and associate producer Nina Joung, who covered the strike in New York City for WNET’s Peril and Promise initiative

Indigenous leaders call attention to disastrous forest fires

Published on Sep 21, 2019

PBS NewsHour

Fires have destroyed millions of acres of rainforest in the Amazon and in portions of Indonesia in recent months. This week, an international coalition of indigenous leaders met in New York during the United Nations climate summit to call attention to the destruction of their land, confront climate change and ask for increased protections for the environment. Megan Thompson reports.

Youth marches for climate action draw millions around the world

•Published on Sep 20, 2019

PBS NewsHour

In cities across the globe on Friday, protesters took to the streets to demand action on climate change. The demonstrations, easily the largest to focus on climate, represent a movement driven largely by young people — many of whom left school to join the walkout. William Brangham spoke to several participants about their mission to reduce fossil fuel emissions and how they plan to execute it. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

In a series of witty punchlines, Patrick Chappatte makes a poignant case for the power of the humble cartoon. His projects in Lebanon, West Africa and Gaza show how, in the right hands, the pencil can illuminate serious issues and bring the most unlikely people together.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Patrick Chappatte · Editorial cartoonist

With simple lines and pointed jokes that skewer injustice, Patrick Chappatte’s editorial cartoons view the tragic, the farcical and the absurd through a lens of unfettered humor.

Rising carbon levels in the atmosphere can make plants grow faster, but there’s another hidden consequence: they rob plants of the nutrients and vitamins we need to survive. In a talk about global food security, epidemiologist Kristie Ebi explores the potentially massive health consequences of this growing nutrition crisis — and explores the steps we can take to ensure all people have access to safe, healthy food.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Kristie Ebi · Public health researcher

At the Center for Health and the Global Environment, Kristie Ebi studies and develops interventions to help at-risk populations deal with climate change.

AMAZING HUMMINGBIRD STORY-Tips Feeder Easy Recipe Nectar BUILDING Nest on Window Mom Feeding Babies

Jul 18, 2019  Robbie and Gary Gardening Easy

Documentary on Hummingbirds what everyone should know, how they live, feed with simple recipe that can bring 100’s to a garden, and what they need to survive their new city world. I now buy large bags of Pure White Cane granulated sugar so they can live and raised their chicks and know they can be supplement to many can stay strong to survive their tough environment. These are the smartest birds, I do believe, they know who feeds them, they know who is helping them. ENJOY my thoughts and Story. Mom Nest on my Window on hummingbird Feeder: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mmCr… More on Hummingbirds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNEmj…

Category   Education

16 Unreal Animals That Actually Exist

Nov 4, 2016  Talltanic

Amazing and bizarre looking animals and creatures you need to know about from the strange scorpion fly to the endangered dhole. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9. The Raccoon Dog No, these dogs aren’t related to raccoons but they do happen to get their name for looking like a close relative of those little-masked bandits. Raccoon dogs are native to the Eastern region of Asia but are considered to be an invasive species ever since they were introduced into the local area. What’s interesting to note is that these dogs often climb trees, unlike most wild canids with the exception of the North American gray fox. The selling of their fur by retail companies has been the center of many scandals. 8. The Dhole The endangered canid can be found living in the regions of South, Central, and Southeast Asia. Here, they face the threat of habitat loss, persecution, and must compete against other animals such as tigers and leopards for food sources. They’re known to hunt in packs during the day and live in social packs that contain a hierarchy built on dominance. Unlike most domestic animals, the Dhole has been deemed as completely untameable due to their shy and vicious nature. 7. The Geoduck This is a geoduck but you probably recognize it as just an ordinary old clam. These saltwater clams are found throughout the west coast of North America and are edible. The most interesting thing about these animals is their very long siphons that can grow to be almost 3.5 inches long by themselves. Not only that, but this is the largest burrowing clam in the world that can live up to 140 years old, making it one of the longest-living creatures to ever exist. The oldest geoduck on record was recorded at being 168-years-old. 6. The Giant Isopod These nightmare inducing crustaceans dwell in the cold deep waters of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans. They closely resemble pillbugs, although, that’s not much of a surprise as they are related to them. They were first described back in 1879 which means that they’ve been known to the public for quite some time now. B. giganteus is capable of reaching between 7.5 to 14.2 inches! 5. A Deformed Chital Deer This might look like a strange new species of deer but no it’s just a regular deer. What makes it look peculiar are its tines. Normally, they’re supposed to form upwards but it isn’t uncommon to come across a deer with downward growing tines. The possible reason for this to occur is most likely due to injury. The deer possibly hit its antlers on a tree while they were growing and caused a blood vessel to either rupture or clot. Thus, the flow of blood gets disrupted and must find a new path to flow. 4. The Cassowary This flightless bird can be found living in the tropical forests of northeastern Australia and New Guinea. They live off a diet of mostly fruit, however, they’re considered to be omnivorous and will feed on smaller animals. Typically, the cassowary is a very shy animal but you do not want to get these birds angry. They’re able to inflict heavy damage by using their massive claws and can produce fatal injuries in humans and dogs. 3. The Lowland Streaked Tenrec This small mammal can be found living only on the island of Madagascar where its conservation status is currently classified as being Least Concerned. These little critters only grow to be around 7 ounces and come equipped with barbed quills on their body. This helps them defend against predators such as the fossa and the Malagasy mongoose. These are the only mammals that use stridulation to create sound, which is most commonly used by snakes and insects. 2. The Scorpion Fly These insects are known as Mecoptera and are referred to as scorpionflies because of their resemblance to a scorpion. The “stinger” that you see isn’t really the fly’s tail but rather only a trait that the males possess because it’s actually their enlarged genitalia. Scorpionflies are known to feed on dead organisms and live inside the bodies of dead humans, however, the body must be fresh in order to sustain the proper living conditions. 1. The Ant-Mimicking Treehopper You’re probably looking at this and wondering “what even is this thing?” Well, given the title of ant-mimicking treehopper you can pretty much guess that this isn’t actually a real ant. No, Cyphonia clavata here is specially designed by evolution to only appear as a ant, much like how other insects and spiders do. The black “ant” part of the treehopper is really just a bunch extension growths from its body. If you look closely you’ll see that the creature’s eye is is the circular shape located towards the brown area near its legs. The reason the “ant” is positioned backwards is because when ants are in defense mode they move backwards, so when the treehopper moves forwards that’s the illusion it creates.

Category   Pets & Animals

The Black Mountain – The Secrets of Nature

Feb 3, 2015  The Secrets of Nature

Subscribe to watch full natural history documentaries! A new documentary is uploaded every week. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thesecretsof… Twitter: https://twitter.com/NatureUniversum When cloud banks swallow the rock and make valleys disappear, the sky draws menacingly close. Then, the sun tears away that curtain and jagged rocks appear, an iron cross gracing their peak. This is the eastern Alps most impressive summit and Austria’s highest peak – the Grossglockner, the ”Black Mountain”. Climbing three thousand seven hundred and ninety eight meters, Mount Grossglockner – the fateful summit of early mountaineers, towers above the Tauern massif like a sentinel over an Alpine paradise of nature. Ibex and chamois climb the rocks, Alpine flowers glow in the sun and golden eagles glide over the mountain peaks.

Category   Travel & Events

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017  Kate Sierzputowski

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4? (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84? x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50? x 75?, 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2016

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60? x 90?, 2017

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84? x 144?, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44? x 60?, 2015

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72? x 72?, 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2? (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60? x 90”, 2017

Enormous Panels of Patchworked Fabric Give Colorful Temporary Makeovers to Public Buildings

September 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Textile artist Amanda Browder collaborates with the communities she’s working in to built site-specific architectural interventions. Using hundreds of yards of donated fabric with bright colors and patterns, Browder and her volunteer teams stitch together enormous panels that resemble crazy quilts. The panels wrap around bell towers, sheath elevated walkways, and drape from gables and eaves to give passersby a new experience of familiar buildings. In a statement on her website, Browder describes her work:

A state of betweenness – ‘twixt soft sculpture /’tween orchestrated public object installation with a studio affinity for abstraction and minimalism”. I am in love with the transformative nature of materials, and how the combination of the familiar creates abstract relationships about place. This relational objectivity generates an open-ended narrative, ambiguous situations defined by the choice of materials and work ethic. Central to the psychedelic experience, I am drawn to reinventing Pop-Art colors by exploring shifts in scale and sculptural perceptions.

The Montana-born artist received a B.A. in studio arts as well as two master’s degrees in sculpture and installation art. Browder is now based in Brooklyn and frequently travels to create new work. She was recently awarded an opportunity with the prestigious ArtPrize organization in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The multi-part work, titled Kaleidoscopic, is currently on view at locations around Grand Rapids. Keep up with Browder’s projects on Instagram, and watch the video below for a time-lapse of a previous installation in Las Vegas and an interview with the artist.

Photo: Bryan Esler

Photo: Bryan Esler

The Hummingbird Whisperer

•Published on Dec 12, 2016 

The Hummingbird Whisperer

 Near the UCLA Court of Sciences, there is a wing-flapping, darting, squeaking colony of 200-plus birds that make their home around the campus office of the “hummingbird whisperer,” as Melanie Barboni is sometimes called. For the full story http://ucla.in/2hqzz4R

Category   Education

The Hummingbird Whisperer: A UCLA Researcher Cultivates a Community of 200 Hummingbirds Outside Her Window

September 4, 2017  Christopher Jobson

Photographer Melanie Barboni is an assistant researcher at UCLA’s Earth, Planetary and Space Science Program where she installed a hummingbird feeder outside her office window in hopes of seeing the elusive birds and maybe snapping a photo. Two years and several feeders later, she estimates there are over 200 birds that now stop by her window every day, over 50 of which she’s bestowed with names because she can recognize them on sight. Barboni was raised in Switzerland where hummingbirds are practically non-existent and she only read about them in books. She likens the view from her office at UCLA as a dream come true, a place that she’s referred to as The Hummingbird Whisperer. (via Laughing Squid)

 Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Greta Thunberg to world leaders: ‘How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood’

Sep 23, 2019  Guardian News

‘You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,’ climate activist Greta Thunberg has told world leaders at the 2019 UN climate action summit in New York. In an emotionally charged speech, she accused them of ignoring the science behind the climate crisis, saying: ‘We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth – how dare you!’ Subscribe to Guardian News on YouTube ? http://bit.ly/guardianwiressub The climate and the cross: the battle between evangelical Christians in the US ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsUlV… UN secretary general hails ‘turning point’ in climate crisis fight ? https://www.theguardian.com/world/201… Support the Guardian ? https://support.theguardian.com/contr… Today in Focus podcast ? https://www.theguardian.com/news/seri… The Guardian YouTube network: The Guardian ? http://www.youtube.com/theguardian Owen Jones talks ? http://bit.ly/subsowenjones Guardian Football ? http://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Sport ? http://bit.ly/GDNsport Guardian Culture ? http://is.gd/guardianculture

Category  News & Politics

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