Black Lives  Matter, PBS News, USA TODAY, CNN, MSNBC, The Young Turks, DW News, Brian Tyler Cohen,  ET Canada,  The Daily Show, The New York Times, TED Talks and Wikipedia

PBS News:  July 2 -5, 2020, #WashWeekPBS Full Episode: President Trump’s Declaration of Grievance, Washington Week,  The #WashWeekPBS Bookshelf: “Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump”,  Why a ‘feverish’ Arctic will affect everyone on the globe, Opioids, Inc. (full film) | FRONTLINE – FRONTLINE PBS | Official, and Name Your Favorite Firework!

USA TODAY: John Bolton on his new book “The Room Where it Happened” – FULL INTERVIEW

CNN: US setting records as Covid-19 cases soar, Trump disregards public health warnings for speech at Mt. Rushmore, Stelter: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech won’t make sense to most people, GOP governor: The numbers are glaring warning signs,

 MSNBC: Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1, ‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden, Speaker Pelosi: ‘The President Himself Is A Hoax’ | Stephanie Ruhle, Cal Perry On The Scene In South Dakota Prior To The Arrival Of President Trump | All In, Epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch on the Risks Americans Face with Reopening | All In, Elijah McClain’s ‘Greatest Crime Was Walking Home While Being Black’ | Stephanie Ruhle, and From Breonna Taylor To Elijah McClain, Rev. Al Sharpton Clues In On Cases Of Police Brutality

 The Young Turks: District Attorney: No Injuries To Elijah McClain

 DW News: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore 4th of July speech: Protesters want to ‘wipe out our history’

 Brian Tyler Cohen:  Top Trump official goes OFF THE DEEP END on national TV over COVID outbreak

 CBS News: Photos show officers reenacting chokehold on Elijah McClain

 ET Canada: Celebs React To ‘Justice For Elijah McClain’

 The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Jordan Klepper vs. Trump Supporters

 The New York Times: Our Weekend Briefing, July 4, 2020 bRemy Tumin and David Scull

TED Talks: Katherine Eban A dose of realit about generic drugs and Rebecca Onie What if our health care system kept us healthy

Wikipedia: The History of America’s Independence Day

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 5, 2020

Jul 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, July 5, Fourth of July weekend sees a spike in COVID-19 cases, Jeff Greenfield on President Trump’s campaign strategy, opioid overdose is a hidden epidemic during the pandemic, and, ‘superspreaders:’ what they are and how they’re worsening the spread of COVID, according to scientists researching the disease. Hari Sreenivasan reports from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode July 4, 2020

Jul 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, July 4, Americans celebrate the holiday weekend amid a surge in COVID-19 cases and Black Lives Matter protests, criticism against Chicago police’s holiday weekend security plan, and an Israeli-Palestinian orchestra celebrates 20 years of intercultural harmony. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, July 3, 2020

Fundraiser

Jul 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. tops 50,000 new coronavirus infections for the second consecutive day as the Fourth of July weekend approaches. Plus: Hong Kong reels from China’s free speech crackdown, advertisers pressure Facebook to further regulate its content, a potential new name for the Washington, D.C., football team, Brooks and Capehart, a COVID-19 children’s book and in memoriam. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Khashoggi trial in absentia begins in Istanbul https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjwAA… Cities struggle to keep residents compliant as virus surges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2lUq… Why this pro-democracy Hong Kong activist fled his home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6te5G… Will advertiser boycott force Facebook to change policy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuS1e… A tipping point for Washington, D.C., football team’s name https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fe1U… David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart on coronavirus failures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQe9T… A book that teaches children ‘Why We Stay Home’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGBDL… In memory of 5 more U.S. victims of the coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqTol… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

PBS NewsHour full episode, July 2, 2020

Fundraiser

Jul 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the U.S. sees a record 50,000 new COVID-19 cases in a day as infections rise in 40 states. Plus: Nurturing the U.S. economy without fueling the pandemic, Hong Kong’s crackdown continues, President Trump’s rhetoric on race, a new twist in the Jeffrey Epstein sex abuse saga, a family textile business adapts to change and a Brief But Spectacular take on empowering community. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: U.S. sees record 50,000 new virus cases in a day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNXJ7… Paul Romer on halting the pandemic to save the U.S. economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tB6uW… What China’s Hong Kong crackdown says about Xi Jinping https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bTIH… Is Trump’s strategy of stoking racial tensions succeeding? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldUIj… How voters view Trump’s handling of racial unrest, COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuc8M… Ghislaine Maxwell’s arrest yields new twist in Epstein saga https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cj3Qu… How the pandemic is reshaping American manufacturing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCVm0… A Chicago electrical worker on empowering her community https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA2kF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

John Bolton on his new book “The Room Where it Happened” – FULL INTERVIEW | USA TODAY

Premiered Jun 26, 2020

USA TODAY

John Bolton, the former national security adviser to President Donald Trump, talks with USA TODAY’s Washington Bureau chief Susan Page about his new book, “The Room Where It Happened.” RELATED: Watch Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma https://youtu.be/WcBTkokxAmc Bolton has gained national attention for his criticism of Donald Trump after spending nearly a year and half as the president’s top adviser on national security. Bolton continues his criticism and recounts for USA TODAY some instances in which he questioned Trump’s acumen, intelligence and dedication to issues of national security. Susan Page asks Bolton about the impeachment efforts led by House Democratic Party leadership, to which Bolton responds that he would have convicted Trump on Ukraine. But Bolton is not interested in supporting Joe Biden, or any other Democratic candidates in 2020. He plans to write-in a conservative of his own choosing. » Subscribe to USA TODAY: http://bit.ly/1xa3XAh » Watch more on this and other topics from USA TODAY: https://bit.ly/2VfvRjw » USA TODAY delivers current local and national news, sports, entertainment, finance, technology, and more through award-winning journalism, photos, videos and VR. #johnbolton #theroomwhereithappened #usatoday

#WashWeekPBS Full Episode: President Trump’s Declaration of Grievance

Jul 3, 2020  Washington Week

President Trump is speaking Friday night at Mount Rushmore, ahead of Independence Day.

The visit captures this president at this moment: turning to symbols from the past and rallying his base as his campaign faces mounting challenges. The panel also discussed reporting from multiple news organizations that Russia offered bounties to the Taliban to kill American and coalition troops in Afghanistan. Panel: Ayesha Rascoe of NPR, Weijia Jiang of CBS News, Peter Baker of The New York Times and Jonathan Swan of AXIOS

The #WashWeekPBS Bookshelf: “Team of Five: The Presidents Club in the Age of Trump”

Jul 3, 2020

Washington Week

On the Washington Week Extra, presidential historian Kate Andersen Brower discusses her newest book Team of Five: The President’s Club in the Age of Trump.

US setting records as Covid-19 cases soar

Jul 5, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Phil Mattingly looks into the latest numbers of the coronavirus pandemic as case counts continue to rise throughout the nation. #CNN #News

Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1 | MSNBC

Jul 2, 2020  MSNBC

Watch the top news stories and highlights from The Rachel Maddow Show, airing weeknights at 9 p.m. on MSNBC. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news and in-depth analysis of the headlines, as well as informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: July 1 | MSNBC

Trump disregards public health warnings for speech at Mt. Rushmore

Jul 3, 2020  CNN

President Donald Trump will soon speak at Mt. Rushmore where masks are optional, and the crowd will not be social distancing. #CNN #News

Why a ‘feverish’ Arctic will affect everyone on the globe

Jun 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A historic heat wave is occurring in the Arctic, already the fastest-warming place on Earth due to the increasing accumulation of greenhouse gases. Dr. Merritt Turetsky, director of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado Boulder, has studied the Arctic for decades. She joins William Brangham to discuss causes and consequences of the Arctic’s rising temperatures. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us:

Opioids, Inc. (full film) | FRONTLINE

Jun 18, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Pushing opioids. Bribing doctors. Making millions. FRONTLINE and the Financial Times investigate how Insys Therapeutics profited from a fentanyl-based painkiller up to 100 times stronger than morphine — and how some Wall Street investors looked the other way. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate “Opioids, Inc.” tells the inside story of how Insys profited from Subsys, a fast-acting fentanyl-based spray that’s been linked to hundreds of deaths. Tactics included targeting high-prescribing doctors and nurse practitioners known as “whales,” misleading insurers, and holding contests for the sales team: the higher the prescription doses they got doctors to write, the larger the cash prize — despite the dangers to patients. But as the documentary traces in unprecedented detail, the scheme fell apart: With federal prosecutors using anti-racketeering laws designed to fight organized crime, Insys became the first pharmaceutical company to have its CEOsentenced to prison timein federal courtin connection with the opioid crisis. #Opioids #OpioidCrisis #WallStreet Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 300 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp

‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden

Jul 4, 2020  MSNBC

Kristopher Purcell, a member of 43 Alumni for Biden, explains why hundreds of Republican ex-staffers under George W. Bush are coming together to endorse Joe Biden and says, “Donald Trump is a threat to our nation.”» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYo… Find MSNBC on Facebook: http://on.msnbc.com/Likemsnbc Follow MSNBC on Twitter: http://on.msnbc.com/Followmsnbc Follow MSNBC on Instagram: http://on.msnbc.com/Instamsnbc ‘Trump Is A Threat To Our Nation’: Hundreds Of Ex-Staffers Under George W. Bush Endorse Biden

Stelter: Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech won’t make sense to most people

Jul 4, 2020  CNN

President Donald Trump used the backdrop of Mount Rushmore the night before the Fourth of July to deliver a speech to his base. CNN’s Brian Stelter examines the message of his speech. #CNN #News

GOP governor: The numbers are glaring warning signs

Jul 4, 2020  CNN

Experts are urging caution as Americans gather to celebrate the 4th of July. CNN’s Polo Sandoval reports. #CNN #News

Trump’s Mt. Rushmore 4th of July speech: Protesters want to ‘wipe out our history’

Jul 4, 2020  DW News

US President Donald Trump has kicked off Independence Day celebrations at an event in South Dakota. Fireworks lit up the sky over the Mount Rushmore monument which, in a controversial move, Trump chose as the venue for this year’s festivities. In a divisive speech, he criticized recent protests against racial injustice as “a merciless campaign to wipe out our history.” Trump made little reference to the coronavirus pandemic, though his speech came on a day the US saw another record rise in cases, with more than 57,000 new infections. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Trump #MountRushmore

Cal Perry On The Scene In South Dakota Prior To The Arrival Of President Trump | All In | MSNBC

Jul 3, 2020  MSNBC

MSNBC Correspondent Cal Perry is on the ground in South Dakota amidst protests for President Trump’s visit to mark the Fourth of July. Aired on 7/3/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more. Connect with MSNBC Online Visit msnbc.com: http://on.msnbc.com/Readmsnbc Subscribe to MSNBC Newsletter: http://MSNBC.com/NewslettersYouTube

Epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch on the Risks Americans Face with Reopening | All In | MSNBC

Jul 3, 2020   MSNBC

As coronavirus cases continue to grow across the country, Harvard epidemiologist Marc Lipsitch discusses the risks of reopening and trajectory of the spread. Aired on 7/3/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news, in-depth analysis of politics headlines, as well as commentary and informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, Meet the Press Daily, The Beat with Ari Melber, Deadline: White House with Nicolle Wallace, Hardball, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

Top Trump official goes OFF THE DEEP END on national TV over COVID outbreak

Jul 3, 2020  Brian Tyler Cohen

BREAKING: A top Trump official just went off the deep end on national TV over the COVID outbreak. Demand White House officials stop wasting time defending Trump’s lies, sign here ? http://odaction.com/btcwhlies Subscribe for more and follow me here: PODCAST: https://apple.co/36UvEHs (or search for “No Lie with Brian Tyler Cohen” on your preferred podcast platform) TWITTER: https://twitter.com/briantylercohen INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/briantylerc… FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/briantylercohen PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/briantylercohen Please sign up for updates on my new projects below: https://www.briantylercohen.com/sign-up/ Sources: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-persp… https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/he… https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsand… https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/us-…

Photos show officers reenacting chokehold on Elijah McClain

Jul 3, 2020  CBS News

Several officers in Aurora, Colorado, have been fired over a photo that reenacted a chokehold their colleagues used on Elijah McClain, who died in police custody in 2019.

Celebs React To ‘Justice For Elijah McClain’

Jun 25, 2020  ET Canada

During “ET Canada Live”, Roz Weston, Graeme O’Neil and guest co-host Elamin Abdelmahmoud discuss the “Justice For Elijah McClain” call for action and the celeb reaction from Ellen DeGeneres and Klay Thompson. SUBSCRIBE to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ETCanada…

Elijah McClain’s ‘Greatest Crime Was Walking Home While Being Black’ | Stephanie Ruhle | MSNBC

Jun 26, 2020  MSNBC

Colorado’s governor has appointed a special prosecutor to investigate the death of Elijah McClain- 10 months after he died after an interaction with police. His family’s attorney Mari Newman joins Stephanie Ruhle to discuss the latest. Aired on 06/26/2020. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc

District Attorney: No Injuries To Elijah McClain

Jun 26, 2020  The Young Turks

Colorado will investigate the death of Elijah McClain. Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian discuss on The Young Turks. Keep Hope (and TYT) Alive: http://tyt.com/go Read more here: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti… “The Colorado governor has reopened the investigation into the death of Elijah McClain, who died after being placed in a chokehold by cops and being sedated with ketamine. Governor Jared Polis announced Thursday he has ordered prosecutors to reopen the inquiry into the black unarmed 23-year-old’s death after being ‘moved’ by speaking to the victim’s mother. He said the state ‘owe[s] it to his family to take this step’ and warned that charges could be brought against the officers involved – after the Colorado District Attorney earlier defended his decision not to charge the cops.” Hosts: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian Cast: Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian

From Breonna Taylor To Elijah McClain, Rev. Al Sharpton Clues In On Cases Of Police Brutality

Jun 28, 2020  MSNBC

In this moment of protest, Rev. Al Sharpton gives an update on the individual cases that have sparked the new civil rights movement. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc About: MSNBC is the premiere destination for in-depth analysis of daily headlines, insightful political commentary and informed perspectives. Reaching more than 95 million households worldwide, MSNBC offers a full schedule of live news coverage, political opinions and award-winning documentary programming — 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Jordan Klepper vs. Trump Supporters | The Daily Show

Jul 4, 2020  The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

What’s better than Jordan Klepper at a Trump rally? Here’s a compilation of his greatest hits: #TheDailyShow #JordanKlepper #TrevorNoah Subscribe to The Daily Show: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWh… Follow The Daily Show: Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow Watch full episodes of The Daily Show for free: http://www.cc.com/shows/the-daily-sho… Follow Comedy Central: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentral Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentral Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentral About The Daily Show: Trevor Noah and The Daily Show correspondents tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture. The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.

The New York Times <nytdirect@nytimes.com> Our Weekend Briefing,

July 4, 2020

By Remy Tumin and David Scull

 

Good morning, and happy Independence Day.
We tend to pause at the end of December to recognize and reflect on the year’s most memorable moments. But six months into 2020, it feels as if we’ve already lived decades. And we still have a presidential election to get through.
The first three months of the year seem a distant memory, or as your Weekend Briefing writer likes to refer to it, “a time ago.” Here’s a recap of 2020 so far with some help from Times reporters and editors.

Abedin Taherkenareh/EPA, via Shutterstock
1. We started 2020 nearly going to war with Iran. Perhaps we should have taken that as a hint of the tumultuous year ahead.
Iran’s top security and intelligence commander was killed on Jan. 2 in a drone strike at Baghdad International Airport that President Trump authorized. Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani was the architect of nearly every significant operation by Iranian intelligence and military forces over the past two decades, claiming the lives of hundreds of Americans in Iraq.
General Suleimani’s killing propelled the U.S. to the precipice of war with Iran and plunged the world into seven days of roiling uncertainty. Online searches for “will there be a draft?” soared.
Earlier this week, Iran issued an arrest warrant for Mr. Trump and 35 others it says were involved in the general’s killing. Interpol, an international police organization, said it would not step in. — Remy
Doug Mills/The New York Times
2. Less than a week into the new year, John Bolton announced that he would be willing to testify in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.
It was a tantalizing prospect. Mr. Bolton, the former national security adviser, above in 2019, was privy to the inner workings of the White House. He was said to be deeply troubled by Mr. Trump’s efforts to pressure Ukraine, and had even written a memoir that, when it was finally released months later, divulged, as promised, much of the inside story.
The possibility of his testimony — and of an outcome that wasn’t a party-line acquittal — hung over the trial for weeks. But Republicans, who had endured countless hours of damaging testimony during the House investigation, had no interest in changing the rules of the trial to allow new witnesses.
The Senate voted against hearing from Mr. Bolton, and days later voted to acquit Mr. Trump. — Tom Wright-Piersanti, Briefings editor
Jordan Gale for The New York Times
3. From the beginning, it was always Joe Biden.
Sure, his chances of winning the Democratic presidential nomination looked shaky after devastating early defeats in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada. But his staunch support among Black voters powered a comeback in South Carolina. The one-two-three punch of support from Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Beto O’Rourke led to blowout victories on Super Tuesday, effectively spelling the beginning of the end of the competition.
Still, a primary field more than two dozen strong was nothing if not historic. The most women ever to run for president. The biggest age gap. The most racially diverse field. The first openly gay major presidential candidate.
But after three years of President Trump, Democratic voters proved themselves to be tired of the unprecedented. In 2020, the pragmatic outweighed the possible. — Lisa Lerer, political reporter
Tolga Akmen/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
4. It was the breakup heard around the world.
Prince Harry and Meghan delivered a jarring blow to Britain’s royal family when they announced on Jan. 8 that they would “step back” from their official duties. It was an extraordinary retreat by the couple, who had grown increasingly isolated within the House of Windsor since their wedding in 2018.
The couple did not originally have the queen’s approval for their plan to become part-time royals, and went rogue to get ahead of a leak. A deal with Buckingham Palace, which included giving up their royal titles, became official on March 31. Above, their last royal appearance.
They now live in Los Angeles with their son, Archie. — Remy
Jenna Schoenefeld for The New York Times
5. Kobe Bryant’s death in a helicopter crash plunged the N.B.A. — and seemingly much of the world — into a state of mourning that persists among the many fans and fellow athletes who idolized him.
The former Los Angeles Lakers star, 41, and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, were among nine people who died in the Jan. 26 accident, which occurred in foggy conditions on a hillside outside of Los Angeles.
Public memorials sprang up overnight, including one in the plaza outside Staples Center, the arena where Bryant had crafted so many singular moments for the Lakers over the course of his 20-year career. — Scott Cacciola, N.B.A. reporter

Brittainy Newman/The New York Times
6. A landmark #MeToo victory.
On March 11, Harvey Weinstein, the glorified producer who for years dominated Hollywood, was sentenced to 23 years in prison for sex crimes, effectively putting the 67-year-old behind bars for the rest of his life.
His sentencing capped a sharp downfall for the once-powerful media mogul that started in October 2017 when several women openly accused him of sexual assault and harassment, and fundamentally altered the perception of sex crimes and power dynamics. — Alisha Haridasani Gupta, gender reporter
Victor Moriyama for The New York Times
7. It first appeared in The Times on Jan. 6 as a “mysterious, pneumonialike illness” that had sickened a few dozen people in Wuhan, China.
Days later, Chinese researchers identified the source as a coronavirus. Two weeks later, the virus was on the front page of The Times as China scrambled to contain the contagion.
Then, time seemed to accelerate. Once-in-a-generation events began erupting one after the next.
Professional sports leagues around the world suspended seasons. Stocks plunged and a bear market emerged after 11 years in bull territory. The World Health Organization declared the virus a global pandemic. President Trump cut off travel from Europe.
And that was just March 11.
More than 10.9 million people have been sickened worldwide and more than half a million have died. Above, gravediggers in São Paulo, Brazil. In the U.S., the country hit hardest by the virus, a surge in new cases shows that the outbreak is spiraling out of control. And from what we can tell, the virus will most likely be with us for some time. — Jonathan Wolfe, Briefings writer
The New York Times
8. A pandemic does strange things to the economy.
The sharp, sudden drop in activity has produced one of the deepest recessions in history, and also perhaps the shortest. Indeed, it may already be over: The upswing in May and June, measured against the depths of March and April, make a range of economic indicators look as if they are soaring.
But compared with a year earlier, those same numbers reveal an economy that remains deep in a hole, with millions of jobs destroyed and billions in sales lost. The damage done will take a long time to repair, and reopenings that have been paused or rolled back may make things worse. — Jason Karaian, DealBook editor

9. Everything from work to theater moved online.
Sex work and sex content make an intriguing leading indicator about where both work and entertainment consumption are going.
This year we saw that our unhappy surprise always-at-home culture made opportunities of all kinds, for the kind of professional streaming sex performers pictured above, amateur dancers and entrepreneurs alike.
That will trickle down! Contributing strongly to that? More and more time spent online, the vast majority of that in apps. If you’re not watching TikTok and Instagram and listening to podcasts in the ways that we used to watch CBS and read Condé Nast magazines, the world is leaving you behind, sir or madam! (Fair, that may be a good choice.) — Choire Sicha, Styles editor
Diana Zeyneb Alhindawi for The New York Times
10. Which brings us to the current national unrest.
On Memorial Day, a graphic video captured the police killing of a Black man suspected of using a counterfeit $20 bill. What followed may be the largest movement in U.S. history.
George Floyd died after a white officer knelt on Mr. Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes, ignoring his pleas of “I can’t breathe.” The phrase has been a part of scores of deaths in police custody, but this time, national outrage crested over the use of deadly police restraints and the treatment of African-Americans, sparking a deep examination of the country’s racist past and present.
It manifested in Black Lives Matter protests around the world, including the one above in New York City, with chants of Mr. Floyd’s name along with Breonna TaylorAhmaud ArberyRayshard Brooks and more; in corporate companies confronting enduring forms of racial discrimination; in the removal of statues and Confederate flags; and in police reform.
“A truly great country does not ignore or excuse its sins. It confronts them and then works to make them right,” Nikole Hannah-Jones wrote in The Times Magazine in her case for reparations. “If we are to be redeemed, if we are to live up to the magnificent ideals upon which we were founded, we must do what is just.”
If you’re celebrating this weekend, stay safe. You can find the full text of the Declaration of Independence here.
Did a friend forward you the briefing? You can sign up here.
What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.
Browse our full range of Times newsletters here.

Investigative journalist Katherine Eban set out to report on a seemingly straightforward question: Are generic drugs really identical to their brand-name counterparts? The answer sparked a decade of interviews, meetings with whistleblowers, on-the-ground reporting across four continents and digging into confidential FDA documents. In this alarming talk, she takes us inside overseas manufacturing plants and exposes the fraud behind many low-cost generic medicines.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Katherine Eban · Investigative journalist

Katherine Eban’s articles on pharmaceutical counterfeiting, gun trafficking and coercive interrogations by the CIA have won international attention.

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Dangerous Doses: A True Story of Cops, Counterfeiters, and the Contamination of America’s Drug Supply

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Mariner Books (2006)

Rebecca Onie asks audacious questions: What if waiting rooms were a place to improve daily health care? What if doctors could prescribe food, housing and heat in the winter? At TEDMED she describes Health Leads, an organization that does just that — and does it by building a volunteer base as elite and dedicated as a college sports team.

This video was produced by TEDMED. TED’s editors featured it among our daily selections on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Rebecca Onie · Health innovator

Rebecca Onie is a nationally recognized leader in the intersection of social determinants, population health and health care delivery

MORE RESOURCES  FURTHER READING

Progress amidst large shifts in the US healthcare system

More funding and increased interest in addressing patients’ nonmedical needs has helped Rebecca Onie’s organization expand. Read more at the TEDMED blog.

More at blog.tedmed.com ?

TAKE ACTION  JOIN

Join the movement for better healthcare with Health Leads.

Learn more ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Day_(United_States)

The History of America’s Independence Day and Name Your Favorite Firework!

 Photo of the “original Rough draught” of the Declaration of Independence courtesy of the Library of Congress.

“Taxation without representation!” was the battle cry in America’s 13 Colonies, which were forced to pay taxes to England’s King George III despite having no representation in the British Parliament. As dissatisfaction grew, British troops were sent in to quell the early movement toward rebellion. Repeated attempts by the Colonists to resolve the crisis without military conflict proved fruitless.

On June 11, 1776, the Colonies’ Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and formed a committee whose express purpose was drafting a document that would formally sever their ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, crafted the original draft document (as seen above). A total of 86 changes were made to his draft and the Continental Congress officially adopted the final version on July 4, 1776.

The following day, copies of the Declaration of Independence were distributed, and on July 6, The Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first newspaper to print the extraordinary document. The Declaration of Independence has since become our nation’s most cherished symbol of liberty.

Bonfires and Illuminations

On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

In June of 1826, Thomas Jefferson sent a letter to Roger C. Weightman, declining an invitation to come to Washington, D.C. to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It was the last letter that Jefferson, who was gravely ill, ever wrote. In it, Jefferson says of the document:

“May it be to the world, what I believe it will be … the signal of arousing men to burst the chains … and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form, which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. …For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.”

– Thomas Jefferson
June 24, 1826 Monticello

Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870, and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a paid holiday for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, firework displays, picnics and performances of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa.

http://www.pbs.org/a-capitol-fourth/fireworks-fun/firework-names/

Name Your Favorite Firework!

Each year A Capitol Fourth strives to bring you the best fireworks display of any July Fourth celebration. But, did you know there are more than a dozen different types of aerial fireworks? Here are 10 examples of the pyrotechnics that you might see at this year’s celebration.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Peony

The most common type of firework, the peony shell is characterized by a spherical break of colored stars that burn without generating a trail of sparks, or tail effect.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Chrysanthemum

Similar to a peony, a chrysanthemum has a spherical break of colored stars, though its stars leave behind a trail of sparks.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Willow

The willow resembles a chrysanthemum, but with long burning silver or gold stars that produce a soft, dome-shaped weeping willow-like effect.

Diadem

As a type of peony or chrysanthemum, a diadem has a cluster of stationary stars at its center.

Palm

This shell contains a few large comet stars, which in bursting create large tendrils that give it the appearance of a palm tree.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Crossette

A crossette produces stars that each break apart into four smaller stars, creating a crisscross effect.

Horsetail

The horsetail shell is identifiable by its break, which resembles a short tail.

Independence Day celebrations on The Mall in Washington on July 4, 2008.

Ring

A ring shell emits stars in a halo-like shape. Smiley faces, stars and other such identifiable shapes are common variants.

Roman Candle

A Roman candle is a long cylinder that can discharge either a single large star or a series of them between short intervals.

Photo courtesy of Matt Buck via Wikimedia Commons.

Cake

With a fuse that sets off a variety of effects in succession, a cake is essentially many Roman candles fused together. Cakes vary widely in size, though some can contain over 1,000 shots.

Photo courtesy of KSDigital via Wikimedia Commons.

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Black Lives Matter, PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, TED Talks, and The Washington Post

PBS News: June 10 – 12, 2020

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

TED Talks: Shantell Martin How drawing can set you free?

The Washington Post: The Post Most and A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years By David Montgomery

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 12, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Warning: Tonight’s In Focus segment contains disturbing imagery. Friday on the NewsHour, the movement to eliminate symbols of the Confederacy continues to gain steam. Plus: NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace on changing his sport, how young Americans are approaching this pivotal moment in culture and society, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the coronavirus and a look at photography’s role in documenting social change. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Trump defends planned rally in Tulsa on June 19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvkgU… Is this the end for public monuments to the Confederacy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwHts… Driver Bubba Wallace on welcoming new fans to NASCAR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYLd4… How Gen-Z is approaching this historic moment of change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydG1W… Shields and Brooks on Americans’ changing views of policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ycQM… Remembering 5 more victims of the coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hTRf… The camera’s role in documenting a critical social movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBhdk… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 11, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the top U.S. military officer apologizes for joining President Trump in a controversial June 1 photo op amid protests in Washington, D.C. Plus: Unemployment in America, protests against racism extend beyond the U.S., the struggles of black-owned businesses, dealing with addiction during the pandemic, strengthening American democracy and community in New York’s Chinatown. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How Gen. Mark Milley became a ‘prop’ during Trump photo op https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI-W8… News Wrap: COVID-19 cases continue to surge in Brazil, India https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvlxh… What latest jobs numbers say about a U.S. economic recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuSj_… George Floyd catalyzes global movement for racial justice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwof9… Pandemic highlights hardships black business owners face https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3B5n… How Americans’ drinking habits have changed during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArHTQ… Policy recommendations to strengthen American democracy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4TBt… A Brief But Spectacular take on the Chinatown Block Watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdmsB… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 10, 2020

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Jun 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, George Floyd’s brother headlines a congressional hearing as lawmakers consider action to address police brutality and racial profiling. Plus: Voting chaos in the Georgia primary, Alabama’s rising COVID-19 cases, the risks of reopening society amid coronavirus, grappling with a pandemic during the war in Syria and the therapeutic value of gardening in turbulent times. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How close is Congress to taking action on police brutality? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhoZP… News Wrap: Ex-DOJ employees call for investigation of Barr https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndJ9W… What went wrong in Georgia’s chaotic primary election? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRQhC… Why COVID-19 cases are rising in Alabama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fq4XJ… What this global health expert sees in state COVID-19 surges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMCDA… Syrians prepare for new battle with invisible foe: COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjq27… Disability advocates lobby for more support during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGLDP… Landscape designer Piet Oudolf on the solace of gardening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJo9Q… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 7,410,510 953 418,294
United States 2,103,926 6,384 647,309 116,795
Brazil 832,866 3,941 427,610 42,055
Russia 520,129 3,544 274,641 6,829
India 308,993 227 154,330 8,884
United Kingdom 294,375 4,431 41,662
Spain 243,605 5,172 150,376 27,136
Italy 236,651 3,928 174,865 34,301
Peru 220,749 6,870 107,133 6,308
Germany 187,388 2,254 171,897 8,866
Iran 184,955 2,220 146,748 8,730
Turkey 176,677 2,125 150,087 4,792
Chile 167,355 8,759 3,101
France 156,813 2,338 72,808 29,389
Mexico 139,196 1,100 101,767 16,448
Pakistan 132,405 604 50,056 2,551
Saudi Arabia 123,308 3,604 82,548 932
Canada 98,373 2,590 59,334 8,106
Bangladesh 84,379 501 17,827 1,139
Mainland China 83,075 59 78,367 4,634
Qatar 78,416 28,543 55,252 70
South Africa 65,736 1,118 36,850 1,423
Belgium 59,918 5,199 16,547 9,650
Belarus 53,241 5,656 29,111 303
Sweden 50,931 4,929 4,874
Netherlands 48,640 2,787 6,057
Colombia 46,858 949 18,715 1,545
Ecuador 45,778 2,622 4,600 3,828
Egypt 42,980 429 11,529 1,484
United Arab Emirates 41,990 4,246 26,761 288
Singapore 40,197 7,048 28,808 26
Indonesia 37,420 140 13,776 2,091
Portugal 36,463 3,548 22,438 1,512
Kuwait 35,466 8,024 25,882 289
Switzerland 31,094 3,621 28,800 1,677
Ukraine 30,506 728 13,976 880
Poland 29,017 756 14,104 1,237
Argentina 28,751 640 8,730 785
Philippines 25,392 234 5,706 1,074
Ireland 25,295 5,140 23,213 1,705
Afghanistan 24,102 748 4,201 451
Dominican Republic 22,572 2,179 13,084 577
Romania 21,679 1,117 15,635 1,394
Panama 19,211 4,554 13,759 421
Iraq 18,950 484 7,515 549
Israel 18,876 2,056 15,319 300
Japan 17,382 138 15,580 924
Austria 17,078 1,918 16,012 677
Bolivia 16,929 1,476 2,431 559
Nigeria 15,181 74 4,891 399
Algeria 10,810 251 7,420 760
Honduras 8,132 888 844 306
Finland 7,087 1,282 6,200 325
Sudan 6,879 162 2,416 433
Hungary 4,064 416 2,476 559

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Who are you? To answer this question, artist Shantell Martin followed her pen. In this brilliantly visual talk featuring her signature freestyle line work — drawn across everything from the screens of Times Square to the bodies of New York City Ballet dancers — Martin shares how she found freedom and a new perspective through art. See how drawing can connect your heart to your hand and deepen your connection with the world.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Shantell Martin · Artist

Shantell Martin forges new connections between fine art, education, philosophy and technology to establish an environment that values artists as integral contributors to a healthy society.

MORE RESOURCES

Shantell Martin: Lines

Shantell Martin, Katharine Stout, Hans Ulrich Obrist

HENI Publishing (2020)

TAKE ACTION   LEARN

Learn how to draw with Shantell Martin.

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TED 2020 | May 2020

The Washington Post    The Post Most    June 11, 2020

(National Defense University)

Pentagon’s top general apologizes for appearing alongside Trump in Lafayette Square

“I should not have been there. My presence in that moment, and in that environment, created the perception of the military involved in domestic politics,” said Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

By Dan Lamothe ?  Read more »

Doctors aren’t sure why some coronavirus patients have been ill for more than 60 days

By Ariana Eunjung Cha and Lenny Bernstein ?  Read more »

Know The Signs: How to tell if your grandparent has become an antifa agent

Opinion ?  By Alexandra Petri ?  Read more »

NASCAR bans display of Confederate flag at all events and properties

By Liz Clarke and Des Bieler ?  Read more »

Trump won’t rename Army posts that honor Confederates. Here’s why they’re named after traitors.

By Alex Horton ?  Read more »

George Floyd’s brother came to Washington to speak. But his power was in the silences.

Perspective ?  By Robin Givhan ?  Read more »

Joe Biden warns that President Trump ‘is going to try to steal this election’

By Matt Viser ?  Read more »

Animal Crossing’s massive popularity has made it less like paradise and more like Wall Street

By Shelly Tan and Joe Fox ?  Read more »

Surgeons perform first known U.S. lung transplant for covid-19 patient

By Lenny Bernstein and Martine Powers ?  Read more »

‘Labor of Love’ breaks from the typical reality dating show — by taking a woman older than 40 seriously

By Lisa Bonos ?  Read more »

Tim Scott, only black GOP senator, seeks to answer national call to fix racist policing

By Mike DeBonis and Seung Min Kim ?  Read more »

Beleaguered and besieged, police try to come to grips with a nation’s anger

By Griff Witte and Nick Miroff ?  Read more »

Ice-T on protests, police brutality and ‘Cop Killer’ 28 years later

By Helena Andrews-Dyer ?  Read more »

Grim numbers and signs of hope signal a complicated economic recovery from coronavirus

Live updates ?  By Washington Post staff ?  Read more »

Remember Neli Latson, the black teen with autism who seemed ‘suspicious’ sitting outside a library? Ten years after his arrest, he still isn’t fully free.

Perspective ?  By Theresa Vargas ?  Read more »

Trump threatens to ‘take back’ Seattle as protesters set up ‘autonomous zone’

By Tim Elfrink ?  Read more »

A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years

From the Magazine ?  By David Montgomery ?  Read more »

‘Gone With the Wind’ will probably be back on HBO Max next week, with an African American scholar at the front of it

By Steven Zeitchik ?  Read more »

Media  (Goldin Solutions)

Heath Freeman is the hedge fund guy who says he wants to save local news. Somehow, no one’s buying it.

How a former Duke place kicker took control of one of the biggest newspaper groups in America — and what it means for democracy.

By Sarah Ellison ?  Read more »

When Fox News disappoints, Trump has a backup: the conspiracy theory-peddling OANN

Perspective ?  By Margaret Sullivan ?  Read more »

What insanity did Kayleigh McEnany just suggest?

Opinion ?  By Erik Wemple ?  Read more »

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A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years By David Montgomery

From the Magazine ?  By David Montgomery ?  Read more »

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/lifestyle/magazine/the-endless-call-for-racial-equity-and-justice-in-photos-and-quotes/?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most

The Endless Call

Demands for racial equity and justice have always been part of the American story.

While the images here span the past two weeks, the words paired with them span the past 100 years.

Turn music on

By David Montgomery    June 11, 2020

Ninety-nine years ago, in Tulsa, white mobs torched the black side of town and killed as many as 300 residents, with the tacit support of some in law enforcement, in one of the worst spasms of racial violence in American history. Last month in Minneapolis, George Floyd died with a police officer’s knee pressed to his neck, just days ahead of the May 31-June 1 anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Those two episodes bookend nearly a century in which civil rights progress has been fitful, hard-fought and unfinished. Across 10 decades, from Tulsa to today — against a backdrop of lynching and cross burning, more recently replaced by police chokeholds and vigilante gunshots, amid the subtler violence of systemic racism — voices have been raised in protest and defiance.

Words spoken in times of uplift or assault, hope or despair, can crystallize a moment or a movement: I have a dream. … Black Power. … I can’t breathe. Black Lives Matter. The voices collected here elaborate and extend the mantras, such as Langston Hughes versifying his insistence that America live up to its myth, and James Baldwin defining protest as a duty.

But how many other voices have been lost? For a long time the Tulsa massacre was barely mentioned in history books. The account of eyewitness B.C. Franklin quoted here surfaced only in 2015. Today it’s harder for people and events to be ignored because another phrase from protests past — The whole world is watching — has literally come true, thanks to the cameras in every potential witness’s pocket. The recent demonstrations were sparked by a bystander’s video of George Floyd’s death — and they have ended up generating more evidence of excessive force used by police against demonstrators in Washington, Buffalo, Philadelphia, New York and Atlanta.

The images presented here, photographed in late May and early June, capture the passion, anger and hope of new voices demanding to be heard. The raised fists communicate as directly as the cardboard signs — hand-lettered with yet more indelible words — while the fleeting tears of a young demonstrator and the warm embrace of comrade marchers speak of the vulnerability and pain at the root of any protest.

Washington, D.C., June 2. (Photo by Kian Kelley-Chung, son of André Chung, who took the photo at top)

Paris, June 6. (Photo by Peter Turnley)

Houston, June 2. (Photo by Greg Noire)

The juxtaposition of the historic voices and contemporary images underscores how much work is left to be done. Read in the context of today’s clamors for justice, the decades-old diagnoses and laments sound remarkably — and wrenchingly — fresh and relevant. That those dreams remain unfulfilled speaks to an American futility and systemic failure. Seen in that light, the images of today become part of the canon of timeless illustrations documenting the unfinished struggle.

The killing of George Floyd offers yet another tragic opportunity to continue an erratic process of change begun long ago. No one can say if this time will be different. All we can know is that these voices echoing from the past put their faith in the future — and that these demonstrators insist that the future is now.

Minneapolis, May 28. (Photo by Joshua Lott for The Washington Post)

For fully forty eight hours, the fires raged and burned everything in its path and it left nothing but ashes and burned safes and trunks and the like where once stood beautiful homes and business houses. And so proud, rich, black Tulsa was destroyed by fire — that is its buildings and property; but its spirit was neither killed nor daunted.

B.C. Franklin, a black lawyer who witnessed a white mob’s attack on the black section of Tulsa in 1921

Atlanta, June 7. (Photo by Sheila Pree Bright)

Let America be America again.

Let it be the dream it used to be.

Let it be the pioneer on the plain

Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

From the poem “Let America Be America Again” by Langston Hughes, 1936

Miami, May 30. (Photos by Jonathan Frydman)

Seattle, June 8. (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)

Though I have found no Negroes who want to see the United Nations lose this war, I have found many who, before the war ends, want to see the stuffing knocked out of white supremacy and of empire over subject peoples. American Negroes, involved as we are in the general issues of the conflict, are confronted not with a choice but with the challenge both to win democracy for ourselves at home and to help win the war for democracy the world over.

  1. Philip Randolph, union leader and civil rights organizer, calling for an end to discrimination in defense jobs and the military, 1942

Tucson, May 30. (Photo by Josh Galemore/Arizona Daily Star/AP)

I had been pushed around all my life and felt at this moment that I couldn’t take it anymore. When I asked the policeman why we had to be pushed around? He said he didn’t know. “The law is the law. You are under arrest.”

Rosa Parks, from her handwritten account of refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus in 1955

Atlanta, May 31. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

I love America more than any other country in the world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.

James Baldwin, from “Notes of a Native Son,” 1955

Minneapolis, June 3. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

No, I’m not an American. I’m one of the 22 million black people who are the victims of Americanism. One of the 22 million black people who are the victims of democracy, nothing but disguised hypocrisy. So, I’m not standing here speaking to you as an American, or a patriot, or a flag saluter, or a flag waver — no, not I. I’m speaking as a victim of this American system. And I see America through the eyes of the victim. I don’t see any American Dream; I see an American nightmare.

Malcolm X, from a speech in Cleveland, 1964

Portland, Ore., June 2. (Photo by Andrew Wallner)

See, it’s time for America to wake up and know that we’re not going to tolerate — we’re not begging anymore. And I’m not going to say it’s not any more of us going to die, because I’m never sure when I leave home whether I’ll get back home or not. But if I fall while I’m in Kentucky, I’ll fall five feet and four inches forward for freedom, and I’m not backing off it. And nobody will have to cover the ground that I walk on as far as freedom is concerned because I know as well as you should know that no man is an island to himself, and until I’m free in Mississippi, you’re not free in no other place.

Fannie Lou Hamer, from a speech in Kentucky, 1968

New York, June 5. (Photos by Celeste Sloman)

Let me speak of a recent, a very recent black dream: The waiting for the Messiah, some leader. Now nobody — Martin Luther King did not tell Rosa Parks to stay in her seat. That came first. Then he came. She just didn’t move. We didn’t used to have to wait for the word. And the history of black people in this country is those people who got up and moved, all over this country.

Toni Morrison, from a speech in Portland, Ore., 1975

Atlanta, June 2. (Photo by Lynsey Weatherspoon)

We imagined a more humane future, but we also risked our very lives to defeat racism and U.S. military aggression against Southeast Asia. Now, it is your turn to imagine a more humane future — a future of justice, equality and peace. And if you wish to fulfill your dreams, which remain the dreams of my generation as well, you must also stand up and speak out against war, against joblessness and against racism.

Angela Davis, from a commencement address to the Berkeley High School graduating class, 1983

Brooklyn, June 2. (Photo by Yunghi Kim/Contact Press Images)

What happened in Los Angeles in April of 1992 was neither a race riot nor a class rebellion. Rather, this monumental upheaval was a multiracial, trans-class, and largely male display of justified social rage. For all its ugly, xenophobic resentment, its air of adolescent carnival, and its downright barbaric behavior, it signified the sense of powerlessness in American society.

Cornel West, from “Race Matters,” on the reaction to the acquittal of white police officers in the beating of Rodney King, 1993

New York, June 1. (Photo by Jelani Rice)

This is where we are right now. It’s a racial stalemate we’ve been stuck in for years. … But I have asserted a firm conviction, a conviction rooted in my faith in God and my faith in the American people, that working together we can move beyond some of our old racial wounds and that, in fact, we have no choice — we have no choice if we are to continue on the path of a more perfect union.

Barack Obama, from a speech on race during the 2008 presidential campaign

Washington, D.C., June 3. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

We know how to be racist. We know how to pretend to be not racist. Now let’s know how to be antiracist.

Ibram X. Kendi, from “How to Be an Antiracist,” 2019

Minneapolis, June 7. (Photo by Russell Frederick)

I came to this city in 1955, which was the year that the body of Emmett Till was found in a body of water in Mississippi, same year that Rosa Parks refused to give up the back seat on the bus. … Since that time, I have seen any number of struggles against racism, and they have all ended up with relatively little outcome. So the question is valid, it’s a reasonable question: Is this going to be just like so many other movements, a moment of anger and rage and then back to business as usual? … [But] his death did not simply start a bunch of good speeches, a bunch of tributes. Out of his death has come a movement, a worldwide movement. And that movement is not going to stop after two weeks, three weeks, a month. That movement is going to change the world.

Rev. William A. Lawson, pastor emeritus of Houston’s Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church, from his address at the funeral for George Floyd, Houston, June 9, 2020  David Montgomery   David Montgomery writes general features, profiles and arts stories for the Washington Post Magazine, including pieces on the Latino community. He joined The Washington Post in 1993 and has covered Prince George’s County, politics in Maryland and life in the District.       About this story  Design by Christian Font. Photo editing by Dudley M. Brooks. Audio editing by Linah Mohammad.                                                       Go to the top

Black Lives Matter, PBS News, CNN, The New York Times, Amanpour & Company, TED Talks, and Colossal

PBS News: June 4 – 9, 2020, PBS NewsHour Presents ‘Race Matters: America in Crisis’, and #WashWeekPBS Extra – How will nationwide protests affect the 2020 election?

 CNN: Senate GOP dodges over Trump’s baseless Buffalo protester tweet

 The New York Times: The Morning, June 5 & 8, 2020

 Amanpour and Company: Antifa – Terrorist Group or Trump Scapegoat?

 TEDx Talks: Black murder is normal | Michael Smith | TEDxJacksonville

 Doctor Mike Hansen: Lung Doctor Analyzes George Floyd Autopsy Report (MEDICAL EXPLANATION)

 TED Talks: Baratunde Thurston How to deconstruct racism one headline at a time

Colossal: From Minneapolis to Syria, Artists Are Honoring George Floyd Through Murals and Public Artworks, A Bold Black Lives Matter Statement Transforms a Street Leading to the White House in Washington D.C., and A 20,000-Square-Foot Tribute to Healthcare Workers Emerges at Queens Museum

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 9, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 9, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, George Floyd is laid to rest in Houston, but protests against police violence — and demands for change — go on. Plus: Race relations in the U.S. military, the experiences of black journalists covering protests of racism, Republicans attack the integrity of voting by mail, how Vietnam has contained the coronavirus and the pandemic’s effect on the global film industry. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS ‘He’s gonna change the world’: George Floyd laid to rest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8mQ_… News Wrap: UN General Assembly won’t convene in September https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yv0Eo… Why military hasn’t made more progress on overcoming racism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NUaN… Coverage of protests illuminates journalism’s race problem https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzuYM… The truth about vote-by-mail and fraud https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkSRJ… How Vietnam’s authoritarian government contained COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RjDq… How pandemic has put film industry in ‘state of paralysis’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvhr_… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 8, 2020

Jun 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, protests of police violence against black Americans continue to echo across the U.S., prompting calls for major policy changes. Plus: What defunding the police would mean, Sen. Cory Booker on police reform, risks for mail carriers and delivery workers amid the pandemic, how dangerous are mass protests for virus spread and Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS 2 weeks after Floyd’s death, Americans are still protesting https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uM2tE… News Wrap: New York City begins gradual reopening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEvt-… 2 views on the future of American policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFN2g… Cory Booker on how the U.S. should reform policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_aOA… Pandemic boosts labor, risks for mail and delivery workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f85kV… A ‘risk-based decision’ about protesting during a pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPME8… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on protest political pressure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCPXW… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 7, 2020

Jun 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, June 7, demands for justice for George Floyd’s killing and calls for police reform grow as massive protests continue across the U.S. and the world. Also, San Francisco considers a resolution to prohibit hiring police officers with a misconduct record. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 6, 2020

Jun 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, June 6, a memorial service was held for George Floyd in the North Carolina town where he was born, and as protests continued in the U.S. thousands of demonstrators around the world took to the streets to rally against police brutality and systemic racism. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 5, 2020

Jun 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, another tumultuous week in the U.S. comes to a close with some signs of economic progress — but continued unrest over racism and police use of force. Plus: What May jobs numbers could mean for the pandemic economy, Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles on protests and policing, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks and remembering five more people killed by COVID-19. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump criticized for invoking George Floyd in jobs remarks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2PgM… News Wrap: WHO urges continued use of face masks worldwide https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=peGEw… Do May jobs numbers indicate economic recovery has begun? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Aboq… Mayor Garcetti on changing, but not eliminating, the police https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfxqD… Shields and Brooks on race in America, Trump’s response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gyJZ… Stories of 5 coronavirus victims in the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VZOw… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 4, 2020

Jun 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, predominantly peaceful protests continue across America despite occasional use of force by police and the presence of National Guard troops, and memorial services begin for George Floyd. Also: Former military leaders push back on President Trump’s rhetoric, Hong Kong protesters defy bans on gathering, why work from home could be devastating for real estate and more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Mourners remember George Floyd as Trump draws pushback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69Q_v… New York protesters say they want change from ‘daily fear’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zdxgq… Bowser questions Trump’s legal ability to call troops to DC https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wlC1… ‘Armed forces exist to protect,’ not police communities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b71uB… News Wrap: Virginia taking down Robert E. Lee statue https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYUR3… At banned vigil, Hong Kong protesters rally for freedoms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3Z2F… American skyscrapers face uncertain future amid coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCitn… Coronavirus is taste of what poor Americans ‘feel every day’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWayR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

WATCH LIVE: PBS NewsHour Presents ‘Race Matters: America in Crisis’

Streamed live 2 hours ago  PBS NewsHour

“Race Matters: America in Crisis, A PBS NewsHour Special” will premiere on PBS stations nationwide on Friday, June 5, 2020, from 9 to 10 p.m. ET. “Race Matters: America in Crisis” will focus on the frustration pouring out onto American streets, and outrage about police brutality. It will also explore America’s deep systemic racial disparities in education, the criminal justice system, the economy and health care, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program will also include grassroots voices from around the country and roundtable conversations with thought leaders, newsmakers and experts. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

#WashWeekPBS Extra: How will nationwide protests affect the 2020 election?

Jun 5, 2020  Washington Week

The panel continued the conversation on the nationwide protests following the death of George Floyd, and discussed the potential relocation of the 2020 Republican National Convention from Charlotte, North Carolina. Panel: Jonathan Martin of The New York Times, Amna Nawaz of the PBS NewsHour, Paula Reid of CBS News, Pierre Thomas of ABC News Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Senate GOP dodges over Trump’s baseless Buffalo protester tweet

Jun 9, 2020  CNN

A number of Republican senators dodged questions or were silent when pressed for reaction after President Donald Trump suggested without evidence that a 75-year-old man who was seriously injured after being shoved by police officers in Buffalo, New York, last week, may have been part of a “set up.” In an unsubstantiated claim, the President tweeted, “Buffalo protester shoved by Police could be an ANTIFA provocateur. 75 year old Martin Gugino was pushed away after appearing to scan police communications in order to black out the equipment. @OANN I watched, he fell harder than was pushed. Was aiming scanner. Could be a set up?” At a news conference following a Republican policy lunch, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky refused to say whether Trump’s tweet was appropriate. CNN pressed him twice, and he instead pointed to the work led by GOP Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina to try to put together a police reform package. #Trump #CNN #News

The New York Times     The Morning     June 8, 2020
Good morning. Minneapolis plans to dismantle its police force. New York City is starting to reopen. And Tropical Storm Cristobal has made landfall. Let’s start with a look at false reports from the police.

 When the police lie

By David Leonhardt

Martin Gugino, a 75-year-old protester, lays on the ground after he was shoved by two police officers in Buffalo, New York.Jamie Quinn, via Reuters
An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.
The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.
That’s a widespread problem:
Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.
Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.
Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.
Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.
(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)
False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”
THREE MORE BIG STORIES
1. Minneapolis to rethink policing
The Minneapolis City Council pledged yesterday to dismantle the Police Department. Council members said that they did not yet have specific plans for a new public safety system and would study models being tested in other cities.
It is the biggest response to the protests so far. In New York and Los Angeles, city officials have vowed to shrink police budgets in coming months.
In other protest developments:
  • Democrats in Congress plan to unveil legislation today that would make it easier to prosecute police misconduct and recover damages from officers who violated people’s constitutional rights.
2. New York emerges from its virus lockdown

Closed Brooklyn businesses ln April.Spencer Platt/Getty Images
New York City will take the first steps toward reopening today, a moment of optimism in a city battered by the coronavirus. Nonessential construction and manufacturing can resume, and retail stores can open for pickup. As many as 400,000 workers could return to their jobs.
The milestone comes 100 days after the city reported its first case. Since then, more than 211,000 residents have been infected and more than 21,000 have died. The confirmed infection rate has dropped sharply since the peak in mid-April.
In other virus developments:
3. Distance learning isn’t working
Education experts believe that distance learning in most school districts is not working and that students are falling behind at alarming rates. “We know this isn’t a good way to teach,” a seventh-grade teacher in Colorado said. Black, Hispanic and low-income students are falling behind the fastest, research suggests.
“The richest and poorest parents are spending about the same amount of hours on remote school,” Dana Goldstein, a Times reporter who has written a book on teaching, told us. But “wealthier parents are inevitably able to provide more books and supplies at home, more quiet space, educational toys and often more knowledge of the curriculum.” More high-income school districts are also providing strong remote instruction, rather than basic worksheet-like activities.
Here’s what else is happening

Lake Pontchartrain’s Orleans Harbor in New Orleans on Sunday, as Tropical Storm Cristobal approaches the Louisiana Coast.Gerald Herbert/Associated Press
  • Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall in southeast Louisiana yesterday, hours after pouring several inches of rain on the New Orleans area. The storm is expected to head north to Arkansas and Missouri by Tuesday.
  • James Bennet, the editorial page editor of The Times, has resigned over the publication of an Op-Ed by Senator Tom Cotton last week that called for the military to crack down on “lawbreakers” in the protests. (Ben Smith, The Times’s media columnist, looked at the revolts inside the country’s big newsrooms.)
  • Lives lived: It was the late 1970s, and the hip-hop scene was just emerging. Robert Ford Jr., better known as Rocky, was there to chronicle it as a journalist and then promote it as a producer and mentor to early stars like Kurtis Blow. Ford’s breakout record? A Christmas single. He has died at 70.
BACK STORY: TAKING A KNEE
Four years ago, Kurt Streeter — then an ESPN writer — published a profile of Nate Boyer, an unusual football player. Boyer was homeless as a young man and later served in the Army as a Green Beret, in both Afghanistan and Iraq. For the Seattle Seahawks, he was the long-snapper, who played only on some kicks.
Boyer’s place in football history, however, won’t be about what he did on the field. It will be about the fact that he gave Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid the idea to protest police brutality by kneeling during the national anthem. Boyer, who’s white, said he would never kneel during the anthem. But he thought it was a symbol of reverence and had seen a photo of Martin Luther King Jr. protesting in Alabama by kneeling.
“If you’re not going to stand,” Boyer remembers telling Kaepernick and Reid, as the three of them sat in a hotel lobby, hours before a game in 2016, “I’d say your only other option is to take a knee.”
Kurt has since left ESPN for The Times, and he has written an article about how kneeling spread from the N.F.L. to the recent protests. Boyer’s comments are a fascinating part of the story — and a reminder of why journalists often make an effort to keep in touch with people they’ve interviewed.

Antifa: Terrorist Group or Trump Scapegoat? | Amanpour and Company

Jun 4, 2020 Amanpour and Company

For protests that turned violent, President Trump blames the far left, and saying he wants to designate Antifa – short for ‘Anti-Fascists’ – as a terrorist organization. But activist and Occupy Wall Street organizer Mark Bray hits back in a piece for the Washington Post. Bray joins Michel Martin to explain why he believes Trump’s bluster is a diversionary tactic. Originally aired on June 4, 2020. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Subscribe to the Amanpour and Company. channel here: https://bit.ly/2EMIkTJ For more from Amanpour and Company, including full episodes, click here: https://to.pbs.org/2NBFpjf Like Amanpour and Company on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2HNx3EF Follow Amanpour and Company on Twitter: https://bit.ly/2HLpjTI Watch Amanpour and Company weekdays on PBS (check local listings). Amanpour and Company features wide-ranging, in-depth conversations with global thought leaders and cultural influencers on the issues and trends impacting the world each day, from politics, business and technology to arts, science and sports. Christiane Amanpour leads the conversation on global and domestic news from London with contributions by prominent journalists Walter Isaacson, Michel Martin, Alicia Menendez and Hari Sreenivasan from the Tisch WNET Studios at Lincoln Center in New York City. #amanpourpbs

Black murder is normal | Michael Smith | TEDxJacksonville

Jan 6, 2015  TEDx Talks

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. In this Talk, Pastor Michael T. Smith argues that the “normalcy” of black murder is engrained in our American culture. Indeed, the idea that a black American would be involved in a homicide—either as perpetrator or victim—is so broadly accepted as to be largely unnoticed. Smith exposes the racism that underlies the appalling lack of outrage at high death rates in the black community, and highlights the hypocrisy of a society that glamorizes violence, but ignores its victims. “It doesn’t take action to keep racism going,” Smith observes, “it takes inaction.” About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Lung Doctor Analyzes George Floyd Autopsy Report (MEDICAL EXPLANATION)

Jun 3, 2020  Doctor Mike Hansen

Lung Doctor Analyzes George Floyd Autopsy Report (MEDICAL EXPLANATION) Let’s be clear..we’ve all seen the video by now. It’s obvious that these police officers killed George Floyd. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner, and the independent medical examiner hired by the family of George Floyd, Dr. Michael Baden, have concluded that his death was a homicide….but their opinion differs on the cause of death. But if both of them declared that his death was a homicide, does the cause of death really matter? (YES). I want justice for George Floyd, and that is why I’m making this video, because the medical explanation for his cause of death, is not a simple explanation. As a lung doctor, part of my job is to figure out why people can’t breathe. As an intensive care doctor, part of my job is to care for people who are on the brink of death. Like when someone can’t breathe. So when someone dies of asphyxia, as is the case of George Floyd, the determination of the cause of death is dependent on information elicited based on the investigation, which includes, the deceased personal medical history namely, autopsy, and crime scene investigation, which of course includes video evidence. Asphyxia is a Greek term that translates to “loss of pulse.” Mechanical asphyxia involves some physical force or physical abnormality that interferes with the uptake and/or delivery of oxygen. With asphyxia, the brain doesn’t get enough oxygen, and when the pons and the medulla aren’t getting enough oxygen, they can no longer function. This means they can no longer tell the diaphragm to contract, and breathing then stops. While this happens, the heart is also not getting enough oxygen, and typically the heart pumps slower and slower until it stops. Prolonged continuous application of extreme pressure on the thorax, such as with the bodyweight of several officers, is capable of causing death. This is important, because this contributed to the death of George Floyd, in addition to the knee to the neck. The neck contains our airway, the trachea, and it also contains carotid and vertebral arteries and jugular veins. The arteries here deliver oxygenated blood to the brain, while the jugular veins allow the deoxygenated blood to flow back to the heart. So what happens when pressure is placed on the neck? Well, it depends, on a lot of different factors (amount and duration of pressure, etc). And looking at the George Floyd video, he was unconscious for more than 2 minutes with the knee still on his neck. There’s no doubt, that during this time, he took his last breath, and right around the same time, lost his pulse. By the time the EMS guy checks his pulse, I highly doubt he actually felt a pulse, because it was more than two minutes after George lost consciousness. It was obvious that when they moved George onto the stretcher, he was completely limp because he was dead. And it wasn’t until much later, did they start CPR, in the ambulance. Now let’s get to what the medical examiners had to say about this case. Dr. Michael Baden, who did the independent autopsy says Floyd died of “asphyxiation from sustained pressure when his back and neck were compressed, with the neck pressure cutting off blood flow to his brain.” I agree with that assessment. I would also add that partial compression of the trachea, causing airway compromise, was also possible. The weight on George’s back made the work of breathing much harder for his diaphragm, and the neck pressure at the very least meant less blood (and thus oxygen) was being delivered to his brain, and less carbon dioxide could be removed from his brain. After a while, the diaphragm becomes fatigued, and no longer has the strength to contract, which means the lungs can’t get oxygen into the blood, and can’t get carbon dioxide out of the blood. And all of this caused him to lose consciousness. And probably within seconds, he lost a pulse. And despite losing consciousness, and despite losing a pulse, they continued to apply pressure on the neck, and put their weight on his back. The Hennepin County medical examiner’s office said that the cause of death is “cardiopulmonary arrest complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint, and neck compression.” This statement doesn’t really make sense to me. But the Hennepin County release also says heart disease was an issue; the independent examiner didn’t find that. The county said that fentanyl and methamphetamine use were among “significant conditions,” but its report didn’t say how much of either drug was in Floyd’s system or how that may have contributed. But Dr. Michael Baden got it right. – Doctor Mike Hansen

Baratunde Thurston explores the phenomenon of white Americans calling the police on black Americans who have committed the crimes of … eating, walking or generally “living while black.” In this profound, thought-provoking and often hilarious talk, he reveals the power of language to change stories of trauma into stories of healing — while challenging us all to level up.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Baratunde Thurston · Writer, activist, comedian

Baratunde Thurston is an Emmy-nominated writer, activist and comedian who addresses serious issues with depth, wit and calls to action. He believes the stories we tell help shape the world in which we live. Also, he’s from the future.

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BOOK  How to Be Black

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The New York Times     The Morning     June 5, 2020
By David Leonhardt
Good morning. Mourners remembered George Floyd. Virus data shows an encouraging trend. Let’s start with a look at police departments that have made changes.
Where police reform has worked

Police recruits at the San Francisco Police Academy in San Francisco.Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
It can often feel like nothing changes with police killings. Gruesome, high-profile cases keep coming — Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, now Manuel Ellis — and the annual number of killings nationwide remains at about 1,100.
In several big cities, however, things have changed. Police departments have adopted new policies, and, while problems remain, the number of shootings and deaths have fallen significantly.
It’s happened in Los Angeles, where fatal police shootings have declined in each of the last four years, down to 12 last year. It’s happened in San Francisco. And it’s happened in Baltimore, Chicago, Philadelphia and Phoenix, Samuel Sinyangwe, a data scientist and activist, writes for FiveThirtyEight. “Many of these reforms were initiated in response to protests and public outcry over high-profile deaths,” he adds.
The changes often revolve around training officers to de-escalate situations and reduce the amount of force they use. Tougher measures to get rid of violent officers also seem to help. Hiring more police officers sometimes helps as well, research shows. “Overstressed, overtired officers working too many shifts generate more complaints of excessive force,” Vox’s Matthew Yglesias notes.
The most sweeping proposals to emerge in recent days, like defunding the police, are unlikely to attract broad political support. Many Americans feel positively toward the police, as David Byler of The Washington Post points out — although there are large gaps by race.
Still, most Americans also say that the police have a racism problem, and most favor reforms, such as body cameras and outside investigations of misconduct. Drew Linzer of the polling firm Civiqs notes that support for the Black Lives Matter movement surged in recent days to almost 50 percent, “the highest it has ever been in over three years of polling.”
All of which points to some common political ground on police reform. “The problem is not that we lack a playbook for fixing the police,” a former police commissioner in Philadelphia and three other experts write for the Times Opinion section. “We have one. The problem is that we have not successfully followed the one we have.” Barack Obama posted a Twitter thread last night making similar points.
Why hasn’t reform worked in Minneapolis? The police department “failed to set clear criteria on the use of force and de-escalation,” Jamiles Lartey and Simone Weichselbaum of The Marshall Project report. The department also failed to “weed out bad cops” and “continued to use choke holds.”
THREE MORE BIG STORIES
1.              Remembering George Floyd

 

Alyssa Schukar for The New York Times
memorial service on Thursday for George Floyd was by turns personal and political, celebrating both the life he had lived and the movement that his death has inspired. Floyd’s brother Philonise recalled playing football and eating banana-and-mayonnaise sandwiches; one of his cousins, Shareeduh Tate, said, “The thing I miss most about him is his hugs.”
In a defiant eulogy, the Rev. Al Sharpton said: “George Floyd’s story has been the story of black folks. Because ever since 401 years ago, the reason we could never be who we wanted and dreamed of being is you kept your knee on our neck.” Later, with the crowd rising, he added, “It’s time for us to stand up in George’s name and say, ‘Get your knee off our necks.’”
More developments from the protests:
2. Some good news on the virus
If you look at one of the charts tracking the coronavirus in the U.S., you’ll probably notice a disturbing pattern: The number of new cases has virtually stopped falling, hovering around 20,000 for the past 10 days.
But the actual trend may be more encouraging. The number of tests being conducted has been rising rapidly in recent weeks — which means more virus cases are being uncovered than otherwise would have been. Another key measure is the percentage of tests that come back positive (as Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight has argued), and it has continued to decline:

By The New York Times | Source: The COVID Tracking Project
Taken together, the various measures suggest that the virus’s spread continues to slow — but only modestly and not as rapidly as in some other countries.
3. An economic burden for women
The lockdown has already created burdens for mothers. They have taken on a disproportionate share of day care, home schooling and housework, research has shown. Now the reopening of many workplaces may cause a new set of problems.
The lack of child care options — with day care centers, camps and schools closed — may force women out of the labor force to take care of their children. And even temporary time away from a job often brings permanent costs, in terms of missed promotions and opportunities, as Patricia Cohen and Tiffany Hsu of The Times explain. “The limited gains made in the past decades are at risk of being rolled back,” concluded a U.N. report on the virus’s impact on women.
Here’s what else is happening
  • The Trump administration moved to weaken two major environmental protections, including on clean air.
  • Many Times readers and employees criticized the Opinion section’s decision to publish an Op-Ed by Senator Tom Cotton calling for the military to crack down on “lawbreakers.” Last night, a spokeswoman for The Times said a review had found that the piece “did not meet our standards” and was the result of a “rushed editorial process.”
  • Lives Lived: Hecky Powell’s South Side Chicago-style barbecue restaurant was an institution in Evanston, Ill., feeding everyone from broke college students to the Chicago Bulls. He even once advised a young Barack Obama, during his run for the Illinois Senate. Powell died on May 22 at 71.
Continue reading the main story
BACK STORY: TEACHING YOUR KIDS ABOUT RACISM

How should parents discuss race with their children? Start early, and keep the conversation going. Talk about racial differences in positive ways. Make sure any home library has books with black protagonists.

These suggestions — and many more — come from Jessica Grose, editor of The Times’s Parenting section. She spoke with experts and wrote up a list of suggested books. She told us:
We wanted to provide information for parents who want to have conversations with their children about racism and the protests over the killing of George Floyd. We also wanted to make clear that it’s a privilege to choose to have these conversations; as many of my sources emphasized, black families are having and have been having these conversations, and reading these books.
The big takeaway here is that nonblack families don’t just need to talk about racism with their kids — they need to show their kids they are also taking action.
One comment, from Jacqueline Dougé, a pediatrician and child health advocate based in Maryland, really stuck with me: “Because of our culture, I have a heavy burden as a black mom. But if I think my kids are going to end racism alone, I’m deluded.”
More resources: Jessica also recommends the conversation guides from EmbraceRace and Raising Race Conscious Children. And you can subscribe to Jessica’s newsletter here.

From Minneapolis to Syria, Artists Are Honoring George Floyd Through Murals and Public Artworks

From Minneapolis to Syria, Artists Are Honoring George Floyd Through Murals and Public Artworks

JUNE 2, 2020  GRACE EBERT

A mural in Minneapolis by Xena Goldman, Cadex Herrera, Greta McLain, Niko Alexander, and Pablo Hernandez

In honor of George Floyd, a Black man murdered by a White police officer in May, artists have been painting murals and sharing messages in what now is a global movement supporting the victim. From Minneapolis to Los Angeles to Syria, the public artworks are drawing attention to the horrific killing, in addition to the larger issue of police perpetrating state-sanctioned violence.

A collaborative project by artists Xena GoldmanCadex HerreraGreta McLainNiko Alexander, and Pablo Hernandez, the Minneapolis mural centers Floyd within a sunflower. Herrera told Hyperallergic that the “idea was to depict Floyd not as a martyr but as a social justice hero.” He’s surrounded by the names of others killed by police, in addition to protestors. The 20-by-6.5-foot project is located near the Cup Foods where Floyd died.

Louisiana-born artist Jammie Holmes created typographic banners with Floyd’s last words that emblazoned the skies of U.S. cities. Bold statements reading, “Please I can’t breathe,” “My neck hurts,” and “They’re going to kill me,” flew over Detroit, Miami, Dallas, Los Angeles, and New York.

We’ve gathered some of the most recent projects below, including work from Syrian artists Aziz Asmar and Anis Hamdoun, Fayetville-based Octavio Logo, and Barcelona-based Tvboy. (via Artnet News)

Fayetteville mural by Octavio Logo. via Clarissa Bustamante

Artwork posts by eme_freethinker

A message that was flown over Detroit by Jammie Holmes

Syrian artists Aziz Asmar and Anis Hamdoun finish a mural depicting George Floyd in Syria’s northwestern Idlib province. https://t.co/fsWfkv8XHB pic.twitter.com/YUMQhn07M6

— ABC News (@ABC) June 1, 2020

Syrian artists Aziz Asmar and Anis Hamdoun finish a mural depicting George Floyd in Syria’s northwestern Idlib province. https://abcn.ws/2TWPRXy 

A mural by Jesus Cruz Artile, also known as Eme Freethinker, in Berlin

Artwork posts by tvboy Born

Artwork posts by xgriffinx

A mural of George Floyd in Dublin, painted by street artist Emmalene Blake. | Image: Niall Carson/PA Images

Artwork posts by a3mex

A Bold Black Lives Matter Statement Transforms a Street Leading to the White House in Washington D.C.

A Bold Black Lives Matter Statement Transforms a Street Leading to the White House in Washington D.C.

JUNE 5, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Photograph © Nadia Aziz

In a show of solidarity, a massive tribute to Black Lives Matter has been painted on the street leading to the White House in Washington, D.C. Completed in permanent street paint, the message features bold, yellow letters that span more than a block of 16th Street and marks a historic moment in the United States after weeks of protests.

Mayor Muriel Bowser commissioned the banner-style piece, which city workers and volunteers began at 3 a.m. Friday morning ahead of weekend demonstrations. The new message is just two blocks north of Lafayette Square, where police charged peaceful protestors and released tear gas and flash-bang shells to clear the crowd for a photo-op for President Trump earlier this week. It sits at the foot of St. John’s Church.

Update: Black Lives Matter D.C. has denounced the public display, saying, “This is performative and a distraction from her active counter organizing to our demands to decrease the police budget and invest in the community. Black Lives Matter means Defund the police.”

Update 2: An earlier version of this article erroneously attributed the mural to a single artist.

A 20,000-Square-Foot Tribute to Healthcare Workers Emerges at Queens Museum

A 20,000-Square-Foot Tribute to Healthcare Workers Emerges at Queens Museum

JUNE 1, 2020  GRACE EBERT

“Somos La Luz” (2020). All images © Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada, by Eduardo Amorim/Greenpoint Innovations

In the Queens Museum parking lot, Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada (previously) has painted a 20,000-square-foot mural as both an act of gratitude to Latinx healthcare workers, who have risked their own safety to care for others, and a nationwide call to action.

These are the people that make our city move, the people that care for us. These are the people that contribute socially, culturally, and economically to the nation… In the year 2020, where hindsight should not be clearer, it is amazing to me that we must continue to ask ourselves…how it is that minorities today still have to suffer the same injustices of the minorities of the past(?)

Somos La Luz,” or “We Are The Light,” is a large-scale rendering of Dr. Ydelfonso Decoo, a pediatrician who died when fighting the virus in New York City. Rodríguez-Gerada hopes to draw attention to the disproportionate number of COVID-19 cases among Latinx and Black populations across the United States, in addition to the alarming rates of infection in Queens, one of the city’s epicenters for the virus.

In an Instagram post about the project, Rodríguez-Gerada said presenting the masked figure on such a massive scale reflects the enormity of the issue. “This artwork ‘Somos La Luz’ strives to give deeper meaning to the loss of each life,” the artist writes. “It strives to make evident the importance of every life as well as to value the amazing contribution of migrant people.”

Best viewed aerially, the mural was commissioned by the immigrant healthcare organization SOMOS and Make the Road New York, an advocacy group. (via Hyperallergic)

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PBS News, africanews, Sky News, CAN 24/7, TED Talks, Doctor Mike Hansen, Google News, DW News, and Colossal

PBS News: May 9 – 14, 2020

africanews Live

Sky News live

CNA 24/7 LIVE

Roylab Stats [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

TED Talks: Andrew Forrest A radical plan to end plastic waste

Doctor Mike Hansen: What Doctors Are Learning From Autopsy Findings of Coronavirus (COVID-19) Patients

Google News: COVID-19 resources

DW News: What can we learn about the coronavirus from past pandemics? | COVID-19 Special

 Colossal: A Dramatic Performance by Juilliard Students Brings a Socially Distant Approach to Ravel’s Boléro, The Human Microbiome Reimagined as a Cut-Paper Coral Reef by Rogan Brown, and Sheets of White Paper Layered into Dense Cityscapes and Forests by Ayumi Shibata

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 14, 2020

May 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, vaccine expert and whistleblower Dr. Rick Bright criticizes the Trump administration’s pandemic response. Plus: Former presidential chiefs of staff offer lessons from past American crises, how colleges and universities are adapting to COVID-19, the pandemic in prisons, how to revive the U.S. economy and Ask Us your questions about parenting during the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Vaccine expert criticizes government’s pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gN1G9… News Wrap: Burr steps down as head of Senate Intel Committee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAbEZ… Andy Card and Rahm Emanuel on what Trump’s crisis response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lxyA… U.S. colleges struggle with decision to reopen in the fall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duu2v… U.S. prisons are breeding grounds for COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCi9q… A Nobel-winning economist’s case for more COVID-19 testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fx2SG… A child psychiatrist on parenting during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnOMO… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 13, 2020

May 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, tensions over when to lift lockdowns and let businesses reopen dominate American life. Plus: Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander and New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy on the U.S. coronavirus response, child welfare experts fear rising abuse, the family of an American hostage in Afghanistan pleas for his release, the Supreme Court considers faithless electors and “Songs of Comfort.” Editor’s Note: For the record, one of the talented musicians shown in our “Songs of Comfort” piece is NewsHour producer Ali Rogin, at 53:50. Thanks to all of the performers for sharing with us. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump criticizes Fauci over Senate committee testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WDcV… Alexander: States need more flexibility with federal aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4SAL… N.J. Gov. Phil Murphy: ‘All states’ need more federal aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOTQp… News Wrap: Federal judge delays decision on Flynn case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VopX9… Why experts worry child abuse is rising during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJFS9… Family of American held in Afghanistan asks Trump for help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U45TN… ‘Faithless electors’ SCOTUS case could have big implications https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74_LT… Yo-Yo Ma’s ‘Songs of Comfort’ inspire musical collaboration https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGagN… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 12, 2020

May 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. public health officials warn of the risks of lifting coronavirus restrictions too early. Plus: Sens. Bill Cassidy and Patty Murray on the federal response to COVID-19, tough questions in legal battle over President Trump’s finances, what’s happening in Venezuela, racial COVID-19 disparities, the Flint water crisis and a Brief But Spectacular take on supporting nurses. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Senators press public health officials on COVID-19 testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5V8k… Sen. Cassidy defends Fauci from GOP criticism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FH8jw… Sen. Murray: Administration ‘not transparent’ about testing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_5i3… News Wrap: Biden disputes Trump’s COVID-19 testing claims https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEgUz… Supreme Court asks tough questions in case on Trump finances https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f__2P… Maduro tries to leverage botched attempt to overthrow him https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V5mZb… COVID-19 a ‘wake-up call’ about racial health disparities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sa7Oo… Pandemic threatens Flint, Michigan, with 2nd health crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLzz3… A Brief But Spectacular take on showing up for nurses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFf-H… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 11, 2020

May 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the Trump administration urges lifting pandemic restrictions as COVID-19 spreads to the White House. Plus: What countries lifting coronavirus lockdowns are seeing, racial disparities in U.S. health care, Americans with disabilities aren’t getting relief, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, dating amid the COVID-19 pandemic and NewsHour’s four-legged friends. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump touts testing efforts as virus spreads to White House  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPTn5… News Wrap: Biden blasts Trump’s COVID-19 response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA0hU… Countries are lifting coronavirus lockdowns. Is that safe? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_T-XU… Why COVID-19 is disproportionately affecting black Americans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=df5f2… COVID-19 legislation leaves out Americans with disabilities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bElXJ… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on COVID-19 at the White House https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMWuc… What COVID-19 has meant for dating in America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEZRQ… The NewsHour’s family of furry friends https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvYdc… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 10, 2020

May 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 10, the economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis, the future of hospital design now being shaped by the pandemic, and little free libraries are turning into pantries to help those in need. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 9, 2020

May 9, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, May 9, more states rush to reopen businesses amid rising unemployment, a new push for absentee voting during the pandemic, and the impact of COVID-19 on frontline Filipino health care workers. Also, a lesson from China on keeping students engaged during lockdown. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Plastic is an incredible substance for the economy — and the worst substance possible for the environment, says entrepreneur Andrew Forrest. In a conversation meant to spark debate, Forrest and head of TED Chris Anderson discuss an ambitious plan to get the world’s biggest companies to fund an environmental revolution — and transition industry towards getting all of its plastic from recycled materials, not from fossil fuels.

This talk was presented at “We the Future,” a special event in partnership with the Skoll Foundation and the United Nations Foundation.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Andrew Forrest · Entrepreneur

Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest is an Australian businessman, philanthropist and entrepreneur, widely considered one of the country’s greatest change agents.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

“We the Future 2019: Talks from TED, the Skoll Foundation and the United Nations Foundation”

At “We the Future,” a day of talks from TED, the Skoll Foundation and the United Nations Foundation at the TED World Theater in New York City, 18 speakers and performers shared daring ideas, deep analysis, cautionary tales and behavior-changing strategies aimed at meeting the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the global goals created in partnership with individuals around the world and adopted at the United Nations in 2015.

More at blog.ted.com ?

TAKE ACTION

LEARN

Visit noplasticwaste.org to learn more about how we can clean the oceans through technological innovation and policy change.

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PARTICIPATE

Tell others that a world with #NoPlastic waste is possible.

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We the Future | September 2019

What Doctors Are Learning From Autopsy Findings of Coronavirus (COVID-19) Patients

May 6, 2020  Doctor Mike Hansen

What Doctors Are Learning From Autopsy Findings of Coronavirus (COVID-19) Patients #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19 Coronavirus | COVID-19 YouTube Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Once the SARS-CoV-2 virus is deeply embedded in the body, it begins to cause more severe disease. This is where the direct attack on other organs that have ACE2 receptors can occur, including heart muscle, kidneys, blood vessels, liver, and the brain. Early findings, including those from multiple autopsy and biopsy reports, show that viral particles can be found not only in the nasal passages and throat, but also in tears, stool, kidneys, liver, pancreas, and heart. One case report found evidence of viral particles in the CSF, meaning the fluid around the brain. That patient had meningitis. So the virus is sometimes going to all these different organs by means of attaching to the ACE2 receptors that are there, but that’s not even the whole story. Because in some cases, by the time the body’s immune system figures out the body are being invaded, it’s like unleashing the military to stomp out the virus, and in that process, there’s a ton of collateral damage. This is what we refer to as the cytokine storm. When the virus gets into the alveolar cells, meaning the tiny little air sacs within the lungs, it makes a ton of copies of itself and goes onto invading more cells. The alveoli’s next-door neighbor is guessed who, yeah, the tiniest blood vessels in our body, capillaries. And the lining of those capillaries is called the endothelium, which also has ACE2 receptors. And once the virus invades the capillaries. It means that it serves as the trigger for the onslaught of inflammation AND clotting. And Early autopsy results are also showing widely scattered clots in multiple organs. In one study from the Netherlands, 1/3rd of hospitalized with COVID-19 got clots despite already being on prophylactic doses of blood thinners. So not only are you getting the inflammation with the cytokine storm, but you’re also forming blood clots, that can travel to other parts of the body, and cause major blockages, effectively damaging those organs. So wait a minute doc, you’re telling me that this can cause organ damage by 1) Directly attacking organs by their ACE2 receptor? Yup 2) Indirectly attacking organs by way of collateral damage from the cytokine storm? Yup 3) Indirectly cause damage to organs by means of blood clots? yup 4) Indirectly cause damage as a result of low oxygen levels, improper ventilator settings, drug treatments themselves, and/or all of these things combined? Yeah Endothelial cells are more vulnerable to dying in people with preexisting endothelial dysfunction, which is more often associated with being a male, being a smoker, having high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. Blood clots can form and/or travel to other parts of the body. When blood clots travel to the toes, and cause blockages in blood flow there, meaning ischemia or infarction, that can cause gangrene there. And lots of times patients with gangrene require amputation, and “COVID toes” So is antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), the cause of all these blood clots in patients with severe COVID? Maybe. Some patients with APS have what’s called catastrophic APS, where these patients can have strokes, seizures, heart attacks, kidney failure, ARDS, skin changes like the ones I mentioned. Viral infectious diseases, particularly those of the respiratory tract, have been reported as being the triggers for CAPS. Various factors increase the risk of developing arterial thrombosis. Classically, the cardiovascular-dependent risk factors implicated in clotting have been hypertension, meaning high blood pressure, high levels of cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, age, chemotherapy, and degree of infection. All of these contribute toward developing arterial thrombosis. A lot of patients with severe COVID-19 have certain labs that resemble DIC, such as increased PT/INR, increased PTT, decreased levels of platelets. But the reason why these COVID patients who developed clots in the study I mentioned earlier, the reason why they don’t have DIC, is actually 2 reasons, one, they weren’t having extensive bleeding, and two, they did not have low fibrinogen levels. And if its truly DIC, you would have both of those things. Anyway, you can probably glean from this video why it’s so hard for doctors to figure out what is going on with this virus. Between the variable ways this disease can present in different patients, and the different ways that organs can suffer damage, yeah, this is really, really really, complicated. Are BLOOD CLOTS the reason why COVID19 patients are dying? Video Link – https://youtu.be/qoJ4VDaGSfY Dr. Mike Hansen, MD Internal Medicine | Pulmonary Disease | Critical Care Medicine Website: https://doctormikehansen.com/ #coronavirus #covid19 #covid_19

Category  Education

 

Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

 Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 4,437,442 571 1,585,286 302,025
United States 1,448,245 4,395 253,239 86,541
Russia 252,245 1,719 53,530 2,305
United Kingdom 233,151 3,509 33,614
Spain 229,540 4,873 143,374 27,321
Italy 223,096 3,703 115,288 31,368
Brazil 202,918 960 79,479 13,993
Germany 174,948 2,104 150,300 7,928
Turkey 144,749 1,741 104,030 4,007
France 141,356 2,107 59,605 27,425
Iran 114,533 1,374 90,539 6,854
Mainland China 82,933 59 78,209 4,633
Peru 80,604 2,509 25,151 2,267
India 78,003 57 26,235 2,549
Canada 73,401 1,933 36,091 5,472
Belgium 54,288 4,711 14,111 8,903
Saudi Arabia 46,869 1,370 19,051 283
Netherlands 43,481 2,492 5,590
Mexico 42,595 337 28,475 4,477
       

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

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What can we learn about the coronavirus from past pandemics? | COVID-19 Special

May 8, 2020  DW News

Pandemics have haunted humanity for centuries. From malaria to smallpox, the plague and now the novel coronavirus. All of them have changed the world we live in. Despite all the lessons from history, the suffering and loss of lives from infectious diseases, we’re caught up again in a last-minute rush to contain an outbreak with a cure, for which success is as uncertain as it ever was. But have we changed the way we do things and what else is there to learn from past pandemics? Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #Pandemics

Category  News & Politics

A Dramatic Performance by Juilliard Students Brings a Socially Distant Approach to Ravel’s Boléro

 

A Dramatic Performance by Juilliard Students Brings a Socially Distant Approach to Ravel’s Boléro

MAY 4, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Maurice Ravel’s Boléro is a particularly collaborative composition in that it passes the melodic theme through a series of solos. The sequential performances highlight the distinct tones and sounds of each instrument, whether it be a flute, violin, or the anomalous saxophone. In a spectacular new project, dozens of Juilliard students who now are quarantined in their respective homes bring a socially distant approach to the classic orchestral composition. What makes it especially impressive, though, is not just appearances by famous alumni—watch for Yo-Yo Ma, Laura Linney, Patti LuPone, and Itzhak Perlman—but because it coordinates the instrumental piece in addition to a range of dramatic and choreographed elements that appear to transcend individual frames.

In a statement about the project, Juilliard said the hundreds of video clips were filmed separately before being edited and overlayed into a single composition. “Bolero Juilliard, assembled by a team of artists all working from remote locations, is part narrative, part collage. Most of all, it is a collective endeavor that captures a snapshot of a specific global moment and the possibilities of creative connection in an uncertain world,” the school said. The assembled video is “a complex online puzzle with many components being conceived, rehearsed, and produced simultaneously.”

If you enjoyed Juilliard’s project, check out this music video filmed entirely on Zoom and these quarantine dispatches. (via Kottke)

Bolero Juilliard | April 2020

Apr 30, 2020  The Juilliard School

“What can we do together even while we are alone?” With 100+ Juilliard students and alumni, at home together. Read more about the creation of ‘Bolero Juilliard’: https://www.juilliard.edu/news/146351… Directed and choreographed by Larry Keigwin with associate Nicole Wolcott, featuring a reimagining of Ravel’s score, conducted by David Robertson, and produced by Kurt Crowley. Featuring Juilliard dancers, musicians, and actors, with alumni Emanuel Ax (music), Christine Baranski (drama), Jon Batiste (jazz studies), Renée Fleming (voice), Isabel Leonard (voice), Laura Linney (drama), Patti LuPone (drama), Yo-Yo Ma (music), Andrea Miller (dance), Bebe Neuwirth (dance), faculty member Itzhak Perlman (music), Susanna Phillips (voice), Bobbi Jene Smith (dance), Davóne Tines (voice), and Bradley Whitford (drama). ‘Bolero Juilliard’ is at the center of the many projects and initiatives the school is undertaking during this time of remote learning, supplementing the online lessons, classes, activities, and student- and faculty-generated collaborations and creativity. These collaborations embrace the ethos of #JuilliardThrives, which showcases the creativity, flexibility, and resilience that define the Juilliard community as we are at home, together. Belong to something brilliant: http://www.juilliard.edu/we Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheJuilliard… Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JuilliardSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/juilliardschool

Category  Education

The Human Microbiome Reimagined as a Cut-Paper Coral Reef by Rogan Brown

The Human Microbiome Reimagined as a Cut-Paper Coral Reef by Rogan Brown

JUNE 4, 2018  KATE SIERZPUTOWSKI

Using the visual metaphor of a coral reef, artist Rogan Brown (previously) introduces his audience to the diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi found in the human body through paper-based sculptures. The detailed works are created after months of research and hunting for aesthetic parallels that might link the two surprisingly similar worlds.

His series Magical Circle Variations merge these sources of inspiration with a pastel color scheme that can also be found in a coral habitat. “What the reef and the microbiome have in common is that they both consist of biodiverse colonies of organisms that coexist more or less harmoniously,” Brown explains. “There are further parallels between coral and human beings in that we are both symbiont organisms, that is we depend on a mutually beneficial relationship with another species: coral only receive their beautiful colors from varieties of algae that live on them and human beings can only exist thanks to the unimaginably huge and diverse number of bacteria that live in and on them.”

Brown hopes that his intricate paper sculptures will allow his audience to more greatly conceptualize the bacteria-based landscape of the human body. Works like these will be exhibited with C Fine Art at the upcoming Art Market Hamptons July 5-8, 2018. You can see more of his work on his website.

Sheets of White Paper Layered into Dense Cityscapes and Forests by Ayumi Shibata

Sheets of White Paper Layered into Dense Cityscapes and Forests by Ayumi Shibata

FEBRUARY 19, 2020  GRACE EBERT

 “Museum Mile Book.” All images © Ayumi Shibata, shared with permission

Japan-based artist Ayumi Shibata (previously) constructs intricate paper cities and natural landscapes layers of paper for a single project, Shibata carves miniature houses, clouds, and tree-filled forests that eventually are illuminated in glass vessels, stored safely in a book, or erected in large-scale installations.

The artist tells Colossal that she doesn’t use pencil outlines, in part because the white paper isn’t durable enough to be erased if there’s an error. Instead, she envisions the three-dimensional shapes she wants to create and begins cutting. “White paper expresses the yang, light, (and) the process to cut expresses the yin, shadow. When the sun shines upon an object, a shadow is born,” she writes. “Front and back, yin and yang, two side(s) of the same coin.”

Shibata also relies on the Japanese word “kami”—which translates to paper but also to god, divinity, and spirit—as she considers the relationship between humans and nature that turns up in her work. “The world of paper that unfolds within the glass expresses the micro world, which is our human world, the Earth, the universe, and other universes and dimensions. The life-sized forest installation expresses the macro world, which is outside of our universe and the unknown worlds.” Each time someone walks into a room with one of her more expansive pieces, she thinks it’s possible “we could meet, communicate and coexist with Kami, which exists but we can’t see.”

To check out more of Shibata’s structural projects, head to her Instagram.

“Museum Mile Book”

“In the Jar Corridors of Time”

“Forest of Kami”

“Forest of Kami”

“In the Jar Bush”

‘Volcano Book”

Right: “In the Jar Drop of Bush”

“Voyager Book”

Go to the top

PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, TED Talks, Scientific America, The New York Times, DailyTop10s and Dominique Lalonde Films Naturemes, Inhabitat,

PBS News: May 4 – 8, 2020, and Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Scientific America: Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

TED Talks: Dianna Cohen Tough truths about plastic pollution, and Melati and Isabel Wijsen Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

The New York Times: The Morning

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

DailyTop10s: This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

 Dominique Lalonde Films Nature: The life of Monarch Butterfly

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 8, 2020

May 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, as U.S. unemployment rises to its highest level since the Great Depression, more states let businesses reopen. Plus: How the government can address the economic crisis, COVID-19 in the American West, Pulitzer honors for local news, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the pandemic, the 75th anniversary of VE-Day and flowers for the sick. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Can states reopen their economies safely? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycq4J… Why U.S. economic crisis is even worse than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6O8E… News Wrap: Suspects in Ahmaud Arbery killing appear in court https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oysat… The western U.S. counties COVID-19 has barely reached https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_ZKk… 2 Pulitzer winners on the changing landscape of local news https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyhS1… Shields and Brooks on DOJ politics, Trump’s economic hopes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITSQU… Remembering Americans lost to the coronavirus pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzKKN… What these World War II veterans remember most about VE-Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ4Rl… How this Calif. artist is sharing ‘Flowers for Sick People’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMjO1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 7, 2020

May 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, facing lost tax revenue and budget shortfalls, more U.S. states start to reopen. Plus: The Justice Department wants to drop the case against Michael Flynn, a public health expert on U.S. testing for COVID-19, Americans lose health insurance along with their jobs, pandemic in India, outcry over Ahmaud Arbery’s death and Ask Us questions about working during the pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Pandemic’s economic damage spreads to all corners of U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-ZK6… Why does DOJ want to drop its case against Michael Flynn? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMBqP… News Wrap: Supreme Court overturns ‘Bridgegate’ convictions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szGZi… Public health expert fears states are reopening too soon https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dj1hZ… For many Americans, layoff means loss of health insurance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hw1vx… How COVID-19 is inflaming India’s religious tensions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Q3i… Ahmaud Arbery’s shooting a ‘hate crime,’ says his father https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3STD… Viewer questions about workplace safety during the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaCWf… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 6, 2020

May 6, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, more countries lift pandemic restrictions in the face of historic economic loss. Plus: Outcry over a black man’s shooting death in Georgia, the Supreme Court hears major cases remotely, the political battle over funding states and cities, South Dakota Sen. John Thune on pandemic response, new rules around campus sexual assault, COVID-19 in conflict zones and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The new life emerging after pandemic restrictions expire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XG2R… News Wrap: New reports of pandemic fallout in North Korea https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=866PE… Video appearing to show Ahmaud Arbery killing sparks outrage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFmsd… 2 major cases come before a Supreme Court operating remotely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsX2p… State, local workers: Federal aid not ‘a red or blue issue’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XEB-… Sen. Thune on funding states, PPP and safety in the Senate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8y0h… What Trump’s Title IX rules mean for survivors, the accused https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooa3… Are people in medical crisis avoiding ER due to COVID-19? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7y0z… In Libya and Yemen war zones, COVID-19 adds a 2nd front https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwPsE… Southwest Airlines CEO on ‘worst economic environment’ ever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01M7E… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 5, 2020

May 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump makes his first cross-country trip since the pandemic took hold of American life. Plus: Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on reopening his state, when critical COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter, the global competition for scarce protective medical gear, what the pandemic means for mental health, high mortality for British people of color and quarantine DIY. Correction: Due to an editing error in Malcolm Brabant’s segment on the United Kingdom, we incorrectly said that country was now second to the United States in per capita rate of deaths due to COVID-19. The UK is second in total deaths to the United States, per official counts. The NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Traveling to Arizona, Trump dismisses new death projections https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXe0x… News Wrap: DNI pick Ratcliffe vows to avoid political bias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lra6W… Gov. Asa Hutchinson on he’s ready to reopen Arkansas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Bx8F… When lifesaving COVID-19 care arrives by helicopter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vCuA… Why the U.S. has struggled to source enough PPE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0Dh7… The ominous impact of COVID-19 on American mental health https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLYiM… An intimate portrait of a British family’s COVID-19 loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rJdU… Stuck at home, some Americans are mastering new skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deZal… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Coronavirus Pandemic (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Apr 21, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

An investigation into the U.S. response to COVID-19, from Washington State to Washington, D.C. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate How did the U.S. become the country with the worst known coronavirus outbreak in the world? FRONTLINE and veteran science reporter Miles O’Brien investigate the American response to COVID-19, and examine what happens when politics and science collide. #Coronavirus #Documentary #COVID-19 Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,955,984 509 1,319,306 275,188
United States 1,318,289 4,000 182,930 78,244
Spain 223,578 4,747 133,952 26,478
Italy 217,185 3,605 99,023 30,201
United Kingdom 211,364 3,181 31,241
Russia 198,676 1,354 31,916 1,827
Germany 170,588 2,052 138,214 7,510
Brazil 145,894 690 59,297 10,017
France 138,421 2,064 55,782 26,230
Turkey 135,569 1,630 86,396 3,689
Iran 104,691 1,256 83,837 6,541
China 82,887 59 78,046 4,633
Canada 66,434 1,749 30,226 4,569
Peru 61,847 1,925 19,012 1,714
India 59,662 44 17,847 1,981

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/stopping-deforestation-can-prevent-pandemics/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=earth&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-05-06_top-stories&spMailingID=64678544&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1880744581&spReportId=MTg4MDc0NDU4MQS2

Stopping Deforestation Can Prevent Pandemics

Destroying habitats makes viruses and other pathogens more likely to infect humans

By THE EDITORS on May 1, 2020

Credit: Taylor Callery

SARS, Ebola and now SARS-CoV-2: all three of these highly infectious viruses have caused global panic since 2002—and all three of them jumped to humans from wild animals that live in dense tropical forests.

Three quarters of the emerging pathogens that infect humans leaped from animals, many of them creatures in the forest habitats that we are slashing and burning to create land for crops, including biofuel plants, and for mining and housing. The more we clear, the more we come into contact with wildlife that carries microbes well suited to kill us—and the more we concentrate those animals in smaller areas where they can swap infectious microbes, raising the chances of novel strains. Clearing land also reduces biodiversity, and the species that survive are more likely to host illnesses that can be transferred to humans. All these factors will lead to more spillover of animal pathogens into people.

Stopping deforestation will not only reduce our exposure to new disasters but also tamp down the spread of a long list of other vicious diseases that have come from rain forest habitats—Zika, Nipah, malaria, cholera and HIV among them. A 2019 study found that a 10 percent increase in deforestation would raise malaria cases by 3.3 percent; that would be 7.4 million people worldwide. Yet despite years of global outcry, deforestation still runs rampant. An average of 28 million hectares of forest have been cut down annually since 2016, and there is no sign of a slowdown.

Societies can take numerous steps to prevent the destruction. Eating less meat, which physicians say will improve our health anyway, will lessen demand for crops and pastures. Eating fewer processed foods will reduce the demand for palm oil—also a major feedstock for biofuels—much of which is grown on land clear-cut from tropical rain forests. The need for land also will ease if nations slow population growth—something that can happen in developing nations only if women are given better education, equal social status with men and easy access to affordable contraceptives.

Producing more food per hectare can boost supply without the need to clear more land. Developing crops that better resist drought will help, especially as climate change brings longer, deeper droughts. In dry regions of Africa and elsewhere, agroforestry techniques such as planting trees among farm fields can increase crop yields. Reducing food waste could also vastly lessen the pressure to grow more; 30 to 40 percent of all food produced is wasted.

As we implement these solutions, we can also find new outbreaks earlier. Epidemiologists want to tiptoe into wild habitats and test mammals known to carry coronaviruses—bats, rodents, badgers, civets, pangolins and monkeys—to map how the germs are moving. Public health officials could then test nearby humans. To be effective, though, this surveillance must be widespread and well funded. In September 2019, just months before the COVID-19 pandemic began, the U.S. Agency for International Development announced it would end funding for PREDICT, a 10-year effort to hunt for threatening microbes that found more than 1,100 unique viruses. USAID says it will launch a new surveillance program; we urge it to supply enough money this time to cast a wider and stronger net.

In the meantime, governments should prohibit the sale of live wild animals in so-called wet markets, where pathogens have repeatedly crossed over into humans. The markets may be culturally important, but the risk is too great. Governments must also crack down on illegal wildlife trade, which can spread infectious agents far and wide. In addition, we have to examine factory farms that pack thousands of animals together—the source of the 2009 swine flu outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people in the U.S. and multitudes worldwide.

Ending deforestation and thwarting pandemics would address six of the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals: the guarantee of healthy lives, zero hunger, gender equality, responsible consumption and production, sustainably managed land, and climate action (intact tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide, whereas burning them sends more CO2 into the atmosphere).

The COVID-19 pandemic is a catastrophe, but it can rivet our attention on the enormous payoffs that humanity can achieve by not overexploiting the natural world. Pandemic solutions are sustainability solutions.

Read more about the coronavirus outbreak here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

THE EDITORS

Recent Articles

Artist Dianna Cohen shares some tough truths about plastic pollution in the ocean and in our lives — and some thoughts on how to free ourselves from the plastic gyre.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dianna Cohen · Artist and activist

Dianna Cohen co-founded the Plastic Pollution Coalition, which is working to help end our cycle of plastics use.

Mission Blue Voyage | April 2010

Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they’re used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Their efforts — including petitions, beach cleanups, even a hunger strike — paid off when they convinced their governor to commit to a plastic bag-free Bali by 2018. “Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’re too young or you won’t understand,” Isabel says to other aspiring activists. “We’re not telling you it’s going to be easy. We’re telling you it’s going to be worth it.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Melati and Isabel Wijsen · Activists

Sisters Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to ban plastic bags in Bali.

TEDGlobal>London | September 2015

The New York Times    The Morning      May 7, 2020

By David Leonhardt

Good morning. We’ve made some changes to this newsletter, and we welcome any feedback you have.
More kids are going hungry. States are reopening without a declining number of coronavirus cases. And mom and dad disagree about who’s doing the home schooling. Let’s start with President Trump’s climate agenda.
Dismantling the rules

A coal-fired generating station in Sidney, Mont. Janie Osborne for The New York Times

This newsletter will often start with coronavirus news. And you’ll always find plenty of news about it below. But the virus isn’t the only story we’re going to cover in depth.
Today, we’re going to start with another one of the world’s vital stories: the battle over climate policy.
Shortly after taking office, President Trump and congressional Republicans found an innovative way to reduce business regulations, one of their top policy priorities. They began using a 1996 law — called the Congressional Review Act, and rarely used before — that allowed them to reverse rules enacted by the Obama administration in its final few months.
Now that Trump’s first term is winding down, administration officials realize that the same law could undo some of their policies — if the Democrats win in November. So the administration has been hurrying to finish as many regulations as possible this spring, to make sure they are not vulnerable to reversal under the Review Act.
And the administration has been particularly focused on the environment. As Nadja Popovich, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Kendra Pierre-Louis of The Times report: Trump’s drive to dismantle major climate and environmental policies is now mostly complete.
This agenda, Trump and his aides say, helped to speed up economic growth (before the coronavirus lockdown) by giving companies more flexibility to behave as they want. Many climate and health experts counter that the rule changes are leading to more pollution-related illnesses and are accelerating climate change.
The Times, working with academic researchers, has created a graphic with all 64 of Trump’s environmental rollbacks, as well as an additional 34 in progress. Among the areas where rules have been loosened:
  • vehicle pollution
  • power-plant emissions
  • braking systems on trains hauling flammable liquids
  • dumping of coal-mining debris into streams
  • chlorpyrifos, a pesticide linked to developmental disabilities in children
  • species endangered by climate change
The larger debate: The Times editorial board has argued that Trump’s policy “imperils the planet,” while National Review has praised Trump for pursuing “American dominance in energy production.”
1. More kids are going hungry
A food distribution center in Queens.Johannes Eisele/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
The coronavirus pandemic is creating a hunger crisis: More than 17 percent of young children in the United States lack sufficient food, according to research — a rate three times higher than during the worst of the Great Recession.
The most likely explanations are the rise in unemployment and the interruption in school meal programs. “I’ve eaten a lot less just to make sure they get what they need,” said one Ohio woman, who is trying to make $170 in monthly food stamps go far enough to feed her grandchildren.
Here’s what else is happening

Ian Prasad Philbrick, Lara Takenaga, Tom Wright-Piersanti and Sanam Yar contributed to The Morning. You can reach the team at themorning@nytimes.com.

Inhabitat: Inspiring rammed earth hospital brings affordable care to rural Nepal

https://inhabitat.com/inspiring-rammed-earth-hospital-brings-affordable-care-to-rural-nepal/

written by Lucy Wang  on April 28,2020

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

An inspiring beacon of humanitarian architecture has arrived to one of the poorest and most remote regions of Nepal — the new Bayalpata Hospital in Accham. Opened earlier this month to replace an aged and overrun clinic, the new hospital is a model of sustainable rural health made possible through a collaboration between the government of Nepal and NGO Possible Health. New York City-based Sharon Davis Design crafted the 7.5-acre campus, which is built primarily from locally sourced rammed earth and powered by rooftop solar panels. oearth and powered by rooftop solar panels.

Located on a hilltop surrounded by the terraced slopes of the Seti River Valley, the new Bayalpata Hospital is expected to provide low-cost, high-quality care to more than 100,000 patients a year from Accham and its six surrounding districts — a number that’s more than eight times its original capacity. The hospital comprises five medical buildings with outpatient, inpatient, surgery, antenatal and emergency facilities for 70 beds as well as clinical functions such as pharmacy, radiology and laboratory spaces. The campus also includes an administration block for offices, a 60-seat cafeteria and 10 single-family houses plus an eight-bedroom dormitory to house the hospital staff and their families.

Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal”

Because of the site’s remote and mountainous location, the hospital is primarily built from rammed earth using a low-tech construction method and local labor. Soil from the site was mixed with 6% cement content for stabilization and seismic resistance. This mixture was then formed into blocks with reusable plastic formwork and set atop foundations constructed from local stone, which was also used for pathways and retaining walls.

Local Sal wood was used for built-in furniture, exterior doors and louvers. In addition to the thermal mass of the massive rammed earth walls, passive heating and cooling design strategies were used to keep the hospital comfortable year-round. The campus also includes a new water supply and storage, wastewater treatment facilities and bioswales to manage monsoon-driven erosion. The hospital’s south-facing roofs are topped with a grid-connected 100 kW photovoltaic array that is powerful enough to generate all of the campus’ electricity needs.

“We see this project as a model of how rammed earth, and other vernacular materials, can be utilized to create modern architecture,” said Sharon Davis, principal of Sharon Davis Design. “Without local materials, this project may not have been possible because of its incredibly remote location — a 10-hour drive from the nearest regional airport and a three-day drive on narrow, mountainous roads from the nearest manufacturing centers around Kathmandu.”

+ Sharon Davis Design

Photography by Elizabeth Felicella via Sharon Davis Design

This is the STRANGEST Caterpillar You’ve Ever Seen!

Aug 6, 2019  DailyTop10s

The world is home to thousands of species of caterpillars, and some of them are very unique indeed. These are the strangest caterpillars on the planet! DailyTop10s brings you fun and informative top ten lists in a variety of different topics. Join us and sub for regular posts. If you have a top ten topic you’d like us to do make a video on, let us know in the comments! We usually focus on top tens that bring educational / informational value to the viewer. Thanks for watching DailyTop10s!

Category  Entertainment

The life of Monarch Butterfly

Sep 12, 2015  Dominique Lalonde Films Nature

Discover the life of the monarch. Adult female monarchs lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves. Each female can lay 400 eggs. These eggs hatch, depending on temperature, in three to five days. Monarchs spend the caterpillar stage of their lives eating and growing. The young caterpillar measures about 2 mm and reaches a length of 50 mm. After about two weeks, the caterpillar will be fully-grown and find a place to attach itself so that it can start the process of metamorphosis. Witness the monarch’s transformation. It is the only one North American butterfly who migrate, each year, in large number. Probably no other insect on the Earth make such a migration. The Monarch can fly more than 100 km in a single day. Copyright Dominique Lalonde Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/user/Explorat…

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, Africanews, Sky News, CAN, Roylab Stats, Google news, BBC – Future, TED-Ed, The Guardian and Colossal  

 PBS News: April 28 – 30 & May 1, 2020, and Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

 Africanews Live

 Sky News Live

 CNA 24/7 LIVE – Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Washington Post: April 28, 2020 – Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic
BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

TED-Ed: Emma Bryce What really happens to the plastic you throw away

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Colossal: Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

PBS NewsHour full episode, May 1, 2020

May 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, with millions of Americans filing for unemployment and businesses desperate, more states lift pandemic restrictions. Plus: Rising tensions between the White House and China, a perspective on reopening restaurants, essential workers strike for their health, Joe Biden denies a sexual assault allegation, the analysis of Shields and Brooks, Jazz Fest goes quiet and in memoriam. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Economic strain drives more states to lift pandemic rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZzPh… The ongoing U.S.-China rhetorical battle over the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKamw… News Wrap: White House blocks Fauci from House testimony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4fJa… The CEO of Waffle House on adapting restaurants to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qd6uZ… How these essential workers feel about the risks they face https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w58M4… What Biden said in 1st public response to assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ApNi… Shields and Brooks on Biden’s assault allegation denial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1I-up… Trombone Shorty on New Orleans’ quieted musical heartbeat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWULo… Mourning some of those lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUNnk… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 30, 2020

Apr 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, new jobs numbers emphasize the depths of the pandemic’s economic damage. Plus: What happens to Americans struggling to pay for housing, complications around accessing food stamps, viewer questions about the economic crisis, Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso on COVID-19, the World Health Organization under fire and a Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone. Correction: When discussing President Trump’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic during the interview with Sen. Barrasso, Judy Woodruff mistakenly said 15 Americans had died of the disease in late February. She meant that there were 15 confirmed U.S. cases of the disease then. We regret the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS States ask for more federal aid as economic crisis deepens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1T_Xq… How to get help if you can’t pay your mortgage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo7RD… How COVID-19 is keeping food from America’s hungriest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7TvV… Michelle Singletary answers viewers’ financial questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXtif… News Wrap: Pelosi defends Biden over assault allegation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9weo… Sen. Barrasso: Early remdesivir results ‘very encouraging’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-mI2… 2 perspectives on the Trump administration’s clash with WHO https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyIcz… A Brief But Spectacular take on why we’re never really alone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEtvP… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 29, 2020

Apr 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, U.S. deaths from COVID-19 now exceed American fatalities incurred in the Vietnam War. Plus: The latest on testing and possible treatment, how the pandemic threatens U.S. food production, distance learning challenges for students with special needs, earning potential for collegiate athletes and a new book on community and relationships from a former U.S. surgeon general. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Amid economic gloom, is there hope for a COVID-19 treatment? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3TNr… What we know about remdesivir study and COVID-19 antibodies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWuPp… News Wrap: Navy widens investigation of Roosevelt outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkHat… Trump wants meat processing plants open. But are they safe? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elxBy… How distance learning is creating a special education crisis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgxRo… Does NCAA earnings decision mean a ‘new era’ for athletes? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oo31s… Could pandemic loneliness spark a ‘social revival?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIecV… What could a post-pandemic world look like? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJCs8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 28, 2020

Apr 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, more states start to lift restrictions put in place due to COVID-19, causing some health experts to worry. Plus: Small businesses struggle to obtain federal aid, Sen. Chuck Schumer on the federal response, New Zealand and Australia successfully battle virus spread, how the pandemic is changing religious observation and telling fact from fiction in a global health crisis. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lift restrictions, in bid for economic relief https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roc_a… News Wrap: Violent new protests in Lebanon turn deadly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YJVO… Why can’t more small businesses get federal pandemic aid? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgjoY… Schumer demands hearings on coronavirus relief oversight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Omuw6… How New Zealand and Australia have kept COVID-19 losses loz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… How religious leaders are keeping the faith during COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leM0L… The dangerous flood of misinformation surrounding COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xl9zg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Jane Goodall on animal-human interconnectedness amid the pandemic

Apr 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

We mark this 50th anniversary of Earth Day with Jane Goodall, one of the world’s most renowned scientists and environmentalists. A new National Geographic documentary explores her life and work, teaching generations how interconnected we are with the natural world. Jeffrey Brown talks to Goodall about her career and mission — and the pandemic that has brought modern civilization to its knees. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020 CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 14 hours ago  Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

 Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 3,424,254 440 1,092,715 243,674
United States 1,157,782 3,513 150,934 67,046
Spain 216,582 4,598 117,248 25,100
Italy 209,328 3,475 79,914 28,710
United Kingdom 182,260 2,743 28,131
Germany 164,967 1,984 121,014 6,812
France 130,979 1,953 50,562 24,760
Turkey 124,375 1,496 58,259 3,336
Russia 124,054 845 15,013 1,222
Brazil 96,559 457 40,973 6,750
Iran 96,448 1,157 77,350 6,156
China 84,388 60 77,713 4,643
Canada 56,714 1,493 23,801 3,566
       

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Washington Post                                          April 28, 2020
Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Goldman Sach
By Angela Fritz
 Email

The latest

The United States surpassed 1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus Tuesday, which is around a third of all the world’s reported infections. More than 55,000 deaths in the United States have been reported since February, according to tracking by The Washington Post. Health experts say that both cases and deaths are likely being undercounted.

The pandemic is endangering the U.S. beef, chicken and pork supply chains, as worker infection has shut down at least 20 plants and forced those still open to slow production. President Trump is expected to sign an executive order to force meat production plants to keep operating, despite mounting reports of employee deaths due to covid-19. Read about the risks for workers and what it means for your grocery store, then check out answers to your questions below.

A Federal Reserve program to begin within weeks will provide $500 billion in emergency aid to large American corporations without requiring them to protect workers or limit payments to executives and shareholders. Since it’s exempt from rules passed by Congress for other aid, critics say it would allow large companies to take federal help without saving any jobs.

Meanwhile, despite pressure from the Trump administration, some larger businesses — including cruise line operators — are refusing to return their small business Paycheck Protection Program money. The program ran out of funds in just weeks, and several businesses have already said they would return money because they realize they weren’t the intended small-business recipients. Read about the companies that are keeping their loans. 

This couple got married in the middle of the friendliest street in town — and the neighbors all came to help create their outdoor, socially distant wedding. The bride wore a white lace jumpsuit with a peach tulle skirt. Big chalk hearts were drawn on the sidewalks. The neighbors hung flowers on the trees, and the neighborhood kids constructed a dogwood bouquet.

More important news

Will summer kill coronavirus? Cities fear heat waves will quickly become deadly.

Patients with three certain cancers are at a much higher risk of death or severe complications from covid-19, according to a new study.

U.S. intelligence agencies issued warnings about the coronavirus in more than a dozen classified briefings prepared for Trump in January and February.

Attorney General William P. Barr told prosecutors to ‘be on the lookout’ for state and local coronavirus orders that could violate the Constitution.

Across the political spectrum, leaders are warning of financial calamity if Congress and the White House don’t help struggling states.

BBC – Future: How-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200422-how-has-coronavirus-helped-the-environment

By Martha Henriques – 23rd April 2020

We know that carbon emissions have sharply fallen during lockdown. But will all these changes actually be good for the environment in the long run?

There’s clear water in the Venice canals, blue skies over Delhi and wild animals are roaming boldly in locked-down cities. The oil industry and airlines are floundering in this new world, and carbon emissions are falling fast.

But there are also mountains of food going to waste that our supply chains aren’t set up to deal with. And, what’s more, the radical changes to daily life that we’re seeing now are not – thankfully – going to be permanent.

History tells us that when emissions have fallen sharply in the past, as they do after recessions, there’s often a rocketing rebound that wipes out any short-term cut in emissions. (Read more about Covid-19’s lasting impact on the environment.)

Is this pandemic any different?

Future Planet talks to BBC Minute about the close ties between lockdown and carbon emissions. In a nutshell: we could see long-lasting positive environmental change after the pandemic. But it’s all down to how we move on after lockdown.

You can watch the video above.

As an award-winning science site, BBC Future is committed to bringing you evidence-based analysis and myth-busting stories around the new coronavirus. You can read more of our Covid-19 coverage here.

TED-Ed

We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Emma Bryce traces the life cycles of three different plastic bottles, shedding light on the dangers these disposables present to our world. [Directed by Sharon Colman, narrated by Addison Anderson, music by Peter Gosling].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

The Guardian: Are female leaders more successful at managing the coronavirus crisis?

Coronavirus outbreak

Plenty of countries with male leaders have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly

Jon Henley and Eleanor Ainge Roy

Sat 25 Apr 2020 00.00 EDT Last modified on Sat 25 Apr 2020 19.15 EDT

12,643

On 1 April, the prime minister of Sint Maarten addressed her nation’s 41,500 people. Coronavirus cases were rising, and Silveria Jacobs knew the small island country, which welcomes 500,000 tourists a year, was at great risk: it had two ICU beds.

Jacobs did not want to impose a strict lockdown, but she did want physical distancing observed. So she spelled it out: “Simply. Stop. Moving,” she said. “If you don’t have the bread you like in your house, eat crackers. Eat cereal. Eat oats. Eat … sardines.”

The 51-year-old Caribbean premier may not have the global profile of Angela Merkel or Jacinda Ardern, but her blunt message exemplified firm action, effective communication – and showed another female leader getting the job done.

From Germany to New Zealand and Denmark to Taiwan, women have managed the coronavirus crisis with aplomb. Plenty of countries with male leaders – Vietnam, the Czech Republic, Greece, Australia – have also done well. But few with female leaders have done badly.

Ardern, 39, New Zealand’s premier, has held Kiwis’ hands through the lockdown, delivering empathetic “stay home, save lives” video messages from her couch and communicating daily through non-combative press conferences or intimate Facebook Live videos, her favourite medium.

Her insistence on saving lives and her kindness-first approach – urging New Zealanders to look after their neighbours, take care of the vulnerable, and make sacrifices for the greater good – has won her many fans, while her emphasis on shared responsibility has united the country.

Choosing to “go hard and go early”, Ardern imposed a 14-day quarantine on anyone entering the country on 14 March and implemented a strict lockdown two weeks later, when fewer than 150 people had been infected and none had died. New Zealand has recorded just 18 deaths; public trust in Ardern’s government is greater than 80%.

In Germany, Angela Merkel has been hailed for direct but uncharacteristically personal public interventions, warning that up to 70% of people would contract the virus – the country’s “greatest challenge” since 1945 – and lamenting every death as that of “a father or grandfather, a mother or grandmother, a partner …”

Thanks to extensive testing from the outset, plenty of intensive care beds, and the chancellor’s periodic forthright reminders that Covid-19 was “serious – so take it seriously”, Germany has so far recorded fewer than 5,000 deaths, a far lower figure than most EU countries.

With a doctorate in quantum chemistry, Merkel’s clear, calm expositions – a clip of her explaining the scientific basis behind the government’s lockdown exit strategy was shared thousands of times online – have also helped propel public approval of the fourth-term chancellor’s handling of the crisis above 70%.

1:38

Merkel sets out clear explanation of how coronavirus transmission works – video

In nearby Denmark, meanwhile, the prime minister, Mette Frederiksen, acted equally firmly, closing the Scandinavian country’s borders as early as 13 March, and following up a few days later by shutting all kindergartens, schools and universities and banning gatherings of more than 10 people.

That decisiveness appears to have spared Denmark the worst of the pandemic, with fewer than 8,000 confirmed cases and 370 deaths. Frederiksen’s no-punches-pulled speeches and clear instructions to the nation have been widely praised.

She even managed to show a sense of fun, posting a clip on Facebook of herself doing the dishes while singing along to the 1980s Danish popsters Dodo and the Dodos during the nation’s weekly TV lockdown singalong. The Scandinavian country’s youngest-ever prime minister, whose approval ratings have doubled to more than 80%, has now begun easing its lockdown.

Taiwan’s president Tsai Ing-wen responded equally fast, activating the country’s central epidemic command centre in early January and introducing travel restrictions and quarantine measures. Mass public hygiene measures were rolled out, including disinfecting public areas and buildings.

In all, Taiwan adopted 124 control and contain measures in weeks, making a full lockdown unnecessary. It has reported just six deaths, and is now dispatching millions of face masks to the worst-struck parts of the US and Europe. Tsai’s warm, authoritative style has won her plaudits, even from political opponents.

Norway, with 7,200 cases and 182 deaths, this week began relaxing its restrictions by reopening kindergartens. The prime minister, Erna Solberg, told CNN she had made a point of “letting scientists make the big medical decisions”, adding that she thought her country’s early lockdown and thorough testing programme had been key.

Following an example set earlier by Frederiksen, Solberg also took the unusual step of directly addressing the country’s children, telling them in two press conferences – from which adult journalists were banned – that it was “permitted to be a little bit scared” and that she, too, missed being able to hug her friends.

Meanwhile, Iceland, under the prime minister, Katrín Jakobsdóttir’s, leadership, has offered free testing to all citizens, not only those with symptoms, and has recorded 1,800 cases and 10 deaths. Some 12% of the population has taken up the offer, and an exhaustive tracing system has meant the country has not had to close schools.

The world’s youngest head of government, Finland’s prime minister, Sanna Marin, also moved decisively to impose a strict lockdown, including a ban on all non-essential travel in and out of the Helsinki region. This has helped her country contain the spread of the virus to just 4,000 cases and 140 deaths, a per-million toll 10 times lower than that of neighbouring Sweden.

Not all the women who have excelled in the corona crisis are national leaders. Jeong Eun-kyeong, the unflappable head of South Korea’s centre for disease control, has become a national icon after overseeing a “test, trace, contain” strategy that has made the country the world’s coronavirus role-model, with daily infections in single digits and a death toll of less than 250.

Jeong, a former rural doctor dubbed “the world’s best virus hunter”, has delivered no-nonsense daily press conferences, including demonstrating the ideal way to cough. While these have won praise, her work ethic – she has left an emergency operations bunker only for quick visits to a food truck – has prompted concern for her health.

5:06

Why South Korea’s coronavirus death toll is comparatively low – video explainer

Whatever conclusions we may draw from these leaders’ performances during the pandemic, experts caution that while women are “disproportionately represented to a rather startling degree” among countries managing the crisis well, dividing men and women heads of state and government into homogenous categories is not necessarily useful.

Complicating factors may be at play. Kathleen Gerson, a professor of sociology at New York University, notes, for example, that women leaders are more likely to be elected in “a political culture in which there’s a relative support and trust in the government – and that doesn’t make stark distinctions between women and men. So you’ve already got a head start”.

In addition, it may be harder for men to escape “the way they are expected to behave” as leaders, Gerson told The Hill website. And since the very best leaders are both strong and decisive and capable of displaying feeling, women could, perhaps, “lead the way in showing that these are not competing and conflicting attributes, but complementary – and necessary for good leadership”, she said.

America faces an epic choice …

… in the coming year, and the results will define the country for a generation. These are perilous times. Over the last three years, much of what the Guardian holds dear has been threatened – democracy, civility, truth. This administration has cleared out science and scientists across all departments. America’s reputation as a competent global leader is in peril. Truth is being chased away. But with your help we can continue to put it center stage.

Rampant disinformation, partisan news sources and social media’s tsunami of fake news are no bases on which to inform the American public in 2020. We believe every one of us deserves equal access to fact-based news and analysis. So we’ve decided to keep Guardian journalism free for all readers, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. This would not be possible without the generosity of readers, who now support our work from across America in all 50 states.

Our journalism relies on our readers’ generosity – your financial support has meant we can keep investigating, disentangling and interrogating. It has protected our independence, which has never been so critical. We are so grateful.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/25/why-do-female-leaders-seem-to-be-more-successful-at-managing-the-coronavirus-crisis?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

Alarming Studio Works by Pejac Focus on Earth’s Environmental Crisis

OCTOBER 22, 2018  SASHA BOGOJEV

After taking a much-needed break over the summer following his successful presentation in Paris in June, Pejac is now back in his studio, developing new works for his U.S. debut in New York City and preparing a special limited edition that will be released toward the end of the year. Mixing his most recognizable techniques and mediums, he’s been sharing some of the alluring new pieces via his Instagram, including most recent drawings and works on pressed wood panels.

The Spanish artist first introduced the captivating works on wooden chipboard from the Redemption series back in January 2017, and eventually had an entire showcase focused on these pieces back in September 2017 in Venice. Known for revisiting his ideas and concepts, he recently finished this poignant new piece titled Safari. Mixing some of the previously seen imagery, such as patrolling helicopters with a spotlight, or a lonely stag, Pejac combines these visuals into a dynamic image that depicts a wild animal caught in the open by an unknown authority. Using fastidious shading and light effects, he uses the unorthodox composite wood medium to create a powerful effect of objects flying around the animal as its surrounding crumble around it. Once again putting a focus on the careless and ignorant bearing of humans towards nature, the artist constructed a gripping image utilizing an original technique he developed.

With similar thematic content, Pejac’s most recent solo exhibition on an old waterway barge on the Seine in Paris included three masterful large-scale drawings, along with other works on paper. Portraying a post-apocalyptic, surreal future, these meticulously rendered drawings mounted on thick frames were matched the quality of his paintings while depicting the hefty subject with a direct and delicate technique. Showing a lone character diving deep to retrieve a sinking lifebuoy ring in between plastic waste, or a helicopter removing a lighthouse over a desert, these images showcase Pejac’s poetic vision and his ability to pass a sharp and weighty message in the most poetic way.

A great example of such narrative is his canvas Le Bateau Ivre (The drunken boat) from 2015, titled after a poem written by Arthur Rimbaud, describing the drifting and sinking of a boat lost at sea in a fragmented first-person narrative saturated with vivid imagery and symbolism. Making an analogy with poem’s verbal saturation, the image shows two boys finishing from a small boat drifting through a sea densely polluted with garbage. Originally exhibited at his 2016 London solo show “Law of the Weakest,” this troubling vision from only three years ago is repeatedly becoming an alarming reality around the globe. You can see Pejac’s works in progress and stay up to date on show and print release announcements by following him on Instagram.

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, BBC Click, TED Talks, and Colossal

PBS News: April 21 – 24, 2020, and

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

BBC Click: Inspiring Communities During the Pandemic

TED Talks: Oliver Jeffers An ode to living on earth?

 Colossal: Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 24, 2020

Apr 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. death toll from the novel coronavirus pandemic hits 50,000, but some states begin to lift restrictions. Plus: Medical facts vs. fiction, an ICU nurse shares his fears, Sen. Amy Klobuchar on responding to crisis, Navajo Nation’s virus vulnerability, Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week’s news and remembering some of those lost to COVID-19. Correction: Judy Woodruff misspoke during the interview with Sen. Amy Klobuchar and referred to Stacey Abrams as former lieutenant governor in the state of Georgia. That is incorrect. Abrams was a candidate for governor in that state. We regret the error. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More than 50,000 have died from COVID-19 in the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zpi6b… Separating fact from fiction in Trump’s COVID-19 briefings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQTbS… News Wrap: U.S. Navy wants to reinstate fired ship captain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biUeE… An ICU nurse on wavering between confidence and fear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gc1U… Amy Klobuchar on her COVID-19 fears for rural America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTiMJ… Why Navajo Nation is especially vulnerable to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jh55… Shields and Brooks on Trump’s briefings, coronavirus aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tlyN… Remembering Americans killed by COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRIEH… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 23, 2020

Apr 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the House passes $484 billion in pandemic relief aimed specifically at small employers and hospitals. Plus: Americans share their economic pain, protests about pandemic restrictions, two views on reopening Georgia businesses, the long road to economic recovery, Europe’s pandemic response, job losses in the arts and Montana’s unusual sounds of support for health workers. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS What’s in the latest federal pandemic relief package https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gg7FU… News Wrap: Severe storms across the South kill at least 7 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQGGU… For many, pandemic’s economic crisis is 2nd financial blow https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOz74… The politics behind protests of stay-at-home orders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKPh_… What 2 Georgia mayors think about reopening their state https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVaYI… Why the pandemic is making U.S. economic inequality worse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Zgmn… EU is united in response to pandemic, says ambassador https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH3eN… Why pandemic is ‘existential crisis’ for performing arts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3fYb… These appreciative neighbors howl for health care workers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnyDB… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 22, 2020

Apr 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, new data indicates the novel coronavirus was spreading in the U.S. weeks earlier than previously thought. Plus: A timeline of COVID-19 in the U.S., the pandemic worsens global hunger, New York’s shocked health care system, the U.S.-China battle over COVID-19 blame, mental health during the pandemic, a White House update and an Earth Day conversation with Jane Goodall. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Some states to begin relaxing rules, as U.S. deaths rise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBXq2… Why contact tracing is critical to containing COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wOJOm… News Wrap: Reduced pollution on Earth Day’s 50th anniversary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hF1q_… What COVID-19 pandemic means for global starvation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kix1… Why New York health care is still ‘in a state of shock’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZRW3… The U.S.-China battle over COVID-19 narrative and blame https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRI1w… Mental health advice from a New York psychiatrist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H0Jb7… Why was a top federal vaccine expert forced out of his job? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La83v… Jane Goodall on lessons from the pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1D_-… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 21, 2020

Apr 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the U.S. Senate reaches a deal on a new $500 billion COVID-19 relief package. Plus: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on the pandemic response, what the collapse in oil prices means for other economic sectors, kidney damage among some COVID-19 patients, why Uganda has a low number of virus cases, the hunt for a vaccine, a White House update and scenes from a world on pause. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,858,489 367.61 809,923 199,874
United States 932,031 2,828.14 101,538 52,608
Spain 223,759 4,750.68 95,708 22,902
Italy 195,351 3,242.7 63,120 26,384
Germany 155,418 1,869.14 99,962 5,805
United Kingdom 148,377 2,233.4 20,319
France 122,577 1,827.43 43,493 22,245
Turkey 107,773 1,296.05 25,582 2,706
Iran 89,328 1,071.97 68,193 5,650
China 84,311 60.13 77,346 4,642
Russia 74,588 508.28 6,250 681
Brazil 52,995 250.76 27,655 3,670
Belgium 45,325 3,932.94 10,417 6,917
Canada 44,364 1,168.12 15,963 2,350
Netherlands 37,190 2,131.11 4,409
Switzerland 28,541 3,323.92 21,000 1,593
India 24,942 18.33 5,210 779

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Inspiring Communities During The Pandemic – BBC Click

Apr 24, 2020  BBC Click

We look at how care homes around Europe are using technology to provide some contact for isolated and elderly people. And in Australia we look at newly introduced smart traffic cams to combat the worst driver behaviour during lockdown. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

If you had to explain to a newborn what it means to be a human being living on Earth in the 21st century, what would you say? Visual artist Oliver Jeffers put his answer in a letter to his son, sharing pearls of wisdom on existence and the diversity of life. He offers observations of the “beautiful, fragile drama of human civilization” in this poetic talk paired with his original illustrations and animations.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Oliver Jeffers · Artist, storyteller

With a style that crackles with wry wit, writer and artist Oliver Jeffers captivates audiences of all ages.

MORE RESOURCES

The Fate of Fausto

Oliver Jeffers

Harper Collins Children’s Books (2019)

Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth

Oliver Jeffers

Philomel Books (2017)

Learn more about how the International Rescue Committee responds to some of the world’s worst crises, delivering aid that saves lives while paving the way for long-term recovery.

TED2020: The Prequel | April 2020

Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

Artful Swirls of Plastic Marine Debris Documented in Images by Photographer Mandy Barker

APRIL 19, 2018  LAURA STAUGAITIS

SOUP – Refused © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic oceanic debris affected by chewing and attempted ingestion by animals. Includes a toothpaste tube. Additives; teeth from goats.

Photographer Mandy Barker creates deceptively eye-catching images to document the pandemic of plastic debris in the world’s waterways. Barker, who is based in Leeds, UK, works closely with scientists to collect trash from our oceans and beaches on the edges of nearly every continent. One research expedition covered the debris field (stretching to Hawaii) that resulted from Japan’s 2011 tsunami and earthquake; she has also explored the Inner Hebrides in Scotland with Greenpeace.

Barker manipulates her findings in Photoshop, mimicking the manner in which ocean water holds these objects in suspension. Swirls of colors and patterns draw in the viewer’s eye, only to realize that these visually appealing compositions consist of garbage that animals have attempted to chew, plastic pellets, tangles of fishing line, and water-logged soccer balls. The artist describes her work in a statement on her website:

The aim of my work is to engage with and stimulate an emotional response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial aesthetic attraction along with the subsequent message of awareness. The research process is a vital part of my development as the images I make are based on scientific fact which is essential to the integrity of my work.

Barker is currently a recipient of a 2018 National Geographic Society grant. Her work is on display through April 22nd at Mexico City’s Museum of Modern Art, at Photo London Art Fair in May 2018, at the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg in June, 2018, and at BredaPhoto in The Netherlands in September 2018. The artist’s book, Beyond Drifting: Imperfectly Known Animals, was named one of the ten best books of 2017 by Smithsonian. You can see more of Barker’s photographs on her website as well as on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

EVERY… snowflake is different (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

EVERY… snowflake is different © Mandy Barker. Ingredients: white marine plastic debris objects collected in two single visits to a nature reserve on the East Coast of England.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Lighter © Mandy Barker. Discarded cigarette lighters make reference to our single-use throw away society. The panda, a national emblem of China represents endangered species and faces away from the group symbolizing mother nature turning its back on man’s inability to take ownership of its waste.

Hong Kong Soup:1826 – Spilt © Mandy Barker. 150 tonnes of pre-production plastic pellets (nurdles) spilt from a cargo container during Typhoon Vincente on 23rd July 2012 adds to Hong Kong’s waste issues in its seas and on its beaches.

PENALTY – Europe © Mandy Barker. 633 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) recovered from 23 countries and islands within Europe, from 104 different beaches, and by 62 members of the public, in just 4 months.

PENALTY – The World © Mandy Barker. 769 marine plastic debris footballs (and pieces of) collected from 41 countries and islands around the world, from 144 different beaches and by 89 members of the public in just 4 months.

PENALTY – 24 Footballs © Mandy Barker.

SHOAL – 30.41N, 157.51E © Mandy Barker.Included in trawl: child’s ball and Japanese character – fridge magnet found on the tsunami shoreline. Fishing buoy found in trawl sample, North pacific Ocean

SHOAL 33.15N, 151.15E © Mandy Barker. Included in trawl: tatami mat from the floor of a Japanese home, fishing related plastics, buoys, nylon rope, buckets, fish trays, polystyrene floats, shampoo bottle, caps, balloon & holder, petrol container.

SOUP – Alphabet © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic debris that includes surface text. Ironic random arrangement of 4 pieces of plastic that suggest a warning; ‘Sea’ ‘AND’ ‘HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES’ ‘FOUL’

SOUP: Bird’s Nest © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; discarded fishing line that has formed nest-like balls due to tidal and oceanic movement. Additives; other debris collected in its path.

SOUP – Ruinous Remembrance © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; plastic flowers, leaves, stems, and fishing line. Additives; bones, skulls, feathers, and fish.

SOUP: Turtle © Mandy Barker.

WHERE © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

WHERE (detail) © Mandy Barker. Ingredients; marine debris balloons collected from around the world.

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PBS News, Roylab Stats, Al Jazeera, DW News, FRANCE 24 English, TED Talks, Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, WEHImovies, and The New York Times

PBS News: March 30 – 31, 2020

Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Al Jazeera English – Live

DW News Livestream – Latest news and breaking stories

FRANCE 24 English: LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

TED Talks: Seth Berkley HIV and flu the vaccine strategy

Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell: The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

WEHImovies: DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

The New York Times: Coronavirus Map – Tracking the Global Outbreak Updated April 1, 020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 31, 2020

Mar 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the death toll from novel coronavirus in the U.S. has now exceeded that in China. Plus: Food banks struggle to feed the newly unemployed, teachers and students adapt to distance learning, unlocking the science of the virus, President Trump relaxes fuel efficiency standards, an update from the White House, how the military is handling the outbreak and Now Read This. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS The U.S. novel coronavirus death toll now tops China’s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9effA… News Wrap: Dow Jones concludes worst quarter since 1987 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqbW… How food bank are trying to cope with a surge in demand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul96q… How learning changes when school happens at home and online https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9Thm… What scientists know about COVID-19 — and what they don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RO37V… Trump hastens deregulation with fuel efficiency rollback https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPe7Y… Trump tells Americans to brace themselves for more pain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGFaK… U.S. Navy says it won’t evacuate ship with infected sailors https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy2ta… ‘Inheritance’ author Dani Shapiro answers your questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImIHT… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 30, 2020

Mar 30, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, COVID-19 continues to burn through the U.S. population, with New York as the most severe national hot spot. Plus: Why U.S. coronavirus testing is still problematic, Illinois’ surging number of cases, a Greek refugee camp poised for disaster, U.S. delivery workers fear for their health, President Trump’s update, Politics Monday and one family’s story of coping with pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS More states lock populations down as COVID-19 cases climb https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-Ki3… How ‘constrained’ virus testing has crippled U.S. response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPmWa… ‘Everyone is afraid’ as Illinois virus cases spike https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8azIz… At Greek refugee camp, few defenses against COVID-19 threat https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TQsl… News Wrap: Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozC06… As more people order delivery, workers fear virus exposure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmWrt… How the president’s coronavirus approach has changed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh5rT… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Trump and COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XTsI… The particular pain of losing a loved one during quarantine https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6xKV… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

Novel coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases, recovered cases(COVID-19). I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the coronavirus spreading. For anyone that wants to know the numbers and progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. At first, I tried to show only official data from governments without any manipulation. But many people wanted to apply an up-to-date format of data to stream. I added a procedure to manually manipulate data with my computer. After seeing the inflicted countries numbers had sharply increased, I realized that I could no longer keep up with new information from 100 countries. So I made another procedure which enables moderators the ability to manipulate the numbers on screen remotely. Not only the moderators who willingly accepted the hard work, but also everyone that gave us reliable information were able to add streaming data. The role of this streaming is to show basic information to undertand situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites. References: 1. WORLDOMETER: https://www.worldometers.info/coronav… 2. BNO News: https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02… 3. JHU CSEE: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/ap… 4. 1point3acres (for USA/CAN):https://coronavirus.1point3acres.com/en 5. RiskLayer (DEU): http://www.risklayer-explorer.com/eve… 6. MorgenPost (DEU): https://interaktiv.morgenpost.de/coro… 7. DXY (CHN): https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneum… 8. J.A.G Japan (JPN): https://jagjapan.maps.arcgis.com/apps… 9. VG (NOR): https://www.vg.no/spesial/2020/corona… 10. Wiki – Brazil page (BRA): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_co… I majored in life science and joined bioinformatics laboratory for master degree. At that time I used python. Since I decided to change my career as dentist, I have been stopped programming for 15 years. Now, I start to learn more about python with googling. Because my job doesn’t allow mistakes, I won’t try something new works. Still I am wondering how can i start this live streaming. Sometimes python program doesn’t work as i intended. If I can devote all my free time to this live stream, I would give more accurate and faster information. But please understand that I can’t manipulate data all day. While I am working and sleeping, data gathering is done automatically. I live in South Korea. At the beginning of streaming, the number of confirmed cases were not so high in South Korea. After sudden appearing local transmission that can’t be trackable, the number has been dramatically increased. Please be warned that COVID-19 is highly contagious disease. Although the stream started off crude and basic, many people have supported me in improving and maintaining this. It is because of your support that I am encouraged to keep streaming. I especially appreciate all moderators for willingly accepting the role. They have given their precious time to making this live stream better – Max Mustermann, Stephanie Hughes, Random, Entrenched Trader, Droid Knight, Craft Fan, Fries, jlpowell73, The NCV, Josh Leathers,The Eldritch God, srpk khin, Hitz1001, Red Chiref, GildArt by Gilda, emmamec, lambi, AmberLeanne, DukeHeart, Green Rock Films, Charlie and amithist57. I hope this live stream can be a useful source of information for you. Please keep track of the numbers that impact you and let them inform the decisions you make when you have to make them. Please take care. Keeping good immunity is very important!!! Please sleep, eat and rest fully for resilience. Keep those affected by this unfortunate outbreak in your thoughts. Data1 – screen numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Data2 – Daily numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Eyes_of_Glory/ Heaven_and_Hell / Heaven_and_Hell_Part_2 / Hero_Down/ Into_the_Sky / Lonely_Troutman / Lonely_Troutman_II / Parzival / Mountain/The_Heartache Hero Down: http://incompetech.com/ from www.bensound.com from www.epidemicsound.com

Category  News & Politics

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020   Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019   DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

FRANCE 24 English – LIVE – International Breaking News & Top stories – 24/7 stream

Started streaming on Jan 24, 2020  FRANCE 24 English

Watch FRANCE 24 live in English on YouTube for free Subscribe to France 24 now https://f24.my/YouTubeEN Watch France 24 live news: all the latest news live broadcasted from Paris, France. Le DIRECT France 24 en français : https://f24.my/YTliveFR France 24 EN VIVO en Español: https://f24.my/YTliveES ????? 24 ???? ??????? https://f24.my/YTliveAR Like us on Facebook: https://f24.my/FBen Follow us on Twitter: https://f24.my/TWen Watch our stories on Instagram: https://f24.my/IGen FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 https://www.france24.com/en/

Category  News & Politics

Seth Berkley explains how smart advances in vaccine design, production and distribution are bringing us closer than ever to eliminating a host of global threats — from AIDS to malaria to flu pandemics.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

TED2010 | February 2010

The Coronavirus Explained & What You Should Do

Mar 19, 2020  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell

Get Merch designed with ? from https://kgs.link/shop Join the Patreon Bird Army ? https://kgs.link/patreon ?? More infos and links are just a click away ?? A huge thanks to the experts who helped us on short notice with the video. Especially “Our World in Data”, the online publication for research and data on the world’s largest problems – and how to make progress solving them. Check out their site. It also includes a constantly updated page on the Corona Pandemic. In December 2019 the Chinese authorities notified the world that a virus was spreading through their communities. In the following months it spread to other countries, with cases doubling within days. This virus is the “Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus 2”, that causes the disease called COVID19, and that everyone simply calls Coronavirus. What actually happens when it infects a human and what should we all do? Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources… OUR CHANNELS ?????????????????????????? German Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeDE by FUNK Spanish Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeES by WIX HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US?

DNA animations by wehi.tv for Science-Art exhibition

Jul 16, 2018  WEHImovies

Edit of wehi.tv’s DNA animations. Created for V&A exhibition “The Future Starts Here” 2018 No narration, Yes sound and text.

Category  Science & Technology

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/world/coronavirus-maps.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_NN_p_20200331&instance_id=17204&nl=morning-briefing&regi_id=105496626&section=topNews&segment_id=23382&te=1&user_id=b26f10713ff3e74bb579e77159591c7d

Coronavirus Map: Tracking the Global Outbreak

By The New York Times Updated April 1, 2020, 1:05 A.M. E.T.

World, U.S., Europe, Asia, Tips

The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 873,200 people, according to official counts. As of Wednesday morning, at least 41,624 people have died, and the virus has been detected in at least 171 countries, as these maps show.

Where cases are rising fastest

Avg. number of new cases each day (for the last 7 days)

Sources: Local governments; The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; World Health Organization.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

There is evidence on six continents of sustained transmission of the virus. The C.D.C. has advised against all non-essential travel throughout most of Europe, and to South KoreaChina and Iran. And the agency has warned older and at-risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.

CASESDEATHSNEW CASES
United States188,0493,909Jan. 22 Mar. 31
Italy105,79212,428
Spain94,4178,189
Mainland China83,2233,312
Germany61,913583
France52,1283,523
Iran44,6052,898
Denmark28,76090
U.K.25,1501,789
Switzerland16,176373
Turkey13,531214
Belgium12,775705
Netherlands12,5951,039
Austria10,180128
South Korea9,887165
Canada8,53696
Portugal7,443160
Brazil5,812202
Israel5,35820
Australia4,70720
Norway4,64139
Sweden4,435180
Czech Republic3,30831
Ireland3,23571
Japan2,87464
Malaysia2,76643
Chile2,73812
Russia2,33717
Poland2,31133
Ecuador2,30279
Romania2,24582
Luxembourg2,17823
Philippines2,08488
Pakistan1,93826
Thailand1,65110
Saudi Arabia1,56310
Indonesia1,528136
Finland1,41817
India1,39735
South Africa1,3535
Greece1,31449
Mexico1,21529
Panama1,18130
Iceland1,1352
Dominican Rep.1,10951
Peru1,06530
Argentina1,05427
Singapore9263
Colombia90616
Serbia90016
Croatia8676
Slovenia80215
Qatar7812
Estonia7454
Algeria71644
Hong Kong7144
Egypt71046
New Zealand7081
Iraq69450
U.A.E.6646
Ukraine64517
Morocco61736
Bahrain5674
Lithuania5378
Armenia5323
Hungary49216
Lebanon47012
Bosnia and Herzegovina42013
Bulgaria3998
Latvia3980
Tunisia39410
Andorra37612
Slovakia3630
Moldova3534
Kazakhstan3482
Costa Rica3472
Uruguay3381
North Macedonia3299
Taiwan3225
Azerbaijan2985
Kuwait2890
Jordan2745
Cyprus2628
Burkina Faso26114
Albania24315
San Marino23626
Vietnam2120
Cameroon1936
Oman1921
Cuba1866
Ivory Coast1791
Senegal1750
Afghanistan1744
Honduras17210
Uzbekistan1722
Faroe Islands1690
Malta1690
Ghana1615
Belarus1521
Sri Lanka1432
Mauritius1435
Channel Islands1413
Nigeria1352
Venezuela1353
Brunei1291
West Bank & Gaza1191
Bolivia1157
Kosovo1121
Georgia1100
Cambodia1090
Montenegro1092
Kyrgyzstan1070
Congo988
Trinidad and Tobago874
Rwanda750
Gibraltar690
Liechtenstein680
Paraguay653
Isle of Man600
Kenya591
Madagascar570
Aruba550
Monaco521
Bangladesh515
Uganda440
Guatemala381
Jamaica382
Zambia360
Barbados340
Niger343
Togo341
Bermuda320
El Salvador321
Djibouti300
Mali282
Ethiopia260
Guinea220
Republic of the Congo190
Tanzania191
Maldives180
Gabon161
Bahamas150
Eritrea150
Equatorial Guinea150
Haiti150
Myanmar151
Cayman Islands141
Saint Lucia130
Dominica120
Guyana122
Mongolia120
Namibia110
Curaçao111
Greenland100
Libya100
Macau100
Seychelles100
Suriname100
Syria102
Benin90
Grenada90
Laos90
Eswatini90
Guinea-Bissau80
Saint Kitts and Nevis80
Mozambique80
Zimbabwe81
Antigua and Barbuda70
Angola72
Sudan72
Chad70
Cape Verde61
Mauritania61
Vatican City60
Sint Maarten60
Fiji50
Montserrat50
Nicaragua51
Nepal50
Somalia50
Turks and Caicos Islands50
Bhutan40
Botswana41
Gambia41
Belize30
Central African Republic30
Liberia30
British Virgin Islands30
Anguilla20
Burundi20
Papua New Guinea10
Sierra Leone10
Timor-Leste10
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines10 
 
 

Notes: New cases are represented as seven-day averages. Japan’s count includes 696 cases and seven deaths from a cruise ship that docked in Yokohama. The data excludes cases on the Zandaam cruise ship, which has not yet docked. France and the U.S. figures include overseas territories.

While the outbreak is a serious public health concern, most people who contract the coronavirus do not become seriously ill, and only a small percentage require intensive care. Older people and those with existing health conditions, like heart or lung disease, are at higher risk.

Follow the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

United States

The number of known coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow quickly. As of Wednesday morning, at least 188,049 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times database, and at least 3,909 patients with the virus have died.

Reported cases

Ala.900+

Alaska100+

Ariz.1,200+

Ark.500+

Calif.8,500+

Colo.2,900+

Conn.3,100+

Del.300+

D.C.400+

Fla.6,700+

Ga.4,100+

Hawaii200+

Idaho500+

Ill.5,900+

Ind.2,100+

Iowa400+

Kan.400+

Ky.500+

La.5,200+

Maine300+

Md.1,600+

Mass.6,600+

Mich.7,600+

Minn.600+

Miss.900+

Mo.1,300+

Mont.100+

Neb.100+

Nev.1,100+

N.H.300+

N.J.18,600+

N.M.300+

N.Y.75,800+

N.C.1,500+

N.D.100+

Ohio2,100+

Okla.500+

Ore.600+

Pa.4,900+

R.I.400+

S.C.1,000+

S.D.100+

Tenn.2,000+

Texas3,500+

Utah800+

Vt.200+

Va.1,200+

Wash.5,200+

W.Va.100+

Wis.1,300+

Wyo.100+

Note: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by county. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive, which may differ from where they contracted the illness. Some people who traveled overseas were taken for treatment in California, Nebraska and Texas. Puerto Rico and the other U.S. territories are not shown. Sources: State and local health agencies, hospitals, C.D.C.

See our page of maps, charts and tables tracking every coronavirus case in the U.S.

The New York Times is engaged in a comprehensive effort to track details about every confirmed case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. Many people are infected despite having no known connection to previous cases, which suggests local, person-to-person spread of the virus.

Europe

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to surge across Europe, there are now more total confirmed cases outside of China than inside China, the country where the virus first spread.

Total confirmed coronavirus cases

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; Local governments.

Many of the cases across Europe have been traced back to Italy, which has one of the world’s largest outbreaks. At least 105,792 people have tested positive as of Wednesday morning.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

ITALY105,700+

SPAIN94,400+

GERMANY61,900+

FRANCE52,100+

U.K.25,100+

NORWAY4,600+

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; local governments.

Asia

The outbreak is believed to have begun in a seafood and poultry market in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people in central China. The virus seems to spread very easily, especially in confined spaces, making containment efforts difficult. It is difficult to know how many people who contract the virus die, but some early estimates put the fatality rate at roughly 1 percent.

Confirmed cases

Wuhan

SOUTH KOREA9,800+

JAPAN2,800+

MALAYSIA2,700+

PHILIPPINES2,000+

THAILAND1,600+

INDIA1,300+

MEXICO1,200+

ICELAND1,100+

SINGAPORE900+

NEW ZEALAND700+

TAIWAN300+

VIETNAM200+

NIGERIA100+

500+

67,800+

CHINA

Sources: Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; local governments.

The precise dimensions of the outbreak are hard to know. Not all infected people have received a diagnosis, and some countries, like Singapore, have more proactive testing and containment efforts than others do.

Tips

Experts’ understanding of how the virus spreads is still limited, but there are four factors that likely play a role: how close you get; how long you are near the person; whether that person projects viral droplets on you; and how much you touch your face.

If your community is affected, you can help reduce your risk and do your part to protect others by following some basic steps:

Wash your hands! Scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, and then dry them with a clean towel or let them air dry.

Keep distance from sick people. Try to stay six feet away from anybody showing flu- or cold-like symptoms, and don’t go to work if you’re sick.

Prepare your family, and communicate your plan about evacuations, resources and supplies. Experts suggest stocking at least a 30-day supply of any needed prescriptions. Consider doing the same for food staples, laundry detergent and diapers, if you have small children.

Here’s a complete guide on how you can prepare for the coronavirus outbreak.

Note: Data are based on reports at the time of publication. At times, officials revise reports or offer incomplete information.

By Jin WuAllison McCannKeith CollinsKaren YourishSarah AlmukhtarRich HarrisJon HuangK.K. Rebecca LaiDerek WatkinsAnjali SinghviJugal K. Patel and Scott Reinhard.  ·   Mitch SmithAmy Harmon and Mike Baker contributed reporting.

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PBS News, TED Talks, New York Time Morning Briefing, and South China Morning Post SCMP

PBS News: March 25, 2020

TED Talks:  Bill Gates How we must respond to the Covid – 19 pandemic

The News York Times: Morning Briefing – Wednesday, March 25, 2020

South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia – Coronavirus: Tokyo’s cherry blossoms bring thousands to parks but experts worry the worst isn’t over yet for Japan                                                                    

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 25, 2020

Mar 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, much of the U.S. is under orders to stay home, as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases climbs past 60,000. Plus: What’s in Congress’ historic economic relief bill, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Louisiana Gov. Bel Edwards on what states need from President Trump, conditions in New York emergency rooms, COVID-19 in Russia, Trump’s news briefing and Songs of Comfort. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Congress pushes ahead on aid deal as U.S. virus cases rise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6AP4… Pelosi says relief bill will ‘put money in people’s pockets’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Uw4P… Louisiana governor: We need help sourcing more ventilators https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Fxjc… ‘Everything is transformed’ as COVID-19 grips NY hospitals https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFU-k… As Russia closes borders, how widespread is COVID-19 there? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32LO7… News Wrap: Pompeo warns Afghan leaders to end political feud https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ES0lP… Trump urges Congress to pass pandemic economic aid package https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7iPz… Yo-Yo Ma’s musical effort to share #SongsofComfort amid coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFGKQ… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates offers insights into the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing why testing and self-isolation are essential, which medical advancements show promise and what it will take for the world to endure this crisis. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Bill Gates · Philanthropist

A passionate techie and a shrewd businessman, Bill Gates changed the world while leading Microsoft to dizzying success. Now he’s doing it again with his own style of philanthropy and passion for innovation.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Whitney Pennington Rodgers · TED Current Affairs Curator

Whitney Pennington Rodgers is an award-winning journalist and media professional.

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?tab=wm&ogbl#inbox/FMfcgxwHMZHmBwDCWfKNDVXsWHNXklrW

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 | View in browser Good morning.   We’re covering a stimulus deal between the Senate and the Trump administration and the growing toll of the coronavirus in New York. We also look at the newest additions to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry (when the news includes Mister Rogers, it’s not all bad).

 By Chris Stanford

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, center, said President Trump was “very pleased with this legislation.”  Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times $2 trillion for a nation under siege   The Senate and the Trump administration agreed early this morning on a roughly $2 trillion measure that would send direct payments and jobless benefits to individuals, as well as money to states and businesses hit by the coronavirus pandemic. The legislation, which was still being finalized, is expected to be enacted within days. It’s the largest fiscal stimulus package in modern U.S. history.   Here are the latest updates and maps of the outbreak. We’ve also compiled a daily tracker that shows the virus’s trajectories by country and state. In other developments:   ? President Trump said on Tuesday that he wanted to reopen the U.S. for business by Easter, on April 12, saying he believed that a crippled economy and forced social isolation would do more harm than the spread of the virus. Public health experts said that lifting the restrictions now in place would result in unnecessary deaths. ? Here’s how some economists assess the trade-off between economic well-being and health. Our Opinion section also compiled a range of perspectives.   ? Global markets rose today on the news from Washington, after a major rally on Wall Street. Here’s the latest. ? The Chinese province of Hubei, where the pandemic began, lifted travel restrictions on most of its 60 million residents today, ending a nearly two-month lockdown.   ? India’s 1.3 billion people must stay in their homes for three weeks starting today. Prime Minister Narendra Modi acknowledged that the lockdown would create “a very difficult time for poor people,” in a country where hundreds of millions are destitute. ? For Olympic athletes, the decision to postpone the Summer Games in Tokyo until 2021 comes as both a blessing and a curse.   ? Yellowstone, Grand Teton and the Great Smoky Mountains national parks were closed, after concerns about crowding. ? Hundreds of e-commerce sites are popping up to sell products that they claim help fight the coronavirus, and many are being shut down for making exaggerated claims or selling phantom goods.   “The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the president’s response to the pandemic. The Times is providing free access to much of our coronavirus coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter — like all of our newsletters — is free. Please consider supporting our journalism with a subscription.

Times Square on Tuesday. The coronavirus infection rate was up to 10 times greater in the New York area than in other parts of the country, officials said.  Bryan Derballa for The New York Times   New York is a ‘high-risk area’ Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday advised people who have passed through or left the city recently to place themselves in a 14-day quarantine. About 60 percent of the country’s new confirmed cases of the coronavirus were in the New York City metropolitan area, officials said.   Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has emerged as the Democratic Party’s most prominent voice during the crisis, offered a grim forecast for the outbreak in the city and criticized the federal government for its slow response in sending crucial equipment. “You want a pat on the back for sending 400 ventilators?” he said. “What are we going to do with 400 ventilators when we need 30,000 ventilators? You’re missing the magnitude of the problem.”   Related: The city’s public transportation network is cutting service at least 25 percent, after subway ridership on Tuesday fell 87 percent — by nearly 4.8 million riders — compared with the same day last year.

Photo illustration by Delcan & Co. ‘What I learned when my husband got sick’   “It has been 12 days since T woke up in the middle of the night on March 12 with chills.” In a first-person essay, an editor for The Times, Jessica Lustig, describes life with her family since her husband was diagnosed with Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.   She writes: “It’s as if we are in a time warp, in which we have accelerated at 1½ time speed, while everyone around us remains in the present — already the past to us — and they, blissfully, unconsciously, go about their ordinary lives, experiencing the growing news, the more urgent advisories and directives, as a vast communal experience, sharing posts and memes about cabin fever, about home-schooling, about social distancing, about how hard it all is, while we’re living in our makeshift sick ward, living in what will soon be the present for more and more of them.” If you have 20 minutes, this is worth it

Drawn to Chernobyl Mark Neville for The New York Times   Driven by his own curiosity, a writer for The Times Magazine traveled to the area around the former nuclear plant, the site of arguably the worst ecological catastrophe in history. “I was on a kind of perverse pilgrimage,” he writes. “I wanted to see what the end of the world looked like.” Above, two tourists at an abandoned amusement park in Pripyat, a city built for Chernobyl workers.   Here’s what else is happening Draft could include women: Under a new recommendation to Congress, all Americans ages 18 to 25 — not just young men as currently required — would have to register with the government in case of a military draft.

Meridith Kohut for The New York Times Snapshot: Above, a boarding school for girls in need in Maracaibo, Venezuela. As the country’s economic crisis deepens, mothers and fathers are going abroad in search of work, leaving hundreds of thousands of children in the hands of relatives, friends and, sometimes, one another.   In memoriam: Terrence McNally, a four-time Tony Award-winning playwright, dramatized and domesticated gay life in a Broadway career that spanned five decades. He died on Tuesday at 81, from complications of the coronavirus. A playlist for history: The theme song for “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” and the Village People’s “Y.M.C.A.” are among 25 recordings that have been added to the national registry at the Library of Congress.   What we’re reading: This article about a socially distanced wedding from The Cut. It’s “a charming story of making do,” says Steven Erlanger, our chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe, “when you just have to get that wedding done for the insurance.” Now, a break from the news

Melissa Clark Cook: This “highly adaptable” vegetarian skillet chili from Melissa Clark is part of her series on cooking with pantry staples.   Watch: Netflix’s feel-good documentary “Crip Camp” recalls a Catskills summer camp that fostered American disability rights activism. We made it a Critic’s Pick. Listen: Patrick Stewart reads Shakespeare on Twitter, Ballet Hispánico is on Instagram, and art museums are expanding their digital offerings. If you’re stuck at home and hankering for the fine arts, there’s plenty online.   Smarter Living: Catastrophizing — imagining the worst-case scenario and planning for it — can be damaging. So take a breath, stick to the facts and follow these other suggestions for staying sane. And now for the Back Story on …   A lost sense of smell There is growing evidence that anosmia — loss of the sense of smell — may be a coronavirus symptom. Medical experts said that people who lose their ability to smell or taste should isolate themselves for at least a week, even if they are otherwise asymptomatic.   Sarah Maslin Nir, a Times reporter who covered a suburban outbreak, lost her sense of smell last week and later tested positive for the virus. She spoke to our colleague Jonathan Wolfe about her experience for our Coronavirus Briefing. When did you notice that you couldn’t smell?   I had a socially distant lunch with a friend on Perry Street, at opposite ends of a stoop, and she passed me some Clorox wipes. And I thought, Unscented Clorox wipes? That’s weird. But then I looked at them, and they said “lemon scent.”

Blossom season in North Macedonia. The loss of smell has been associated with the coronavirus.  Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters   What did you do next? I quickly made my exit, because I remembered reading an article about two Chinese health care workers and one sentence stuck out to me — that one of the women lost her sense of taste and smell. I went home, got my godmother on FaceTime, opened my spice cupboard and tried sniffing all of the spices. I sliced fresh ginger and practically put it up my nose and couldn’t smell it.   Is anosmia your only symptom? I don’t have a cough or a fever, but I’m exhausted. And because I can’t smell, food is bland. Eggplant Parmesan tastes like a hot wet book.   Has your sense of smell returned? Since I can’t smell, I don’t really have an appetite, but I’m still trying to eat nutritiously. After several days, my sense of smell briefly came back: I was making myself what I would normally make, a kale salad, and surprisingly, it did not taste like serrated paper. But shortly after that it went away again.   How would you describe anosmia to others? It’s deeply unsettling. It’s a constant reminder that something is deeply wrong with your body. You can perk up and have a good moment or two, but then you eat your Cheerios and your heart misses a beat.   A correction: Tuesday’s briefing cited an article that misstated the regulatory status of the drug thalidomide. It was approved in the 1990s for leprosy and, later, cancer treatment; it is not the case that it was never approved in the U.S.   That’s it for this briefing. See you next time. — Chris   Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.   P.S.
• We’re listening to “The Daily.” Today’s episode is about President Trump’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.
• Here’s today’s Mini Crossword, and a clue: Capital of Vietnam (five letters).

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South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia –

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/health-environment/article/3076854/coronavirus-tokyos-cherry-blossoms-bring-thousands

Coronavirus: Tokyo’s cherry blossoms bring thousands to parks but experts worry the worst isn’t over yet for Japan

  • Japanese people bow instead of shaking hands and avoid direct contact with each other, so many believe they are relatively safe from Covid-19
  • But health experts say Japan faces a serious risk and people are not taking the threat seriously enough

Julian Ryall   Published: 9:09am, 25 Mar, 2020

Thousands of people ventured out to see the cherry blossoms over the weekend, but Tokyo’s governor has warned that a lockdown could be declared if people do not heed calls for social distancing. Photo: EPA-EFE

Japanese

 law student Mayako Shibata is making plans to see the cherry blossoms this weekend, despite increasingly strident warnings from health authorities to stay at home.

The 23-year-old said she was washing her hands often as she does during “regular flu season” and was not concerned about getting the 

coronavirus

 given that she has no underlying conditions.

The one concession that Shibata is making to the 

Covid-19

 disease that has so far infected well over 380,000 people globally and caused more than 16,000 deaths, is to try to steer clear of elderly people.

“I’m trying to stay away from them when I see them on the train because I know that I could be infected but that it would be far more serious for them,” she said.

Thousands of people visit Ueno Park in Tokyo to see the cherry blossoms. Photo: Reuters

Her sense of security is partly because of her location – the capital Tokyo has 14 million residents and has reported only 138 cases so far, less than 12 per cent of the national total. Japan has had 1,141 infections and 45 deaths out of its population of 127 million people, and close to 900 patients have already been discharged from hospital. This figure excludes the Diamond Princess cruise ship that docked in Yokohama last month, where one in five people on board became infected.

In comparison, 334 infections have been reported in the 

South Korean

 capital of Seoul, which has 10 million residents, while 

Singapore

, a city state with 5.6 million people, has more than 500 infections. 

Hong Kong

, with over 7 million residents, has recorded more than 350 cases.

“If I was in 

Spain

 or 

Italy

, where the outbreaks have been much worse and where the medical infrastructure is not as developed as here, then I think I would be more careful,” Shibata said.

In Italy, an estimated 0.1 per cent of the population of 60.5 million – or about 60,000 people – have been infected, with 5,476 deaths, while in Spain, about 0.06 per cent of the 46.66 million population – or 28,572 people – have been infected, with 1,720 people dying.

While many Asian nations are concerned about new cases being imported from overseas, Japan’s borders remain open to some foreign travellers, though Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi on Tuesday said arrivals from 18 European countries and Iran would be turned away, in an expansion of existing restrictions. Japan had already closed its doors to some regions in Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Iran, in addition to the whole of Iceland and San Marino as well as parts of 

China

 and South Korea.

According to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, 12 people have been found to have the virus after arriving at airports and were subsequently quarantined.

Abe agrees to Tokyo 2020 postponement after call with Olympics chief

25 Mar 2020

Experts say Japan’s comparatively low rate of infection may be due to low testing rates – the country carried out 18,322 tests before March 22, compared to almost 348,000 tests for South Korea’s 51 million population.

But Makoto Watanabe, an associate professor of communications at Hokkaido Bunkyo University, said ordinary Japanese people’s belief that they are relatively safe could also be attributed to social and cultural traditions.

People in Japan bow instead of shaking hands, hugging or kissing cheeks, he pointed out, while Japanese wash their hands frequently, shower or bathe daily and typically try to keep a distance between each other.

“It has always been like that in Japan, it’s part of our culture and I believe that perhaps people here act more out of respect for the broader community in which they live and work than elsewhere,” he said.

Thousands of Tokyo residents thronged parks over the past weekend to enjoy the early blooming of the cherry blossoms, while the K-1 kick-boxing organisation held matches before 6,500 fans at the Saitama Super Arena. Many people pack trains to get to work and are still dining out, with most shops and bars operating as usual.

On Monday, Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike sought to dispel some of this complacency by warning that if more people fail to heed calls for “social distancing” she will have no option but to declare a lockdown in the city.

Japan’s cherry blossoms have come early but no one’s around to see them

16 Mar 2020

Koike said the next three weeks are “critical” for whether the city will experience an explosive rise in infections. Part of the problem is that the greater Tokyo region encompasses six other surrounding prefectures and is home to more than 38.1 million people, many of whom travel into the city on a daily basis.

“Depending on developments, it is possible that we may need to take strong measures, such as a so-called lockdown of the city,” Koike said. “We must do our best to avoid that, so I want to ask all of the people of Tokyo for their further cooperation.”

I think citizens are not facing this epidemic with a sense of crisis and the impact of their actions on one another Professor Hiroshi Nishiura

Hitoshi Oshitani, a professor of virology at Tohoku University, said the riskiest environments are those that are enclosed, have low ventilation and draw large crowds, such as the K-1 kick-boxing, while cherry blossom viewing is less risky.

Hiroshi Nishiura, a professor of infectious disease epidemiology at Hokkaido University, warned that large-scale events risk a resurgence of the virus. “If behaviour returns to normal, there could be an explosion of cases like what’s happened in the United States and Europe,” Nishiura wrote in a commentary published on Yahoo Japan. “In particular, once major events have resumed in an endemic area, the outbreak can grow out of control.”

Japanese citizens “are not facing this epidemic with a sense of crisis and the impact of their actions on one another”, Nishiura said.

Coronavirus: Hokkaido ends state of emergency; Japan schools to reopen

20 Mar 2020

While the first wave of infections originating from China was relatively small, Japan faces a more serious threat from explosive outbreaks in Europe and the United States. “We’re expecting that the second wave is much bigger,” Oshitani said.

At the current rate of transmission, experts predict there will be 530 cases in Tokyo by April 8 – although city officials appear to be less optimistic that numbers can be kept that low and have increased the number of hospital beds solely for coronavirus cases to 4,000.

World Bank data shows Japan has about 13 hospital beds per 1,000 people, the highest among the G7 nations and more than triple the rate for Italy and Britain.

Visitors wearing face masks walk under cherry blossoms at Ueno Park in Tokyo. Photo: AP

Watanabe said he was not surprised that people were out enjoying the cherry blossoms as the government had only recommended they stay indoors.

“The recommendations so far are more of a soft ‘code of conduct’ rather than the strict and specific orders that are coming out in Europe,” he said.

“Japanese people are generally obedient and if it had been an official order then they would not have been out, but I also believe that anyone who does go out in these circumstances accepts the responsibility for their actions. They were aware of the risks and would blame no one for their actions.”

Coronavirus: how Japan’s response echoes 1918 Spanish flu guidelines

24 Mar 2020

Kazuhiro Tateda, president of the Japan Association of Infectious Diseases and a member of the panel advising the government on the crisis, agreed that many of the everyday habits of Japanese people may be giving the population a degree of added protection, but he admitted to having some serious concerns.

“We feel at the moment that we are doing quite well with the infection numbers, although we still do not know much about what is going on under the surface,” he said.

“We do not know if supercarriers with no symptoms are walking around, visiting clubs and bars and pubs and spreading it. I worry that it is going to be the younger generation who are going to pass this virus on. For me, that is a very big concern.”

Additional reporting by Park Chan-kyong, Bloomberg, Kyodo and Reuters

Julian Ryall

Julian Ryall never expected to still be in Japan 24 years after he first arrived, but he quickly realised its advantages over his native London. He lives in Yokohama with his wife and children and writes for publications around the world.

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Japan warns against cherry blossom watching parties to contain coronavirus spread

Mar 12, 2020  South China Morning Post

Subscribe to our YouTube channel for free here: https://sc.mp/subscribe-youtube The Japanese government urges people to refrain from ‘hanami’, or traditional cherry blossom watching parties, to contain the spread of coronavirus. Follow us on: Website: https://scmp.com Facebook: https://facebook.com/scmp Twitter: https://twitter.com/scmpnews Instagram: https://instagram.com/scmpnews Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/sout…

Category   News & Politics



South China Morning Post: SCMP – This week in Asia


Confirmed Covid – 19 cases

Based on the WHO’s Covid -19 situation reports

Sources: WHO and health authorities

Cases: 443,554

Deaths: 20,463

Recovered: 105,668

Cases                     Deaths

 Mainland China                              81,285                      3,287

Italy                                                     74,386                     7,503

United States**                                54,381                       734

Spain                                                   47,610                    3,434

Germany                                            31,554                       149

Iran                                                      27,017                    2,077

France                                                 25,233                    1,331

Switzerland                                         9,765                        103

United Kingdom                                9,529                         422

South Korea                                       9,137                        126

Netherlands                                       6,412                        356

Austria                                                5,560                           31

Belgium                                              4,269                         122

Canada                                               3,409                           35

Portugal                                             2,995                           43

Norway                                              2,830                           12

Sweden                                              2,510                           42

Turkey                                                2,433                           59

Australia                                            2,423                             8

Brazil                                                  2,201                           46

Israel                                                 1,930                              3

Malaysia                                           1,796                           20

Denmark                                         1,724                           34

Czech Republic                              1,654                            6

Ireland                                             1,564                            9

Luxembourg                                    1,333                           8

Japan                                               1,271                          45

Ecuador                                            1,211                         29

Chile                                                 1,142                           3

Pakistan                                            1,022                          8

Thailand                                               934                          4

Poland                                                  927                        12

Finland                                                  792                           1

Indonesia                                             790                         58

Greece                                                  743                          20

Diamond Princess*                             712                         10

South Africa                                         709                            0

Russia                                                    658                            1

Iceland                                                  648                             1

Philippines                                           636                           38

Singapore                                             631                             2

Romania                                               576                            13

India                                                      562                            10

Saudi Arabia                                        562                              0

Qatar                                                    526                               0

Colombia                                             470                               4

Panama                                                443                              6

Croatia                                                  442                             1

Slovenia                                               442                              1

Bahrain                                                419                              4

Peru                                                      416                              5

Hong Kong                                          410                              4

Estonia                                                404                              1

Egypt                                                   402                            20

Argentina                                           387                               6

Mexico                                               367                              4

Dominican Republic                        312                              6

Lebanon                                            304                               4

Serbia                                                 303                               2

Iraq                                                     266                              23

Armenia                                             265                                0

Algeria                                                264                              17

New Zealand                                      262                               0

Lithuania                                             255                               2

United Arab Emirates                       248                               2

Bulgaria                                              242                                3

Taiwan                                                235                               2

Hungary                                              226                              10

Slovakia                                              204                                0

Latvia                                                  197                                0

Kuwait                                                191                                0

Uruguay                                             189                                0

Andorra                                              188                                1

Costa Rica                                          177                                2

Tunisia                                                173                                3

Morocco                                            170                                 5

Bosnia and Herzegovina                 164                                 2

San Marino                                        162                               21

Jordan                                                 153                                0

North Macedonia                             148                                2

Albania                                               146                                 5

Vietnam                                              134                                 0

Faroe Islands*                                    132                                 0

Moldova                                              125                                 1

Cyprus                                                  124                                 1

Burkina Faso                                        114                                4

Ukraine                                                 113                                4

Malta                                                     110                                0

Brunei                                                    109                                0

Sri Lanka                                                102                                0

Cambodia                                                96                                0

Azerbaijan                                              87                                 1

Oman                                                       84                                 0

Venezuela                                               84                                 0

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/health-environment/article/3076854/coronavirus-tokyos-cherry-blossoms-bring-thousands

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PBS News, Global National, CNN, DW News, ABC News, TED Talks, The New York Times, and Scientific American

PBS News: March 15 & 16, 2020, and Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

 Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

CNN: Fareed Zakaria – Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

DW News: Coronavirus update – Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders

ABC News: Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency – Four Corners – ABC News In-depth

TED Talks: Adam Kucharski How can we control the coronavirus pandemic?

The New York Times: We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L. By Chris Stanford

Scientific American: Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there By Jane Qiu, and WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar 16, 2020

Mar 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, the novel coronavirus pandemic dominates the U.S., as numbers of cases and deaths continue to climb and cities essentially shut down. Plus: The economic fallout from the outbreak, what epidemiologists mean by “flattening the curve,” the Biden-Sanders debate, Politics Monday, coronavirus threatens Lebanon with another crisis, coping through art and song and more. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 15, 2020

Mar 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 15, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, what you need to know about “social distancing,” how the coronavirus scare is shaping the political playing field, and what’s being done to stop Russia’s interference in U.S. elections. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on leadership in a time of crisis

Mar 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the unique magnitude of the novel coronavirus pandemic, how President Trump is handling the crisis, what the government should do to reassure fearful Americans, and how the outbreak might affect the 2020 Democratic presidential primary race.

Category  News & Politics

Global National: March 15, 2020 | Countries clamp down as coronavirus continues to spread

Mar 15, 2020  Global News

Canadian travellers are scrambling to return home amid the COVID-19 outbreak as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says nothing is ‘off the table” in combating the pandemic in Canada. Abigail Bimman reports on whether those plans could also involve border closures, and Jennifer Johnson reports on how U.S. health authorities are raising the possibility of more country-wide crackdowns. Heather Yourex-West reports on how many Canadian provinces are beginning to enforce tough measures by closing public spaces and schools. Robin Gill reports on a disastrous pipeline explosion in Nigeria and why the COVID-19 pandemic is halting Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s corruption trial. Plus, Mike Le Couteur looks at why hundreds of millions of dollars allocated to support Canadian veterans has not been spent. For more info, please go to http://www.globalnews.ca Subscribe to Global News Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/20fcXDc Like Global News on Facebook HERE: http://bit.ly/255GMJQ Follow Global News on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Toz8mt Follow Global News on Instagram HERE: https://bit.ly/2QZaZIB #GlobalNews #Coronavirus #COVID19

Category  News & Politics

Fareed Zakaria: Crisis brings out the worst in Trump

Mar 15, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria discusses how President Trump is handling coronavirus and America’s well-being in comparison to other countries’ response to the global pandemic. #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus update: Spain on lockdown, Germany shuts borders | DW News

Mar 15, 2020  DW News

Germany joins a growing list of EU countries to at least partially shut out its neighbors. Authorities here have decided to close borders with Switzerland and Austria. That’s according to German media reports. Added restrictions are also being imposed on the French-German boundary. Spain is in lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus Covid-19. Unprecedented lockdowns and border closures are coming into effect in many European countries, and the streets are empty throughout Europe, with Spain and France among the worst hit by the virus’ spread behind Italy. England is planning self-isolation measures for all people over 70, for up to four months. Austria’s Chancellor Sebstian Kurz says his government is banning gatherings of more than five people. Iran’s coronavirus death toll has leapt by 113 in one day to reach 724. And the Vatican says all Easter services will take place without worshipers in attendance. Pope Francis will hold Sunday blessings via TV and the internet. Meanwhile, the United States has tightened its ban on visitors from Europe. President Donald Trump says it will now include travelers from Britain and Ireland. In countries that are far away from coronavirus hotspots, like Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia, the response from authorities has ranged from tough to nonexistent.Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #Covid19 #dwNews

Category  News & Politics

Coronavirus: How the deadly epidemic sparked a global emergency | Four Corners

Feb 24, 2020  ABC News In-depth

It’s likened to a scene from an apocalypse. Wuhan — a city more populous than London or New York — placed in ‘lockdown’ following the outbreak of the new and deadly coronavirus. In China, more than two thousand people have died, with tens of thousands more infected, and authorities are resorting to extreme measures to try to halt the contagion. In interviews filmed on smartphones, Chinese activists and Australians trapped in the lockdown explain what they are going through. Four Corners charts how the outbreak occurred and investigates whether a cover-up by Chinese authorities allowed the virus to spread. _________ Watch more Four Corners investigations here: https://bit.ly/2JbpMkf You can also like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abc4corners/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/4corners And sign up to our newsletter: https://www.abc.net.au/4corners/newsl… _____________

Category  News & Politics

As the threat of COVID-19 continues, infectious disease expert Adam Kucharski answers five key questions about the novel coronavirus, providing necessary perspective on its transmission, how governments have responded and what might need to change about our social behavior to end the pandemic. (This video is excerpted from a 70-minute interview between Kucharski and head of TED Chris Anderson. Listen to the full interview at go.ted.com/adamkucharski.)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Adam Kucharski · Infectious disease scientist

Adam Kucharski is working to understand how epidemics spread — and how they can be controlled.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

MORE RESOURCES

BOOK

The Rules of Contagion: Why Things Spread — and Why They Stop Hardcover

Adam Kucharski

Basic Books (2020)

The New York Times                                nytimes.com

Morning Briefing

Monday, March 16, 2020 | View in browser
Good morning.
We’re covering the latest in the coronavirus pandemic, a potential pardon for the former national security adviser Michael Flynn, and a new labor deal in the N.F.L.
 

By Chris Stanford

Chelsea Market in Manhattan on Sunday. Restaurants and bars were ordered closed in several parts of the U.S.  Jose A. Alvarado Jr. for The New York Times
Americans are urged to ‘hunker down’
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that no gatherings of 50 people or more be held in the U.S. for the next two months, one of the federal government’s most sweeping efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
“For a while, life is not going to be the way it used to be in the United States,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on Sunday. “We have to just accept that if we want to do what’s best for the American public.”
Here are the latest updates on the outbreak and maps of where the virus has spread.
In other developments:
? New York City’s public school system, the largest in the country, will be closed starting today. The city has also ordered a shutdown of tens of thousands of bars and restaurants, except for delivery and pickup services.
To ease a bottleneck in coronavirus testing, federal officials are setting up more drive-through centers and increasing commercial laboratories’ ability to process multiple samples at once.
? The Trump administration tried to persuade a German company that is developing a possible vaccine to move its work to the U.S., German officials said, raising fears in Berlin that any inoculation would be available first — and perhaps exclusively — in the U.S.
? Italy, the hardest-hit country outside China, reported a death toll of 1,809, a 25 percent increase over the day before. In a communal effort to lift the mood, Italians stuck in their homes have been breaking out in song. “It’s not like we’re maestros,” a woman in Rome said, but “it’s a moment of joy in this moment of anxiety.”
? As part of restrictions across Europe, Germany will close its borders with several neighbors.
? A Tennessee man who became a subject of national scorn after stockpiling more than 17,000 bottles of hand sanitizer donated the supplies. The state has begun a price-gouging investigation.
? Movie theaters had their worst weekend in two decades. Domestic ticket sales totaled $55.3 million, a 44 percent drop from the previous weekend.
What to know: Here’s how to practice social distancing and clean your phone. The Times is providing free access to much of our coverage, and our Coronavirus Briefing newsletter, like all of our newsletters, is free.
Another angle: On a special episode of “The Daily,” a magazine writer for The Times reflects on interviewing Tom Hanks last fall — and on the generosity he showed her in a difficult personal moment. The story is a reminder that “contagion is real, but it doesn’t just work for viruses,” our writer said. “It works for kind words and generous thoughts, and acts of selflessness and honesty.” Listen here.
Fed cuts rates to near zero
The Federal Reserve on Sunday cut its benchmark interest rate by a full percentage point and said it would inject hundreds of billions of dollars into the U.S. economy, making an aggressive effort to address the economic fallout from the coronavirus outbreak.
If the measures remind you of the 2008 global financial crisis, you’re not alone, our senior economics correspondent writes.
Global markets fell today. Here’s the latest.
“The Daily”: Today’s episode is about the financial system’s response to the pandemic.
Related: Retailers, dairy farmers and meat producers say the U.S. food supply chain remains intact and has been ramping up to meet pandemic stockpiling.
Another angle: As the outbreak forces the cancellation of trips, nights out and large gatherings, economic damage is mounting. “Last week, I would have told you nothing had changed,” a California real estate agent said. “This week, it has all gone to hell.”  
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders bumped elbows rather than shaking hands before Sunday’s debate.  Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Democrats debate pandemic, and each other
Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders called on Sunday for far more aggressive government action against the coronavirus and its economic effects, during their first one-on-one debate of the Democratic primary race.
The shadow of the pandemic loomed over the event, which was held without a live audience and with a six-foot distance between the candidates, following guidelines for social distancing.
Mr. Biden committed for the first time to selecting a female running mate, and Mr. Sanders said that “in all likelihood” he would do so as well. Here are six takeaways from the debate. We also fact-checked some of the candidates’ remarks.
Perspective: Writers from our Opinion section ranked the performances.
What’s next: Polls suggest that Mr. Biden is likely to win the four states with primaries on Tuesday: Arizona, Florida, Illinois and Ohio. Georgia, which had been scheduled to vote March 24, postponed its primary for two months because of the coronavirus.
Go deeper: The Times Magazine looks at Mr. Sanders’s campaign. “Even as the two-man race has taken a more pugilistic turn while the economy reels and a pandemic sweeps the globe, Sanders has remained steadfast in his willingness to let the Democratic voters judge him by his democratic-socialist vision of what America should be. And so, it would seem, they have.”
Thank you
Mark Josephson and Eleanor Stanford provided the break from the news. Shira Ovide wrote today’s Back Story. You can reach the team at briefing@nytimes.com.

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How China’s “Bat Woman” Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Wuhan-based virologist Shi Zhengli has identified dozens of deadly SARS-like viruses in bat caves, and she warns there are more out there

     By Jane Qiu on March 11, 2020 

How China's "Bat Woman" Hunted Down Viruses from SARS to the New Coronavirus

Shi Zhengli, known as China’s “bat woman” for her virus-hunting expeditions in bat caves, releases a fruit bat after taking blood and swab samples from it. Credit: Wuhan Institute of Virology

BEIJING—The mysterious patient samples arrived at Wuhan Institute of Virology at 7 P.M. on December 30, 2019. Moments later, Shi Zhengli’s cell phone rang. It was her boss, the institute’s director. The Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention had detected a novel coronavirus in two hospital patients with atypical pneumonia, and it wanted Shi’s renowned laboratory to investigate. If the finding was confirmed, the new pathogen could pose a serious public health threat—because it belonged to the same family of bat-borne viruses as the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that plagued 8,100 people and killed nearly 800 of them between 2002 and 2003. “Drop whatever you are doing and deal with it now,” she recalls the director saying.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-chinas-bat-woman-hunted-down-viruses-from-sars-to-the-new-coronavirus1/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=health&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-03-16_featured-this-week&spMailingID=64310566&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1841993808&spReportId=MTg0MTk5MzgwOAS2

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

The virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe, but actions can still limit its impact

     By Helen BranswellAndrew JosephSTAT on March 11, 2020

WHO Declares the Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

Coronavirus illustration. Credit: Dowell Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, acknowledging what has seemed clear for some time—the virus will likely spread to all countries on the globe.

Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the situation will worsen.

“We expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher,” said Tedros, as the director general is known.

As of Wednesday, 114 countries have reported that 118,000 have contracted Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, known as SARS-CoV2. In the United States, where for weeks state and local laboratories could not test for the virus, just over 1,000 cases have been diagnosed and 29 people have died. But authorities here warn continuing limits on testing mean the full scale of spread in this country is not yet known.

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Read more from this special report:

The New Coronavirus Outbreak: What We Know So Far

The virus causes mild respiratory infections in about 80% of those infected, though about half will have pneumonia. Another 15% develop severe illness and 5% need critical care.

For more information please visit the following:

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/who-declares-the-coronavirus-outbreak-a-pandemic/

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