Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 19

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Chinese guardian figure beside a gate in Wat Pho

“The temple grounds contain 91 small chedis (stupas or mounds), four great chedis, two belfries, a bot (central shrine), a number of viharas (halls) and other buildings such as pavilions, as well as gardens and a small temple museum. Architecturally the chedis and buildings in the complex are different in style and sizes.[19] A number of large Chinese statues, some of which depict Europeans, are also found within the complex guarding the gates of the perimeter walls as well as other gates within the compound. These stone statues were originally imported as ballast on ships trading with China.[19]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho was also intended to serve as a place of education for the general public. To this end a pictorial encyclopedia was engraved on granite slabs covering eight subject areas, namely history, medicine, health, custom, literature, proverbs, lexicography, and the Buddhist religion.[20][24]

“These plaques, inscribed with texts and illustration on medicine, Thai traditional massage, and other subjects, are placed around the temple,[25] for example, within the Sala Rai or satellite open pavilions. Dotted around the complex are 24 small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand, and one, called the Contorting Hermit Hill, contains some statues showing methods of massage and yoga positions.[19][24]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

 Fish pond in small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

Chinese guardian figure beside a gate in Wat Pho

 

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

Fish pond in small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Reclining Buddha of Wat Pho

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“One of the most famous and impressive temples in Bangkok is Wat Pho. Also known as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha for the 46-meter long Buddha image it houses, it’s a must-see attraction when visiting the Thai capital.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://blogs.transparent.com/thai/wat-pho-temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

 

The Reclining Buddha, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimon Mangkhalaram Ratchaworamahawihan, more commonly referred to as Wat Pho, is one of the six temples in Thailand that are of the highest grade of first class Royal temples. Wat Pho serves as home to the massive 46-meter long reclining Buddha image, the size of which must be experienced in person as it is simply breathtaking. The amazing feeling of taking in the sight of the enormous golden figure of the ‘enlightened one’ cannot be explained with words, and even more rarely captured in photos due to its massive size. You have to visit this amazing site to see it for yourself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://yourthaiguide.com/temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

 “The Reclining Buddha, Wat Pho, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Reclining Buddha standing at 15 meters tall and stretching 46 meters in length, it barely fits in the building.

The Buddha’s feet are 3 x 4.5 meters and are decorated in shiny mother-of-pearl. They also display the 108 auspicious characteristics of Buddha.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://blogs.transparent.com/thai/wat-pho-temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

The Reclining Buddha of Wat Pho

 

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Wat Pho , also spelt Wat Po, is a Buddhist temple complex in the Phra Nakhon District, Bangkok, Thailand. It is on Rattanakosin Island, directly south of the Grand Palace.[2] Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn[1]Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimonmangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan;  The more commonly known name, Wat Pho, is a contraction of its older name Wat Photaram .[4]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Phra Mondop or the ho trai is the Scripture Hall containing a small library of Buddhist scriptures. The building is not generally open to the public as the scriptures, which are inscribed on palm leaves, need to be kept in a controlled environment for preservation.[36] The library was built by King Rama III. Guarding its entrance are figures called Yak Wat Pho (Wat Pho’s Giants) placed in niches beside the gates.[37] Around Phra Mondop are three pavilions with mural paintings of the beginning of Ramayana.

 

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

The temple is first on the list of six temples in Thailand classed as the highest grade of the first-class royal temples.[5][6] It is associated with King Rama I who rebuilt the temple complex on an earlier temple site, and became his main temple where some of his ashes are enshrined.[7] The temple was later expanded and extensively renovated by Rama III. The temple complex houses the largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand, including a 46 m long reclining Buddha. The temple is considered the earliest centre for public education in Thailand, and the marble illustrations and inscriptions placed in the temple for public instructions has been recognised by UNESCO in its Memory of the World Programme. It houses a school of Thai medicine, and is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage which is still taught and practiced at the temple.[8]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mural at The Reclining Buddha Temple, Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho is open every day from 8am until 6:30pm.

Admission Price: 100 Baht per person (free entry for children under 120 centimeters).

Things you should be aware of when visiting the Wat Pho:

  • Respectful attire is required. Wat Pho is a functioning Thai Buddhist temple, and a such the management insists that visitors dress in a respectful manner. This means that men must wear long pants and short-sleeved or long-sleeved shirts (no tank tops or sleeveless shirts). Women must wear skirts or pants extending at least to the knee, and also should not wear a top that reveals bare shoulders.
  • Visitors are allowed to take photographs in any area of the complex.
  • It is recommended that you wear shoes that can be easily removed as you’ll need to take them off when entering any structure in the complex.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://yourthaiguide.com/temple-of-the-reclining-buddha/

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 18

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

 

“Wat Pho, also spelt Wat Po, is a Buddhist temple complex in the Phra Nakhon District, Bangkok, Thailand. It is on Rattanakosin Island, directly south of the Grand Palace.[2] Known also as the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, its official name is Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn[1] Wat Phra Chettuphon Wimonmangkhlaram Ratchaworamahawihan; IPA: The more commonly known name, Wat Pho, is a contraction of its older name Wat Photaram (Wat Photharam).[4]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

“Wat Pho: The temple is first on the list of six temples in Thailand classed as the highest grade of the first-class royal temples.[5][6] It is associated with King Rama I who rebuilt the temple complex on an earlier temple site, and became his main temple where some of his ashes are enshrined.[7] The temple was later expanded and extensively renovated by Rama III. The temple complex houses the largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand, including a 46 m long reclining Buddha. The temple is considered the earliest centre for public education in Thailand, and the marble illustrations and inscriptions placed in the temple for public instructions has been recognised by UNESCO in its Memory of the World Programme. It houses a school of Thai medicine, and is also known as the birthplace of traditional Thai massage which is still taught and practiced at the temple.[8]

“Wat Pho is one of Bangkok’s oldest temples. It existed before Bangkok was established as the capital by King Rama I. It was originally named Wat Photaram or Podharam, from which the name Wat Pho is derived.[4][9] The name refers the monastery of the Bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya, India where Buddha is believed to have attained enlightenment.[6][10] The older temple is thought to have been built or expanded during the reign of King Phetracha (1688–1703), but date and founder unknown.[6][11] The southern section of Wat Pho used to be occupied by part of a French Star fort that was demolished by King Phetracha after the 1688 Siege of Bangkok.[12]

 

“After the fall of Ayutthaya to the Burmese, King Taksin moved the capital to Thonburi where he located his palace beside Wat Arun on the opposite side of the river from Wat Pho. The proximity of Wat Pho to this royal palace elevated it to the status of a wat luang (royal monastery).[6]

 

“In 1782, King Rama I moved the capital from Thonburi across the river to Bangkok and built the Grand Palace adjacent to Wat Pho. In 1788, he ordered the construction and renovation at the old temple site of Wat Pho, which had by then become dilapidated.[1] The site, which was marshy and uneven, was drained and filled in before construction began.”

 

 “Wat Pho: During its construction Rama I also initiated a project to remove Buddha images from abandoned temples in Ayutthaya, Sukhothai, as well other sites in Thailand, and many of these Buddha images were kept at Wat Pho.[13] These include the remnants of an enormous Buddha image from Ayuthaya‘s Wat Phra Si Sanphet destroyed by the Burmese in 1767, and these were incorporated into a chedi in the complex.[14] The rebuilding took over seven years to complete. In 1801, twelve years after work began, the new temple complex was renamed Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklavas in reference to the vihara of Jetavana, and it became the main temple for Rama I.[15][16]

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“The complex underwent significant changes in the next 260 years, particularly during the reign of Rama III (1824-1851 CE). In 1832, King Rama III began renovating and enlarging the temple complex, a process that took 16 years and seven months to complete. The ground of the temple complex was expanded to 22 acres, and most of the structures now present in Wat Pho were either built or rebuilt in this period, including the chapel of the reclining Buddha. He also turned the temple complex into a public center of learning by decorating the walls of the buildings with diagrams and inscriptions on various subjects.[9]:90 ] On 21 February 2008, these marble illustrations and inscriptions was registered in the Memory of the World Programme launched by UNESCO to promote, preserve and propagate the wisdom of the world heritage.[17][18]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

 

“Wat Pho is regarded as Thailand’s first university and a center for traditional Thai massage. It served as a medical teaching center in the mid-19th century before the advent of modern medicine, and the temple remains a center for traditional medicine today where a private school for Thai medicine founded in 1957 still operates.[19][20]

 

“The name of the complex was changed again to Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm during the reign of King Rama IV.[1] Apart from the construction of a fourth great chedi and minor modifications by Rama IV, there had been no significant changes to Wat Pho since. Repair work, however, is a continuing process, often funded by devotees of the temple. The temple was restored again in 1982 before the Bangkok Bicentennial Celebration.[21]

 

“The Temple complex

Phra Mondop of Wat Pho. Beside its entrances are statues of Yak Wat Pho.

Wat Pho is one of the largest and oldest wats in Bangkok with an area of 50 rai, 80,000 square metres,[22] and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images, as well as one of the largest single Buddha images at 150 feet (46 m) in length.[23]

 

“The Wat Pho complex consists of two walled compounds bisected by Chetuphon Road running in the east–west direction. The larger northern walled compound, the phutthawat, is the part open to visitors and contains the finest buildings dedicated to the Buddha, including the bot with its four directional viharn, and the temple housing the reclining Buddha.[15] The southern compound, the sankhawat, contains the residential quarters of the monks and a school. The perimeter wall of the main temple complex has sixteen gates, two of which serve as entrances for the public (one on Chetuphon Road, the other near the northwest corner).[10]

 

“The temple grounds contain 91 small chedis (stupas or mounds), four great chedis, two belfries, a bot (central shrine), a number of viharas (halls) and other buildings such as pavilions, as well as gardens and a small temple museum. Architecturally the chedis and buildings in the complex are different in style and sizes.[19] A number of large Chinese statues, some of which depict Europeans, are also found within the complex guarding the gates of the perimeter walls as well as other gates within the compound. These stone statues were originally imported as ballast on ships trading with China.[19]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Wat Pho was also intended to serve as a place of education for the general public. To this end a pictorial encyclopedia was engraved on granite slabs covering eight subject areas, namely history, medicine, health, custom, literature, proverbs, lexicography, and the Buddhist religion.[20][24]

“These plaques, inscribed with texts and illustration on medicine, Thai traditional massage, and other subjects, are placed around the temple,[25] for example, within the Sala Rai or satellite open pavilions. Dotted around the complex are 24 small rock gardens (Khao Mor) illustrating rock formations of Thailand, and one, called the Contorting Hermit Hill, contains some statues showing methods of massage and yoga positions.[19][24]

 

“There are also drawings of constellations on the wall of the library, inscriptions on local administration, as well as paintings of folk tales and animal husbandry.[20]

 

“Phra Ubosot (Phra Uposatha) or bot is the ordination hall, the main hall used for performing Buddhist rituals, and the most sacred building of the complex. It was constructed by King Rama I in the Ayuthaya style, and later enlarged and reconstructed in the Rattanakosin style by Rama III. The bot was dedicated in 1791, before the rebuilding of Wat Pho was completed.[26] This building is raised on a marble platform, and the ubosot lies in the center of courtyard enclosed by a double cloister (Phra Rabiang).”

“Inside the ubosot is a gold and crystal three-tiered pedestal topped with a gilded Buddha made of a gold-copper alloy, and over the statue is a nine-tiered umbrella representing the authority of Thailand.[19] The Buddha image, known as Phra Buddha Theva Patimakorn and thought to be from the Ayutthaya period, was moved here by Rama I from Wat Sala Si Na (now called Wat Khuhasawan) in Thonburi.[27][28]

 

“Rama IV later placed some ashes of Rama I under the pedestal of the Buddha image so that the public may pay homage to both Rama I and the Buddha at the same time. There are also ten images of Buddha’s disciples in the hall; Moggalana is located to the left of Buddha and Sariputta to the right, with eight Arahants below.[1][29]

 

“The exterior balustrade surrounding the main hall has around 150 depictions in stone of the epic, Ramakien, the ultimate message of which is transcendence from secular to spiritual dimensions.[10]

“The stone panels were recovered from a temple in Ayuthaya. The ubosot is enclosed by a low wall called kamphaeng kaew,[30] which is punctuated by gateways guarded by mythological lions, as well as eight structures that house the bai sema stone markers that delineate the sacred space of the bot.”

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Phra Rabiang – This double cloister contains around 400 images of Buddha from northern Thailand selected out of the 1,200 originally brought by King Rama I.[10] Of these Buddha images, 150 are located on the inner side of the double cloister, another 244 images are on the outer side.[29] These Buddha figures, some standing and some seated, are evenly mounted on matching gilded pedestals. These images are from different periods in Thai history, such as the Chiangsaen, Sukhothai, U-Thong, and Ayutthaya eras, but they were renovated by Rama I and covered with stucco and gold leaves to make them look similar.[29]

 

“The Phra Rabiang is intersected by four viharns. The viharn in the east contains an 8 metre tall standing Buddha, the Buddha Lokanatha, originally from Ayutthaya. In its antechamber is Buddha Maravichai, sitting under a bodhi tree, originally from Sawankhalok of the late Sukhothai period.”

 

“The one on the west has a seated Buddha sheltered by a naga, the Buddha Chinnasri, while the Buddha on the south, the Buddha Chinnaraja, has five disciples seated in front listening to his first sermon. Both Buddhas were brought from Sukhothai by Rama I. The Buddha in the north viharn called Buddha Palilai was cast in the reign of Rama I.[29] The viharn on the west also contains a small museum.[31]

“Phra Prang – There are four towers, or phra prang, at each corner of the courtyard around the bot. Each of the towers is tiled with marbles and contains four Khmer-style statues which are the guardian divinities of the Four Cardinal Points.[32]

“Phra Maha Chedi Si Rajakarn

This is a group of four large stupas, each 42 metres high. These four chedis are dedicated to the first four Chakri kings.[8] The first, in green mosaic tiles, was constructed by Rama I to house the remnants of the great Buddha from Ayuthaya, which was scorched to remove its gold covering by the Burmese. Two more were built by Rama III, one in white tiles to hold the ashes of his father Rama II, another in yellow for himself. A fourth in blue was built by Rama IV who then enclosed the four chedis leaving no space for more to be built.[33]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Viharn Phranorn

The viharn or wihan contains the reclining Buddha and was constructed in the reign of Rama III emulating the Ayutthaya-style. The interior is decorated with panels of mural.[34]

Adjacent to this building is a small raised garden (Missakawan Park) with a Chinese-style pavilion; the centrepiece of the garden is a bodhi tree which was propagated from the Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi tree in Sri Lanka that is believed to have originally came from a tree in India where Buddha sat while awaiting enlightenment.[35]

 

Phra Mondop

“Phra Mondop or the ho trai is the Scripture Hall containing a small library of Buddhist scriptures. The building is not generally open to the public as the scriptures, which are inscribed on palm leaves, need to be kept in a controlled environment for preservation.[36] The library was built by King Rama III. Guarding its entrance are figures called Yak Wat Pho (Wat Pho’s Giants) placed in niches beside the gates.[37] Around Phra Mondop are three pavilions with mural paintings of the beginning of Ramayana.”

“Phra Chedi Rai – Outside the Phra Rabiang cloisters are dotted many smaller chedis, called Phra Chedi Rai. Seventy-one of these small chedis were built by Rama III, each five metres in height. There are also four groups of five chedis that shared a single base built by Rama I, one on each corner outside the cloister.[38] The 71 chedis of smaller size contain the ashes of the royal family, and 20 slightly larger ones clustered in groups of five contain the relics of Buddha.[19]

 

“Sala Karn Parien – This hall is next to the Phra Mondop at the southwest corner of the compound, and is thought to date from the Ayutthaya period. It serves as a learning and meditation hall.[39] The building contains the original Buddha image from the bot which was moved to make way for the Buddha image currently in the bot.[26] Next to it is a garden called The Crocodile Pond.”

 

“Sala Rai – There are 16 satellite pavilions, most of them placed around the edge of the compound, and murals depicting the life of Buddha may be found in some of these. Two of these are the medical pavilions between Phra Maha Chedi Si Ratchakarn and the main chapel. The north medicine pavilion contains Thai traditional massage inscriptions with 32 drawings of massage positions on the walls while the one to the south has a collection of inscriptions on guardian angel that protects the newborn.[40]

 

“Phra Viharn Kod – This is the gallery which consists of four viharas, one on each corner outside the Phra Rabiang.[41][42]

Tamnak Wasukri – Also called the poet’s house, this is the former residence of Prince Patriarch Paramanujita Jinorasa, a Thai poet.[43] This building is in the living quarters of the monks in the southern compound and is open once a year on his birthday.”

“Tamnak Wasukri – Also called the poet’s house, this is the former residence of Prince Patriarch Paramanujita Jinorasa, a Thai poet.[43] This building is in the living quarters of the monks in the southern compound and is open once a year on his birthday.”

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Po, Bangkok, Thailand on Thursday, July 13, 2017

“Thai massage

The temple is considered the first public university of Thailand, teaching students in the fields of religion, science, and literature through murals and sculptures.[8] A school for traditional medicine and massage was established at the temple in 1955, and now offers four courses in Thai medicine: Thai pharmacy, Thai medical practice, Thai midwifery, and Thai massage.[47]

 

“This, the Wat Pho Thai Traditional Medical and Massage School, is the first school of Thai medicine approved by the Thai Ministry of Education, and one of the earliest massage schools. It remains the national headquarters and the center of education of traditional Thai medicine and massage to this day.”

“Courses on Thai massage are held in Wat Pho, and these may last a few weeks to a year.[19] Two pavilions at the eastern edge of the Wat Pho compound are used as classrooms for practising Thai traditional massage and herbal massage, and visitors can received massage treatment here for a fee.[48][49] Foreigners from 135 countries have studied Thai massage at Wat Po.[50]

There are many medical inscriptions and illustrations placed in various buildings around the temple complex, some of which serve as instructions for Thai massage therapists, particularly those in the north medical pavilion.[51]

 

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Among these are 60 inscribed plaques, 30 each for the front and back of human body, showing pressure points used in traditional Thai massage. These therapeutic points and energy pathways, known as sen, are engraved on the human figures, with explanations given on the walls next to the plaques.[52] They are based on the principle of energy flow similar to that of Chinese acupuncture. The understanding so far is that the figures represent relationships between anatomical locations and effects produced by massage treatment at those locations, but full research on the diagrams has yet to be completed.[53]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Pho

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 17

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Street Art in Pathum Thani and Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Pathum Thani is one of the central provinces (changwat) of Thailand. Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Ayutthaya, Saraburi, Nakhon Nayok, Chachoengsao, Bangkok, and Nonthaburi.

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The province is north of Bangkok and is part of the Bangkok metropolitan area. In many places the boundary between the two provinces is not noticeable as both sides of the boundary are equally urbanized. Pathum Thani town is the administrative seat, but Ban Rangsit, seat of Thanyaburi District, is the largest populated place in the province.[2]

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Pathum Thani is an old province, heavily populated by the Mon people, dotted with 186 temples and parks. The Dream World amusement park is here

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Academic institutes

National Science Museum, Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok University, Eastern Asia University, Pathumthani University, Rajamangala University of Technology, Rangsit University, Shinawatra University, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, and Thammasat University (Rangsit Center)”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

 Street Art in Pahtum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

 “Education and technology

Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Research bodies

Thailand Science Park, National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Thai Microelectronics Center (TMEC), Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research (TISTR), TOT Innovation Institute (TOT)”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Education and technology

“Pathum Thani has a very high concentration of higher education institutions, especially ones in the field of science and technology. This, together with a large number of industrial parks and research facilities (including those in Thailand Science Park), make the region the educational and technology hub of the area.

Industrial parks

Software Park Thailand (in Nonthaburi, southwest of Pathum Thani), Nava Nakorn Industrial Promotion Zone (1376 acres / 5.6 km²), Bangkadi Industrial Park (470 acres / 1.9 km²), Techno Thani (a “Technology City” administered by the Ministry of Science and Technology), and a number of industrial parks in neighboring Ayutthaya and Nonthaburi Provinces”

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

“Pathum Thani is one of the central provinces (changwat) of Thailand. Neighboring provinces are (from north clockwise) Ayutthaya, Saraburi, Nakhon Nayok, Chachoengsao, Bangkok, and Nonthaburi.

The province is north of Bangkok and is part of the Bangkok metropolitan area. In many places the boundary between the two provinces is not noticeable as both sides of the boundary are equally urbanized. Pathum Thani town is the administrative seat, but Ban Rangsit, seat of Thanyaburi District, is the largest populated place in the province.[2]

Pathum Thani is an old province, heavily populated by the Mon people, dotted with 186 temples and parks. The Dream World amusement park is here.

Geography

The province lies on the low alluvial flats of the Chao Phraya River that flows through the capital. Many canals (khlongs) cross the province and feed the rice paddies.

History

The city dates back to a settlement founded by Mon migrating from Mottama  in Myanmar around 1650. The original name was “Sam Khok”.[3]:230,369 In 1815 King Rama II visited the city and the citizens offered him many lotus flowers, which prompted the king to rename the city “Pathum Thani”, meaning “the lotus flower town”.[4]

Symbols

The provincial seal shows a pink lotus flower with two rice stalks bending over it, representing the fertility of the province. The provincial tree is the Indian coral tree (Erythrina variegata). The provincial flower is the lotus (Nymphaea lotus).

Administrative divisions

The province is divided into seven districts (amphoe). The districts are further subdivided into 60 communes (tambon) and 529 villages (muban).

  1. Mueang Pathum Thani
  2. Khlong Luang
  3. Thanyaburi
  4. Nong Suea
  1. Lat Lum Kaeo
  2. Lam Luk Ka
  3. Sam Khok

For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathum_Thani_Province

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Silpakorn UniversityMahawitthayalai Sinlapakon is a national university in Thailand. The university was founded in Bangkok in 1943 by Italian-born art professor Corrado Feroci, who took the Thai name Silpa Bhirasri when he became a Thai citizen. It began as a fine arts university and now includes many other faculties as well. In 2016, it has 25,210 students.[4]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

History: Silpakorn University was originally established as the School of Fine Arts under Thailand’s Fine Arts Department in 1933. The school offered the only painting and sculpture programs and waived tuition fees for government officials and students. Its creation owes much to the almost lifetime devotion of Professor Silpa Bhirasri, an Italian sculptor (formerly Corrado Feroci) who was commissioned during the reign of King Rama VI to work in the Fine Arts Department. He subsequently enlarged his classes to include greater members of the interested public before setting up the School of Fine Arts. The school gradually developed and was officially accorded a new status and named Silpakorn University on 12 October 1943.[2] Its inaugural faculty was the Faculty of Painting and Sculpture. In 1955, the Faculty of Thai Architecture was established, later named the Faculty of Architecture) and two more faculties were created, the Faculty of Archaeology and the Faculty of Decorative Arts.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

In 1966, Silpakorn University diversified the four faculties into sub-specializations to broaden its offerings, but the university’s Wang Tha Phra campus proved inadequate. A new campus, Sanam Chandra Palace, was established in Nakhon Pathom Province in the former residential compound of King Rama VI. The first two faculties based on this campus were the Faculty of Arts in 1968 and the Faculty of Education in 1970. Later, three more faculties were created: the Faculty of Science in 1972, the Faculty of Pharmacy in 1986, and the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology in 1992. In 1999, the Faculty of Music was created.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

 

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

“In 1997, Silpakorn extended its reach by establishing a new campus in Phetchaburi Province. The new campus was named “Phetchaburi Information Technology Campus”. In 2001 and 2002, the Faculty of Animal Sciences and Agricultural Technology and the Faculty of Management Science were established on the Phetchaburi Campus. In 2003, the Faculty of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was established, as well as Silpakorn University International College (SUIC). Its role is to provide an international curriculum in additional fields of study.

Ganesha, one of the Hindu deities symbolizing arts and crafts, is Silpakorn University’s emblem.[1] The “university tree” is the chan tree.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Silapakorn University Art Gallery: Hosin Mahawitthayalai Sinlapakon) is an art gallery and museum in Bangkok, Thailand. It is a building in Silpakorn University Wang Tha Phra Campus on Na Pralarn Road, directly north of the Grand Palace and south of Wat Mahathat Yuwaratrangsarit. It was created in 1994.[1]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

 Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Silpakorn University (also known as the University of Fine Arts) is a National university in Thailand. The university was founded in Bangkok in 1943[2] by Italian-born art professor Corrado Feroci, who took the Thai name Silpa Bhirasri when he became a Thai citizen. It began as a fine arts university and now includes many other faculties as well.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Museums and art galleries in Bangkok

Bang Khun Thien Museum

Bangkok Folk Museum

Bangkok Noi Museum

Bank of Thailand Museum

Children’s Discovery Museum

Museum of Counterfeit Goods

Golden Jubilee Museum of Agriculture

King Prajadhipok Museum

King Rama VI Museum

Museum of Imagery Technology

National Museum Bangkok

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

Street Art in Pathum Thani, Thailand, near Future Park Mall, photos captured on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Museums and art galleries in Bangkok

Plai Nern PalacePrasart MuseumPrincess Maha Chakri    Sirindhorn Anthropology CentreQueen Sirikit GalleryRoyal Barge National MuseumRoyal Elephant National Museum

Royal Thai Air Force Museum

Samphanthawong Museum

Siriraj Medical Museum

Thai Human Imagery Museum

Thai Labour Museum

Thai Philatelic Museum

Science Centre for Education

The Science Museum – Klong Luang

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silpakorn_University_Art_Gallery

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Podstel Hostel Bangkok

is a brand new premium hostel “Poshtel”, that has over 200 beds to offer in over 5 different room types. Located in an upcoming district of Bangkok right by the intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek), the rest of Bangkok city is just at your door step. The hostel itself is within a part of a larger complex called The Bazaar Ratchadaphisek, which comprises of The Bazaar Hotel that accommodates up to 800 rooms, offices, municipal shops, restaurants, a 24 hour supermarket and convenience store, a nightly food street, a full facility gym with a pool, a Muay Thai boxing school, and daily entertainment cabaret and boxing shows at The Bazaar Theater. No doubt this makes The Bazaar a destination in itself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://podstelbangkok.com/

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Which Hindu gods are widely worshiped in Thailand? Why?

Nasa Saze, I am a scientist

Answered Jan 16 2016

Thailand adopt worshipping some Hindu gods and goddesses. I think it is true that Brahma is widely worshipped more than Vishnu and Shiva. Brahma is the god of creation that is why people worship him most. Vishnu is the god of protection might be worshiped in specific places. Shiva was mostly worshiped in the old time while Khmer Empire was ruling parts of Thailand, but he is the god of destruction who is not likely to be worshiped. Thais worship only some Hindu gods or goddesses who (they believe) can give their wishes come true. Some certain places may developed their belief to a specific god such as the worshipping of the Brahma at Erawan Shrine in Bangkok. Many hotels in Thailand will have small shrines of Brahma or Vishnu in front of the hotels.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another god who is the son of Shiva, the god Ganesha, is also widely worshiped in many places in Thailand. Thais believe that Ganesha is the god of arts. Everyone who work in the artist field will have the tradition to held ceremonies to pray for this god.”
For more information please visit the following link:                                      https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Goddess of rivers and water, the goddess Ganges, is widely worshiped. Every year Thailand will have the Loy Krathong festival to thank the goddess Ganges. People will make krathong, a floating vessel made from any materials that can float on water with beautiful decorations with flowers and candles and the scent sticks, and then float in rivers, ponds, or reservoirs. This is one of the most famous festival of the year.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Goddess of the Earth, Phra Mae Thorani, is worshiped by everyone or at least some farmers. I am not sure that this goddess exist in Hindu or not, but I believe Thais adopt the idea that there is a holy spirit of the Earth from Hindu. When farmers will start new season of farming, they will pray for this goddess. There is no big statue or shrine of this goddess, but she is very well-known and everywhere. When Thais go to make merit at temples, they will pass the merit to their dead love ones. There will be a ceremony that the monks will chant a montra to pass the merit to spirits of the dead ones. During the chanting, people will pour water from a jar to a container. This is a symbolic ritual to pass the merit to the water. Then the water will be poured under trees or any ground in the temple. People will ask Phra Mae Thorani to pass the merit to the spirits.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

People pouring water to pass the merit

There is a goddess I am not sure she exists in Hindu or not. The goddess of farming, Phra Mae Posop, is widely worshiped by Thai farmers. During the rice farming season, farmers will held a ceremony (or more 2 or 3 ceremonies) to pray for this goddess to ask her for successful farming.
For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“A ceremony to worship goddess of farming
People in ancient time adopt the idea that their kings are avatars of Vishnu from ancient Khmer Empire. There are some traditions of expressing the king status as semi-divine in the royal ceremonies that are still practicing until now. People in rural area are still worshiping the king as a semi-divine. In modern Thailand, Thai people don’t worship the king like god, instead they think of the king and the royals as celebrities. Some express their respects to the royals as high as the most senior members of their families.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Thailand major religion is Buddhism and there are some minor religions such as Islam, Christian, Sikhism, and Hindu. Some Buddhist ceremonies also adapt Hindu traditions and that makes it the mixed religion tradition. There are some who really believe in these gods. Nowadays, many Thais might not believe that the gods really exist, but they still follow the old traditions to held many ceremonies during a year.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.quora.com/Which-Hindu-gods-are-widely-worshiped-in-Thailand-Why

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“The Deity (God) Brahma In the Hindu Religion

  • Hindus believe that Brahma is the creator of the world and everything in it. He was most respected in the early period.
  • At first, he was only an abstract, without forms, until later that the Brahmans created his appearance to make it easier for people to worship. Thus, he has become the god of four faces and four arms.
  • Brahma has a wife called Sarasvati and has a Hamsa as vehicle.
  • Brahma’s origin has been recorded differently. But in the recent scriptures such as Purana, it is believed that he is born out of Vishnu’s navel. Although Brahma is the creator of the World, he has not actually been much respected. There is not any denomination which respects him in particular; instead he is included in other denominations which respect the other two principal gods.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.thailandsworld.com/en/thai-people/hindu-deities-in-thailand/index.cfm

Religion in Thailand is varied. There is no official state religion in the Thai constitution, which guarantees religious freedom for all Thai citizens, though the king is required by law to be Theravada Buddhist.[1] The main religion practiced in Thailand is Buddhism, but there is a strong undercurrent of Hinduism with its distinct priestly class.[2] The large Thai Chinese population also practices Chinese folk religions, including Taoism. The Yiguandao (Thai: Anuttharatham) spread in Thailand in the 1970s and it has grown so much in recent decades to come into conflict with Buddhism; it is reported that each year 200,000 Thais convert to the religion.[3] Many other people, especially among the Isan ethnic group, practice Tai folk religions. A significant Muslim population, mostly constituted by Thai Malays, is present especially in the southern regions.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Thailand

The Bazaar Area at the PodStel Hotel Complex, Lad Prao Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Podstel Hostel Bangkok

is a brand new premium hostel “Poshtel”, that has over 200 beds to offer in over 5 different room types. Located in an upcoming district of Bangkok right by the intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek), the rest of Bangkok city is just at your door step. The hostel itself is within a part of a larger complex called The Bazaar Ratchadaphisek, which comprises of The Bazaar Hotel that accommodates up to 800 rooms, offices, municipal shops, restaurants, a 24 hour supermarket and convenience store, a nightly food street, a full facility gym with a pool, a Muay Thai boxing school, and daily entertainment cabaret and boxing shows at The Bazaar Theater. No doubt this makes The Bazaar a destination in itself.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://podstelbangkok.com/

Lat Phrao roads intersection of Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Lat Phrao Road or Thailand Route 366 is a major road in Bangkok, Thailand. Despite its name the road does not run through the nearby Lat Phrao District. It begins at Phahonyothin Road in Chatuchak District, passes through Huai Khwang and Wang Thonglang, and ends in Bang Kapi District. The road is serviced by two MRT stations: Phahon Yothin and Lat Phrao.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lat_Phrao_Road

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

“Ratchada is overwhelmingly modern but with a less built-up, more out of town feel than, say, Sukhumvit. Distinctive landmarks along Ratchadaphisek Road include the well-known Thailand Cultural Centre, local nightclubs and pubs, as well as department stores and value-for-money hotels. Located just to the north of the downtown metropolitan area, it runs parallel to Viphavadi Rangsit Road to the east, stretching northwards all the way from the end of Asok Road (Sukumvit Soi 21) to Lad Phrao Road. In recent years it’s gained something of a reputation for being an affordable nightlife spot – although this is more among locals than the expat or holiday crowd. It is extremely well-served by the MRT underground.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/ratchadapisek/#

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Ratchadapisek is situated to the north of metropolitan area. Ratchadapisek Road runs parallel to Viphavadi Rangsit Road from Lad Prao to Sukumvit’s Soi Asoke 21. Ratchadapisek is within the area of the Thai Cultural Center, several leading department stores, and a wide selection of entertainment venues. Transportation access into and out of Bangkok from here is easy and there are good connections to the eastern seaboard. From 6:00 PM onwards, along Silom Road are numerous street bazaars selling everything from cloths, to watches and souvenirs. To complete your entertainment options, there’s a good choice of pubs and restaurants and Patpong is just around the corner. The Chatuchak weekend market is one Bangkok’s most famous markets. It is popular with locals and visitors alike, looking for a bargain from everything such as discount clothes and souvenirs, to ornate Thai handcrafts.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/ratchadapisek/#

The intersection of Ratchadaphisek and Ladprao roads, just steps away from two MRT (subway) stations (Ladprao and Ratchadaphisek)

Ratchadaphisek is north of Sukhumvit and is a busy commercial and entertainment district. Accommodation on Ratchadaphisek Road has great access to restaurants, malls and nightclubs. Lots of students, young Bangkok office workers and expat teachers call this part of the city home.

The subway (MRT) follows Ratchadaphisek Road, making it safe and easy to connect between shops, restaurants and hotels. The two major cultural attractions in the area are Siam Niramit and Thailand Cultural Center. These are great venues for first-time visitors to learn about Thai traditions and art, and the presentation includes enough excitement and special effects to interest children.

Hotels in Ratchadaphisek are large and especially popular with Chinese and Japanese tourists. Prices are affordable in Ratchadaphisek, and since guests have access to the subway they can easily connect to the Grand Palace or the Sukhumvit area easily.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218 “Shopping centers including Lotus, Carrefour and Robinson are located next to the Cultural Center MRT station. The more affordable and more locally-flavored Jusco shopping center is also only a few steps from Thailand Cultural Center MRT. Esplanade is the most popular mall with younger people, featuring an ice-skating rink, cinema complex, mini skate park and several big-chain cafés and restaurants. Behind Esplanade is a dedicated nightclub zone with several large clubs that are busy every night of the week with Bangkok locals. Across the road are Ratchada Soi 4 and Soi 8 – both of which feature many large nightclubs, the most popular called Hollywood.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218

Ratchadaphisek Road, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Ratchadaphisek covers a large area which is mostly residential and gives visitors to Bangkok a good idea about what life is like for locals. Since it’s also where many expats find affordable accommodation there are plenty of facilities geared towards foreigners, with markets (Ratchada Soi 14), the vintage weekend market (Huay Kwang MRT), Esplanade and Robinson shopping complex presenting plenty to do.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.agoda.com/ratchadaphisek/maps/bangkok-th.html?cid=-218

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 16

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao  41, 28 and 27, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“Think of Bangkok as just a gray, concrete jungle? Head over to the historic Bang Rak neighborhood and maybe you’ll think again. Located around the famous Charoen Krung Road and close to the Royal Orchid Sheraton Hotel & Towers, the area has been given a colorful makeover with the BUKRUK Urban Arts Festival earlier this year. This 10-day event saw some of the world’s most talented street artists converge on the city, with numerous building blocks, old houses and walls around the area being transformed into vibrant masterpieces, creating a superb new attraction in Bangkok.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

  Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
“Those traveling to the hotel from the city can catch their first glimpse of the street art next to Saphan Taksin Bridge, the point of transit for many switching from the BTS to river ferry. Look out for the giant duck mural painted on a green background across a giant factory wall. Guests staying at the Royal Orchid Sheraton can use the complimentary boat service from the hotel’s pier to Saphan Taksin (and catch the street art on the way). From there, the BTS Skytrain is just a few steps away, providing quick and easy access to the rest of the city.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“The main collection of street art is best explored on foot; the closest to the Royal Orchid Sheraton can be found just footsteps away from the hotel on Charoen Krung Soi 28, 30 and 32. Start your journey on Soi 28, where you can check out a very Banksy-style mural by Daehyun Kim that appears to look into the side of a building. Hop over to the next alleyway and then onto Soi 32, which is actually where the majority of BUKRUK festival’s artwork can be found. Artists from across Asia and Europe including Bonus TMC, Phai, Lolay, Sabek and Alex Face have all delivered a splash of color, from a cartoon girl holding a rifle, to a mysterious furry creature holding a food basket over its shoulder.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 41, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

“For those wanting to venture a little further afield, more street art from the same project can be found throughout the Bang Rak and surrounding Talad Noi area, which is packed full of charming shop houses, museums and shrines. Perhaps the most colorful example of the street art here is located north up river from the hotel on Song Wat Road: a bright pink mural covering the entire face of a building.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

Talad Noi also has other examples of older street art created by local artists over the years. The artwork takes on a distinct graffiti style, using physical objects on the street (such as windows, pipes and doors) to complete a more dynamic picture. For example, down the alleyway signposted as ‘Trok San Chao Rong Kueak’ – named of the Chinese temple found here –  you’ll find a traditional long boat painted along the length of a wall in bright red. There are also some cool cartoonish scenes from Thai family culture (including children looking through a window with a cute cat jumping up). A lot of these works are reminiscent to some of the iconic pieces found dotted around the colonial streets of Penang or even Phuket’s old town area.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Aside from the street art, the surrounding Talad Noi area is bursting full of galleries, great if you need a break from the heat on your walking tour. Doubling up as a backpackers’ hostel, Speedy Grandma is a cool space on Charoen Krung 28 showcasing local artists’ work in various forms, while MoST Gallery showcases cutting-edge exhibitions over three floors of an old renovated shop house.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Finally, after a long day’s walking tour of Bang Rak’s cool street art scene, it might be time for a refreshing drink. Guests, as well as outside visitors, are welcome at the Sheraton’s luxurious Lobby Lounge, which serves savory bites, sweets, cocktails and soft drinks throughout the day. If you’re arriving a little earlier, the comfortable lounge space serves up afternoon tea from 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m. daily.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.royalorchidsheraton.com/street-art

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“25 August 2017

Underground – and specifically street art – has emerged in Bangkok as a new and vibrant way for artists to share creativity that often contains social or humorous messages.

Alex Face is a prominent street artist whose signature is the ‘baby face’, which was inspired by his daughter as a new-born. Face uses the baby-face symbol as a way of communicating messages about the future.

“I want to represent humans’ next generation. I make them look worried – they worry about the future”, Face explains to Jason Lai.

Street art is moving from the underground to the mainstream in Bangkok, which has just hosted its first street art festival. But not everyone is convinced.

“There is still this image of coarse work, and art work done by uncommitted artists”, explains Fawalai Sirisomphol, an emerging street artist. “For me, I want to do my best so people will understand that street art is beautiful.”

Jason Lai is a musician and conductor with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra who is exploring the arts and culture of Thailand for this series on BBC World News.”

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170825-the-street-art-flourishing-in-bangkok

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Art lovers based in Thailand’s cultural stronghold of Bangkok have certainly noticed that there has been a surge of exhibitions featuring work of successful international street artists. Here are some of the best exhibits in Bangkok for viewing the work of street artists from around the world.

Those unfamiliar with street art might have gotten their first taste at the first international street art festival in Thailand, which takes place in Bangkok every year. BUKRUK, which translates to ‘invasion’, started as a collaboration between 11 Thai and 16 European street artists. The festival was organized by Toot Yung Gallery, Nemo Studio and BKK Arthouse with exhibition areas including the Bangkok Art and Cultural Center and walls around the city center.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Two well-known street artists attended the festival—Patcharapol Tangruen aka ALEX FACE and Danaiphat Lersputtitrakan aka BON. Both have already received international attention for their work, including a successful exhibit at the Frieze London Art Fair in 2013. In addition to showing in London, ALEX FACE has also presented his iconic three-eyed bunny ‘Mardi’ (said to be inspired by his daughter) in Korea and Taiwan.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“ALEX FACE actually studied architecture, but realized he could interact with the public more directly through graffiti. His pieces attempt to express frustration with local problems. Similarly, BON gives attention to a changing society and refers to social and cultural problems with his colorful characters. After his graduation in 2005 his reputation has grown and culminated in his first solo show at the Soy Sauce Factory in Bangkok’s Chinatown. He prepared for the exhibition for two years, creating canvases, installations, etchings and sculptures, transforming street art into work fit for a gallery.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another iconic symbol that can be found on walls in Bangkok is the bear of prominent Thai artist known as BONUS TMC. The artist also recently had his first solo exhibition, titled ‘Animal Planet’ at Goja Gallery. In the Phra Khanong area, an area of Bangkok that’s becoming more artsy by the day, visitors can easily spot BONUS’s work on the street and in galleries. In W District, the reopened Hof Art Space welcomes you with an exhibition showing pieces by Thai and international artists.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 28, Bangkok, Thailand, photos captured on Friday, July 21, 2017
Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“As well as these three renowned Thai artists, there are also international tracks on the city walls. The three French artists that make up BIRDY KIDS have just brought their characteristic paintings in an exhibition at the Badmotel. Another graffiti artist, A.EM., made up of graphic designer Guillaume and print expert Gautier have spread their iconic bird design with several techniques such as graffiti, collage and serigraphy around the world.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Another collaboration of street artists is the Japanese duo DOPPEL. Kohei Yamao aka BAKIBAKI, who is renowned for his traditional Japanese hemp patterns, joined forces with Kontaro OOyama aka MON in 2001. Together they have shown their murals in an exhibition and at least one of their street paintings in Bangkok as they’ve done previously in Japan and locations in Southeast Asia.

This a testament to the idea that street art can connect people with their surroundings, a notion that will continue to inspire galleries around the world.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/bangkok-street-art-from-graffiti-to-the-gallery/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Bangkok recently hosted their first Street Art Festival, inviting artists from around the world to join the best Thai talent to leave their colourful messages around town. Not everyone likes graffiti, but this is a popular art open to everyone and there is no doubt those artists are extremely talented. Unlike museums, street art is visible to everyone, everyday and are here to stay – as long as the old walls used as canvas are left standing. As construction claims more and more of Bangkok, this artwork will one day disappear, but for now it is here to enjoy. During our exploration of Bangkok, we have found several locations exhibiting these oversized painting. The best known set is next to Ratchatewi BTS Station, not far from MBK, and some other artworks are painted along the nearby canal. Another beautiful set is found at the Alliance Française on Sathorn Road.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Exhibition at Alliance Francaise on Sathorn The Street Art Exhibition of Thai artist Alex Face (Patcharapol Tangruen) and French Jace at Alliance Française on Sathorn Road is as discreet as it is unusual. The Alliance Française building has been on Sathorn for ages, since 1912 to be precise, but the Alliance Française (as well as the old French Embassy on the riverside) is due to move to a brand new building currently under construction near Lumpini park. All this explains why the exhibition is unusual and creative… an entire floor of the building has been emptied of all desks, filing cabinets and furniture, and every room has been offered to the two artists to express themselves. Indoor street art inside the abandoned floor of an official building with pieces of discarded desks left in dusty corners? It is beautiful and a bit eerie! Entry is free so you should rush to enjoy this before the Alliance Française moves to its new location and the building torn down. Opening Hours: Closed on Sunday Location: 29 Sathorn Road (next to Banyan Tree Hotel)”
For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Street Art, Bangkok, Thailand

“Bukruk Festival on Phaya Thai Road Bukruk Street Festival (Bukruk meaning ‘Invasion’) united 16 European and 11 Thai artists for a month of frenzy wall art in the very middle of Bangkok. The most striking pieces are painted on a series of abandoned buildings located on Phaya Thai Road, below Ratchatewi BTS station, just a hundred meters from the famous MBK shopping mall. Here again famous Thai artist Alex Face strikes back, with his ‘rabbit falling from the roof’ and a giant mutated fly by Yuree Kensaku, a hairy one eye monster by Pharuephon Mukdasanit, known as Mamafaka, next to a psychedelic dog by Thai artist P7. More murals can be seen along the nearby Saen Saeb canal, in Siam Square or on Rama 6 Road, past the famous Jim Thompson house. The whole thing is extraordinary and proves that Bangkok too contributes to the comtemporary art scene.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/street-art.htm#

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise, the very successful interactive attraction which started in Pattaya, is now open at Esplanade Shopping Mall on Ratchada road. Also refered by locals as the Trickeye Museum or 3D Museum, Art in Paradise is great fun for couples, friends and families to spend a few hilarious hours, especially on rainy days. Esplanade Mall is located on the outskirts of Bangkok, but the MRT station is right in front of the mall. Located on the 4th floor of the rather quiet mall, the new 3D Art in Paradise is a shiny and spotless 2 storey gallery packed with superbly executed paintings in which visitors are invited to be part of dozens of scenes ranging from ‘stairway to hell’, ‘ride a flying carpet’ to the ‘Coronation of the Emperor’.”

 

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise: Distributed in several large rooms, the artwork done by the artists is really impressive and just admiring it is part of the pleasure of visiting. It’s a bit overwhelming at first to see so many intricate scenes in each room with people everywhere trying to find the best or the silliest pose, but soon the game captures you and you will find yourself trying to strike a pose on a surfboard or above a fictional abyss. To help the visitors, markers with arrows have been placed on the floor to indicate the best angle, and if you look in some hard to find corners, you’ll find photos taken by previous visitors that will help you understand which pose works best with each scene.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Art in Paradise: Walking around the rooms of Art in Paradise and finding the right pose takes 2 to 3 hours depending on how much fun you are having and how many friends are with you. There is no particular order to go around and take your photos, there are so many scenes to interact with you can go back and forth as you please, especially when someone monopolizes the scene you really want to be in. Trying to describe all the scene depicted in the gallery would spoil the fun, just know that they are different from the ones displayed in the Pattaya gallery.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

“Art in Paradise: Benefiting from their experience with previous museums, the Korean artists of Art in Paradise did an amazing job at maximising the space and rendering scenes using floor and walls, allowing you to literally step into a frame. On the downside, the protecting varnish used to coat the paintings is so glossy, it reflects everything, lights and people, partly spoiling the effect. For instance if you are walking a (virtual) rickety bridge above an abyss, you shouldn’t see your reflection into the abyss… but you do. Note also the you will need to deposit your shoes at the entrance and pick them up on the way back, tripods are also allowed in the gallery so everyone can be happily part of the frame!
Art in Paradise Bangkok Opening Hours: 10:00 – 22:00 (Ticket Booth closes at 21:00) Location: Esplanade Shopping Mall, 4th floor Address: Ratchadapisek Road, Din Daeng,Din Daeng, Bangkok, Thailand 10400 Tel: +66 2 660 9130 Price Range: 300 baht for adults, 200 for children”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/magazine/art-in-paradise.htm

 “MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

 “Where to find street art in Bangkok

In Street Art, Thailand by Jaclynn SeahMarch 12, 2017

Bangkok is a gritty urban city, and while most visitors are happy to hang out in their myriad markets or shopping malls, many of its little alleyways hide some interesting street art which I had the pleasure of uncovering. I’ve been to Bangkok many times – its proximity to Singapore makes it one of the best weekend trip options – but all I’ve done is mostly shopping and eating – this was the first time I went hunting for street art in Bangkok and I found a surprising number of artworks.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theoccasionaltraveller.com/street-art-bangkok/

“MAKE ART NOT WAR” Street Art in Soi Lad Prao 27, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Spots to find Street Art in Bangkok

RATCHATEWI

This area is not far from Central World mall and easily accessed by BTS – the Ratchatewi station is closest although National Stadium BTS is also fairly near.

BANGRAK

Many of the works from the Bukruk Urban Art Festival 2016 which brought in many foreign street artists can be found here. This stretch is found along the Chao Phraya River between Saphan Taksin and Hua Lamphong BTS stations.

TALAT NOI / CHINATOWN

This area is near the Chinatown and quite a lot more industrial. You’ll find yourself walking by scrap metal shops but look out for interesting art in random alleys.

Chalerma park

Chalerma is a park and playground covered with murals and graffiti and popular among the hipster crowd for getting their OOTD shots. Make sure to check out the tiny lanes in the surrounding area – it’s a small bustling local community and you’ll see some works on the walls amidst people going about their daily lives.

Getting there: exit Ratchatewi BTS station in the direction of VIE hotel. This little park can be seen along the main Phaya Thai road – the entrance is on Si Sirut or Petchaburi 18 Allery just off Phaya Thai.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://theoccasionaltraveller.com/street-art-bangkok/

Go to the top

 

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 15

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

We went for a short walk to the end area of Sukhumvit Road near Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand on August 24,2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Sukhumvit is an exclusive district in Bangkok. It is home to fancy apartments, villas, restaurants, bars and clubs. Popular among foreign visitors and expats, it becomes more and more a Thai residential neighbourhood as you follow the road southeast. Khlong Toei is also dealt with here, which, by contrast, is one of the poorest neighbourhoods of Bangkok.

Sukhumvit Road is not only one of the longest boulevards in Thailand, but one of the longest boulevards in the world. Towards the west end it changes name to Phloen Chit Road and Rama I Road as it enters the Siam Square area, but to the east it runs most of the way to the Cambodian border. The sois are numbered from west to east, with odd numbers north and even numbers south of Sukhumvit Road. The sois on the north and south sides of Sukhumvit don’t line up; for example, Soi 33 is opposite Soi 24. Confusing is that these sois also have names of their own (for example, Soi 55 is better known as Soi Thong Lo) and these sois can also have sois of their own (such as Thong Lo Soi 1). “

For more information please visit the following link:

https://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Sukhumvit

“Looking at the high-rise apartment buildings, the Skytrain and the perennial traffic jam on Sukhumvit Road, it is hard to believe that this area used to consist of rice fields until World War II. After the war, this area became developed with large contemporary villas catering to the upper class. As property values kept rising, developers have been buying more and more land and cashed them in by constructing big apartment high-rises. The construction of the BTS Skytrain in 1999, covering most of Sukhumvit Road, has increased the popularity of this district even more.”

“The lowered-numbered sois (roughly between Soi 1 and 63) are a popular residential area for western expatriates and affluent Thais. It is densely packed with shopping centres, restaurants and hotels. The fleshpots of Nana Entertainment Plaza (in Soi 4) and Soi Cowboy (between Soi 21 and 23) are also in this area, as are plenty of more (and less) salubrious bars. Also, the pavement of Sukhumvit itself has become a huge market carrying everything from luggage to fake Rolex watches, and after midnight they turn into roadside bars and pubs. Sukhumvit offers the best dining in Bangkok, from five-star dining to street stands, the variety of choices and tastes are almost overwhelming. Japanese nationals can be found in the area Soi 21 and upwards, but most tend to congregate around Soi 55. Indians have settled around Soi 12, while Arabs are grouped at Soi 3/1, which informally is known as Soi Arab. After Soi 63, Thais take over again, though this might change when the Skytrain extension is completed in late 2011.”

A nice commercial Mural of Siam Commercial Bank on Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok

We went for a short walk to the end area of Sukhumvit Road near Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand on August 24,2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“South of Sukhumvit’s sois lies Khlong Toei, which, if recognised at all, foreigners only know for the Khlong Toei Market. Khlong Toei is a borough, a market and a port, all named after the canal that flows through the area. It means “canal of pandan” as that plant used to grow along the southern bank of the canal. A large part of it was filled up to make way for Rama IV Road in 1947. South (and under) the Chalerm Maha Nakhon Expressway are the infamous Khlong Toei slums, generally unexplored by even the most adventurous travellers. At the banks of the Chao Phraya river is the Khlong Toei Port, which has a history dating back to the ninth century, when it connected Bangkok with the cities upstream the river. Since 1981, it has lost most of its economic relevance when the larger Laem Chabang Port near Pattaya took over business.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Sukhumvit

“Museums

Garden at Kamthieng House Museum

  • Kamthieng House Museum, 131 Sukhumvit Soi 21 (Asoke Rd) (BTS Asok or MRT Sukhumvit), ? +66 2 661-6470?, [1]. Tu-Sa 09:00-17:00. Ban Kamthieng is a 19th-century Thai stilted teak house where you definitely wouldn’t expect it: right in the middle of Bangkok’s high-rises. It was transported from Chiang Mai in pieces and assembled in Bangkok in 1964 to function as the headquarters of the Siam Society, an organisation that has the goal of preserving the cultural heritage of Thailand. Beside the house itself, on display are traditional tools, arts and crafts used by Lanna farmers and fishermen from northern Thailand in olden times, as well as a large selection of Thai flora in its yard. There is a heavy focus on the cultural heritage of northern Thailand, as that’s where the house and most of the tools on display came from. The only downside of the museum is that it’s quite small, so don’t expect to spend here longer than 30 minutes (or even 15 minutes if you’re quick). 100 baht.”

“Museums

  • Museum of Thai Pharmacy, 40 Sukhumvit Soi 38 (BTS Thong Lo), ? +66 2 391-6243. M-F 10:00-16:00. The museum is on the third floor of the Pharmaceutical Association of Thailand under Royal Patronage Building. It was established to publicise about traditional Thai medicine from past to present, so that later generations would learn and treasure it. The exhibition features various topics, such as the birth of pharmacy, the evolution of oriental pharmacy and basic wisdom, the evolution of western Thai pharmacy and the evolution of herbs and natural products. Make contact in advance if you are visiting with a group. Free.”

“Museums

  • National Science Centre for Education, 928 Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Ekkamai), ? +66 2 391-0544, [2]. Tu-Su 08:30-16:30. This is an exhibition centre about the variety of scientific knowledge. Among the attractions are a planetarium, an aquarium as well as a permanent exhibition on sports science, communication technology and natural environments. One-hour shows at the planetarium start at 11:00 and at 14:30 with additional shows on Saturdays and Sundays at 10:00 and 13:30. 20-40 baht.”  

“Museums

  • Thailand Creative and Design Center, 6F, Emporium, 622 Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Phrom Phong), ? +66 2 664-8448, [3]. Tu-Su 10:30-21:00. There couldn’t have been a better place for this design gallery, at the the Emporium, the most fashionable shopping mall of Bangkok. The TCDC, as abbreviation-loving Bangkokians call it, seeks to show and promote Thailand’s design innovations. There is a permanent exhibition about the question what design actually is, and how it is influenced by factors like society, history, politics, economics, geography and religion. There is also a temporary exhibition that often changes. If you want to enter the resource centre and the library, you can get a free one-day pass. You can only do this once and you must carry your passport with you. Spend the day reading amazing design books, or just using the internet. If you want to visit the resource centre and library again later, you’ll need to pay for a subscription. Free.”

“Parks

  • Benchasiri Park, Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Phrom Phong). 05:00-20:00 daily. This compact park was built to commemorate the 60th birthday of HM Queen Sirikit in 1992. It features a huge sculpture of a commemorative coin illustrating an image of HM Queen Sirikit and 12 pieces of contemporary sculptures including children’s works. Free.”

“Parks

  • Benjakiti Park, Ratchadaphisek Rd (MRT Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre). 05:00-20:00 daily. When the Thailand Tobacco Monopoly moved all its factory operations to Chiang Rai in 2008, the lake and some adjoining land that were part of its compound, previously enjoying semi-wild vegetation, were turned into a public park. Many splendid old rain trees were cut down in order to landscape the park, in which young trees were planted instead. Adjoining the Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre, it is a neat park with dedicated cycling and walking paths, fixed exercise equipment and several monuments. Free.”

“Eat

There is a huge selection of places to eat in and around Sukhumvit and its side sois, although prices tend to be on the high side by Thai standards. With practically every cuisine in the world represented, this is the place to break your pad thai diet and sample some of the best Japanese, Lebanese or Indian food you will ever eat.”

“Café

  • Cataholic Café, Sukhumvit 39, ? 084 269 7945. Cataholic Café is the café that has many cats (about 8-10 cats) to make you enjoy. Cataholic Café is on New Petchburi Road (Sukhumvit 39), Bangkok. Business Hours Tue-Fri: 12.00 am-9.00 pm Sat-Sun: 11.30 am – 9.00 pm Close every Monday. The restaurant is decorated in warm white color with Japanese style , used furniture like wooden tables and colorful soft cushions. The café area is not very wide. It is a small coffee shop but it has becomes one of the most popular café because of their cats service. Before enter to the cafe, you need to wash your hands with alcohol gel to clean and safety of the cat . The important concept is to make customer feel relaxing by playing with cats while you enjoy the dessert. With free Wi-Fi, you can use your camera to take a photo with cats and sharing to social network.”

For more information please visit the following link:                              https://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Sukhumvit

“Café

  • CityLight Coffee, 21/2 Sukhumvit Road Soi 4 (BTS Nana, Exit #2, left on Soi 4), ? 02-0232071, [27]. Tue-Sat 7:30am to 10:30pm. Comfortable and inviting coffee shop in Nana that uses locally sourced 100% arabica beans, Italian equipment, carrot cake, and freshly baked muffins. Some unique cold creations on the menu like the “Sukhumvit Sling” – a remarkable fizzy limeade mixed with market fresh mint leaves and passion fruit. Wall artwork showcases the Bangkok skyline. Live acoustic music most Friday evenings. drinks 45 to 125 baht.”

“Budget

While not as much an institution as in Siam Square, the food courts in any mall or department store are a good option if you’re trying to survive Sukhumvit on budget and want air-conditioning. Just like in Siam Square, food courts come in many varieties, from basic snack places to more upscale dining. The Emporium Mall, Ploenchit Center and Robinson all have decent food courts (see Buy). Most food courts use some variation of a coupon system; unused coupons are always refunded.”

“There are some cheapie sois with excellent street food if you know where to go:

  • Soi 7 Seafood Market, (BTS Nana). Soi 7 is a good option for seafood. About 30 metres down the soi on the right hand side is a group of Thai seafood restaurants. The sitting area looks shared, but actually only the tables in front of the food stalls belong to that restaurant. So in case you liked the food, remember the name of “your” restaurant. Main courses go for about 150 baht, while a cold beer sets you back 65 baht.”

“Talat Na Sukhumvit Soi 1, Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Phloen Chit). Between Soi 1 and Soi 3 is a set of street food stalls with the best one furthest from the street. It is called Oowan Im (literally ‘fatty is full’), but is sign-posted in English with just the word “Seafood” on an otherwise Thai sign. Seafood is their specialty — good things to order include the “crispy fish in chili sauce”, tom yum soup and any of their Thai salads (such as mixed seafood salad). The Chinese-style fried vegetables are also delicious.”

A Mural on Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok

We went for a short walk to the end area of Sukhumvit Road near Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand on August 24,2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Budget restaurants are generally hard to find, but the following are favorites among Bangkok’s large expat population:

  • Ramen Ichiban, 3/7-9 Sukhumvit Soi 24 (BTS Phrom Phong), ? +66 2 258-6314. An authentically Japanese greasy-spoon noodle joint specializing in ramen soup. A bowl or ramen was 120 baht as of September, 2016. 80-150 baht.”

“Took Lae Dee, Nai Lert Bldg, 87 Sukhumvit Soi 5 (Soi 5, up the street ~50 m in the Foodland store), ? +66 2 254-2367, [28]. 24 hours. Took Lae Dae is a Bangkok institution. Imagine a long bar counter, only with chefs and food instead of bartenders and drinks, and a colourful cast of characters thanks to Nana Plaza across the street. The name literally means cheap and good and indeed basic fried rice starts at 40 baht, but the cheap Western dishes, many less than 100 baht, are what makes this place popular. The American breakfast (two eggs, ham, bacon or sausage, fruit juice, toast, coffee) is particularly good value at 47 baht between 06:00-09:00, or 58 baht at any other time. 50-100 baht.”

“Mid-range

Fusion

Thai food with a modern twist has become particularly popular the last years. Fusion restaurants are centred around the H1 complex on Sukhumvit Soi 55 (Soi Thong Lo).

  • Be your Guest’ Café, 24 Sukhumvit Soi 53 (BTS Thong Lo exit 1), ? +66 8 1637-9047, [29]. 11:00-18:00 daily. Delicious diverse cooking experience with dishes from all around the world. Soup, salad, sandwich, mains, as well as a selection of typical French, Thai and fusion food are served. The café also provides a large choice of food for take away and delivery. The Villa is also a three-bedroom guest house in a relaxing tropical garden with private pool. 300 baht.”

“Greyhound Café, 2F, Emporium, 622 Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Phrom Phong), ? +66 2 255-6964(-5), [30]. 10:00-22:00 daily. An extremely modern restaurant of concrete and brushed steel, offering a fusionesque menu of food ranging from authentic Thai to Italian pasta to Elvis burgers. Mains are around 300 baht, although the lunch sets are cheaper. 300 baht.”

Many high rise commercial buildings on Sukhumvit Road

“Minibar Royale, Citadines Bldg, 37/7 Sukhumvit Soi 23 (BTS Thong Lo), ? +66 2 261-5533, [31]. Su-Th 11:00-00:00, F-Sa 11:00-01:00. If you’re looking for a hip New York or Paris-style brasserie, this is definitely the place. The French decor is well done, and service is OK. On the menu are a mix of French and American comfort food. Drink it down with one of their cocktails and you’ll have a fun night out. Prices are at the upper mid-range end. 450 baht.”

“Thyme Bistro & Martini Bar, 1F, Kingston Suites Bldg, 39/3-7 Sukhumvit Soi 15 (BTS Asok), ? +66 2 120-8288, [32]. 06:30-23:00 daily. A brand new restaurant located in Kingston Suites Bangkok, its dishes could be described as “fusion”, as it offers local, international and some popular Mediterranean dishes. The asparagus rolls are recommended, as are the Martinis. 300-400 baht.”

A Mural on Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok

We went for a short walk to the end area of Sukhumvit Road near Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand on August 24,2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Thai

+66 2 391-1762, [33]. 15:00-00:00 daily. This is a lovely garden restaurant with palm trees and fountains. Decent food albeit somewhat pricey. Hidden at the rear is the cool and cosy Groove Kitchen club with funky house music. Compared to the crowded clubs of Sukhumvit, this is definitely a change of pace into a more relaxed jungle atmosphere. 300-700 baht.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Sukhumvit

“Cabbages and Condoms, 6 Sukhumvit Soi 12 (BTS Asok), ? +66 2 229-4610, [34]. 11:00-22:00 daily. Run by Thailand’s Population and Community Development Association, the odd name refers to the fact that the NGO promotes agricultural production as well as condom use; and no prizes for guessing what you’ll get after dinner instead of an after-dinner mint. The food is competent but toned down for the foreign palate. A bit expensive for what you get but it’s for an excellent cause. 300 baht.”

“Check Inn 99 (an Original Bangkok Cabaret Bar), b/w Sois 5 & 7 on Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Nana, tucked away between Soi 5 and 7, look for the white sign with black letters that direct you into a passageway entrance), ? +66 870737989, [35]. 17:00-02:00 daily. Previous reviews said this place was straight out of a James Bond film. However, it’s closer to Rick’s Café in Casablanca and is quite unique as a no hassles old style cabaret style entetainment venue for both couples and singles. Recently it is enjoying cult style following with locals after a recent management change. Check Inn 99 (previously Checkinn Garden) is an oasis amidst the chaos of the Nana area. Good Western and Thai menu, a friendly and attentive staff, and terrific entertainment every night courtesy of three delightful Philippine singers and a gifted accoustic / backing musician. At 20:45, the music starts – often light and relaxed – but the band then gradually wind up the tempo throughout the evening playing to the audience, but is a great place to relax and spend an evening and one of the few bars where there are no girlie hassles. Although not an Aussie Bar – the band perform the best classic Australian Rock from the 70’s-90s you will hear. From Skyhooks,LRB, Aussie Crawl, Cold Chisel, IceHouse to Angels – got to be seen to be believed Happy hour is from 18:00-20:00. The steakhouse style restuarant whilst small is very popular and serves both European and Thai food, the steaks are consistently good. The new style management throw theme parties most Saturdays – so dont be surprised if you come in finding the staff in pajamas or Hawaiian grass skirts. 300-450 Baht no cover charge.”

“Kinnaree, 43 Sukhumvit Soi 8 (BTS Nana), ? +66 2 256-0328, [36]. 11:30-15:00, 18:00-00:00 daily. Very nice Thai ambience and decoration, great in the evening. Lounge bar and private rooms upstairs. The different sets of lunch menus are reasonably priced. The food is excellent and includes dishes hard to find elsewhere. Some dishes could be more spicy by Thai standards though. 200-400 baht.”

“Lemongrass, 5/1 Sukhumvit Soi 24 (BTS Phrom Phong, opposite the Emporium), ? +66 2 258-8637. 18:00-22:00 daily. This is a very good if slightly expat-oriented Thai restaurant. Located in an old tea house, the ambience is very charming and eclectic. The pomelo salad and tom yam kung  are both excellent. As is usual with popular expat places, the spicyness has been toned down somewhat. Also, the service can be a bit hasty. 350-450 baht.”

“Ruen Mallika, 189 Sukhumvit Soi 22 (BTS Phrom Phong, a far hike into Soi 22, take a right at the 7-11 and after about 300 metres it is on your right), ? +66 2 663-3211, [37]. 11:00-23:00 daily. A very good restaurant in an “antique” Thai house with a leafy outdoor section. The menu is a huge picture book which should help in ordering. The staff are very friendly and wear traditional Thai outfits to complete the ambience. 450-650 baht.”

“Horapha Authentic Thai Indian Cuisine, ” (BTS Phrom Phong,), ? +66 20456651, [38]. 11:00- 14:00 18:00-23:00 daily. Horapha Authentic Thai Indian Cuisine use authentic Thai and indian ingredients from Thailand, in a range of exquisite dishes served by our charming and attentive Thai staff. The appeal of Thai and indian cuisine lies in fresh flavours and in featuring some dishes that have a kick of chilli. Diners with a more European taste simply need to ask for their favourite dishes with a less spicy flavour – we will be happy to oblige. 70-250 baht.”

“Asian

Finding your way around the mindblowing variety in Sukhumvit might feel a bit daunting at first. One way to approach the area is to visit its ethnic food neighborhoods. Little Japan is located near Sukhumvit Soi 33 and across the street at Sukhumvit Soi 24, with Phrom Phong BTS station straddling the two. There is also a smaller concentration of Japanese restaurants along Sukhumvit Soi 55 (Soi Thong Lo), notably the Nihonmura (“Japan Village”) in Thong Lo Soi 13.

  • Akiyoshi, 2F, Taksin Square Bldg, 1521/1 Sukhumvit Rd (BTS Phra Khanong), ? +66 2 714-0791. M-F 11:00-14:00, 17:30-22:00, Sa-Su 11:00-22:00. The two must-tries here are the Japanese-style sukiyaki and the shabu shabu. The employees will light up a burning pan on your table and you can just throw in the ingredients yourself. The food is really delicious, and they will serve until you’re full. The ambience is best-suited for a group of people. But better make a reservation if you’re coming after 18:00, as it’s often packed. 400-500 baht.”

“Grande Teppanyaki and Grande Ramen, 25/17-19 Sukhumvit Soi 55 (BTS Thong Lo), ? +66 2 714-1020. Two small Japanese restaurants facing each other, popular with Thais and Japanese alike. Sub-100 baht lunch menus are particularly good value, but the beef curry with real steak is a deal at any time of the day. 130 baht, subs 80 baht.  edit

Le Dalat, 47/1 Sukhumvit Soi 23 (BTS Asok or MRT Sukhumvit), ? +66 2 258-4192. 11:00-14:30, 18:00-22:00 daily. Two Vietnamese restaurants, two locations about a block apart and across the street from each other. When it’s a nice day outside, take a seat in the beautiful tropical garden which is wonderful. The traditional interior You can get lunch for about 250 baht, which is a good value. Service can be rough, be especially wary for the overcharge at the end. 450 baht.”

“Nihonmura, 87 Soi Thong Lo 13 (BTS Thong Lo). Nihonmura, commonly known as Japan Village, is a dining complex with about a dozen quality Japanese restaurants. Uomasa (? +66 2 392-6575) is the best joint for sashimi (raw fish). You can order the “Iso” menu, a plate full of sashimi priced at 1,600 baht. It seems expensive, but its similarly priced to the generic Japanese chain restaurants, but the sashimi here is much fresher and of better quality. 350 baht.

Nobu, 414 Sukhumvit Soi 55 (BTS Thong Lo, between Thong Lo Soi 12 and 14), ? +66 2 392-5297, [39]. 11:00-14:00, 18:00-00:00 daily. This is a nice local restaurant. They are very good for lunch with a large selection of Bento (boxed lunch) specials. Getting dinner here is a lot more expensive than lunch. It is focused on fresh seafood and dishes from the Osaka region of Japan. It’s always crowded with Japanese expats that live in the area. 300 baht.”

“Sukhumvit Plaza, 212 Sukhumvit Soi 12 (BTS Asok), ? +66 2 255-4178. Korean restaurants can be found scattered throughout Sukhumvit, but a particularly heavy concentration lurks in Korea Town, the informal name of Sukhumvit Plaza. There are about a dozen Korean restaurants on the ground floor of the complex. These are extremely authentic though and you may have a little trouble ordering if not familiar with Korean food. Price-wise they are on the steep side — Arirang (? +66 2 654-0177(-9), [40]) is among the more fairly priced ones. 300-500 baht.

Tenderloins, 9 Sukhumvit Soi 33 (BTS Phrom Phong), ? +66 2 258-4529, [41]. 10:00-01:00 daily. This Australian barbecue restaurant calls itself a “contemporary upmarket sports bar and steak house”, and even they have to admit that it is a weird combination. They serve up a good grill, although a bit on the pricey side. Their 250-baht lunch sets might be a better idea. Reserving a table is recommended, especially at weekends. 250-500 baht.”

We went for a short walk to the end area of Sukhumvit Road near Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand on August 24,2017

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Xuan Mai, 351/3 Sukhumvit Soi 55 (BTS Thong Lo, across the street from Mercedes-Benz Thong Lo), ? +66 2 185-2619, [42]. Tu-Th 11:00-14:00, 17:00-22:00, F-Su 11:00-14:00, 17:00-00:00. Excellent and varied Vietnamese menu, served by the owner, a charming lady who was a former Vietnamese beauty queen and FBI operative before moving to Bangkok to open a restaurant. It has an open kitchen, so you can see the cooking in action. 250-450 baht.

Vientiane Kitchen, 8 Soi Napha Sap Yaek 1, Sukhumvit Soi 36 (BTS Thong Lo, at the corner of Soi 36 and Soi Napha Sap Yaek 1), ? +66 2 258-6171, [43]. 12:00-00:00 daily. This relaxed-looking Lao restaurant serves very good Lao food. It has a nice ambience featuring a band playing music from Laos. 150-300 baht.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Sukhumvit

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 12

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

The Thai Classical dancers perform for Pra Phrom (The four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Culture of Thailand

Thailand’s culture has evolved greatly over time, from the country’s pre-globalization time in Sukhothai era, to its more contemporary Ayutthaya era, which absorbs influences from all over Asia. Strong Indian, Chinese and other Southeast Asian influences are still evident in traditional Thai culture up until the modern Rattanakosin era.[1] Buddhism and Animism also play a significant role in shaping the culture.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Thailand

Thailand is nearly 94 percent Buddhist, mainly of the Theravada school (which includes the Thai Forest Tradition and the Dhammayuttika Nikaya and Santi Asoke sects) and an unknown minority belonging to the Mahayana school. In addition there are minorities of Muslims in Thailand (5-6 percent), Christians (1 percent), and other religions.[2] Thai Theravada Buddhism is supported and overseen by the government, with monks receiving a number of government benefits, such as free use of public transportation.

Buddhism in Thailand is strongly influenced by traditional beliefs regarding ancestral and natural spirits, which have been incorporated into Buddhist cosmology. Most Thai people install spirit houses (Thai: ??????????; rtgssan phra phum), miniature houses outside their dwellings, where they believe household spirits live. They present offerings of food and drink to these spirits to keep them happy. If these spirits aren’t happy, it is believed that they will inhabit the household and cause chaos. These spirit houses can be found in public places and on the streets of Thailand, where the public make offerings.[3]

Prior to the rise of Theravada Buddhism, both Indian Brahmanic religion and Mahayana Buddhism were present in Thailand. Influences from both these traditions can still be seen in present-day Thai folklore. Brahmanist shrines play an important role in Thai folk religion, and the Mahayana Buddhist influence is reflected in the presence of figures like Lokesvara, a form of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara sometimes incorporated into Thailand’s iconography.[3]

The traditional customs and the folklore of Thai people were gathered and described by Phya Anuman Rajadhon in the 20th century, at a time when modernity changed the face of Thailand and a great number of traditions disappeared or became adapted to modern life. Still, the striving towards refinement, rooted in ancient Siamese culture, consisting of promoting that which is refined and avoiding coarseness is a major focus of the daily life of Thai people and high on their scale of values.[5]

One of the most distinctive Thai customs is the wai. Used in greetings, leave-taking, or as an acknowledgement, it comes in many forms, reflecting the relative status of those involved. Generally the salutation involves a prayer-like gesture with the hands, derived from the Añjali Mudr? of the Indian subcontinent, and it also may include a slight bow of the head. This salutation is often accompanied by a serene smile symbolizing a welcoming disposition and a pleasant attitude. Thailand is often referred to as the “land of smiles” in tourist brochures.

Public displays of affection are not overly common in traditional Thai society, especially between lovers.[6] It is becoming more common, especially among the younger generation.

A notable social norm holds that touching someone on the head may be considered rude. It is also considered rude to place one’s feet at a level above someone else’s head, especially if that person is of higher social standing. This is because the Thai people consider the foot to be the dirtiest and lowliest part of the body, and the head the most respected and highest part of the body. This also influences how Thais sit when on the ground—their feet always pointing away from others, tucked to the side or behind them. Pointing at or touching something with the feet is also considered rude.

Since a serene disposition is valued, conflict and sudden displays of anger are eschewed in Thai culture. For these reasons, visitors should take care not to create conflict or to display anger. Disagreements or disputes should be handled with a smile and no attempt should be made to assign blame to another. In everyday life in Thailand, there is a strong emphasis on the concept of sanuk; the idea that life should be fun. Because of this, Thais can be quite playful at work and during day-to-day activities. Displaying positive emotions in social interactions is also important in Thai culture.

Often, Thais will deal with disagreements, minor mistakes, or misfortunes by using the phrase mai pen rai, translated as “it doesn’t matter”. The ubiquitous use of this phrase in Thailand reflects a disposition towards minimizing conflict, disagreements or complaints. A smile and the sentence “mai pen rai” indicates that the incident is not important and therefore there is no conflict or shame involved.

Respect for hierarchy is a very important value for Thai people. The custom of bun khun emphasizes the indebtedness towards parents, as well as towards guardians, teachers, and caretakers. It describes the feelings and practices involved in certain relationships organized around generalized reciprocity, the slow-acting accounting of an exchange calculated according to locally interpreted scales and measures.[7] It is also considered rude to step on any type of Thai currency (Thai coin or banknote) as they include a likeness of the King of Thailand.

There are a number of Thai customs relating to the special status of monks in Thai society. Thai monks are forbidden physical contact with women. Women are therefore expected to make way for passing monks to ensure that accidental contact does not occur. A variety of methods are employed to ensure that no incidental contact (or the appearance of such contact) between women and monks occurs. Women making offerings to monks place their donation at the feet of the monk, or on a cloth laid on the ground or a table. Powders or unguents intended to carry a blessing are applied to Thai women by monks using the end of a candle or stick. Laypersons are expected to sit or stand with their heads at a lower level than that of a monk. Within a temple, monks may sit on a raised platform during ceremonies to make this easier to achieve.

When sitting in a temple, one is expected to point one’s feet away from images of the Buddha. Shrines inside Thai residences are arranged so as to ensure that the feet are not pointed towards the religious icons, such as placing the shrine on the same wall as the head of a bed, if a house is too small to remove the shrine from the bedroom entirely.

It is also customary to remove one’s footwear before entering a home or the sacred areas within a temple, and not to step on the threshold.

Traditional Thai clothing is called chut thai (Thai: ?????? Thai pronunciation: [t??út.t?aj]) which literally means “Thai outfit”. It can be worn by men, women, and children. Chut thai for women usually consists of a pha nung or a chong kraben, a blouse, and a sabai. Northern and northeastern women may wear a sinh instead of a pha nung and a chong kraben with either a blouse or a suea pat. Chut thai for men includes a chong kraben or pants, a Raj pattern shirt, with optional knee-length white socks and a sabai. Chut thai for northern Thai men is composed of a sado, a white Manchu styled jacket, and sometimes a khian hua. In formal occasions, people may choose to wear a so-called formal Thai national costume.

Cuisine

Thai dining etiquette refers to the traditional and proper behaviors of Thai people while eating. Since Thai society has a lot of big families, so having a meal together and sharing the food between members of the family is Thai traditional dining style. Generally, Thais eat rice as the main food and share the rice side dishes with one another.
Traditionally, in Thailand, people have a meal on the floor mat and eat the food with their right hands. The rice dishes are on the outer circle while the shared dishes are in the center of the circle with shared spoons to transfer the side dish food to their own rice dish.

In the reign of King Mongkut (Rama IV), King Chulalongkorn the Great (Rama V), Prince Chulalongkorn at that time, was educated by an English woman, courted Western diplomats and leaders and travelled abroad, observe and learn the western dining and he found out the fork and knife are not suitable for Thai food (no need to chop anything, he introduced the fork and spoon and so began the use of cutlery in Thailand. Thais use the fork to push the food onto the spoon (right hand), which then goes into your mouth instead of making the meat stable for the knife function.[8] Nowadays, Thai dining is mixed with various countries’ dining cultures, so Thai people use a lot of styles to eat not only with spoon and fork one but also chopstick, knife and bare hand as well.

Regional Thai dining[9]

  • Central part of Thailand

In central Thailand, sitting on a chair, eating at a table and using a fork, spoon and shared spoon are longstanding customs (Rama IV). For Thai rich family dining, variously shaped napkins are added on the table and also employ waiters or waitresses to serve the food and beverages beside the table. For some poor people the shared spoon is not used.

Northern part of Thailand

Thai northern people still preserve their traditional culture by using small food bowls and putting them on a “Kan tok” (Thai northern small table). They are decorated with wood, pearl or yellowish gold. Sticky rice, glutinous rice is the main food eaten with shared dishes. It is contained in “Kratip Song Soong”, high-height container for sticky rice. Beside “Kan tok”, there is “Kon Tho Din”, jar made from the soil and “Kan ngeaun” silver cup. After finishing the main course, the desserts are served and also “Buri Chai Yo”, the cigarette, which is end of the meal.

  • Northeastern part of Thailand, “Isan”

Typically the food is served on a large flower-patterned circular zinc tray. The sticky rice contained in ”Kra Tip Song Taei” (low-height container for sticky rice). Then the desserts are served.

Southern part of Thailand

The local people eat on a floor mat. The dishes are placed on the center of it. They sit in the circle and traditionally eat with their bare hands. The drinking water is contained in “Kan”or”Jok”, (little Thai cup.) Nowadays, fork and spoon are used instead of bare hands. Sitting on a chair and eating at a table now predominates. There are only few local people who still preserve the original dinning style.

Ways of serving food in Thailand

There are two main ways to serve Thai food, “Raad Kao”, individual dish and “Gap Kao”, separate dish.[10]

Individual Dish

In the past, Thai people had large families. Due to the difficulty of eating together at the same time, placing the rice side dish and the rice on the same dish and serving individually is to some extent supplanting the traditional Thai dinning style.

Separated Dish

The rice side dishes are separately served with the rice (not same dish). Normally, this style is suitable for eating with others. The shared rice side dishes are in the center of the circle. Each has their own rice while the side dishes are shared by transferring them with the shared spoons to the individual rice dishes.

Table setting

  • Individual dish

The spoon is on the right and the fork is on the left side of the dish.

  • Shared dishes

For rice dishes, the spoon is on the right and the fork is on the left side of the dish. Shared dishes are placed in the center of the table with the serving spoons.

Manners and customs

  • Ordering

For shared dish style, let the senior of the group order their rice side dish first and then another select the menu which everyone can eat and try to order balance of dish, ordering fish or seafood, pork, shrimp, chicken and vegetarian dishes which encompass a full range of tastes. Spicy, sweet, salty and bitter will all be represented, often all in one dish. When the dishes are served, all of them do not come at once. The food keeps coming and coming.

Dining

Thai people eat using the fork and spoon combo method. The spoon acts as the main tool and the fork is the supporting tool pushing the food onto the spoon and the shared spoon is the main tool to scoop the food from shared dish to rice dish. Some people use their own spoon to scoop the food from the shared dish directly but it is not a good dining manner for Thais because they concern about sanitation issue. If the shared dish is curry, it is transferred to an individual little cup first. Then they sip the soup from the spoon. Sipping it from the cup directly is not proper, Moreover, making noise during eating and sipping is impolite in Thailand. On the other hand, talking during eating is not prohibited. However, Thai food menus include a lot of fish and spices of which some parts are not for eating—splitting the food is the general behavior for Thais. Splitting on the spoon, and put them on the edge of the dish or provided dish for the trash is Thai general practice.
After finishing eating, placing the spoon and fork down close together on the bowl/plate, gathering the trash to one side of their dish and stacking the empty plates at the side of the table makes the waiters realize that customer(s) require them to clean the table.
Since there are a lot Chinese families in Thailand, the Chinese culture is mixed with the Thai culture. Sticking up sticks, poking a stick or skewer into food on a plate and having it stick straight upwards, is impolite. To be polite using a toothpick, block the mouth with one hand before you pick with the other.

Bill

The bill is usually picked up and paid by the wealthiest or most important person[11] or inviter or oldest person.[12] If customers are friends the bills are usually paid separately.

Birth traditions and beliefs

Main article: Birth in Thailand

Traditional principles concerning pregnancy and childbirth are largely influenced by folk beliefs, especially in rural areas of central and north Thailand. Modern practices follow the Western medical model.

Nicknames

See also: Thai names,

Thai people universally have one, or occasionally more, short nicknames (Thai: ???????? name-play) that they use with friends and family. Often first given shortly after birth by friends or an older family member, these nicknames are overwhelmingly one syllable[13] (or worn down from two syllables to one). Though they may be simply shortened versions of a full name, they quite frequently have no relation to the person’s full name and are often humorous and/or nonsense words. Babies may be given a nickname of a relative or named for a characteristic of birth, e.g., “little”. Traditionally, nicknames would relate to things of low value, e.g., “dirt”, which was to convince evil spirits lurking in the vicinity that the child was not worthy their attention. Today this folk custom is on the decline.

Some common nicknames translate into English as “small”, “fatty”, “pig”, “little”, “frog”, “banana”, “green”, or “girl/boy”. Though rare, sometimes Thai children are given nicknames in the order they were born into the family (i.e., “one”, “two”, “three”, etc.). Nicknames are useful because official Thai names are often long, particularly among Thais of Chinese descent, whose lengthy surnames stem from an attempt to translate Chinese names into Thai equivalents, or among Thai with similarly lengthy Sanskrit-derived names. In recent years, English language words have become popular nicknames. Examples include: “Ice” (????); “Bank” (?????); “New” (???); “Ball” (???), and even “Beer” (??????).[13]

Marriage

Thai Buddhist marriage ceremonies are generally divided into two parts: a Buddhist component, which includes the recitation of prayers and the offering of food and other gifts to monks and images of the Buddha, and a non-Buddhist component rooted in folk traditions, which centers on the couple’s families.

In former times, it was unknown for Buddhist monks to be present at any stage of the marriage ceremony itself. As monks were required to attend to the dead during funerals, their presence at a marriage (which was associated with fertility, and intended to produce children) was considered a bad omen. A couple would seek a blessing from their local temple before or after being married, and might consult a monk for astrological advice in setting an auspicious date for the wedding. The non-Buddhist portions of the wedding would take place away from the temple, and would often take place on a separate day.

In modern times, these prohibitions have been significantly relaxed. It is not uncommon for a visit to a temple to be made on the same day as the non-Buddhist portions of a wedding, or even for the wedding to take place within the temple. While a division is still commonly observed between the “religious” and “secular” portions of a wedding service, it may be as simple as the monks present for the Buddhist ceremony departing to take lunch once their role is complete.

During the Buddhist component of the wedding service, the couple first bow before the image of the Buddha. They then recite certain basic Buddhist prayers or chants (typically including taking the Three Refuges and the Five Precepts), and light incense and candles before the image. The parents of the couple may then be called upon to “connect” them, by placing upon the heads of the bride and groom twin loops of string or thread that link the couple together. The couple may then make offerings of food, flowers, and medicine to the monks present. Cash gifts (usually placed in an envelope) may also be presented to the temple at this time.

The monks may then unwind a small length of thread that is held between the hands of the assembled monks. They begin a series of recitations of Pali scriptures intended to bring merit and blessings to the new couple. The string terminates with the lead monk, who may connect it to a container of water that will be “sanctified” for the ceremony. Merit is said to travel through the string and be conveyed to the water. A similar arrangement is used to transfer merit to the dead at a funeral, further evidence of the weakening of the taboo on mixing funerary imagery and trappings with marriage ceremonies. Blessed water may be mixed with wax drippings from a candle lit before the Buddha image and other unguents and herbs to create a paste that is then applied to the foreheads of the bride and groom to create a small dot, similar to the marking made with red ochre on Hindu devotees. The bride’s mark is created with the butt end of the candle rather than the monk’s thumb, in keeping with the Vinaya prohibition against touching women.

The highest-ranking monk present may elect to say a few words to the couple, offering advice or encouragement. The couple may then make offerings of food to the monks, at which point the Buddhist portion of the ceremony is concluded.

The Thai dowry system is known as the sin sodt (Thai: ??????). Traditionally, the groom will be expected to pay a sum of money to the family, to compensate them and to demonstrate that the groom is financially capable of taking care of their daughter. Sometimes, this sum is purely symbolic, and will be returned to the bride and groom after the wedding has taken place.

The religious component of marriage ceremonies between Thai Muslims are markedly different from that described above. The Imam of the local mosque, the groom, the father of the bride, men in the immediate family, and important men in the community sit in a circle during the ceremony, conducted by the Imam. All the women, including the bride, sit in a separate room and do not have any direct participation in the ceremony. The secular component of the ceremony, however, is often nearly identical to the secular part of Thai Buddhist wedding ceremonies. The only notable difference here is the type of meat served to guests (goat and/or beef instead of pork). Thai Muslims frequently, though not always, also follow the conventions of the Thai dowry system.

Funerals

Traditionally, funerals last for at least one week. Crying is discouraged during the funeral, so as not to worry the spirit of the deceased. Many activities surrounding the funeral are intended to make merit for the deceased. Copies of Buddhist scriptures may be printed and distributed in the name of the deceased, and gifts are usually given to a local temple. Monks are invited to chant prayers that are intended to provide merit for the deceased, as well as to provide protection against the possibility of the dead relative returning as a malicious spirit. A picture of the deceased from his/her best days will often be displayed next to the coffin. Often, a thread is connected to the corpse or coffin which is held by the chanting monks during their recitation; this thread is intended to transfer the merit of the monks’ recitation to the deceased. The corpse is cremated, and the urn with the ash is usually kept in a chedi in the local temple.

Thai Chinese and Thai Muslim minorities bury their deceased according to the rituals of their respective communities.

National anthem and respect for the flag and king

Twice a day, at 08:00 and again at 18:00, the national anthem is played by all Thai media outlets. Thais stop what they are doing and stand at attention to pay homage to the flag during the anthem. Students in school stand in front of the raised flag and sing the national anthem at 08:00 every school day. The practice dates from 1935 when the regulations for the raising and lowering of the colours was published in the Royal Gazette. The Flag Act of 1979 decreed that those who do not observe the custom by standing in silence during the anthem are subject to a fine of up to 2,000 baht and not more than one year in prison.[14]

In a related practice, the royal anthem of the King of Thailand is played before movies, concerts, and sporting events. All are expected to stand.[citation needed]

Traditional arts

Thai visual arts were traditionally Buddhist. Thai Buddha images from different periods have a number of distinctive styles. Thai temple art and architecture evolved from a number of sources, one of them being Khmer architecture. Contemporary Thai art often combines traditional Thai elements with modern techniques.

Literature in Thailand is heavily influenced by Indian Hindu culture. The most notable works of Thai literature are a version of the Ramayana, a Hindu religious epic, called the Ramakien, written in part by Kings Rama I and Rama II, and the poetry of Sunthorn Phu.

Traditional Thai paintings showed subjects in two dimensions without perspective. The size of each element in the picture reflected its degree of importance. The primary technique of composition is that of apportioning areas: the main elements are isolated from each other by space transformers. This eliminated the intermediate ground, which would otherwise imply perspective. Perspective was introduced only as a result of Western influence in the mid-19th century. Monk artist Khrua In Khong is well known as the first artist to introduce linear perspective to Thai traditional art.

There is no tradition of spoken drama in Thailand, the role instead being filled by Thai dance. This is divided into three categories: Khon, ‘Lakhon, and Likay, Khon being the most elaborate and Likay the most popular. Nang drama, a form of shadow play, is found in the south.

There is also Thai folklore, Sri Thanonchai as an example.

Dance

The first detailed European record of khon and other classical Siamese dances was made during the Ayutthaya Kingdom. It described a dramatic tradition and style that are almost identical to the Thai traditions we still see today. Historical evidence clearly establishes that the Thai art of stage plays must have already been perfected by the 17th century. Louis XIV, the Sun King of France, had a formal diplomatic relation with Ayutthaya’s King Narai. In 1687, France sent the diplomat Simon de la Loubère to record all that he saw in the Siamese Kingdom and its traditions. In his account Du Royaume de Siam, La Loubère carefully observed the classic 17th century theatre of Siam, including an epic battle scene from a khon performance, and recorded what he saw in great detail:

“The Siamese have three sorts of Stage Plays: That which they call Cone [khon] is a figure dance, to the sound of the violin and some other instruments. The dancers are masked and armed, and represent rather a combat than a dance. And though every one runs into high motions, and extravagant postures, they cease not continually to intermix some word. Most of their masks are hideous, and represent either monstrous Beasts, or kinds of Devils. The Show which they call Lacone is a poem intermix with Epic and Dramatic, which lasts three days, from eight in the morning till seven at night. They are histories in verse, serious, and sung by several actors always present, and which do only sing reciprocally…. The Rabam is a double dance of men and women, which is not martial, but gallant … they can perform it without much tying themselves, because their way of dancing is a simple march round, very slow, and without any high motion; but with a great many slow contortions of the body and arms.”[15]:49

Of the attires of Siamese khon dancers, La Loubère recorded that: “[T]hose that dance in Rabam, and Cone, have gilded paper-bonnets, high and pointed, like the Mandarins caps of ceremony, but which hang down at the sides below their ears, which are adorned with counterfeit stones, and with two pendants of gilded wood.[15]:49

Today “ram Thai” (Thai: ?????), ‘Thai dance’. Thai dance, like many forms of traditional Asian dance, can be divided into two major categories that correspond roughly to the high art (classical dance) and low art (folk dance) distinction.

Although traditional Thai performing arts are not as vibrant as they once were, suffering inroads from Western entertainment and generally changing tastes, Thai dance drama is not extinct. What survives displays the elegance of an art form refined over centuries and supported by regal patronage.[citation needed]

Aside from folk and regional dances (southern Thailand’s Indian-influenced Menora dance, for example), the two major forms of Thai classical dance drama are khon and Lakhon nai. In the beginning both were exclusively court entertainments and it was not until much later that a popular style of dance theater, Likay, evolved as a diversion for the common folk who had no access to royal performances. Apart from Lakhon nai, Lakhon chatri is also one of the most important Thai dances.

The Music of Thailand includes classical and folk music traditions, e.g., Piphat and Mor lam, respectively, as well as Thai pop music, e.g., “String”. Thai classical music is synonymous with those stylized court ensembles and repertoires that emerged in its present form within the royal centers of Central Thailand some 800 years ago. These ensembles, while being deeply influenced by Khmer and even older practices and repertoires from India, are today uniquely Thai expressions. While the three primary classical ensembles, the Piphat, Khrueang sai and Mahori differ in significant ways, they all share a basic instrumentation and theoretical approach. Each employ the small ching hand cymbals and the krap wooden sticks to mark the primary beat reference.

Several kinds of small drums (klong) are employed in these ensembles to outline the basic rhythmic structure (natab) that is punctuated at the end by the striking of a suspended gong (mong). Seen in its most basic formulation, the classical Thai orchestras are very similar to the Cambodian (Khmer) pinpeat and mahori ensembles, and structurally similar to other orchestras found within the widespread Southeast Asian gong-chime musical culture, such as the large gamelan of Bali and Java, which most likely have their common roots in the diffusion of Vietnamese Dong-Son bronze drums beginning in the first century.

Traditional Thai classical repertoire is anonymous, handed down through an oral tradition of performance in which the names of composers (if, indeed, pieces were historically created by single authors) are not known. However, since the beginning of the modern Bangkok period, composers’ names have been known and, since around the turn of the century, many major composers have recorded their works in notation. Musicians, however, imagine these compositions and notations as generic forms which are realized in full in idiosyncratic variations and improvisations in the context of performance.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Thailand

A Worshipper and Thai Classical dancers perform for Pra Phrom (The four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“People offer prayers and seek blessings at the Erawan Shrine in Bangkok, Thailand. The Erawan Shrine is a Hindu shrine in Bangkok, Thailand, that houses a statue of Phra Phrom, the Thai representation of the Hindu creation god Brahma. A popular tourist attraction, it often features performances by resident Thai dance troupes, who are hired by worshippers in return for seeing their prayers at the shrine answered.”

For more information please visit the following link:

Travel & Events

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeZF_mpFbgM

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 11

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Worshiper at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Erawan Shrine in Bangkok is Brahman, not strictly Buddhist. And yet, this famous shrine attracts more visitors than many of the city’s temples. It was erected during the mid 1950s, after the Thai government had decided to build the luxury Erawan Hotel on this location. However, the first stages of the construction were beset with so many problems that superstitious labourers refused to continue unless the land spirits were appeased. After consultations with astrologers, the erection of a shrine to honour the four-faced Brahma God, Than Tao Mahaprom, was considered to be an auspicious solution. A magnificent image of the Brahma God was especially cast and gilded, and The Erawan Hotel opened to acclaims and worldwide fame for three decades. Towards the end, the property could not compete with more modern facilities, and was replaced by the privately owned Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok in 1991. As the shrine was originally constructed to grace the old Erawan Hotel, the location became known as the Erawan Shrine.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/shrines/erawan-shrine.htm#

Phra Phrom (The four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Worshippers of the god usually offer incense, candles, jasmine flowers or jasmine garlands and young coconut milk (with water in them) in their worship, usually placing these offerings before all four heads of Phra Phrom, each head representing a different aspect of the deity; it is believed each side of Phra Phrom offers different blessings. Another common way of worship is to place wooden elephant statues on the altar to honor him. Phra Phrom is also known to admire Thai classical music, which is played near larger scale outdoor altars, accompanied by dancers. For a small fee, the dancers include worshiper’s name into the songs they sing while dancing. Worshipers of Phra Phrom are also usually advised to abstain from consuming meat. It is also believed that worshipers have to make good on any promises made to the deity else misfortune will befall them instead of the fortune that was asked for. Items needed for prayers are available in the premises of the shrine.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phrom

Phra Phrom (The four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Phra Phrom (Thai: ???????; from Sanskrit:Brahma, ??????) is the Thai representation of the Hindu god Brahma (the god of the manifested world),[1] who is regarded in Thai culture as a deity of good fortune and protection. According to puranas, Brahma has four faces representing four Vedas or knowledge coming from four directions: north, south, east and west[2]. Phra Phrom is colloquially known outside Thailand as the Four-Faced Awakening (???, Sìmiànfó) or Four-Faced God (??? Simianshen). Among Chinese folk religious worshipers, among whom the faith of this god has spread in the latest decades by assimilating Brahma as Buddist deva Brahma.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phrom

Phra Phrom (The four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Spread of the cult among Chinese

As early as the 1980s, the popularity of the Erawan cult of Brahma from its inceptions in Thailand spread, accompanied by faithful reproduction of the structure of the shrine and the image, among overseas Chinese in other countries of Southeast Asia (Singapore, Indonesia and Malaysia), in Taiwan, and in China, with shrines established in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Guangzhou. Chinese call Brahma colloquially the “Four-Faced Buddha” (??? Simianfo).”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phra_Phrom

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 “Cultural depictions of elephants

Elephants have been depicted in mythology, symbolism and popular culture. They are both revered in religion and respected for their prowess in war. They also have negative connotations such as being a symbol for an unnecessary burden. Ever since the stone age, when elephants were represented by ancient petroglyphs and cave art, they have been portrayed in various forms of art, including pictures, sculptures, music, film, and even architecture.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

 “The Asian elephant appears in various religious traditions and mythologies. They are treated positively and are sometimes revered as deities, often symbolising strength and wisdom. Similarly, the African elephant is seen as the wise chief who impartially settles disputes among the forest creatures in African fables,[2] and the Ashanti tradition holds that they are human chiefs from the past.[3]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“The Earth is supported and guarded by mythical World Elephants at the compass points of the cardinal directions, according to the Hindu cosmology of ancient India. The classical Sanskrit literature also attributes earthquakes to the shaking of their bodies when they tire. Wisdom is represented by the elephant in the form of the deity Ganesh, one of the most popular gods in the Hindu religion‘s pantheon. Sometimes known as Ganesha, this deity is very distinctive in having a human form with the head of an elephant. This was put on after the human head was either was cut off or burned, depending on the version of the story from various Hindu sources. Lord Ganesha’s birthday (rebirth) is celebrated as the Hindu festival known as Ganesha Chaturthi.[4] In Japanese Buddhism, their adaptation of Ganesha is known as Kangiten (“Deva of Bliss”), often represented as an elephant-headed male and female pair shown in a standing embrace to represent unity of opposites.[5]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“In Hindu iconography, many devas are associated with a mount or vehicle known as a v?hana. In addition to providing a means of transport, they symbolically represent a divine attribute. The elephant v?hana represents wisdom, divine knowledge and royal power; it is associated with Lakshmi, Brihaspati, Shachi and Indra. Indra was said to ride on a flying white elephant named Airavata, who was made the King of all elephants by Lord Indra. A white elephant is rare and given special significance. It is often considered sacred and symbolises royalty in Thailand and Burma, where it is also considered a symbol of good luck. In Buddhist iconography, the elephant is associated with Queen M?y? of Sakya, the mother of Gautama Buddha. She had a vivid dream foretelling her pregnancy in which a white elephant featured prominently.[6] To the royal sages, the white elephant signifies royal majesty and authority; they interpreted the dream as meaning that her child was destined for greatness as a universal monarch or a buddha.[7]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Elephants remain an integral part of religion in South Asia and some are even featured in various religious practices.[8] Temple elephants are specially trained captive elephants that are lavishly caparisoned and used in various temple activities. Among the most famous of the temple elephants is Guruvayur Keshavan of Kerala, India. They are also used in festivals in Sri Lanka such as the Esala Perahera.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“In the version of the Chinese zodiac used in Northern Thailand, the last year in the 12-year cycle – called “Year of the Pig” in China – is known instead as “Year of the Elephant”, reflecting the importance of elephants in Thai culture.

In Islamic tradition, the year 570 is when the Prophet Muhammad was born and is known as the Year of the Elephant.[9] In that year, Abraha, ruler of Yemen tried to conquer Mecca and demolish the Kaaba, reportedly in retaliation for the previous Meccan defilement of Al–Qalis Church in Sana’a, a cathedral Abraha had constructed.[10] However, his plan was foiled when his white elephant named Mahmud refused to cross the boundary of Mecca. The elephant, who led Abraha’s forty thousand men, could not be persuaded with reason or even with violence, which was regarded as a crucial omen by Abraha’s soldiers. This is generally related in the five verses of the chapter titled ‘The Elephant[b] in the Quran.[11]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

Elephant Statues used as adornment at the Worship of Phra Phrom (the four-faced Brahma God) at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“In the Judeo-Christian tradition, medieval artists depicted the mutual killing of both Eleazar the Maccabee and a war elephant carrying an important Seleucid general as described in the apocryphal book of 1 Maccabees. The early illustrators knew little of the elephant and their portrayals are highly inaccurate.[12]

The unfamiliarity with the exotic beast has also made elephants a subject of widely different interpretations thus giving rise to mythological creatures. The story of the blind men and an elephant was written to show how reality may be viewed from differing perspectives. The source of this parable is unknown, but it appears to have originated in India. It has been attributed to Buddhists, Hindus, Jainists, and Sufis, and was also used by Discordians. The scattered skulls of prehistoric dwarf elephants, on the islands of Crete and Sicily may have formed the basis of belief in existence of cyclopes,[c] the one-eyed giants featured in Homer‘s Odyssey (c. 800~600 BC). As early as the 1370s, scholars had noted that the skulls feature a large nasal cavity at the front that could be mistaken for a singular eye socket;[13] and the skulls, twice the size of a human’s, looked as if they could belong to giant humanoids.[13][14] It is also suggested that the Behemoth described in the Book of Job may be the elephant due to its grazing habits and preference to rivers.[15]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cultural_depictions_of_elephants

The worshipers pay the dancers to dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Than Tao Mahaprom is a Brahma god, full of kindness, mercy, sympathy and impartiality. These four virtues are represented by his four faces, each radiating serene grace. Since Buddhism in Thailand has always been influenced by the Brahma beliefs, he made an immediate impact. Nowadays, as has been the case for years, unending streams of people pay respects from early morning till late at night. Thais, and even foreign visitors, make ceremonial offerings from floral garlands, fruits to teakwood elephants in the hope that their wishes will be fulfilled. Judging from the flowing multitude of believers, for many those wishes were indeed granted. Cash contributions are managed by a foundation who distributes funds regularly to various charitable organisations and equipment for needy hospitals in the provinces. To feel the aura of reverence while watching the joyful celebration of a graceful Thai Classical Dance troupe or a lively Chinese Lion Dance is an experience to be added to your many memories of exotic Bangkok.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/shrines/erawan-shrine.htm#

RATE FOR DANCING

NUMBER OF DANCERS                         AMOUNT OF MONEY

8                                                        710 BAHTS (ABOUT $24)

6                                                        610 BAHTS (ABOUT $20)

4                                                        360 BAHTS (ABOUT $12)

2                                                        260 BAHTS (ABOUT $9.70)

Ing’s comments,

How we are taught to believe:

This person just bought a small cage that keeps the life birds for sale.  She is going to free the birds. 

She is freeing the birds in a small cage.  She probably prays or wish that her trouble will go away or wish for her good fortune.  I just hope that the poor birds will not get trapped again to be in the same confinement from the poor low-income people who captured them.  However, I am not sure, it might be a rich person who traps the birds and distributes them for sale to different locations for the believers to buy birds to free for their wishes or some kind of merit. 

I probably would do the same if I were live in Thailand.  People tend to do the same as other people in one’s own social believe, until someone points out and tells you to analyze the situation.  Then you may see a different view point, or you may not.  But staying outside of one own society for a period of time, one has a chance to look back, and allow yourself to think more about what we are taught to believe.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, November 13, 2017

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 10

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

The Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“The shrine is located by the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel, at the Ratchaprasong intersection of Ratchadamri Road in Pathum Wan district. It is near the Bangkok Skytrain‘s Chitlom Station, which has an elevated walkway overlooking the shrine. The area has many shopping malls nearby, including Gaysorn, CentralWorld and Amarin Plaza.

Five other shrines dedicated to Hindu deities are located in the area as well: Phra Laksami (Lakshmi), Phra Trimurati (Trimurti), Phra Khanet (Ganesha), Phra In (Indra), and Phra Narai Song Suban (Narayana on his garuda).[2][3][4]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erawan_Shrine

The Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“The Erawan Shrine was built in 1956 as part of the government-owned Erawan Hotel to eliminate the bad karma believed caused by laying the foundations on the wrong date.

The hotel’s construction was delayed by a series of mishaps, including cost overruns, injuries to laborers, and the loss of a shipload of Italian marble intended for the building. Furthermore, the Ratchaprasong intersection had once been used to put criminals on public display.

An astrologer advised building the shrine to counter the negative influences. The Brahma statue was designed and built by the Department of Fine Arts and enshrined on 9 November 1956. The hotel’s construction thereafter proceeded without further incident.[5] In 1987, the hotel was demolished and the site used for the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel.[6]

The Worshipers at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Erawan Shrine in Bangkok is Brahman, not strictly Buddhist. And yet, this famous shrine attracts more visitors than many of the city’s temples. It was erected during the mid 1950s, after the Thai government had decided to build the luxury Erawan Hotel on this location. However, the first stages of the construction were beset with so many problems that superstitious labourers refused to continue unless the land spirits were appeased. After consultations with astrologers, the erection of a shrine to honour the four-faced Brahma God, Than Tao Mahaprom, was considered to be an auspicious solution. A magnificent image of the Brahma God was especially cast and gilded, and The Erawan Hotel opened to acclaims and worldwide fame for three decades. Towards the end, the property could not compete with more modern facilities, and was replaced by the privately owned Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok in 1991. As the shrine was originally constructed to grace the old Erawan Hotel, the location became known as the Erawan Shrine.”

The worshipers pay the dancers to dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Than Tao Mahaprom is a Brahma god, full of kindness, mercy, sympathy and impartiality. These four virtues are represented by his four faces, each radiating serene grace. Since Buddhism in Thailand has always been influenced by the Brahma beliefs, he made an immediate impact. Nowadays, as has been the case for years, unending streams of people pay respects from early morning till late at night. Thais, and even foreign visitors, make ceremonial offerings from floral garlands, fruits to teakwood elephants in the hope that their wishes will be fulfilled. Judging from the flowing multitude of believers, for many those wishes were indeed granted. Cash contributions are managed by a foundation who distributes funds regularly to various charitable organisations and equipment for needy hospitals in the provinces. To feel the aura of reverence while watching the joyful celebration of a graceful Thai Classical Dance troupe or a lively Chinese Lion Dance is an experience to be added to your many memories of exotic Bangkok.”

For more information please visit the following link:

http://www.bangkok.com/shrines/erawan-shrine.htm#

The Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Dance in Thailand (Thai: ????? ram Thai) is the main dramatic art form of Thailand. Thai dance, like many forms of traditional Asian dance, can be divided into two major categories that correspond roughly to the high art (classical dance) and low art (folk dance) distinction.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_in_Thailand

The Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thai classical dance drama include khon, lakhon, and fon Thai.

The first detailed European record of khon and other Thai classical dances was made during the Ayutthaya Kingdom. The tradition and styles employed are almost identical to the Thai traditions we still see today. Historical evidence establishes that the Thai art of stage plays were already perfected by the 17th century. Louis XIV, the Sun King of France, had a formal diplomatic relation with Ayutthaya’s King Narai. In 1687, France sent the diplomat Simon de la Loubère to record all that he saw in the Siamese Kingdom and its traditions. In his famous account Du Royaume de Siam, La Loubère carefully observed the classic 17th century theatre of Siam, including an epic battle scene from a khon performance, and recorded what he saw in great detail:[1]:4”

The Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“The Siamese have three sorts of Stage Plays: That which they call Cone [khon] is a figure dance, to the sound of the violin and some other instruments. The dancers are masked and armed, and represent rather a combat than a dance. And though everyone runs into high motions, and extravagant postures, they cease not continually to intermix some word. Most of their masks are hideous, and represent either monstrous Beasts, or kinds of Devils. The Show which they call Lacone is a poem intermix with Epic and Dramatic, which lasts three days, from eight in the morning till seven at night. They are histories in verse, serious, and sung by several actors always present, and which do only sing reciprocally…. The Rabam is a double dance of men and women, which is not martial, but gallant … they can perform it without much tyring themselves, because their way of dancing is a simple march round, very slow, and without any high motion; but with a great many slow contortions of the body and arms.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_in_Thailand

A Worshiper and the Thai Classical dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thai classical dance drama include khon, lakhon, and fon Thai.

Of the attires of Siamese khon dancers, La Loubère recorded that: “[T]hose that dance in Rabam, and Cone, have gilded paper-bonnets, high and pointed, like the Mandarins caps of ceremony, but which hang down at the sides below their ears, which are adorned with counterfeit stones, and with two pendants of gilded wood.”[1]:49

La Loubère also observed the existence of muay Thai and muay Lao, noting that they looked similar (i.e., using both fists and elbows to fight), but the hand-wrapping techniques were different.[1]:49

The accomplishment and influence of Thai art and culture, developed during the Ayutthaya Period, on neighboring countries was evident in the observation of Captain James Low, a British scholar of Southeast Asia, during the early Rattanakosin Era:

“The Siamese have attained to a considerable degree of perfection in dramatic exhibitions — and are in this respect envied by their neighbours the Burmans, Laos, and Cambojans who all employ Siamese actors when they can be got.”[2]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_in_Thailand

The musicians and the Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thai classical dance drama include khon, lakhon, and fon Thai.

Khon is the most stylized form of Thai dance. It is performed by troupes of non-speaking dancers, the story being told by a chorus at the side of the stage. Choreography follows traditional models rather than attempting to innovate. Most khon performances feature episodes from the Ramakien. Costumes are dictated by tradition, with angels, both good and bad, wearing coloured masks.”

A Worshiper and the Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Thai classical dance drama include khon, lakhon, and fon Thai.

Lakhon

Main articles: Lakhon nai, Lakhon chatri, and Lakhon nok

Lakhon features a wider range of stories than khon, including folk tales and Jataka stories. Dancers are usually female and perform as a group rather than representing individual characters.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_in_Thailand

The Thai Classical dancers dance for the Brahma God at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thai classical dance drama include khon, lakhon, and fon Thai.

Fon (Thai: ????; rtgsfon) is a form of folk dance accompanied by the folk music of the region. The first fon originated in the northern region of Thailand. It was designed and taught by Chao Dararasami of Chiang Mai. Since then, a variety of fon came into practice, featuring the music and style of each province, such as the fon lep (Thai: ????????; rtgsfon lep) fingernail dance from Chiang Mai, fon ngiew from Chiang Rai with the influence of Burmese music and costume.

Fon Thai is divided into three types:

  • Fon lep (fingernail dance): A northern Thai dance style. Each dancer wears six inch long brass fingernails. The long fingernails accentuate the finger movement of each dancer. Dancers wear their hair in a chignon-style with a yellow jasmine flower tiara.
  • Fon tian (candle dance): A performance consists of eight dancers, each carrying candles. Dancers are in pairs, one pair to each side. They wear full-length sarongs and jackets with a matching shoulder cloth. This dance is always held at night.
  • Fon ngiew (scarf dance): A dance performed at a happy event. The dance is similar to the fon lep but the dance is faster and more fun. Each dancer wears a yellow flower tiara, jong kra bane, and sabai.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dance_in_Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

The Thai musicians perform at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thailand Instruments

There are many different varieties of Instruments from Thailand. They have 3 families of instruments, the wind, percussion, and string instruments. There are 2 main types of string instruments, plucked and bowed. The Percussion family is separated into 3 main groups, the drums, keyboards, and gongs or cymbals. Also, many Thai instruments are very similar, just in different sizes to produce higher or lower pitches.

The Ranat Ek has a similar look to xylophones. The keys from the ranad ek do not touch the base of the instrument, but rather hang over it, similar to a suspension bridge. The keys are wooden, and are different sizes in order to make different sounds.”

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

The Thai musicians perform at the Erawan Shrine, Bangkok, Thailand

“Thailand Instruments

The Taphon is a percussion instrument that is often found in a percussion ensemble called a piphat. The Taphon has two heads, and is shaped like a barrel. It is played with your hands, not with mallets. Many taphons have designs woven into the middle of the barrel.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://thailandmusicproject.weebly.com/thailand-instruments.html

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 9

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Chiang Mai has over 300 Buddhist temples (“wat” in Thai).[29] These include:
• Wat Phrathat Doi Suthep, the city’s most famous temple, stands on Doi Suthep, a hill to the north-west of the city. The temple dates from 1383.
• Wat Chiang Man, the oldest temple in Chiang Mai, dating from the 13th century.[1]:209 King Mengrai lived here during the construction of the city. This temple houses two important and venerated Buddha figures, the marble Phra Sila and the crystal Phra Satang Man.
• Wat Phra Singh is within the city walls, dates from 1345, and offers an example of classic Northern Thai-style architecture. It houses the Phra Singh Buddha, a highly venerated figure brought here many years ago from Chiang Rai.[30]
• Wat Chedi Luang was founded in 1401 and is dominated by a large Lanna style chedi, which took many years to finish. An earthquake damaged the chedi in the 16th century and only two-thirds of it remains.[31]
• Wat Ku Tao in the city’s Chang Phuak District dates from (at least) the 13th century and is distinguished by an unusual alms-bowl-shaped stupa thought to contain the ashes of King Nawratha Minsaw, Chiang Mai’s first Burmese ruler.[32]
• Wat Chet Yot is on the outskirts of the city. Built in 1455, the temple hosted the Eighth World Buddhist Council in 1977.
• Wiang Kum Kam is at the site of an old city on the southern outskirts of Chiang Mai. King Mengrai lived there for ten years before the founding of Chiang Mai. The site includes many ruined temples.
• Wat Umong is a forest and cave wat in the foothills west of the city, near Chiang Mai University. Wat U-Mong is known for its “fasting Buddha”, representing the Buddha at the end of his long and fruitless fast prior to gaining enlightenment.
• Wat RamPoeng (Tapotaram), near Wat U-Mong, is known for its meditation center (Northern Insight Meditation Center). The temple teaches the traditional vipassana technique and students stay from 10 days to more than a month as they try to meditate at least 10 hours a day. Wat RamPoeng houses the largest collection of Tipitaka, the complete Theravada canon, in several Northern dialects.[33]
• Wat Suan Dok is a 14th-century temple just west of the old city wall. It was built by the king for a revered monk visiting from Sukhothai for a rainy season retreat. The temple is also the site of Mahachulalongkorn Rajavidyalaya Buddhist University, where monks pursue their studies.[34]
• “First Church” was founded in 1868 by the Laos Mission of the Rev. Daniel and Mrs. Sophia McGilvary. Chiang Mai has about 20 Christian churches[35] Chiang Mai is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Chiang Mai at Sacred Heart Cathedral.
• Muslim traders have traveled to north Thailand for many centuries, and a small settled presence has existed in Chiang Mai from at least the middle of the 19th century.[36] The city has mosques identified with Chinese or Chin Haw Muslims as well as Muslims of Bengali, Pathan, and Malay descent. In 2011, there were 16 mosques in the city.[37]
• Two gurdwaras (Sikh Temples), Siri Guru Singh Sabha and Namdhari,[38] serve the city’s Sikh community.[38]
• The Hindu temple Devi Mandir serves the Hindu community.[38]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiang_Mai

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Burmese style chedi
Behind the principal viharn stands the attractive chedi, ornamented with very detailed stucco work. The Burmese style chedi is enclosed by a low crenellated wall, at each of its corners stands a large guardian Chinthe.
The bell sits on a base of several square tiers of receding size and an octagonal tier. The top consists of a spire and a very ornate golden hti.
At the center of each side of the chedi is a niche with a small stairway leading to it, the bodies of a fearsome creature extending over the balustrades. Enshrined in each niche is a standing statue of the Buddha, flanked by celestial beings.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Burmese style viharn
In the North-West corner of the temple complex stands a large Burmese style viharn. The brick building was constructed by a wealthy Burmese teak trader towards the end of the 19th century. The hall enshrines a large seated Burmese style Buddha image.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
How to get to the Wat Mahawan
The temple is found about 300 meters East of Tha Phae gate outside the old walled town center of Chiang Mai. It is located on Tha Phae road just past Tha Phae Soi 5, opposite the Wat Cheatawan.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Founding date unknown
Principal viharn 1865
Location: Tha Phae road just past Tha Phae Soi 5, Chiang Mai
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Just outside the old walled town center of Chiang Mai near Tha Phae gate is the Wat Mahawan, an attractive temple with both Lanna and Burmese style buildings and many sculptures of mythical creatures. Several gate houses in the surrounding wall are guarded by Chinthe, mythological lions often found in Burmese temples.
The temple comprises of a Lanna style viharn and ubosot, a large Burmese style chedi, a Ho Trai and a large Burmese style brick viharn.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Lanna style viharn
The main viharn with its imposing multi tiered roof was build in 1865. The ends of the barge boards are adorned with mythological Naga serpents. At the roofs top are chofah, a decorative element in the shape of a thin bird, representing Garuda, the mount of the Hindu God Vishnu.
Flanking the stairs to the viharn’s entrance are two large, white Chinthe guarding the hall. The Lanna style wooden panels on the front gable are adorned with very detailed carvings of deities and flower motifs in gold on a red background.
Large gold lacquered red columns support the roof. Seated on a pedestal to the back of the viharn is the principal Buddha image in subduing Mara posture surrounded by several smaller images.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai
Ubosot: Next to the principal viharn stands the ubosot, the hall where novices are ordained into monkhood. Access to the small bot is through an entrance gate adorned with very detailed stuccoed decorations of mythological beings and Lanna flower motifs.
The Lanna style building is fitted with a two-tiered roof; stylized Nagas adorn the ends of the elaborately carved white barge boards. The gable is embellished with golden Lanna flower motifs, while the door contains golden flower motifs on a red background.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Mahawan, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Ho Trai (temple library), Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Ho Trai – the temple library is another prime example of classical Lanna architecture and it is one of the most beautiful temple libraries in Thailand. The guards, flanking the stairs, consist of lions emerging from the mouths of a Makara, a mythical water creature. This combination is rarely seen elsewhere.

Ho Trai scripture library: The Ho Trai, a dark teak wooden structure wit a multi-tiered roof has been turned into the residence of the Wat Mahawan’s abbot. The building was originally used as the temple scripture library where copies of the Tripitaka, the Buddhist teachings traditionally written on dried palm leaves are kept.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.renown-travel.com/temples/wat-mahawan.html

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
History: Construction on Wat Phra Singh began in 1345 when King Phayu,[2]:226–227 the fifth king of the Mangrai dynasty, had a chedi built to house the ashes of his father King Kham Fu. A wihan and several other buildings were added a few years later and the resulting complex was named Wat Lichiang Phra. When, in 1367, the statue of Phra Buddha Singh was brought to the temple, the temple complex received its present name. During restoration works in 1925, three funerary urns were discovered inside a small chedi. It was assumed that these contained royal ashes. The urns have since been lost. From 1578 to 1774 the Burmese ruled Lanna and in this period the temple was abandoned and came under serious disrepair. It was only when King Kawila assumed the throne as King of Chiang Mai in 1782, that the temple was restored. King Kawila had the ubosot built and the chedi enlarged. Later successors restored the Wihan Lai Kham and the elegant Ho Trai (temple library).
The whole temple complex underwent extensive renovations under the famous monk Khru Ba Srivichai during the 1920s. Many of the buildings were again restored in 2002.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Notability: The temple houses an important Buddha statue: the Phra Buddha Sihing which gives the temple its name. The origins of this statue are unknown but, according to legend, it was based on the lion of Shakya, a statue since lost which used to be housed in the Mahabodhi Temple of Bodh Gaya (India). The Phra Buddha Sihing statue is supposed to have been brought, via Ceylon (present day Sri Lanka), to Ligor (present day Nakhon Si Thammarat) and, from there, via Ayutthaya, to Chiang Mai.
There are two more Buddha statues in Thailand which are claimed to be the Phra Buddha Sihing: one is housed in Wat Phra Mahathat in the city of Nakhon Si Thammarat and another in the Bangkok National Museum.[1]:227,369
It is alleged that the head of the statue had been stolen in 1922. The possibility remains that the present statue (or maybe only the head) is a copy.
Every year, during the Songkran festival, the statue is taken from wihan Lai Kham and carried through the streets of Chiang Mai in a religious procession during which the spectators honour the statue by sprinkling water over it.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Wat Phra Singh (full name: Wat Phra Singh Woramahaviharn; RTGS: Wat Phra Sing Wora Maha Wihan; (pronunciation); Lanna: ) is a Buddhist temple (Thai language: Wat) in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand. King Ananda Mahidol (Rama VIII), the older brother of the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), bestowed on it the status of Royal temple of the first grade in 1935.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Wihan Luang – the original wihan was replaced by the present building in 1925.
Wihan Lai Kham – this wihan is the main attraction of the complex. It was built in 1345 to house the Phra Buddha Singh statue and it is a prime example of classical Lanna architecture. The murals of the wihan are also highly remarkable. The murals on the left show the history of Songthong and on the right the history of Suwanna Hongse.

Ubosot – built in 1806, it contains two entrances: a south entrance for monks and a north entrance for nuns. It is as such a song sangha ubosot (‘song’ meaning ‘two’ in Thai). The building houses a mondop with the Phrachaotongtip Buddha statue, a smaller version of the Phra Buddha Sihing and it is therefore also known as Phrasingha noi (‘noi’ meaning ‘small’ in Thai). The northern end of the wihan, near the entrance for the nuns, contains a copy of the Emerald Buddha.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
The Phrathatluang – each side of the square base of the main chedi of the complex features the front half of an elephant emerging from it. After it was built in 1345, the chedi was enlarged several times.
The Kulai chedi – this small square based chedi, built as a pagoda with five tiered roofs by King Mueangkaeo (1495-1525), is connected to Wihan Lai Kham by a short tunnel which is not opened to visitors. When the chedi was restored under King Dharmalanka (1813-1822), a golden box containing ancient relics was found. After the works were completed, the box and its contents were placed once more inside the chedi.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Phra Singh, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Wat Phra Singh is located in the western part of the old city centre of Chiang Mai, which is contained within the city walls and moat. The main entrance is guarded by Singhs (lions). Wat Pra Singh is situated at the end of the main street (Rachadamnoen road) of Chiang Mai. The road runs east from the temple, via Tapae Gate, to the Ping River.
Name: Phra Singh is an abbreviated form of Phra-Put-Tha-Shi-Hing and does not refer to the word Singh (“lion”).
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Phra_Singh

Wat Buppharam, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Wat Buppharam  pronounced [wát bùp.p???.r??m]) is a Buddhist temple in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Founded in 1497 by King Mueang Kaeo,[1] the temple was where Kawila began a ritual circumambulation of Chiang Mai to reoccupy it after two centuries of Burmese rule.[2] Most of the temple buildings date to the late 1800s.[2] The temple is also known for its Burmese-style chedi, which was rebuilt in 1958, and a Lanna-style ordination hall made from teak and glass inlay mosaic, built in 1819.[3]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Buppharam,_Chiang_Mai

Wat Buppharam, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Wat Bua Pharam is an ancient temple at Phaya Muk Kaeng, King of Lanna No. 12, Meng Rai. Please make it in 2039 was restored in 2362 by the prince of Dharma, please build a small temple. The Lanna Art Wood There is a glazed stucco glass. Carved wood carving The temple is large. Gable, Burmese carvings, is a statue of a handsome bronze Buddha statue weighing 400 kilograms, and a Buddha image. Chiang Saen is casted with bronze on the left and right side of the temple. The Buddha image of teak lap width of 1 watts is about 400 years old, however.

The importance of the temples of all the worshipers is that this was once the abode of the Patriarch of Passover. And it is enshrined the Lord Buddha’s relics of Lord Buddha. There will be a tradition of worshiping Buddha relics on the lunar calendar month six (north central month 4) around February every year.

Google Translate for Business:Translator ToolkitWebsite Translator
For more information please visit the following link:
https://thai.tourismthailand.org/%E0%B8%AA%E0%B8%96%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%99%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B5%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%97%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%AD%E0%B8%87%E0%B9%80%E0%B8%97%E0%B8%B5%E0%B9%88%E0%B8%A2%E0%B8%A7/%E0%B8%A7%E0%B8%B1%E0%B8%94%E0%B8%9A%E0%B8%B8%E0%B8%9E%E0%B8%9E%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A3%E0%B8%B2%E0%B8%A1–131

Wat Buppharam, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Location: Located at 143 Thapae Road, opposite Wat Sa Fang, Chang Klan District, Muang District, Chiang Mai Province. For that trip. Drive along the Super Highway. Lampang – Chiang Mai Before Chiang Mai. Turn left at the intersection Luang Luang. Then drive straight ahead. Until the bridge over Nawarat. Then drive straight for about 800 meters, Buppam temple located on the left hand side.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wat_Buppharam,_Chiang_Mai

Go to the top

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand part 7

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I went to Thailand to visit my family for two months, from July and August 2017.  I did not visit home since 2006.  I was glad to see my family.  I enjoyed seeing all new development in Bangkok and loved eating authentic Thai food, especially Thai fruits.

I had a chance to visit my home town, Lopburi, where I was raised when I was young, before we moved to Bangkok.  I traveled to Ayutthaya to see the ruins of temples that were burned by Burmese soldiers, when the Burmese wanted to take over Thailand, The Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767).  Ayutthaya was one of the former capitals of Thailand before moved to, Thonburi and then Bangkok.  I also traveled to, Chiang Mai, located in the Northern part of Thailand.  Chiang Mai is the second largest and second most popular city of Thailand.

John, my husband came to Thailand in August.  He joined me traveling to different part of Thailand.  I had a good time taking videos and photographs wherever I traveled around Bangkok and other part of Thailand.  I hope the viewers of my website will enjoy the photographs that I present in these projects.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Thursday, October 26, 2017

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s covered page catalog of his Exhibition
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand

Mr. Chamni Koedpiam had his exhibition at The National Gallery, Chao Fa Road, Bangkok, September 4 – 29, 2016. 9:00 am – 16:00 pm (Close on Monday, Tuesday and Special Holidays).
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s personal comments:
“If anybody asked me about the result of this artwork in the exhibition, I can answer clearly that “It is a record of memory. It is an impression of my fond memory and the influence from difference places that I had visited.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s Painting in the Exhibition
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s personal comments:
“There are many ways that artists have expressed their memories, which depend on their personal preference. The expression can be in the form of sketch, line drawing, printing and water colors of artwork. I have expressed my true personal feelings in different forms of styles and mediums. If anyone who views my artwork, even though some might not have any knowledge about art would be able to understand what I have convey.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s Wood Craving artwork in the Exhibition
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam had his exhibition at The National Gallery, Chao Fa Road, Bangkok, September 4 – 29, 2016. 9:00 am – 16:00 pm (Close on Monday, Tuesday and Special Holidays).
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s personal comments
“Art is my personal love and I always express my inner feelings in the form of artwork wherever or whenever I travel aboard. I prefer using water color as a foundation or for a short period of time I would use line drawing with pen.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s Painted on ceramic in the Exhibition
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam’s personal comments
“I would like to dedicate my artwork to Buddha, my parents who gave me birth and cared for me and my teachers who gave me knowledge. All have taught me to always see the beauty of the world. Thanks to everyone at the National Gallery who made my exhibition possible and successful.”
Mr. Chamni Koedpiam graduated from Silpakorn Fine Art University, Bangkok, Thailand in 1973.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam

Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

On Sunday, July 16, 2017 I met a Thai artist, Mr. Chamni Koedpiam at Chatuchak Market, a large weekend market in Bangkok. Mr. Chamni Koedpiam was working on his drawing in front of his brother’s Japanese Crepe Shop.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam

I asked Mr. Chamni Koedpiam “Can I take your pictures?” He said O.K. Before I left I asked him if he had a business card. He said he has a catalog of his exhibition.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam

Mr. Chamni Koedpiam had his exhibition at The National Gallery, Chao Fa Road, Bangkok, September 4 – 29, 2016. 9:00 am – 16:00 pm (Close on Monday, Tuesday and Special Holidays).

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Thai Artist Mr. Chamni Koedpiam
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mr. Chamni Koedpiam is an established artist and well known among Thai artists. He works on a variety of mediums and styles. His work is Si-mi-Abstract. He also works on wood craving and Painted on ceramic.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.bangkok.com/shopping-market/popular-markets.htm

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John called out, “Ing! Come see this artist’s work. You are going like what you see. He is working from a very small picture of Gandhi. He is very good.”

When John mentioned Gandhi, I immediately paid attention because I was very interested to see the work. His name is Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra. We met him at his studio, called, “Rich Art Studio”, 245B Basement Nightbazaar, Changklan Road, Chiang Mai. I talked to him about my Peace Project. I belief in the, “Nonviolent”, philosophy of Gandhi, which I advocate in my project.

Tita Gallery is located in Mae Rim District, where the tourists can stop on the way to Mae Sa Elephant Camp, or the trip to the North of Chiang Mai. Although it is a popular coffee spot, the gallery is also known for its range of art from the traditional to the contemporary, as well as its support of local artists. Recently Tita Gallery has featured work by renowned watercolor and magazine illustrators Khun Manoth Kitticheewan and Khun Narongyot.
68 Mu 6, Rimtai,Maerim, Chiang Mai, Thailand +66 53 297 811
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Documentary Arts Asia seeks to encourage and support emerging Asian photographers, documentary artists, and filmmakers. In turn, the gallery aims to give the Thai and visiting international public more exposure to this burgeoning art form, which has some real stories to tell. Past exhibitions have included works featuring Thailand’s Buddhist monks, a photographic spotlight on the contrasts between North and South Korea, and a multicultural project entitled, I AM BANGKOK by Lilian Suwanrumpha.
2/7 Wualai Road, Soi 3, Chiang Mai, Thailand,+66 81 387 470
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

La Luna Gallery: Since 2004, La Luna Gallery has showcased the work of a number of talented emerging artists from Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Although some of those who have exhibited here are well-known, most are up-and-coming experimental artists such as Trinh Truan from Vietnam, who has since gone on to exhibit in New York. Within its multi-floor 400 meter square venue are displays of paintings, photos, prints, sculptures, and design products. A unique cooperation with the Elephant Parade makes La Luna Gallery the sole seller in Thailand of the miniature elephants created by Thai and European artists. La Luna Gallery also cooperates with interior designers and offers special deals to developers.
190 Charoenraj Rd. T.Watgate, A.Muang, Chiang Mai, +05 33 06 678
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

H Gallery Chiang Mai: Alongside its larger sister gallery in Bangkok, H Gallery is one of Thailand’s leading venues for emerging regional and international art. Established in 2002, the gallery began with a focus on emerging Asian artists and has since established a program of exhibitions and installations that aim to generate critical and artistic dialogue on contemporary art practices for a global audience. The gallery’s Project H Space is now in its third year, and functions as a platform to exhibit more experimental artists. H Gallery Chiang Mai has seen notable artists and events, such as the 2012 Mit Jai Inn exhibit, which received critical acclaim.
H Gallery Chiang Mai, Tiger Kingdom, Mae Rim, Chiang Mai, +66 (0) 85 021 5508
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John called out, “Ing! Come see this artist’s work. You are going like what you see. He is working from a very small picture of Gandhi. He is very good.”

When John mentioned Gandhi, I immediately paid attention because I was very interested to see the work. His name is Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra. We met him at his studio, called, “Rich Art Studio”, 245B Basement Nightbazaar, Changklan Road, Chiang Mai. I talked to him about my Peace Project. I belief in the, “Nonviolent”, philosophy of Gandhi, which I advocate in my project.

I went back to visit Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra again a few days later. He has almost completed Gandhi’s drawing. I enjoyed seeing his drawing.

Suvannabhumi is one of the only galleries to focus almost exclusively on Burmese artists. The space provides a retrospective look at Burmese artists and their work in a variety of mediums, ranging from oil on canvas to sculptures. The gallery hopes that these types of art exhibitions will help visitors to experience the rich culture of Burma and celebrate it as a center of exquisite art and architecture.
116, Chareonrat Road,T. Watgate, A. Muang, Chiang Mai,+66 81 031 5309
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Galerie Panisa: Nestled in the heart of Chiang Mai, Galerie Panisa is a privately owned enterprise founded in 2002 by the Chindasilpa family, who collectively share a passion for art and furthering the reputation of artists in the Chiang Mai and Northern areas of Thailand. The gallery organizes around five or six exhibitions each year for collectors and art lovers alike to enjoy. All those who volunteer their time at the Gallery are fine artists from the area and therefore can provide visitors with insider knowledge, as well as curating exciting and imaginative exhibitions. Recently the gallery hosted the works of Missamai Prutamang, who explored the lives of Northern Thailand’s hill tribes. His exhibition showed how even these remote tribes are integrating more and more with modern culture.

Ne’na Contemporary Art Space: Ne’na takes a wholly collaborative, international approach to its exhibitions and activities. Founded in 1998 by a group of Thai and Swedish artists, the space consists of several buildings in the traditional Lanna style, in which artists-in-residence live and work together. The cooperative vibe extends to the local arts community, who often work with the international residents on creative projects. Many of the works produced by Ne’na artists are large scale and site specific, like Royce Ng and Daisy Bisenieks Hanging Altar (2009), an installation that recreated the entire cultural center out of natural materials and hanging plants. Although located a mere 2km from Chiang Mai city, Ne’na feels more like a tranquil haven in which to appreciate art inspired by the landscape of Northern Thailand.
Monfai Cultural Center, Living Museum 6 soi7 khor, Sukasem Road, T. Partan, A.Muang, Chiang Mai, Thailand, +66 89 266 6547
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

H Q Gallery: Within the picturesque city of Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, there are an estimated 1,500 practicing art students and a further 1,000 independent artists, drawn to this magical area by its natural beauty and light, not to mention its fine arts departments within Chiang Mai University and five colleges of tertiary education.

Many of these young artists continue to pursue a career as professionals, some becoming famous in the process. Our job at HQ Art Gallery is to try to pick out those with the greatest talents, while their names are still relatively unknown and their works can be sold at realistic prices. What we offer to you is great value for money and by buying these paintings you are also helping young artists to fund their continuing studies and start their careers.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.hqartgallery.com/artists.html

Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John called out, “Ing! Come see this artist’s work. You are going like what you see. He is working from a very small picture of Gandhi. He is very good.”

When John mentioned Gandhi, I immediately paid attention because I was very interested to see the work. His name is Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra. We met him at his studio, called, “Rich Art Studio”, 245B Basement Nightbazaar, Changklan Road, Chiang Mai. I talked to him about my Peace Project. I belief in the, “Nonviolent”, philosophy of Gandhi, which I advocate in my project.

I went back to visit Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra again a few days later. He has almost completed Gandhi’s drawing. I enjoyed seeing his drawing.

Michael Good’s Comments on Gandhi

Michael Good: Wonderful.Tears of Joy,remembering t’was in reading his autobiography then the film touching me with such deep feeling,that brought me into my own journey.And now,experiencing the sadness of the upsurge of conflict resulting in so much violence 70yrs since partition as I watch TV portrayal, discussion with those of families who witnessed the horrific times managing to survive.Joy & sadness,but I think helping me to ground myself to move on spiritually better so.I’d love a picture of ‘Gandhiji’!

Street Art, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Discovering Chiang Mai’s Amazing Street Art
by Kian & Sri | May 1, 2016 | Chiang Mai
Street Art in Chiang Mai or generally in Thailand is not automatically illegal as many walls are filled with religious signs and symbols of prosperity. Locals, on the contrary, have different opinions: while some welcome street art as a form of creativity, others will tell you that it has no connection to their culture and simply consider it vandalism.
One thing for sure: street art is the reflection of an artist’s imagination. It offers a way to connect with people in a different way, to get publicly noticed and to put a lasting stamp in an unexpected place. On top, it makes old plain walls more interesting and attractive.

For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.how2travelsmart.com/discovering-chiang-mais-amazing-street-art/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

We were lucky to meet Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 245 B, Chiang Mai Night Bazaar, Chiangklan Road, Chiang Mai.

He was busy explaining to his customer about the writing on his artwork.
Chiang Mai’s Top 10 Contemporary Art Galleries

A. J. Samuels
Nestled in Northern Thailand, 700km away from the bustling tourist mecca of Bangkok, Chiang Mai has positioned itself as the cultural capital of Thailand, with many tech start-ups, digital designers, and artists forming a creative hub in the city. With numerous creatives taking up residence here, Chiang Mai has become an extremely artistically and visually rich city to visit. Explore the city’s top ten galleries with our guide.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai. He did the portrait from a photo given to him by customers.

Sangdee Art Gallery
Meaning ‘good light’ in Thai, the not-for-profit Sangdee Gallery has set itself the task of promoting not only local but also national and international artistic talent. The space has previously showcased the work of Royal Academy alumnus Chris Bredon, who made a study of Aung San Suu Kyi during her house arrest in Rangoon and has also painted canvases inspired by his travels across Madagascar and the African Continent. Sangdee Gallery also has a lively café attached to it and plays host to open mic nights, as well as live musical performances from emerging local talent.
5 Sirimankalajarn Rd, Soi 5 Amphur Muang Tambol Suthep, Chiang Mai, Thailand, +66 53 894 955
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng talked to his customers. One of his artwork was displayed between them.

Gongdee Gallery
With one of the largest artistic spaces in Chiang Mai, Gongdee Gallery is a veritable incubator of local creative talent. Established in 1989, the gallery set out to showcase some of the finest wooden creations of the Chiang Mai area, blending both Oriental and Western styles of contemporary art. Home to dramatic sculptures such as large Buddhas and altars painted by local artist Baniya, some of the works include home interiors, soft furnishings, and tapestries.
12 Soi 1 Nimmanhaemin Rd., A.Muang Chiang Mai, Thailand, +66 53 225 032
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng waved good bye to his customers.
Matoom Art Space

Showcasing the work of local artist Chumpol Taksapornchai, the Matoom Art Space, which was established in 2014, promotes Thai and Southeast Asian contemporary art. Including work in a variety of mediums such as oil, acrylic, and watercolor on handmade bamboo papers, Taksaponchai’s versatile artwork exudes a peaceful aura and allows those who come to view it to take a moment to relax and reflect.
136/4 Ratchapakinai Rd., T.Prasign A.Muang, Mueang Chiang Mai, +66 89 998 8055
For more information please visit the following link:
https://theculturetrip.com/asia/thailand/articles/chiang-mai-s-top-10-contemporary-art-galleries/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

We were lucky to meet Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 245 B, Chiang Mai Night Bazaar, Chiangklan Road, Chiang Mai.

I went back to visit Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng again. At the same time, I visited Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra. He was working on a commissioned portrait of a lovely couple. We talked about artwork and his philosophy that he practices to keep him peaceful and free.

A Tale of Two Homes Tales of Navin
Commemorative Exhibitions to mark the 20th anniversary of Navin Production

Launch: May 1-2, 2015

To commemorate 20-years since the founding of Navin Production, artist Navin Rawanchaikul together with collector Dr. Disaphol Chansiri have organised a special collaborative art event at three-venues around the artist’s hometown of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.navinproduction.com/new-list.php?action=4

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng’s Drawing, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng was working on a commissioned portrait of a lovely couple. We talked about artwork and his philosophy that he practices to keep him peaceful and free.

Ne’-Na Contemporary Art Space: We are an artist-run residency program in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand. The program gives artists the opportunity to develop and expand their work and engage in intercultural exchange amidst a supportive network of local and international artists.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.nena-artspace.com/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng’s Painting, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Ne’-Na Contemporary Art Space, Artist Projects: AIRs art exhibition by Jeannette Castioni
Art exhibition by our current ( April ) artists-in-residence: Jeannette Castioni, Italy based in Iceland and Rosario Vásquez Mira, Chilli.
Jeannette Castioni: My art-practice is often stimulate throughout workshops and seminars as instruments to engage with people as well as localities, to become acquainted about site-specific issues helping me to generate portrays of local peculiarities. My projects and analyses are often triggered by collective behaviours and ideologies, where people skills and projections are becoming part of their practice in the ordinary, and where subject strives for agencies. The organization of small communities alongside subject definitions are main platforms of enquiries; where main analysis try to unfold how subjects are playing different values and projections inside the social realm. I believe the way people activate potentialities be a necessary chore in the everyday, where re-enactment of forces entrenched in the urge of life as motivational forces, create frictions otherwise absent.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.nena-artspace.com/projects/

Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng and his paints, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

We were lucky to meet Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng, Thai Artist in Chiang Mai on Monday, August 14, 2017 at 245 B, Chiang Mai Night Bazaar, Chiangklan Road, Chiang Mai.

I went back to visit Mr. Kittidet Wongmueng again. At the same time, I visited Mr. Phaiboon Bannasatra. He was working on a commissioned portrait of a lovely couple. We talked about artwork and his philosophy that he practices to keep him peaceful and free.

Ne’-Na Contemporary Art Space, Artist Projects: AIRs art exhibition by Rosario Vásquez Mira, Chilli
Rosario Vasquez Mira, Chilean Artist: “The Central Market Project”
“The Central Market Project” intends to show the vivacious and colourful activity that takes place at Chiang Mai’s Central Market. From early hours in the morning the movement starts and the merchandise is out. Corn, t-shirts , frogs, mangos and snails join the crowds of people buying, selling, chopping and cooking. The smells, the noises and colors fill the cluttered space. These watercolor paintings express the movement through the colors and bring out the emotion in the middle of the ordinary. They shift your focus to a renewed point of view.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.nena-artspace.com/projects/

Street Art, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

If Walls Could Talk by Vincent Millet
Chiang Mai is awash with art, but many people probably don’t notice the growing number of tagged walls, painted concrete, graffiti style advertising, anonymous stickers, spray painted stencils and mysterious signals dotted around town. Unlike in some parts of the world, street art hasn’t been as prolific here, and has therefore stayed for the most part under the public radar. While you may occasionally glance, peripherally as you whiz past on your motorbike, a few dilapidated walls, some abandoned buildings or a construction site or two marked by artistic expression, they probably don’t cause much more than a “huh” or a second glance. Yes, life is hectic, and often the little things go unnoticed, but take a moment and pay attention! There is a whole creative universe alive in our city streets.
A fringe culture that stakes claim on public spaces and continues to evolve by generating innovative new forms, graffiti is a movement which has evolved so much in terms of expression and style that it is now generally termed “street art”.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.chiangmaicitylife.com/citylife-articles/if-walls-could-talk/

Street Art, Chiang Mai, Thailand
If Walls Could Talk by Vincent Millet
In Thailand, this movement likely emerged about a decade ago, led by artists and writers such as Kobby, Yuree Kensaku, Floyd Floyds, and Mamafaka, whose moustachioed hairy monster character, Mr. Hellyeah, brought him acclaim throughout the wider world of art and design. Tragically, Mamafaka drowned in Phuket this past September, shocking not only his fellow street artists but the graphic design communities in Thailand as well. This inspired the artists to create stunning memorials for him which can be seen in Chiang Mai today.
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.chiangmaicitylife.com/citylife-articles/if-walls-could-talk/

Street Art, Chiang Mai, Thailand
If Walls Could Talk by Vincent Millet
The local street art community is both tight-knit and welcoming, unafraid to break with tradition and traverse cultural boundaries. One Chiang Mai based street artist, Orange, is a 28-year-old female. New to the street art circle, she has managed to pave her way in this male-dominated universe. “There are three girls in Chiang Mai who graffiti and more than 20 guys,” she tells me. “But negative comments about women doing street art are mainly from outsider men who remain in the Palaeolithic age and who still think that a woman is only good to stay at home to care for children.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.chiangmaicitylife.com/citylife-articles/if-walls-could-talk/

Street Art, Chiang Mai, Thailand
Welcome To My Beloved Country, Thailand
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

If Walls Could Talk by Vincent Millet
Having graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts at Chiang Mai University, art in its broader sense is not unknown to Orange. So why choose graffiti to express herself? “I’m not just a graffiti artist,” she says. “I’m a painter first and foremost. But graffiti essentially allows me to express myself in a free way. I paint what I like and share my work with as many people as possible. This outreach is not always obvious at a traditional exhibition where rules are more restrictive. I also don’t do the same thing in the gallery that I do in the street. I completely separate these two worlds.”
Orange is a lone wolf in the Chiang Mai graffiti world. She does not belong to a crew and she has no desire to join one: “I’m addicted to my freedom and the idea of belonging to a crew and being held accountable… no thanks! I want to continue to express myself as I see fit.”
For more information please visit the following link:
http://www.chiangmaicitylife.com/citylife-articles/if-walls-could-talk/

Go to the top