Mumbles Visitors, Swansea Bay, Wales, UK, June 9, 2019

Mumbles Visitors, Swansea Bay, Wales, UK, June 9, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John was waiting for me to come down from Oystermouth Castle hill.

Oystermouth Castle (Welsh: Castell Ystum Llwynarth) is a Norman stone castle in Wales, overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the village of the Mumbles.

I looked down seeing Mumbles village.

We walked along the shops of Mumbles center toward the promenade by Swansea Bay.

Beautiful baskets of mixed flowers are hung in front of some shops and bars.

Father and son were enjoying ice-cream together by the view of Swansea bay.

Swansea bay at the time of a receding tide.

People enjoyed walking along the promenade of Swansea bay.

Over all the mountaintops is peace.

In all treetops you perceive scarcely a breath.

The little birds in the forest are silent.

Wait then; soon you, too, will have peace.

By JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (1749 – 1832)

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

Leave home In the sunshine: Dance through a meadow – Or sit by a stream and just be. The lilt of the water Will gather your worries And carry them down to the sea.

By J. DONALD WALTERS 

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

THE PEACE OF BEING AT ONE WITH NATURE

The morning sun, the new sweet earth and the great silence

By TC. MCLUHAN 

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

Once you have heard meadowlark                                                                                                                       and caught the scent of fresh-plowed earth,                                                                                                                            you cannot escape peace.

By SEQUICHI

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

I lay in a meadow until the unwrinkled serenity

entered into my bones, and made me into one                                          with the browsing kine, the still greenery,                  the drifting clouds, and the swooping birds. 

By ALICE JAMES 91848 – 1892)

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

DRAW AWAY

I can’t bear a journey to the village –

I’m too contented here. I call my son to close the wooden gate. Thick wine drunk in quiet woods, green moss, Jade gray water under April winds –

and beyond the simmering dusk of the wild.

By TU FU

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

Do not let trifles disturb your tranquility of mind.

Life is too precious to be sacrificed for the nonessential and transient.

By GRENVILLE KLEISER

From A SPECIAL GIFT OF PEACE & CALM BY A HELEN EXLEY GIFTBOOK, Published in 2001

Go to the top

Oystermouth Castle, Swansea, Wales, UK, June 9, 2019

Oystermouth Castle, Swansea, Wales, UK, June 9, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

This is the Gower Peninsula’s finest castle, standing on a small hill with a magnificent view over Swansea Bay in the resort town of Mumbles. It is well-preserved, intricate and exciting to explore. Oystermouth Castle was founded by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle

We enjoyed walking in the woods in back of the Castle, near the chapel window.

 Sun shines on leaves 

Touching little pink flowers

On the ground a patch of light yellow-green grass

A bush of dark green plants near by

On the surface of the castle wall

Creates a harmony of textures

And shades of green

A moment of utopia on earth

I was so happy to be surrounded by nature. We need to protect the forests and create more green places for all of us to enjoy.

Peace with Nature, where all life originates.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Monday, June 17, 2019

Here there are beautiful tall trees.

 There is a woods in back of the castle.

Sun shines through the space between the leaves that cover the tree branches, casting a beautiful shadow on the tree trunk.

Adults and children have a good time walking through the woods.

I love the roots of the tree, growing out and wrapping around the trunk of the tree.

John walked out of the woods, unexpextedly viewing a large open space of neatly cut grass.

With a special lens I viewed the beautiful pink flowers inside the castle.

Oystermouth Castle (Welsh: Castell Ystum Llwynarth) is a Norman stone castle in Wales, overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the village of the Mumbles.

Oystermouth Castle, showing the gatehouse and the chapel window

 The chapel (on the second floor of the chapel block) has 14th century traceried windows. According to local tradition the chapel was built under the direction of Aline de Mowbray.

People enjoyed playing football on the grass. I enjoyed viewing the shadow of the castle cast upon the grass.

Go to the top

Oystermouth Castle, Mumbles Village, Swansea Bay, Wales, UK, 6.9.2019

Oystermouth Castle, Mumbles Village, Swansea Bay, Wales, UK, June 9, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Oystermouth Castle (Welsh: Castell Ystum Llwynarth) is a Norman stone castle in Wales, overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the village of the Mumbles.

The early castle The first castle was founded by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle soon after 1106 following the capture of Gower by the Normans. In 1116 the Welsh of Deheubarth retook the Gower Peninsula and forced William to flee his castle which was put to the torch. The castle was rebuilt soon afterwards, but was probably destroyed again in 1137 when Gower was once more retaken by the princes of Deheubarth. The Londres or London family finally died out in 1215 when Gower was again taken by the Welsh under the leadership of Llywelyn the Great. In 1220 the Welsh were expelled from the peninsula and the government of Henry III of England returned the barony of Gower to John de Braose who rebuilt both Swansea Castle and Oystermouth.

In the 13th century the Braose family were Lords of Gower and held the castle as part of their extensive land holdings and titles, including other castles on Gower and in the Welsh Marches. The de Braose dynasty could afford to rebuild Oystermouth castle in stone. A high curtain wall was built, internal buildings added, a chapel, basements,three storey residential buildings with fireplaces and garderobes on each floor. The castle had every residential feature necessary for living in some comfort and was also refortified cleverly. Towards the end of the century Oystermouth rather than Swansea Castle became their principal residence. Edward I paid a brief visit here in December 1284.

By 1331 the Lords of Gower were living elsewhere and the castle declined in importance in the 14th century.

The daughter of the last de Breos Lord, Aline de Breos, who improved the chapel making it one of the finest in any castle in south Wales, later married John de Mowbray, and the Lordship of Gower including the castle at Oystermouth passed to the de Mowbrays through this marriage, and then to the Herbert family, and finally the Somersets, who became successive Marquis of Worcester and finally Dukes of Beaufort.

Decline and decay After the Middle Ages, the castle gradually fell into ruin. A survey of Gower made in 1650 describes Oystermouth Castle as [a]n old decayed castle of no use, but of a very pleasant situation. It was portrayed in art in the 18th century as a picturesque ruin, and was restored by George Grant Francis in the 1840s while the castle was owned by the then Duke of Beaufort. In 1927 the Duke of Beaufort gave the castle to Swansea Corporation; today, the castle is maintained under the responsibility of the City and County of Swansea council.

2000s restoration In 2009 the National Assembly for Wales announced it was investing £19 million in the country’s heritage sites in an attempt to boost tourism.[1] As part of the programme Oystermouth Castle closed in 2010 while it underwent a £1 m refurbishment; it reopened to the public in July the following year.[2] Following the first phase of conservation works Oystermouth Castle reopened to the public in mid July 2011. The scheme includes new visitor facilities, an educational space, improvements to access and a 30-foot high glass viewing platform and bridge that leads to Alina’s Chapel.

Notable features of the castle On either side of the entrance gate the walls curve inward, showing that at one time there were supposed to be two round towers built into the gatehouse. It is unknown whether these were ever built.

The chapel (on the second floor of the chapel block) has 14th century traceried windows. According to local tradition the chapel was built under the direction of Aline de Mowbray.

Remnants of an ornate medieval painting dating back to the 14th century have recently been found in the chapel. The surviving painting is thought to be over 700 years old and was spotted during conservation work in the historic attraction’s chapel area. Exposure to the elements has taken its toll on the painting over time but expert Cadw analysis suggests it’s a double-arched canopy that contains the figures of angels. Some of the clear elements of the painting that remain include a wing with multiple feathers and circular shapes that form a head with yellow hair surrounded by a nimbus. It’s thought the painting is both highly important and testimony to the original design of the chapel attributed to Alina de Breos in the early 14th century that once formed part of a larger work of art.

This is the Gower Peninsula’s finest castle, standing on a small hill with a magnificent view over Swansea Bay in the resort town of Mumbles. It is well-preserved, intricate and exciting to explore. Oystermouth Castle was founded by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle

Ogmore Castle early in the 12th century. Of this first castle, which was probably a ringwork and bailey on the highest part of the hill, there is now no trace. The castle later came to be the chief residence of the lords of Gower, and its history became intimately connected with that of Swansea Castle.

The earliest stone building of the castle, the keep, dates from the 12th century. This is the building straight ahead of the entrance. It has been much altered and incorporated into a later block, of which it now forms the southern half. Originally it was a free-standing, rectangular building, entered through an arched doorway, now blocked to the right of the present entrance porch. The great hall would have been on the first floor. Twice the Welsh burnt this early castle, first in 1116 and later in 1215.

In the 13th century the de Braoses were lords of Gower and held the castle, and towards the end of the century Oystermouth rather than Swansea became their principal residence. Edward I paid a brief visit here in December 1284. The de Braoses rebuilt the castle in stone, and most of what remains today is from that period. On the east and west sides is a high and impressive curtain wall with a wall-walk along the top. At its north-east end this leads to a garderobe and then rises to a small tower from which the panoramic view is magnificent. This is a good place from which to appreciate the lovely south window of the chapel. On its north side the castle is enclosed by the outside walls of several residential blocks.

The castle entrance on the south side is an arched passage flanked by what were originally two half-round towers. These have had their fronts hacked off, and the remainder patched and tidied up. Inside the castle the southern part is an open courtyard, with remains of two long, rectangular buildings against the curtain walls on either side of the entrance. The rest of the castle buildings fill the northern end. Behind the keep is a rectangular room with small windows and a fireplace in the south wall. Above this was the lord’s private apartment, or solar, and below is a basement.

A narrow passage leads through the top floor of the north-west block, thought to be the earliest stone addition to the castle after the keep. It is a high, three storey block with a barrel-vaulted basement, and similar middle floor, now held up by a modern pillar. In the south-east corner there is a fascinating narrow passage, dimly lit by narrow slits, which leads back to the keep. It skirts round a spiral staircase which can be glimpsed through its slits. To the west of the keep is a small guardroom. The north end of the west range is a three-storey residential building with fireplaces and garderobes on each floor. To the south is a range with steps leading down to two barrel-vaulted basements and steps up to a large, once well-lit room, with the remains of a large fireplace in its west wall. Apparently the de Braoses lived in some comfort here.

There remains the chapel block on the east side, architecturally the high point of the castle. It was added in the early 14th century, and is usually attributed to Lady Alenora de Mowbray, wife of lord John Mowbray who held the castle then. It blends in well with the rest of the castle, but its detail suggest a much greater level of refinement. On the ground floor are a large fireplace, narrow trefoil-headed splayed windows and a garderobe in the south-east corner. Above is a similar floor. But on the top floor was a large chapel, the great glory of which is its east window. This and the other chapel windows, retain their fine tracery, the finest of the period of any window in south-east Wales.

The chapel use was short-lived, for by 1331 the lords of Gower lived elsewhere. A gradual decline set in, and by the 16th century the castle was ruined. It still has the power to stir the imagination.

Welsh’ s Flag with red dragon as a symbol

Mumbles’ Village

I stood on the hill of Oystermouth Castle and looked down to Swansea Bay, the pier extending onto the beach, where the light house stands tall by the edge of the bay.

We enjoyed viewing outside of the Castle with beautiful yellow flowers in full bloom near the stone structure of the Castle creating a romantic atmosphere.

Two bouquets of pink flowers growing out of the wall as if it is an invitation saying “Hello” to the visitors who come to enjoy the Castle. Plants and trees beautify the place and surroundings creating oxygen for us to breath at the same time taking in carbon dioxide giving a healthy environment.

Sunlight shines on the leaves, giving different shades of green and light yellow as if the artist painted them on a canvas.

This is a glimpse of beauty that nature creates, if we take notice, cultivate, and enjoy it in our beautiful world.

Go to the top

Dylan Thomas ‘Poems, Seagulls, Swansea Centre, and the Shoppers, Wales, UK, on, May 25, 2019

Dylan Thomas ‘Poems, Seagulls, Swansea Center, and the Shoppers, Wales, UK, on, May 25, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Oh, Seagulls!

You are free

Flying above people

Landing on the roofs and on the ground

Walking among people

As if you are the shoppers

Picking throw away food

For your delicious meals

Swansea is your home

No place like Home

Poem written by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, June 8, 2019, 12:30 a.m.

While I was walking among the Welsh, I thought about Dylan Thomas. He is one of my favorite artists. I wish that he would have lived longer than thirty-nine years. He passed away on November 9, 1953, shortly after his thirty-ninth birthday.

Dylan Thomas was one of the great Poet and writer in his time, 1914-1953 and at the present time. He was born in Swansea on October 27, 1914. He was a son of the senior English master at the grammar School in Swansea.

He worked briefly at the South Wales Evening Post before embarking on a literary career in London. He wrote eighteen poems in 1934, twenty-five poems in 1936.

He wrote, The Map of London in 1939, Deaths and Entrances in 1946, and, In Country Sleep, in 1952.

Dylan Thomas’ collected poems 1934-1952 was published in 1952.

Throughout his life he also wrote short stories, the most famous collection being the autobiographical stories comprising, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog, in 1940.

During the 1940s and early 1950s he also wrote film scripts, and features and talks for radio.

Between 1950 and 1953 he went on four lecturing visits to America, and it was on the last of these trips that he completed his radio play for voices, Under Milk Wood.

On November 9, 1953, shortly after his thirty-ninth birthday, he collapsed and died in New York City. He is buried in Laugharne, Carmarthenshire, which had become his main home since 1949.

On March 1, 1982 a memorial stone to commemorate Dylan Thomas was unveiled in ‘Poets’ Corner’ in Westminster Abbey.

The above information was taken from, “The Collected Stories Dylan Thomas”, edited by Walford Davies, introduced by Leslie Norris.

Fern Hill by Dylan Thomas

Now as I was young and easy under the apple boughs

About the lilting house and happy as the grass was green,

The night above the dingle starry,

Time let me hail and climb

Golden in the heydays of his eyes,

And honoured among wagons

I was prince of the apple towns

And once below a time

I lordly had the trees and leaves

Trail with daisies and barley

Down the rivers of the windfall light.

And as I was green and carefree,

famous among the barns

About the happy yard and singing as the farm was home,

In the sun that is young once only,

Time let me play and be

Golden in the mercy of his means,

And green and golden

I was huntsman and herdsman,

the calves Sang to my horn,

the foxes on the hills barked clear and cold,

And the sabbath rang slowly

In the pebbles of the holy streams.

All the sun long it was running,

it was lovely,

the hay Fields high as the house,

the tunes from the chimneys, it was air

And playing, lovely and watery

And fire green as grass.

And nightly under the simple stars

As I rode to sleep the owls were bearing the farm away,

All the moon long I heard, blessed among stables, the nightjars

Flying with the ricks, and the horses

Flashing into the dark.

And then to awake, and the farm, like a wanderer white

With the dew, come back, the cock on his shoulder: it was all

Shining, it was Adam and maiden,

The sky gathered again

And the sun grew round that very day.

So it must have been after the birth of the simple light In the first, spinning place, the spellbound horses walking warm

Out of the whinnying green stable

On to the fields of praise.

And honoured among foxes and pheasants by the gay house

Under the new made clouds and happy as the heart was long,

In the sun born over and over,

I ran my heedless ways,

My wishes raced through the house high hay

And nothing I cared, at my sky blue trades, that time allows

In all his tuneful turning so few and such morning songs

Before the children green and golden

Follow him out of grace,

Nothing I cared, in the lamb white days, that time would take me

Up to the swallow thronged loft by the shadow of my hand,

In the moon that is always rising,

Nor that riding to sleep

I should hear him fly with the high fields

And wake to the farm forever fled from the childless land.

Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means,

Time held me green and dying

Though I sang in my chains like the sea.

From Read Me 2: A Poem For Every Day of The Year

The Song of the Mischievous Dog by Dylan Thomas

There are many who say that a dog has its day,

There are others who think that a lobster is pink,

And that bees never work in their hives.

There are fewer, of course, who insist that a horse

Has a horn and two humps on its head,

And a fellow who jests that a mare can build nests Is as rare as a donkey that’s red.

Yet in spite of all this, I have moments of bliss,

For I cherish a passion for bones,

And though doubtful of biscuit,

I’m willing to risk it,

And I love to chase rabbits and stones.

But my greatest delight is to take a good bite

At a calf that is plump and delicious;

And if I indulge in a bite at a bulge,

Let’s hope you won’t think me too vicious.

From Read Me: A Poem A Day

Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright

Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,

And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,

Do not go gentle into that good night.

30 Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,

Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears,

I pray. Do not go gentle into that good night.

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

From A Poem For Every Night of The Year

From ‘Under Milk Wood’ by Dylan Thomas

Every morning when I wake,

Dear Lord, a little prayer I make,

O please do keep Thy lovely eye

On all poor creatures born to die

And every evening at sun-down

I ask a blessing on the town,

For whether we last the night or no

I’m sure is always touch-and-go.

We are not wholly bad or good

Who live our lives under Milk Wood,

And Thou, I know, wilt be the first

To see our best side, not our worst.

O let us see another day!

Bless us all this night, I pray,

 And to the sun we all will bow

And say, good-bye – but just for now!

From A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

And Death Shall Have No Dominion by Dylan Thomas

And death shall have no dominion.

Dead man naked they shall be one

With the man in the wind and the west moon;

When their bones are picked clean and the clean bones gone,

They shall have stars at elbow and foot;

Though they go mad they shall be sane,

Though they sink through the sea they shall rise again;

Though lovers be lost love shall not;

And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.

Under the windings of the sea

They lying long shall not die windily;

Twisting on racks when sinews give way,

Strapped to a wheel, yet they shall not break;

Faith in their hands shall snap in two,

And the unicorn evils run them through;

Split all ends up they shan’t crack;

And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.

No more may gulls cry at their ears

Or waves break loud on the seashores;

Where blew a flower may a flower no more

Lift its head to the blows of the rain;

Though they be mad and dead as nails,

Heads of the characters hammer through daisies;

Break in the sun till the sun breaks down,

And death shall have no dominion.

From A Poem For Every Day Of The Year

From love’s first fever by Dylan Thomas

From love’s first fever to her plague, from the soft second

And to the hollow minute of the womb,

From the unfolding to the scissored caul,

The time for breast and the green apron age

When no mouth stirred about the hanging famine,

All world was one, one windy nothing,

My world was christened in a stream of milk.

And earth and sky were as one airy hill.

The sun and mood shed one white light.

From the first print of the unshodden foot, the lifting

Hand, the breaking of the hair,

From the first scent of the heart, the warning ghost, And to the first dumb wonder at the flesh,

The sun was red, the moon was grey, The earth and sky were as two mountains meeting.

The body prospered, teeth in the marrowed gums,

The growing bones, the rumour of the manseed

Within the hallowed gland, blood blessed the heart,

And the four winds, that had long blown as one,

Shone in my ears the light of sound,

Called in my eyes the sound of light.

And yellow was the multiplying sand,

Each golden grain spat life into its fellow,

Green was the singing house.

The plum my mother picked matured slowly,

The boy she dropped from darkness at her side Into the sided lap of light grew strong,

Was muscled, matted, wise to the crying thigh,

And to the voice that, like a voice of hunger,

Itched in the noise of wind and sun.

And from the first declension of the flesh

I learnt man’s tongue, to twist the shapes of thoughts

Into the stony idiom of the brain,

To shade and knit anew the patch of words

Left by the dead who, in their moonless acre,

Need no word’s warmth.

The root of tongues ends in a spentout cancer,

That but a name, where maggots have their X.

I learnt the verbs of will, and had my secret;

The code of night tapped on my tongue;

What had been one was many sounding minded.

One wound, one mind, spewed out the matter,

One breast gave suck the fever’s issue;

From the divorcing sky I learnt the double,

The two-framed globe that spun into a score;

A million minds gave suck to such a bud As forks my eye;

Youth did condense; the tears of spring

Dissolved in summer and the hundred seasons;

One sun, one manna, warmed and fed.

Poem by Dylan Thomas

Go to the top

Swansea Center, Wall Murals and the Shoppers on, May 26&28, 2019

Swansea Center, Wall Murals and the Shoppers on, May 26&28, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

  The USA flag shows the location of American Hotel by the beach in Swansea.

We left Swansea beach and walked toward TESCO supermarket, which took about 10 minutes and it is close to the Shopping Center. We saw a man sitting on the sidewalk.

 We are not sure that he wanted to rest or beg.

 We arrived at TESCO and found out that the supermarket closes early on Sunday.

 I love to see the rays of sun rays upon the building.

 After TESCO we walked toward home, we went through Bus Station. We saw a young man outside Bus Station. He asked for change while we were passing him.

This young lady, holding a cigarette, standing by a door inside the Bus Station, asked us for change as well.

This sign inside the bus station advertises the Quadrant Shopping Center.

There were not many people traveling on Sunday, only these two pigeons, who enjoyed walking freely.

After we came out of the Bus Station, another man asked us for money. I am sad to see these people begging for money. I do not know what are their circumstances that caused them to beg. But I wish someone or the government would help them both mentally and physically.

 We passed a Tattoo shop and I was glad to see the mural on the wall. I noticed that tattoos are very popular here. I saw both men and women with tattoos, some only on an arm or leg, but some have tattoo’s covering a lot of their body. I thought that only young people love to tattoos for fashion, but I also saw middle aged people with tattoos.

I presume that this wall mural was produced by, Fresh Murals Co.

The signature shown here is, Read and Weeps.

An interesting graffiti near the wall mural.

John was waiting for me as I was taking photographs of the wall mural. The advertising on the opposite wall between people at both ends and John sitting by the tattoo sign made it an interesting composition.

We passed the Swansea Grand Theatre.

64

I like the sign of this Indian Cuisine restaurant.

Interesting mural on the store gate of a Tatto Lab shop.

Volunteer, Donate and Service, for good causes are good for society at last.

There is quite a mixed population in Swansea. Many Arabic shops, and Chinese shops on St. Helens Road and also Arabic, Chinese, Indian, and Thai restaurants throughout Swansea. So, we see all races of people walking on Swansea streets.

This is Swansea Shopping center, where I took these photographs on Tuesday, May 28, 2019.

By accident, I captured a picture of Phyllis neighbors and friends, Mikey, and Betty, his sister, stood next to him, they were talking to someone. These two people were very helpful to Phyllis, John’s sister. We are very grateful for their generosity.

John told me that he saw Chinese people in Swansea more than in previous years.

I was really surprised and enjoyed seeing this Seagull eating French frys on the tray, as if he or she was one of Burger King’s customers.

It is fun to see our reflection on the glass window.

Go to the top

Swansea Beach and the Visitors on Sunday, May 26, 2019

Swansea Beach and the Visitors on Sunday, May 26, 2019

  First thing we did before we went out of the house is to enjoy the blooming of spring flowers in Phyllis’s little garden. We miss Mom and Phyllis who devoted their energy and time taking care of family and this house. We wish they were here. Please do not fight, we will all perish one day, soon or later. Please get along and enjoy each other while you can.

I love plants and beautiful flowers. Thanks, Phyllis and Mom who created a beautiful little place for us.

Swansea Library allowed us to be temporary members. As members we can use free internet for 2 hours each day. Without membership free internet is only available for 30 minutes a day. For the record, we went to Swansea city center and asked a shop the cost of using the internet. The rate was 1 pound for 20 minutes. The library and the shop are the same distance from the house we are staying in. We appreciate the help Swansea Library gives to foreigners and others who come to visit Swansea.

After visiting the library, we usually enjoy the beach which is situated right next to the library. In fact, the large library windows look out directly onto Swansea Bay.

John was eager to step onto the beach, to walk about enjoying the scenery and remembering his youth playing here every chance he could.

We visited Swansea beach about two years ago, on Monday, October 9, 2017 and I wrote a poem as follows: Swansea Shore!

A poor little bird Standing on the edge

Watching the sea roll by

My poor sick husband Trying to compose himself Breathing in the fresh air Oh, Swansea Shore!

I came here before Seeing the waves Rolling and hugging you

In and out with the rhythm of the tides

Oh, Swansea Shore! I will come here again In the sunset of my life

And you will still be here For the long centuries to come

My little Grandson Kai

Holding his hands with his parents

Walking along the shore

Another younger generations will come

Admiring you with the sunset or the sunrise

The full moon appearing in the sky You will give pleasure for all to see,

Oh, Swansea Shore!

I love you!

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 4:17 am

This was one of the pictures that I took two years ago, which I posted along with my poem.

The information about the Swansea Bay which I posted when we came to Swansea last time. “Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is a bay on the Bristol Channel on the southern coast of Wales. Places on the bay include Swansea and Port Talbot. The River Neath, River Tawe, River Afan, River Kenfig and Clyne River flow into the bay. Swansea Bay (and upper reaches of the Bristol Channel) experience a large tidal range. The shipping ports in Swansea Bay are Swansea Docks, Port Talbot Docks and Briton Ferry wharfs. Oyster fishing was once an important industry in Swansea Bay, employing 600 people at its height in the 1860s. However, overfishing, disease and pollution had all but wiped out the oyster population by 1920. In 2005 plans were announced to reintroduce the Oyster farming industry.[1]” Beaches[edit] The bay is lined with sandy beaches. Each stretch of beach within the bay has its own individual name: • Aberavon Beach • Baglan Bay • Jersey Marine Beach • Swansea Beach • Mumbles Beach For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

 “Swansea Bay: Harnessing the power of our tides • Did you know… the UK has the second highest tidal range in the world and the difference in the range at Swansea Bay is a massive 7-9 metres! • Dave Sagan, Project Manager • An iconic, world-first infrastructure project in South West Wales • Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon will be the world’s first tidal lagoon power plant. • A tidal lagoon is a ‘U’ shaped breakwater, built out from the coast which has a bank of hydro turbines in it. Water fills up and empties the man-made lagoon as the tides rise and fall. We generate electricity on both the incoming and outgoing tides, four times a day, every day. • Due to the incredible tides on the West Coast of Britain, by keeping the turbine gates shut for just three hours, there is already a 14ft height difference in water between the inside and the outside of the lagoon. Power is then generated as the water rushes through 200ft long draft tubes, rotating the 23ft diameter hydro turbines. • The project was awarded a Development Consent Order in 2015 and is primed for construction. It will comprise 16 hydro turbines, a six-mile breakwater wall, generating electricity for 155,000 homes for the next 120 years. Its major delivery partners include Atkins, General Electric, Andritz Hydro, Le aing O’Rourke and Alun Griffiths Ltd.” For more information please visit the following link: http://www.tidallagoonpower.com/projects/swansea-bay/ I posted the above information about two years ago. I was so glad for the new pollution free project for Wales. I hoped that I would enjoy seeing this project come to reality when we visit Swansea next time. But unfortunately, the project still has not been completed. I hope that no matter what party is in control, the project will still go through. This will benefit the people, help the environment of the country, and in turn the world at large.

I always enjoy seeing the, “funny humps” on the horizon, which is the lighthouse at the Mumbles end of Swansea Bay.

“Swansea Bay: Wind plans In addition to tidal power, construction of an offshore windfarm in the Bay has been approved,[9] but construction has now been deferred owing to the costs involved. The windfarm was to have been sited at Scarweather Sands, about 5 km (3 mi) off the coast and visible from Porthcawl.” For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay I posted above information in 2017, when we visited Swansea last time. We saw some of the wind mills in two locations while we were on the Bus from Heathrow airport to Swansea city. Two of the large wind mills are in the photograph.

The lady enjoyed walking on the pathway along the beach.

John concentrated on capturing the action on the beach.  

The fresh air and gentle breeze against these two bikers faces on this beautiful seashore will to be remembered by them.

John probably said “Got it”. One of his perfect photographs, he captured on the beach.

A little one had fun on the beach with brother and mother. I wish to see Kai and his parents on the beach with us.

I saw at least two people holding equipment for digging worms for fishing.

Some people enjoyed the cool breeze on the steps while the tide was out before the waves roll back in covering the steps again.

Riding on the path next to beach is fun, especially having a loved one hugging you by the waist.

Happiness is freedom to enjoy biking, walking, or sitting in the pleasant atmosphere on Swansea beach.

 Swansea Bay, Pollution: For the last two decades of the 20th century, the bay was blighted by pollution, partly from the surrounding heavy industry and partly from sewerage outlets being sited at inappropriate locations including the main one that was located just seaward of Mumbles Lighthouse. A pumping station inside the cliff adjacent to Knab Rock brought all of Swansea city’s effluent in a raw form to this point. Adding to the problem was the natural current flow of the waters in the Bay which often did not move the polluted waters further out to sea. Ironically, the outgoing tide did not carry the raw sewage down the adjacent Bristol Channel, but instead cause it to be sucked in around the circumference of the Bay and only then out down the Channel. If not fully discharged on that tide, the incoming tide would then push the same effluent up the Channel, and once again circulate around the Bay. Efforts were made by the local authority to reduce the pollution in the Bay but care had to be taken to ensure the pollution did not move to the popular beach resorts in south Gower instead. This original sewer outlet was finally made inactive in around 1996 following the construction of a brand new pipeline which ran all the way back around the Bay following the line of the old Mumbles Railway as far as Beach Street, along the sea-side of the Maritime Quarter and through Swansea Docks to a new £90 million sewage treatment plant at Crymlyn Burrows near Port Tennant from which a new outlet was made, extending further out to sea. As a consequence of the huge improvement these works have made, it is hoped that Swansea Bay will achieve Blue Flag Beach status. Aberavon beach was awarded Blue Flag status in December 2007.[2]” For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

After the tide went out, it showed the remaining evidence of the living organisms that exist on the beach.

Soft sand on the sea shore is probably comfortable for running.

I asked John, “What is this big lump of sand? It Looks like poop.” He said, “ That hole was the place where people used a pipe do draw core sample of deeper sand to find warms for fishing. The sand in the pipe get discard on the surface.” One can learn new things, no matter how old you are.

I enjoyed seeing different types of shell, big and small.

 Shells are everywhere on the curve of tide waves that end on the beach. Like our hearts beating, the tide never stops its rhythmic cycle. in and out regularly like our heart beat that never stop until we no longer breath, as if when the tide never came back the beach lay dry and the organisms on the beach are vanishing.

I collected different types of shells for Kai while thinking of him, hoping that he will enjoy seeing the shells from the Swansea shore.

 I wish we would appreciate the sea more than we do, so that we will keep it clean from polution that humans dump in the sea including large quantities of plastic. The earth is not only for humans use. It belongs to all the organisms that live in the sea.

The sun cast our shadow on the beach for me to capture and remember our walk that beautiful day. “We miss you! We miss you! Until we meet again!

 I love this photo where John walked on the beautiful smooth sand, casting his perfect shadow at a 45 degrees angle. In front of him is a tall building reaching into the clouds and blue sky.

The wall dividing the United States and Mexico is a political problem for immigrants into USA, but not this wall.

Playing on the beach with mother and brother is fun, and happy time. They will remember this moment as long as they live.

A pretty young lady on walks alonghe beach.

The wind blows the hair while a cool breeze brings pleasure.

This gentleman is enjoying a time with no rain in the comfortable atmosphere of Swansea beach.

 Millions of pictures were taken by the beach for love ones at home or as a personal memory of the Swansea shore.

 I came to Swansea many times before, when Mom, John’s Mother and Phyllis, John’s sister were still alive. Mom passed away in 1996. We still came to visit Phyllis and Swansea. Then Phyllis passed away three years ago. We still visit Swansea. I miss Mom and Phyllis and said hello when I went in their rooms. Before I concentrated on taking photographs of places and monuments more than people. Lucky technology has allowed us to capture images of people, see their movements on video, and hear them talk. From now on I will concentrate on recording the stories of people rather than places. Places will continue to exist but people are here for only a limited time. Kai my grandson, who is three and a half, will look back at my photos posted on my website in ten or twenty years. Here he will see the difference time has made to the people and culture presented in my work and learn from this.

Go to the top

Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales –Part 7

Photograph and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You”Poem translated into Welsh By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017

Sent: 09 October 2017 19:38
From: Lewis, Hywel                                                      Subject: poem

Pan fyddwch chi’n mwynhau diferion glaw,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan fyddwch chi’n clywed adar yn canu,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan welwch chi bysgod’n nofio mewn dwr glân,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
Pan fyddwch chi’n clywed plant yn chwerthin,

Ddaw heddwch i chi,
A phan fyddwch chi’n hwmian wrth gerdded yn y goedwig

Ddaw heddwch i chi,,
A phan fyddwch chi’n eistedd yn dawel yn gwylio’r haul yn codi a’i osod
Gwrando ar y tonnau’n canu,
Yna ddaw heddwch i chi,
Gadewch i heddwch ddod atoch mewn gwahanol ffyrdd
Gadewch i heddwch fod gyda ni holl.

 Ing’s comments:
I was very lucky when I went to Swansea, Wales in October 2017. A friend came to visit us with her three daughters and her sister with one daughter. They made us very happy from their visit and all of them read my “Peace Comes to You” poem aloud for me to record their voices. They also wrote their peace comments from my Peace Project “What does Peace mean to you?” on my large Peace Poster. The girls enjoyed drawing artwork and writing their expressions on Peace. I was doubly lucky to have Mr. Hywel Lewis, who works at the Swansea Library, being kind enough to translate my poem “Peace Comes To You” into Welsh. Mr. Lewis also read my poem both in Welsh and in English for me to record. John went to Swansea many times to visit his sister but was unable to find anyone to translate my Peace Poem. John is Welsh, I thought that it is important for me to have a Welsh translation for my Peace Poem. I already have my Peace Poem translated into 28 languages and the Welsh translation added to this number made the total 29. I was so lucky, happy and grateful to receive this help, that I felt much better even though I had bad cold for the entire time of my trip to the UK.
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Wednesday, December 27, 2017

 

 Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Welsh translated into Welsh By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017

 Welsh (Cymraeg or y Gymraeg, pronounced Welsh pronunciation: [k?m?rai?, ? ??m?rai?] ( listen)) is a member of the Brittonic branch of the Celtic languages. It is spoken natively in Wales, by few in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).[10] Historically, it has also been known in English as “Cambrian”,[11] “Cambric”[12] and “Cymric”.[13]
The United Kingdom Census 2011 recorded that 19% of people aged three and over who live in Wales can speak Welsh, a decrease from the 20.8% recorded in 2001. An overall increase in the size of the Welsh population, most of whom are not Welsh speakers, appears to correspond with a fall in the number of Welsh speakers in Wales – from 582,000 in 2001 to 562,000 in 2011. This figure is still a greater number, however, than the 508,000 (18.7%) of people who said that they could speak Welsh in 1991. According to the Welsh Language Use Survey 2013–15, 24% of people aged three and over living in Wales were able to speak Welsh, demonstrating a possible increase in the prevalence of the Welsh language.[14]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Welsh translated into Welsh by Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Welsh orthography: Welsh is written in a Latin alphabet traditionally consisting of 28 letters, of which eight are digraphs treated as single letters for collation:
a, b, c, ch, d, dd, e, f, ff, g, ng, h, i, l, ll, m, n, o, p, ph, r, rh, s, t, th, u, w, y
In contrast to English practice, “w” and “y” are considered vowel letters in Welsh along with “a”, “e”, “i”, “o” and “u”.
The letter “j” is used in many everyday words borrowed from English, like jam, jôc “joke” and garej “garage”. The letters “k”, “q”, “v”, “x”, and “z” are used in some technical terms, like kilogram, volt and zero, but in all cases can be, and often are, replaced by Welsh letters: cilogram, folt and sero.[75] The letter “k” was in common use until the sixteenth century, but was dropped at the time of the publication of the New Testament in Welsh, as William Salesbury explained: “C for K, because the printers have not so many as the Welsh requireth”. This change was not popular at the time.[76]
The most common diacritic is the circumflex, which disambiguates long vowels, most often in the case of homographs, where the vowel is short in one word and long in the other: e.g. man “place” vs mân “fine”, “small”.
Morphology
Main articles: Colloquial Welsh morphology and Literary Welsh morphology
Welsh morphology has much in common with that of the other modern Insular Celtic languages, such as the use of initial consonant mutations and of so-called “conjugated prepositions” (prepositions that fuse with the personal pronouns that are their object). Welsh nouns belong to one of two grammatical genders, masculine and feminine, but they are not inflected for case. Welsh has a variety of different endings and other methods to indicate the plural, and two endings to indicate the singular of some nouns. In spoken Welsh, verbal features are indicated primarily by the use of auxiliary verbs rather than by the inflection of the main verb. In literary Welsh, on the other hand, inflection of the main verb is usual.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in Welsh translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017,  Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Welsh numerals
The traditional counting system used in the Welsh language is vigesimal, i.e. it is based on twenties, as in standard French numbers 70 (soixante-dix, literally “sixty-ten”) to 99 (quatre-vingt-dix-neuf, literally “four score nineteen”). Welsh numbers from 11 to 14 are “x on ten” (e.g. un ar ddeg: 11), 16 to 19 are “x on fifteen” (e.g. un ar bymtheg: 16), though 18 is deunaw, “two nines”; numbers from 21 to 39 are “1–19 on twenty”, 40 is deugain “two twenties”, 60 is trigain “three twenties”, etc. This form continues to be used, especially by older people, and it is obligatory in certain circumstances (such as telling the time, and in ordinal numbers).[77]
There is also a decimal counting system, which has become relatively widely used, though less so in giving the time, ages, and dates (it features no ordinal numbers). This system is in especially common use in schools due to its simplicity, and in Patagonian Welsh. Whereas 39 in the vigesimal system is pedwar ar bymtheg ar hugain (“four on fifteen on twenty”) or even deugain namyn un (“two score minus one”), in the decimal system it is tri deg naw (“three tens nine”).
Although there is only one word for “one” (un), it triggers the soft mutation (treiglad meddal) of feminine nouns, where possible, other than those beginning with “ll” or “rh”. There are separate masculine and feminine forms of the numbers “two” (dau and dwy), “three” (tri and tair) and “four” (pedwar and pedair), which must agree with the grammatical gender of the objects being counted. The objects being counted appear in the singular, not plural form.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

Adelaide Dupont’s comments:
#welsh is a very #peaceful #language.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts: +Adelaide Dupont Thank you for your comment
Have A Wonderful New Year

Adelaide Dupont: +Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts I appreciate your #newyear #wishes!

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and “The Flag of Wales”

“The Flag of Wales (Y Ddraig Goch) incorporates the red dragon, a popular symbol of Wales and the Welsh people, along with the Tudor colours of green and white. It was used by Henry VII at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, after which it was carried in state to St. Paul’s Cathedral. The red dragon was then included in the Tudor royal arms to signify their Welsh descent. It was officially recognised as the Welsh national flag in 1959. Since the British Union Flag does not have any Welsh representation, the Flag of Wales has become very popular.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_people

 

 Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem in English and Swansea Bay, Swansea, Wales, UK

Welsh syntax
The canonical word order in Welsh is verb–subject–object.
Colloquial Welsh inclines very strongly towards the use of auxiliaries with its verbs, as in English. The present tense is constructed with bod (“to be”) as an auxiliary verb, with the main verb appearing as a verbnoun (used in a way loosely equivalent to an infinitive) after the particle yn:
Mae Siân yn mynd i Lanelli
Siân is going to Llanelli.
There, mae is a third-person singular present indicative form of bod, and mynd is the verbnoun meaning “to go”. The imperfect is constructed in a similar manner, as are the periphrastic forms of the future and conditional tenses.
In the preterite, future and conditional mood tenses, there are inflected forms of all verbs, which are used in the written language. However, speech now more commonly uses the verbnoun together with an inflected form of gwneud (“do”), so “I went” can be Mi es i or Mi wnes i fynd (“I did go”). Mi is an example of a preverbal particle; such particles are common in Welsh.
Welsh lacks separate pronouns for constructing subordinate clauses; instead, special verb forms or relative pronouns that appear identical to some preverbal particles are used.
Possessives as direct objects of verbnouns
The Welsh for “I like Rhodri” is Dw i’n hoffi Rhodri (word for word, “am I [the] liking [of] Rhodri”), with Rhodri in a possessive relationship with hoffi. With personal pronouns, the possessive form of the personal pronoun is used, as in “I like him”: Dw i’n ei hoffi, literally, “am I his liking” – “I like you” is Dw i’n dy hoffi (“am I your liking”).
Pronoun doubling
In colloquial Welsh, possessive pronouns, whether they are used to mean “my”, “your”, etc. or to indicate the direct object of a verbnoun, are commonly reinforced by the use of the corresponding personal pronoun after the noun or verbnoun: ei d? e “his house” (literally “his house of him”), Dw i’n dy hoffi di “I like you” (“I am [engaged in the action of] your liking of you”), etc. It should be noted that the “reinforcement” (or, simply, “redoubling”) adds no emphasis in the colloquial register. While the possessive pronoun alone may be used, especially in more formal registers, as shown above, it is considered incorrect to use only the personal pronoun. Such usage is nevertheless sometimes heard in very colloquial speech, mainly among young speakers: Ble ‘dyn ni’n mynd? T? ti neu d? fi? (“Where are we going? Your house or my house?”).
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Ing’s “Peace Comes To You” Poem translated into Welsh
By Mr. Hywel Lewis on October 9, 2017 and Swansea Bay at the back of Swansea Library, Swansea, Wales, UK
Photograph and Artwork by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) is a bay on the southern coast of Wales. The River Neath, River Tawe, River Afan, River Kenfig and Clyne River flow into the bay. Swansea Bay and the upper reaches of the Bristol Channel experience a large tidal range. The shipping ports in Swansea Bay are Swansea Docks, Port Talbot Docks and Briton Ferry wharfs.
Each stretch of beach within the bay has its own individual name:
·Aberavon Beach
·Baglan Bay
·Jersey Marine Beach
·Swansea Beach
·Mumbles Beach
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

 

 “The 1588 Welsh Bible: The Bible translations into Welsh helped maintain the use of Welsh in daily life. The New Testament was translated by William Salesbury in 1567 followed by the complete Bible by William Morgan in 1588.

The Welsh language arguably originated from the Britons at the end of the 6th century. Prior to this, three distinct languages were spoken by the Britons during the 5th and 6th centuries: Latin, Irish, and British. According to T. M. Charles-Edwards, the emergence of Welsh as a distinct language occurred towards the end of this period.[17] The emergence of Welsh was not instantaneous and clearly identifiable. Instead, the shift occurred over a long period of time, with some historians claiming that it happened as late as the 9th century. Kenneth H. Jackson proposed a more general time period for the emergence, specifically after the Battle of Dyrham, a military battle between the West Saxons and the Britons in 577 AD.[18]
Four periods are identified in the history of Welsh, with rather indistinct boundaries: Primitve Welsh, Old Welsh, Middle Welsh, and Modern Welsh. The period immediately following the language’s emergence is sometimes referred to as Primitive Welsh,[19] followed by the Old Welsh period – which is generally considered to stretch from the beginning of the 9th century to sometime during the 12th century.[19] The Middle Welsh period is considered to have lasted from then until the 14th century, when the Modern Welsh period began, which in turn is divided into Early and Late Modern Welsh.
The name Welsh originated as an exonym given to its speakers by the Anglo-Saxons, meaning “foreign speech” (see Walha)[citation needed], and the native term for the language is Cymraeg, meaning “British”.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Swansea Bay (1840)
Bartlett, William Henry, 1809-1854, artist. Armytage, James Charles, d. 1897, engraver. – This image is available from the National Library of Wales You can view this image in its original context on the NLW Catalogue
Abstract: A view of showing Swansea bay and a town. Ships are sailing in the sea and a lighthouse can be seen in the background.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Bay

 

Bilingual road markings near Cardiff Airport. In Welsh-speaking areas, the Welsh signage appears first. Photograph by Adrian Pingstone
The Welsh Language (Wales) Measure 2011 gave the Welsh language official status in Wales,[15] making it the only language that is de jure official in any part of the United Kingdom, with English being de facto official. Thus, official documents and procedures require Welsh and English to be given equality in the conduct of the proceedings of the National Assembly for Wales.[16]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

 

Trilingual (Spanish, Welsh and English) sign in Argentina

Gastón Cuello – Own work

Sign at former Gaiman Station of the Central Chubut Railway

Sign promoting the learning of Welsh: Alan Fryer

Defnyddiwch eich Cymraeg – Use your Welsh. Detail of 488575

Origins

See also: Celtic languages § Classification

Welsh evolved from Common Brittonic, the Celtic language spoken by the ancient Celtic Britons. Classified as Insular Celtic, the British language probably arrived in Britain during the Bronze Age or Iron Age and was probably spoken throughout the island south of the Firth of Forth.[20] During the Early Middle Ages the British language began to fragment due to increased dialect differentiation, thus evolving into Welsh and the other Brittonic languages. It is not clear when Welsh became distinct.[18][21][22]

Kenneth H. Jackson suggested that the evolution in syllabic structure and sound pattern was complete by around 550, and labelled the period between then and about 800 “Primitive Welsh”.[18] This Primitive Welsh may have been spoken in both Wales and the Hen Ogledd (“Old North”) – the Brittonic-speaking areas of what is now northern England and southern Scotland – and therefore may have been the ancestor of Cumbric as well as Welsh. Jackson, however, believed that the two varieties were already distinct by that time.[18] The earliest Welsh poetry – that attributed to the Cynfeirdd or “Early Poets” – is generally considered to date to the Primitive Welsh period. However, much of this poetry was supposedly composed in the Hen Ogledd, raising further questions about the dating of the material and language in which it was originally composed.[18] This discretion stems from the fact that Cumbric was widely believed to have been the language used in Hen Ogledd. An 8th century inscription in Tywyn shows the language already dropping inflections in the declension of nouns.[23]

Janet Davies proposed that the origins of Welsh language were much less definite; in The Welsh Language: A History, she proposes that Welsh may have been around even earlier than 600 AD. This is evidenced by the dropping of final syllables from Brittonic: *bardos “poet” became bardd, and *abona “river” became afon.[21] Though both Davies and Jackson cite minor changes in syllable structure and sounds as evidence for the creation of Old Welsh, Davies suggests it may be more appropriate to refer to this derivative language as Lingua Brittanica rather than characterizing it as a new language altogether.

Sculpture of Owain Glynd?r, the last native Welsh person to hold the title Prince of Wales

Primitive Welsh

The argued dates for the period of “Primitive Welsh” are widely debated, with some historians’ suggestions differing by hundreds of years.

Old Welsh

The next main period is Old Welsh (Hen Gymraeg, 9th to 11th centuries); poetry from both Wales and Scotland has been preserved in this form of the language. As Germanic and Gaelic colonisation of Britain proceeded, the Brittonic speakers in Wales were split off from those in northern England, speaking Cumbric, and those in the southwest, speaking what would become Cornish, and so the languages diverged. Both the works of Aneirin (Canu Aneirin, c. 600) and the Book of Taliesin (Canu Taliesin) were during this era.

Middle Welsh

Middle Welsh (Cymraeg Canol) is the label attached to the Welsh of the 12th to 14th centuries, of which much more remains than for any earlier period. This is the language of nearly all surviving early manuscripts of the Mabinogion, although the tales themselves are certainly much older. It is also the language of the existing Welsh law manuscripts. Middle Welsh is reasonably intelligible to a modern-day Welsh speaker.

The famous cleric Gerald of Wales tells, in his Descriptio Cambriae, a story of King Henry II of England. During one of the King’s many raids in the 12th century, Henry asked an old man of Pencader, Carmarthenshire whether the Welsh people could resist his army. The old man replied:

It can never be destroyed through the wrath of man, unless the wrath of God shall concur. Nor do I think that any other nation than this of Wales, nor any other language, whatever may hereafter come to pass, shall in the day of reckoning before the Supreme Judge, answer for this corner of the Earth.[24]

Modern Welsh

Modern Welsh is subdivided within itself into Early Modern and Late Modern Welsh.Early Modern Welsh ran from the 15th century through to the end of the 16th century, and the Late Modern Welsh period roughly dates from the 16th century onwards. Contemporary Welsh still differs greatly from the Welsh of the 16th Century, but they are similar enough that a fluent Welsh speaker should have little trouble understanding it. The Modern Welsh period is where one can see a decline in the popularity of the Welsh language, as the number of people who spoke Welsh declined to the point at which there was concern that the language would become extinct entirely. Welsh government processes and legislation have worked to increase the proliferation of the Welsh language throughout school projects and the like.

Welsh as a first language is largely concentrated in the north and west of Wales, principally Gwynedd, Conwy, Denbighshire (Sir Ddinbych), Anglesey (Ynys Môn), Carmarthenshire (Sir Gâr), north Pembrokeshire (Sir Benfro), Ceredigion, parts of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), and north-west and extreme south-west Powys, although first-language and other fluent speakers can be found throughout Wales.

Outside Wales

Welsh-speaking communities persisted well on into the modern period across the border with England. Archenfield was still Welsh enough in the time of Elizabeth I for the Bishop of Hereford to be made responsible, together with the four Welsh bishops, for the translation of the Bible and the Book of Common Prayer into Welsh. Welsh was still commonly spoken here in the first half of the 19th century, and churchwardens’ notices were put up in both Welsh and English until about 1860.[31]

The number of Welsh-speaking people in the rest of Britain has not yet been counted for statistical purposes. In 1993, the Welsh-language television channel S4C published the results of a survey into the numbers of people who spoke or understood Welsh, which estimated that there were around 133,000 Welsh-speaking people living in England, about 50,000 of them in the Greater London area.[32] The Welsh Language Board, on the basis of an analysis of the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Longitudinal Study, estimated there were 110,000 Welsh-speaking people in England, and another thousand in Scotland and Northern Ireland.[33] In the 2011 Census, 8,248 people in England gave Welsh in answer to the question “What is your main language?”[34] The ONS subsequently published a census glossary of terms to support the release of results from the census, including their definition of “main language” as referring to “first or preferred language” (though that wording was not in the census questionnaire itself).[35][36] The wards in England with the most people giving Welsh as their main language were the Liverpool wards: Central and Greenbank, and Oswestry South.[34] In terms of the regions of England, North West England (1,945), London (1,310) and the West Midlands (1,265) had the highest number of people noting Welsh as their main language.[37]

In the later 19th century, virtually all teaching in the schools of Wales was in English, even in areas where the pupils barely understood English. Some schools used the Welsh Not, a piece of wood, often bearing the letters “WN”, which was hung around the neck of any pupil caught speaking Welsh. The pupil could pass it on to any schoolmate heard speaking Welsh, with the pupil wearing it at the end of the day being given a beating. One of the most famous Welsh-born pioneers of higher education in Wales was Sir Hugh Owen. He made great progress in the cause of education, and more especially the University College of Wales at Aberystwyth, of which he was chief founder. He has been credited[by whom?] with the Welsh Intermediate Education Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict c 40), following which several new Welsh schools were built. The first was completed in 1894 and named Ysgol Syr Hugh Owen.

Towards the beginning of the 20th century this policy slowly began to change, partly owing to the efforts of Owen Morgan Edwards when he became chief inspector of schools for Wales in 1907.

The Aberystwyth Welsh School (Ysgol Gymraeg Aberystwyth) was founded in 1939 by Sir Ifan ap Owen Edwards, the son of O.M. Edwards, as the first Welsh Primary School.[52] The headteacher was Norah Isaac. Ysgol Gymraeg is still a very successful school, and now there are Welsh language primary schools all over the country. Ysgol Glan Clwyd was established in Rhyl in 1955 as the first Welsh language school to teach at the secondary level.[53]

Examples of sentences in literary and colloquial Welsh

English

Literary Welsh

Colloquial Welsh

I get up early every day. Codaf yn gynnar bob dydd. Dw i’n codi’n gynnar bob dydd. (North)
Rwy’n codi’n gynnar bob dydd. (South)
I’ll get up early tomorrow. Codaf yn gynnar yfory. Mi goda i’n gynnar fory
Wna i godi’n gynnar fory
He had not stood there long. Ni safasai yno yn hir.[82] Doedd o ddim wedi sefyll yno’n hir. (North)
(D)ôdd e ddim wedi sefyll yna’n hir. (South)
They’ll sleep only when there’s a need. Ni chysgant ond pan fo angen. Fyddan nhw’n cysgu ddim ond pan fydd angen.

In fact, the differences between dialects of modern spoken Welsh pale into insignificance compared to the difference between some forms of the spoken language and the most formal constructions of the literary language. The latter is considerably more conservative and is the language used in Welsh translations of the Bible, amongst other things (although the 2004 Beibl Cymraeg Newydd – New Welsh Bible – is significantly less formal than the traditional 1588 Bible). Gareth King, author of a popular Welsh grammar, observes that “The difference between these two is much greater than between the virtually identical colloquial and literary forms of English”.[83] A grammar of Literary Welsh can be found in A Grammar of Welsh (1980) by Stephen J. Williams[84] or more completely in Gramadeg y Gymraeg (1996) by Peter Wynn Thomas.[85] (No comprehensive grammar of formal literary Welsh exists in English.) An English-language guide to colloquial Welsh forms and register and dialect differences is “Dweud Eich Dweud” (2001, 2013) by Ceri Jones.[86]

Welsh emigration

Flag of the city of Puerto Madryn, Argentina, inspired by the Flag of Wales, owing to the Welsh immigration

There has been migration from Wales to the rest of Britain throughout its history. During the Industrial Revolution thousands of Welsh people migrated, for example, to Liverpool and Ashton-in-Makerfield.[72][73] As a result, some people from England, Scotland and Ireland have Welsh surnames.[74][75][76][77]

John Adams, the second President of the United States (1797–1801), whose paternal great-grandfather David Adams was born and bred at “Fferm Penybanc”, Llanboidy, Carmarthenshire, Wales[78] and who emigrated from Wales in 1675.

Other Welsh settlers moved to other parts of Europe, concentrated in certain areas. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a small wave of contract miners from Wales arrived in Northern France; the centres of Welsh-French population are in coal mining towns of the French department of Pas-de-Calais.[citation needed] Welsh settlers from Wales (and later Patagonian Welsh) arrived in Newfoundland in the early 1900s, and founded towns Labrador‘s coast region.[citation needed] In 1852 Thomas Benbow Phillips of Tregaron established a settlement of about 100 Welsh people in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil.

Internationally Welsh people have emigrated, in relatively small numbers (in proportion to population, Irish emigration to the USA may have been 26 times greater than Welsh emigration),[79] to many countries, including the USA (in particular, Pennsylvania), Canada and Y Wladfa in Patagonia, Argentina.[80][81][82] Jackson County, Ohio was sometimes referred to as “Little Wales”, and the Welsh language was commonly heard or spoken among locals by the mid 20th century.[citation needed] Malad City in Idaho, which began as a Welsh Mormon settlement, lays claim to a greater proportion of inhabitants of Welsh descent than anywhere outside Wales itself.[83] Malad’s local High School is known as the “Malad Dragons”, and flies the Welsh Flag as its school colours.[84] Welsh people have also settled in New Zealand and Australia.[79][85]

Around 1.75 million Americans report themselves to have Welsh ancestry, as did 458,705 Canadians in Canada’s 2011 census.[5][7] This compares with 2.9 million people living in Wales (as of the 2001 census).[86]

There is no known evidence which would objectively support the legend that the Mandan, a Native American tribe of the central United States, are Welsh emigrants who reached North America under Prince Madog in 1170.[87]

The Ukrainian city of Donetsk was founded in 1869 by a Welsh businessman, John Hughes (an engineer from Merthyr Tydfil) who constructed a steel plant and several coal mines in the region; the town was thus named Yuzovka (??????) in recognition of his role in its founding (“Yuz” being a Russian or Ukrainian approximation of Hughes).[88]

Former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard was born in Barry, Wales. After she suffered from bronchopneumonia as a child, her parents were advised that it would aid her recovery to live in a warmer climate. This led the family to migrate to Australia in 1966, settling in Adelaide.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_language

Go to the top

Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales – Part 6

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 Ings Peace Project Organized by Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children

Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children, Lacey, Madison, Hallie, and Cleo were reciting Ing’s Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”, Swansea, Wales

“Peace Comes To You”
When you enjoy rain drops
Peace comes to you
When you hear birds sing
Peace comes to you
When you see fish swim in clean water
Peace comes to you
When you hear children laugh
Peace comes to you
And when you hum while walking in the wood
Peace comes to you
And when you sit quietly watching the sun rise and set
Listening to the waves sing
Then Peace comes to you
Let Peace come to you in different ways
Let Peace be with us all

“Peace” poem by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, written on September 24, 2010

Hi Kelly & Stephanie,
I was very glad to see both of you and the girls. The girls are so lovely and very good kids. I love their drawings and comments on “What does Peace mean to you?” I really enjoyed that day, it made me forget about my sickness. John enjoyed cooked Pizza and prepared for everything. I was too weak to help him. He said he loved to do it for the kids. Thank you for everything. We appreciate all your help and your parents also.
Thanks again, please give my love to everyone.
All the best,
Ing
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John and I had bad colds all three weeks in Swansea, Wales. At the end of our trip, two days before we left Swansea, two of our former neighbors who become our good friends, came to visit us with their children, four girls. We were so glad to see them. The children sang Welsh songs for our grandson, Kai for me to record on my camcorder. All of them recited my Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”. They also joined in to write their comments on “What does Peace mean to you?”. 

 Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

 

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Their comments are as the following:

Peace means Love all around the world
Peace means care and kindness
Peace means happiness, relaxation and peace starts with Love
Peace is Life
Peace means getting down on a special chair, quietly watching over your garden
Peace means silence and kindness
Peace is joy, Sweetness and Love
Love. Love. Love. Love.
Peace means caring and kind
Peace starts with kind heart and Love!
Peace is Hope
Peace is us
Peace means Family
Be in Peace not in pieces
Peace begins with a smile
“Aren’t we all Humans then why can we all live in PEACE!!”
Peace is our gift to others
Peace is Beacks!
Peace means caring and Kind
Peace means Love
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”
Peace means that all is clam and Its also means to me is friendship and Loyalty.
Peace begins with a smile.
Peace is family
Peace means that everything is calm and relaxing

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

 

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Their comments are as the following:
Peace means caring and kind
Peace starts with kind heart and Love!
Peace is Hope
Peace is us
Peace means Family
Be in Peace not in pieces
Peace begins with a smile
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”

 Kelly, Stephanie and their four Children, Lacey, Madison, Hallie, and Cleo were reciting Ing’s Peace poem, “Peace Come To You”, Swansea, Wales
“Peace Comes To You”
When you enjoy rain drops
Peace comes to you
When you hear birds sing
Peace comes to you
When you see fish swim in clean water
Peace comes to you
When you hear children laugh
Peace comes to you
And when you hum while walking in the wood
Peace comes to you
And when you sit quietly watching the sun rise and set
Listening to the waves sing
Then Peace comes to you
Let Peace come to you in different ways
Let Peace be with us all
“Peace” poem by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, written on September 24, 2010
Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11 commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Their comments are as the following:

Peace means Love all around the world
Peace means care and kindness
Peace means happiness, relaxation and peace starts with Love
Peace is Life
Peace means getting down on a special chair, quietly watching over your garden
Peace means silence and kindness
Peace is joy, Sweetness and Love
Love. Love. Love. Love.

 Ing’s Peace Project Organized by Kelly and Stephanie and their Children
Lacey aged 11, Madison aged 14, Hallie aged 12, and Cleo kavanaghaged 11, commented on “What does Peace Mean to You?” Comments, Swansea, Wales

Some of their comments are as the following:

“Aren’t we all Humans then why can we all live in PEACE!!”
Peace is our gift to others
Peace is Beacks!
Peace means caring and Kind
Peace means Love
“Forgive others, not because they deserve forgiveness, but because you deserve peace”
Peace means that all is clam and Its also means to me is friendship and Loyalty.
Peace begins with a smile.
Peace is life

Before Kelly, Stephanie and four of their children came to our gathering John was very busy preparing pizza for everyone, especially for the children.  Because he knows that they love pizza.

 

John is a good cook and he presents his food nicely just like they are his artwork.

 

I love pepperoni and mushroom.  He used a mixture of cheeses for his home made pizza.

I was sick with a bad cold and could not help him.  But I thought John was enjoying making the food for the children and good friends.

 

Now Everybody was arriving and John’s hot pizza just came out of the oven ready to eat.

 

We all enjoyed John’s pizza.  The children said they loved it.

 

 

Ending with a slice of cake.  Our fully bellies said thanks to John for a wonderful meal.

I showed everyone the photos of Kai, our two years old grandson, and his parents, Mali and Jim.

 

I showed my Peace Poem and Peace Project from my website.

 

Lacey and Cleo were reading my Peace Poem.

 

Hallie was reading my Peace Poem.

 

Madison turned to read the Peace poem.

 

Madison was helping Cleo to recite my peace poem.

 

Kelly was generous enough to recite my Peace Poem.

Lacey and Cleo enjoyed singing Welsh songs for Kai to listen and watch from my camcorder.

Cleo and her mother, Stephanie, recite my Peace Poem.

 

Hallie was enjoying acting and reciting the poem.

 

Now everyone joined in reading my Peace Poem all together.

 

Time to relax, the children enjoyed acting out for the camera.

They love the little gifts from us, hand made bronze chokers from Thailand.

 

 

Time to say good bye!!!!!  We will meet again soon 🙂 🙂 🙂

 Thank you very much!!  We had a good time and will forever remember our time together.

 John Watts and Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Go to the top

Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland, Wales – Part 5

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

An entrance of the Civic Center, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Swansea Civic Centre (Welsh: Canolfan Ddinesig Abertawe) – formerly known as County Hall – is the principal administrative centre of the City and County of Swansea Council. Standing some 800 m southwest of Swansea centre on a seafront site overlooking Swansea Bay, the complex houses – in addition to the council chamber and offices – a public cafe, the city’s central library, an exhibition space, the West Glamorgan Archive Service, and a council contact centre.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Civic_Centre

 

An Emblem of the Civic Center, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Swansea Civic Center: The building was opened in July 1982 as County Hall and was the headquarters of the former West Glamorgan County Council. Following local government re-organisation in 1996, its ownership was transferred to the new City and County of Swansea. The building was renamed the Civic Centre on 19 March 2008, and Swansea Central Library was moved in as part of a redevelopment scheme. The library issued nearly 566,000 loans in 2008/09, making it the busiest in Wales and the tenth busiest in the UK.[1] The Civic Centre is served by local bus services.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Civic_Centre

 

 Shopping District, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea Plans:
At the sea front, The Tower, Meridian Quay is now Wales’s tallest building at a height of 107 metres (351 ft) with a restaurant on the top (29th) floor. It was under construction adjacent Swansea Marina until 010.[72]”

 

“Swansea Plans:
The city centre is also being brightened up with street art and new walkways, along with the first phase of the David Evans – Castle Street development. New green spaces will be provided in conjunction with the proposed Quadrant Square and Grand Theatre Square. Redevelopment of the Oxford Street car park and Lower Oxford Street arcades are also planned.[71]”

Shopping District, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Swansea City Centre is undergoing a £1 billion transformation scheme.[70] A large area of the city is earmarked for redevelopment. A new city-centre retail precinct is planned involving demolition of the dilapidated St. David’s Shopping Centrewhich has three or four traders, about 13% of the retail space in the centre and the Quadrant Shopping Centre. Including relocation of the Tesco Superstore near to the city’s Sainsbury’s store in Parc Tawe, the new retail precinct will be almost four times the size of the Quadrant Centre.”

 

Saint Mary’s Church, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“St. Mary’s Church in St. Mary’s Square
In 2001, 158,457 people in the local authority area (71 per cent) stated their religion to be Christian, 44,286 (20 per cent) no religion, 16,800 (7.5 per cent) did not state a religion and 2,167 were Muslim.[64] There are small communities of other religions, each making up a little under 1 per cent of the total population.[64]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Saint Mary’s Church, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Nightlife
Wind Street in the daytime
Swansea has a range of pubs, bars, clubs, restaurants and a casino.[125] Swansea had two casinos until 30 August 2012 when Aspers closed. The majority of city center bars are situated on Wind Street, with various chains represented including Revolution, Varsity, Yates’s and Walkabout. Some venues feature live music.[126] The Mumbles Mile, described by the BBC as “one of Wales’s best-known pub crawls” has declined in recent years with a number of local pubs being converted into flats or restaurants.[127]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Saint Mary’s Church, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Activities
Swansea has a range of activities including sailing, water skiing, surfing, and other watersports,[116] walking[117] and cycling.[118] Part of the Celtic Trail and the National Cycle Network, Swansea Bay provides a range of traffic-free cycle routes including along the seafront and through Clyne Valley Country Park.[119] The Cycling TouringClub CTC has a local group in the area.[120] Swansea Bay, Mumbles and Gower have a selection of golf courses.[121]
Prior to closure in 2003, Swansea Leisure Centre was one of the top ten visitor attractions in the UK; it has been redeveloped as an indoor waterpark, rebranded the ‘LC’,[122] and was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 7 March 2008.[123] The Wales National Pool is in Swansea.[124]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 The Sea-Gull was comfortable standing on the head of the statue of Sir H Hussey Vivian Bart: M.P., First Baron Swansea of Singleton, Swansea, Wales, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Leisure and tourism
The LC leisure centre
A number of beaches around Swansea Bay are promoted to visitors.[104] Surfing is possible at Langland Bay, Caswell Bay and Llangennith, with the latter winning accolades from two national newspapers for the quality of its waves.[105] The five-mile promenade from the Marina to Mumbles offers views across Swansea Bay.[106] The seaside village of Mumbles has a Victorianpier, small, independent shops and boutiques, restaurants and cafes.[107] The south coast of Gower is the chief magnet for walkers, with a path stretching from Mumbles Head across the cliff tops, beaches and coastal woodland to Rhossili.[108]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

The dedication written about Sir H Hussey Vivian Bart: M.P., First Baron Swansea of Singleton, Swansea, Wales, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Attractions
The Meridian tower, Swansea. The tallest building in Wales.
On the Waterfront, Swansea has a five-mile (8 km) sweep of coastline[109] which features a beach, promenade, children’s lido, leisure pool, marina and maritime quarter featuring the museums the National Waterfront Museum and Swansea Museum, the oldest museum in Wales.[110] Also situated in the maritime quarter is the Dylan Thomas Centre, which celebrates the life and work of the author with its permanent exhibition ‘Dylan Thomas – Man and Myth’,[111] and Mission Gallery, a unique art galleryalso in the heart of the Maritime Quarter which hosts a range of exhibitions from various art disciplines; it also host a craft space, with ranging works from local and international artists.[112] The Dylan Thomas Centre is the focal point for the annual Dylan Thomas Festival (27 October – 9 November). There is a permanent exhibition at the Dylan Thomas Birthplace and Home for 23 years in Uplands which has been restored to its condition as a new house when bought by the Thomas family in 1914 a few months before Dylan was born in the front bedroom. The SA1 Waterfront area is the latest development for living, dining and leisure.[113]
Swansea Bay, Mumbles and Gower are home to various parks and gardens and almost 20 nature reserves.[114] Clyne Gardens is home to a collection of plants set in parkland and host to ‘Clyne in Bloom’ in May. Singleton Park has acres of parkland, a botanical garden, a boating lake with pedal boats, and crazy golf. Plantasia is a tropical hothouse pyramid featuring three climatic zones, housing a variety of unusual plants, including several species which are extinct in the wild, and monkeys, reptiles, fish and a butterfly house. Other parks include Cwmdonkin Park, where Dylan Thomas played as a child, and Victoria Park which is close to the promenade on the seafront.[115]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

The Sea-Gull was comfortable standing on the head of the statue of Sir H Hussey Vivian Bart: M.P., First
Baron Swansea of Singleton, Swansea, Wales, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

I wish I were a bird
Perching over human statue head
Above the sky
Flying freely
Seeing all sorts of activities
People are working hard
Others relaxing
Some look for mischiefs
I see them all

poor me just walking on the ground
Seeing only in front of my face
As far as eyes can see
If I am a bird
I would take flight
Around the world

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, November 4, 2017, 5 pm

 

The Sea-Gull was comfortable standing on the head of the statue of Sir H Hussey Vivian Bart: M.P., First
Baron Swansea of Singleton, Swansea, Wales, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Economy of Swansea
Swansea originally developed as centre for metals and mining, especially the copper industry, from the beginning of the 18th century. The industry reached its apogee in the 1880s, when 60% of the copper ores imported to Britain were smelted in the Lower Swansea valley.[73] However, by the end of the Second World War these heavy industries were in decline, and over the post-war decades Swansea shared in the general trend towards a post-industrial, service sector economy.[citation needed]
Of the 105,900 people estimated to work within the City and County of Swansea, over 90% are employed in the service sectors, with relatively high shares (compared to the Welsh and UK averages) in public administration, education & health and banking, finance & insurance,[74] and correspondingly high proportions of employment in occupations associated with the service sector, including professional, administrative/secretarial and sales/customer service occupations. The local authority believes this pattern reflects Swansea’s role as a service centre for South West Wales.[74]
Economic activity and employment rates in Swansea were slightly above the Welsh average in October 2008, but lower than the UK average.[74] In 2005, GVA per head in Swansea was £14,302 – nearly 4% above the Welsh average but 20% below the UK average.[74] Median full-time earnings in Swansea were £21,577 in 2007, almost identical to the Welsh average.[74]
Swansea is home to the DVLA headquarters in Morriston, which employs around 6,000 people in the city. Other major employers in the city are Admiral Group, HSBC, Virgin Media, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, BT and Amazon.co.uk. Virgin Atlantic also maintains its largest worldwide contact centre in Swansea; including reservations, sales, baggage claims, and customer relations.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 “More Poetry is needed”, A Poster Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

‘Park and Ride[edit]
Park and Ride services are operated from car parks at Landore and Fabian Way.[92] During busy periods of the year, additional Park and Ride services are operated from the Brynmill recreation ground. Subsidised services to Fforestfach were cut in 2015 due to local authority financial constraints.[93]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

I was lucky to be able to snap the Sea-gull flying over my head, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
“Coaches
Swansea is served by the following direct coach services:
National Express Coaches operate eastbound to Heathrow Airport, Gatwick Airport, London, Birmingham, Cardiff and Bristol, and westbound to Llanelli, Carmarthen and Haverfordwest.
Megabus operate eastbound to Cardiff, Newport, Bristol, London, Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds and York, and westbound to Pembrey, Carmarthen, Pembroke Dock, Lampeter, Aberaeron and Aberystwyth.
TrawsCymru operate services to Brecon, Carmarthen, Lampeter, Aberaeron and Aberystwyth”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

The Sea-Gull was comfortable standing on the head of the statue of Sir H Hussey Vivian Bart: M.P., First Baron Swansea of Singleton, Swansea, Wales, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Cycles
There are four dedicated cycle routes in the local authority’s area:
Swansea Bay: The Maritime Quarter to the Knab Rock near the Mumbles Pier.
Clyne Valley Country Park: Blackpill to Gowerton forming part of National Cycle Network, Route 4.
Along the east bank of the River Tawe forming the start of National Cycle Network, Route 43, which terminates at Abercraf. Sustrans advise that it will continue northwards to Builth Wells once complete.[94]
Adjacent to the Fabian Way: Forming part of National Cycle Network, Route 4 and extending as the Celtic Trail to Chepstow and (eventually) London.
City cruiser pedal vehicles are being introduced to the city centre in a joint venture between the council and Swansea Business Improvement District.[95][96]
In November 2007 a new bridge was completed over the Fabian Way which provides a one way park and ride bus lane and a shared-use pedestrian and NCN route 4 cycle way. The leaf-shaped bridge was shortlisted for the 2008 Structural Steel Design Awards.[97]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 


“Rail
Swansea railway station is located 10 minutes from Swansea bus station by foot. Services calling at Swansea operate to Llanelli, Carmarthen, Milford Haven and Haverfordwest to the west, Shrewsbury to the north, and Cardiff Central (for connections to England and beyond), Newport and London Paddington to the east. There are also suburban stations in Gowerton, Llansamlet and in Pontarddulais which are served by Arriva Trains Wales.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Mosaic Tile Mural, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Local media
The local newspaper is the Swansea edition of the South Wales Evening Post. The Swansea Herald of Wales was a free newspaper which was distributed every week to residential addresses until 2011 when the paper ceased to be in print.[79] The Cardiff edition of the free daily paper Metro is distributed throughout the city. The Council also produces a free monthly newspaper called the Swansea Leader. Swansea Life is a monthly lifestyle magazine published and distributed in Swansea.
Swansea is served by three local radio stations – the CHR-formatted 96.4 The Wave on FM and DAB, its sister station Swansea Sound on 1170MW and DAB and lastly, the Adult Contemporary-orientated Swansea Bay Radio on 102.1FM and DAB. The city also has a community radio station, Radio Tircoed. It is also served by two regional radio stations Heart Wales and Nation Radio.
The patients and staff at Singleton Hospital can listen to the hospital radio station, Radio City 1386AM and Swansea University also runs its own radio station, Xtreme Radio, on 1431 AM. Providing the DAB service, the local multiplex called Swansea SW Wales is broadcast from Kilvey Hill. This transmitter also provides digital terrestrial television in the Swansea area. As well as Kilvey Hill the city is in the catchment areas of the Wenvoe transmitter (in the Vale of Glamorgan) and the Carmel transmitter in Carmarthenshire.
Since 1924, the BBC has maintained a studio in the city;[14] Dylan Thomas worked here in the interwar years, when the studio was used for the BBC Regional Programme.[80] Currently it has facilities to broadcast live radio and television and is listed as a BBC regional studio.[81]
In mid-2008, the BBC included Swansea in its “Big Screen” project, and a large live permanent television screen has been sited in Castle Square.[82]
Independent filmmakers Undercurrents and Studio8 are based in Swansea, and the city plays host to the BeyondTV Film Festival. BeyondTV is annual event organised by Undercurrents to showcase the best of activism filmmakers. Swansea has also hosted the annual Swansea Bay Film Festival, where past-winning directors have included Gareth Evans, Anthony James, Alun D Pughe and Andrew Jones.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Representation in the media

Swansea has been used as a location for films such as Only Two Can Play,[83] Submarine and Twin Town, the TV series Mine All Mine and in episodes of Doctor Who.[84]
Swansea was the first city in Wales to feature in its own version of the board game Monopoly. The Swansea edition of Monopoly features 33 local landmarks, including the Mumbles Pier and the National Waterfront Museum; the game has been produced in both English and Welsh.[85]
Swansea was also featured in a television documentary titled Swansea Love Story as part of the Rule Britannia series on VBS.tv. The film is of a rather graphic nature and features heroin users as well as community members affected by the narcotic while trying to provide some explanation for the increase in use.[86] Swansea was featured in several Yes Minister series as an undesirable civil service posting, in particular the vehicle licensing centre.
Swansea is also the hometown of Edward Kenway, the main protagonist of Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. This is because Matt Ryan, the voice actor of Edward, is from Swansea.[87]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Mosaic Tile Mural, Near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
Public services
Swansea is policed by the South Wales Police. The regional headquarters for the Swansea area is Swansea Central Police Station.
Ambulance services are provided by the Welsh Ambulance Service, and fire services by the Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service. Swansea Airport is one of the country’s three Wales Air Ambulance bases, the others being Welshpool and Caernarfon.[88]
Local public healthcare services are operated by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, who operate two hospitals in Swansea, Singleton Hospital and Morriston Hospital; the latter provides Accident and Emergency services. Singleton Hospital has one of Wales’s three radiotherapy departments.
Waste management services are coordinated by the local council, which deals with refuse collection and recycling and operates five civic amenity sites.
The electricity distribution network operator supplying Swansea is Western Power Distribution.
Welsh Water provides drinking water supply and wastewater services to Swansea. There is a water treatment works at Crymlyn Burrows. Reservoirs which supply Swansea include the Cray reservoir and the Lliw Reservoirs, which are operated by Welsh Water.
The Local Gas Distribution company is Wales and West Utilities.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Public order
There was a high rate of car crime during the 1990s. In 2002, the BBC described Swansea as a “black spot for car crime”.[89] Car crime is a central theme in the film Twin Town, which was set in and around Swansea and Port Talbot.
The football violence that Swansea experienced during the 1970s–1990s has considerably reduced, the only major clashes occurring between Swansea City supporters and Cardiff City supporters. Many matches between these sides have ended in violence in both Swansea and Cardiff. These two clubs have a long history of intense rivalry,[90] being described in the media as tribal.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Building near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Swansea: Education
Further and higher education
Swansea University has a campus in Singleton Park overlooking Swansea Bay. Its engineering department is recognised as a centre of excellence with pioneering work on computational techniques for solving engineering design problems.[75] The Department of Physics is renowned for its research achievements at the frontiers of Theoretical Physics, particularly in the areas of Elementary Particle Physics and String Theory. And many other departments such as History, Computer Science and German were awarded an “Excellent” in the last inspection. The university was awarded The Times Higher Education Supplement Award for the UK’s “best student experience” in 2005.[76] In 2017, Swansea University Medical School was ranked as the third best medical school in the United Kingdom, behind Oxford and Cambridge universities.[77]
In 2015 Swansea University opened a new Bay Campus situated in the Jersey Marine area of Swansea.
Other establishments for further and higher education in the city include University Of Wales Trinity Saint David and Gower College Swansea. Trinity Saint David was formed on 18 November 2010 through the merger of University of Wales Lampeter and Trinity University college Carmarthen under Lampeters royal charter of 1828. On 1 August 2013, Swansea Metropolitan University became part of University Of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD). Swansea Metropolitan University is particularly well known for its Architectural Glass department, as well as its Teaching and Transport & Logistics degrees.[citation needed]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Mural near Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK

“Swansea: Schools
See also: List of schools in Swansea
In the local authority area, there is one nursery school; six infant schools and five junior schools. There are 77 primary schools, nine of which are Welsh-Medium, and six of which are voluntary aided. There are 15 comprehensive schools under the remit of the local education authority, of which two are Welsh-medium. In addition, there are six special schools.[78]
The oldest school in Swansea is Bishop Gore School. The largest comprehensive school in Swansea is Olchfa School. There is one Roman Catholic comprehensive school in the city – Bishop Vaughan Catholic Comprehensive School. The Welsh medium schools are Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg G?yr and Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bryn Tawe. Other schools in Swansea include Birchgrove Comprehensive School, Cefn Hengoed Community School, Dylan Thomas School, Pentrehafod Comprehensive School, Morriston Comprehensive School and Gowerton School.
Some primary schools in Swansea are:
Cwm Glas Primary School
Danygraig Primary School
Pennard Primary School
Pentre’r Graig Primary School
Sketty Primary School
St. Thomas Primary School
Waun Wen Primary School
Ysgol Gynradd Gymraeg Gellionnen
Ysgol Gynradd Gymraeg Tirdeinaw
There are also a few Roman Catholic primary schools, one of them being St. Joseph’s Primary School.
Independent schools in Swansea include Ffynone House School and Oakleigh House School.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Marina, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“Swansea Marina offers visitor berths for as little as a day, to as long as a month. Seasonal berths are also available, with 3, 4, 5 and 6-month contract terms.
Swansea Marina is situated in the award winning Maritime Quarter area of Swansea City. We are bordered on one side by the sandy beach of Swansea Bay. The vibrant city centre, with all of the amenities you could ever need, is only a short walk away.”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Marina

 

Swansea Marina, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Transport links are excellent, we are situated about 10 minutes drive from J42 of the M4. The bus and train stations are both within easy walking distance.

If you need any further information, please give our knowledgeable and helpful staff a call. No matter how long you wish to stay, we look forward to welcoming you to Swansea soon!
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Marina

 

Swansea Marina, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Boating organisations based at Swansea Marina include Swansea Yacht and Sub Aqua club and the Maiden Voyage, which owns a 72 ft ocean racing yacht.[2]
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_Marina

 

 The Buildings Around the Swansea Marina, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea_MarinaS

 

The Buildings Around the Swansea Marina, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Beautiful Over Grown Garden from our backyard Garden, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A. After we came back from our trip to U.K.
Poem and Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 Look at that!!!
A very tall plant
Over grown in front of
My husband’s tall black sculpture
It’s producing a large beautiful
Deep red purple bouquet of flowers
Standing against a man-made object

As if to say
Look at me!!!
I am all natural
I will show you my beauty
For the world to see

Oh! My over grown garden
There is some beauty of nature left
To please my eyes

I appreciate you my beautiful plants
You give me much pleasure
When I come back to visit my little garden
With lovely flowers and fresh air

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 3:19 am

Go to the top

Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland, Wales – Part 3

Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

 Swansea Market,Shopping Center and Bus Station, Swansea, Wales, UK

 

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“History of Swansea: Industrial Revolution
From the late 17th century to 1801, Swansea’s population grew by 500%—the first official census (in 1841) indicated that, with 6,099 inhabitants, Swansea had become significantly larger than Glamorgan’s county town, Cardiff, and was the second most populous town in Wales behind Merthyr Tydfil (which had a population of 7,705). However, the census understated Swansea’s true size, as much of the built-up area lay outside the contemporary boundaries of the borough; the total population was actually 10,117. Swansea’s population was later overtaken by Merthyr in 1821 and by Cardiff in 1881, although in the latter year Swansea once again surpassed Merthyr.[14] Much of Swansea’s growth was due to migration from within and beyond Wales—in 1881, more than a third of the borough’s population had been born outside Swansea and Glamorgan, and just under a quarter outside Wales.[16]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“History of Swansea: Industrial Revolution
20th century
Through the 20th century, heavy industries in the town declined, leaving the Lower Swansea Valley filled with derelict works and mounds of waste products from them. The Lower Swansea Valley Scheme (which still continues) reclaimed much of the land. The present Enterprise Zone was the result and, of the many original docks, only those outside the city continue to work as docks; North Dock is now Parc Tawe and South Dock became the Marina.”

 

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea:Governance, The Guildhall
Local government
Main article: City and County of Swansea councilIn 1887, Swansea was a township at the mouth of the river Tawe, covering 4,562 acres (1,846 ha) in the county of Glamorgan.[22] There were three major extensions to the boundaries of the borough, first in 1835, when Morriston, St Thomas, Landore, St John-juxta-Swansea, and part of Llansamlet parish were added, and again in 1889 when areas around Cwmbwrlaand Trewyddfa were included, and in 1918 when the borough was enlarged to include the whole of the ancient parish of Swansea, the southern part of Llangyfelach parish, all of Llansamlet parish, Oystermouth Urban District and Brynau parish.[23][24]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“In 1889, Swansea attained county borough status,[25] and it was granted city status in 1969, which was inherited by the Swansea district when it was formed by the merger of the borough and Gower Rural District in 1974.[26] In 1996, Swansea became one of 22 unitary authorities with the addition of part of the former Lliw Valley Borough. The new authority received the name ‘City and County of Swansea’ (Welsh: Dinas a Sir Abertawe).[27]
Swansea was once a staunch stronghold of the Labour Party which, until 2004, had overall control of the council for 24 years.[28] The Liberal Democrats were the largest group in the administration that took control of Swansea Council in the 2004 local elections until the 2012 council elections saw the council return to Labour control. For 2009/2010, the Lord Mayor of Swansea was Councillor Alan Lloyd, and in 2010/2011 Richard Lewis was the Lord Mayor. The Lord Mayor changes in May each year.”

“History of Swansea: Industrial Revolution
High Street in 1915
In the Second World War, its industrial importance made Swansea the target of German bombing, and much of the town centre was destroyed during the Swansea Blitz on the 19, 20 and 21 February 1941 (the ‘Three Nights Blitz'[17]).
In 1969, Swansea was granted city status,[18] to mark Prince Charles’s investiture as the Prince of Wales. The announcement was made by the prince on 3 July 1969, during a tour of Wales.[19] It obtained the further right to have a lord mayor in 1982.[20]
Within the city centre are the ruins of the castle, the Marina, the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea Museum, the Dylan Thomas Centre, the Environment Centre, and the Market, which is the largest covered market in Wales.[21] It backs onto the Quadrant Shopping Centre which opened in 1978 and the adjoining St David’s Centre opened in 1982. Other notable modern buildings are the BT Tower (formerly the GPO tower) built around 1970, Alexandra House opened in 1976, County Hall opened in July 1982. Swansea Leisure Centre opened in 1977; it has undergone extensive refurbishment which retained elements of the original structure and re-opened in March 2008.”

 

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea (/?sw?nzi/ SWON-zee; Welsh: Abertawe [ab?r?taw?]), officially known as the City and County of Swansea(Dinas a Sir Abertawe), is a coastal city and county in Wales. It is the second largest city in Wales after Cardiff, and the twenty-fifth largest city in the United Kingdom.[1] Swansea lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan and the ancient Welsh commote of G?yr.[2] Situated on the sandy South West Wales coast, the county area includes the Gower Peninsula and the Lliw uplands. According to its local council, the City and County of Swansea had a population of 241,300 in 2014. The last official census stated that the city, metropolitan and urban areas combined concluded to be a total of 462,000 in 2011,[3] making it the second most populous local authority area in Wales after Cardiff. During its 19th-century industrial heyday, Swansea was a key centre of the copper industry,[4] earning the nickname ‘Copperopolis’.[5”

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“History of Swansea: Archaeological finds are mostly confined to the Gower Peninsula, and include items from the Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Iron Age. The Romans reached the area, as did the Norsemen.
Swansea is thought to have developed as a Viking trading post. Its Englishname may be derived from Sveinn’s island (Old Norse: Sveinsey) – the reference to an island may refer to a bank at the mouth of the river Tawe, or an area of raised ground in marshes.[6] An alternative explanation is that the name derives from the Norse name ‘Sweyn’ and ‘ey’, which can mean inlet.[7] This explanation supports the tradition that the city was founded by the Danish king Sweyn Forkbeard.[8][9] The name is pronounced Swans-y /?sw?nzi/), not Swan-sea.[10]”

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“History of Swansea: Abertawe, its Welsh name, meaning Mouth of the Tawe,[11] first appears as Aper Tyui c. 1150 [see Place-Names in Glamorgan, Gwynedd O. Pierce, p 182.]
The earliest known form of the modern name is Sweynesse, which was used in the first charter granted sometime between 1158 and 1184 by William de Newburgh, 3rd Earl of Warwick. The charter gave Swansea the status of a borough, granting the townsmen, called burgesses certain rights to develop the area. A second charter was granted in 1215 by King John. In this charter, the name appears as Sweyneshe. The town seal which is believed to date from this period names the town as Sweyse.[12][13]
Following the Norman Conquest, a marcher lordship was created under the title of Gower. It included land around Swansea Bay as far as the River Tawe, the manor of Kilvey beyond the Tawe, and the peninsula itself. Swansea was designated chief town of the lordship and received a borough charter some time between 1158 and 1184 (and a more elaborate one in 1304).[14]”

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

“History of Swansea: Industrial Revolution
The port of Swansea initially traded in wine, hides, wool, cloth and later in coal.[14] At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, the combination of port, local coal, and trading links with the West Country, Cornwall and Devon, meant that Swansea was the logical place to site copper smelting works. Smelters were operating by 1720 and proliferated. Following this, more coal mines(everywhere from north-east Gower to Clyne and Llangyfelach) were opened and smelters (mostly along the Tawe valley) were opened and flourished. Over the next century and a half, works were established to process arsenic, zinc and tin and to create tinplate and pottery. The city expanded rapidly in the 18th and 19th centuries, and was termed “Copperopolis”.[14]
The Swansea smelters became so adept at recovering gold and silver from complex ores that in the 1800s they received ore concentrates from the United States, for example from Arizona in the 1850s, and Colorado in the 1860s.[15]”

 

Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Culture
Brangwyn Hall main entrance, The Royal Institution of South Wales was founded in 1835 as the Swansea Literary and Philosophical Society.
Performing arts[edit]
The Grand Theatre in the centre of the city is a Victorian theatre which celebrated its centenary in 1997 and which has a capacity of a little over a thousand people. It was opened by the celebrated opera singer Adelina Patti and was refurbished from 1983 to 1987. The annual programme ranges from pantomime and drama to opera and ballet. Fluellen Theatre Company is a professional theatre company based in Swansea who perform at the Grand Theatre and the Dylan Thomas Centre. The Taliesin building on the university campus has a theatre, opened in 1984. Other theatres include the Dylan Thomas Theatre (formerly the Little Theatre) near the marina, and one in Penyrheol Leisure Centre near Gorseinon. In the summer, outdoor Shakespeare performances are a regular feature at Oystermouth Castle, and Singleton Park is the venue for a number of parties and concerts, from dance music to outdoor Proms. A folk festival is held on Gower.[48] Standing near Victoria Park on the coast road is the Patti Pavilion; this was the Winter Garden from Adelina Patti’s Craig-y-Nos estate in the upper Swansea valley, which she donated to the town in 1918. It is used as a venue for music shows and fairs. The Brangwyn Hall is a multi-use venue with events such as the graduation ceremonies for Swansea University. Every autumn, Swansea hosts a Festival of Music and the Arts, when international orchestras and soloists visit the Brangwyn Hall. The Brangwyn Hall is praised for its acoustics for recitals, orchestral pieces and chamber music alike.[49]

Red fountain water during the celebration of St David’s Day in Swansea
Swansea is also home to the Palace Theatre. Located at 156 High Street, it is recognisable for its distinctive wedge shape. Originally built in 1888 as a traditional music hall, the building’s original name was the ‘Pavilion’. During its lifetime, the building has been used as a bingo hall as well as a nightclub.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Festivals[edit]
Swansea hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1863, 1891, 1907, 1926, 1964, 1982 and 2006. The 2006 event occupied the site of the former Felindre tinplate works to the north of the city and featured a strikingly pink main tent. In 2009 Swansea Council launched Wales’s only week long St David’s Week festival in venues throughout the city. The Beginning and Do Not Go Gentle are Festivals in the Uplands area of the city where Dylan Thomas was born and lived for 23 years.”

 

Artist who produced artwork in his shop
“Cats Leave Pawprints on your heart”
Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Welsh language: There are many Welsh language chapels and churches in the area. Welsh-medium education is a popular and growing choice for both English and Welsh-speaking parents. 45% of the rural council ward Mawr are able to speak Welsh, as can 38% of the ward of Pontarddulais. Clydach, Kingsbridge and Upper Loughor all have levels of more than 20%. By contrast, the urban St. Thomas has one of the lowest figures in Wales, at 6.4%, a figure only barely lower than Penderry and Townhill wards.[50]””
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Artist who produced artwork in his shop
“Cats Leave Pawprints on your heart”
Swansea Market, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Food
Local produce includes cockles and laverbread which are sourced from the Loughor estuary. Local Gower salt marsh lamb is produced from sheep which are raised in the salt marshes of the Loughor estuary.[51]”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Shopping Center, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: The geology of the Gower Peninsula ranges from Carboniferous Limestone cliffs along its southern edge from Mumbles to Worm’s Head and the salt-marshes and dune systems of the Loughor estuary to the north. The eastern, southern and western coasts of the peninsula are lined with numerous sandy beaches both wide and small, separated by steep cliffs. The South Wales Coalfield reaches the coast in the Swansea area. This had a great bearing on the development of the city of Swansea and other nearby towns such as Morriston. The inland area is covered by large swathes of grassland common overlooked by sandstone heath ridges including the prominent Cefn Bryn. The traditional agricultural landscape consists in a patchwork of fields characterised by walls, stone-faced banks and hedgerows. Valleys cut through the peninsula and contain rich deciduous woodland.[35]
Much of the local authority’s area is hilly with the main area of upland being located in the council ward of Mawr. Areas of high land up to 185 metres (607 ft) range across the central section and form the hills of Kilvey, Townhill and Llwynmawr, separating the centre of Swansea from its northern suburbs. Cefn Bryn, a ridge of high land, forms the backbone of the Gower Peninsula. Rhossili Down, Hardings Down and Llanmadoc Hill form land features up to 193 metres (633 ft) high. The highest point is located at Penlle’r Castell at 374 metres (1,227 ft) on the northern border with Carmarthenshire.[34]”

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Shopping Center, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Mumbles Pier, situated around four miles outside the city centre.
About three quarters of Swansea is bordered by the sea—the Loughor Estuary, Swansea Bay and the Bristol Channel. The two largest rivers in the region are the Tawe which passes the city centre and the Loughor which flows on the northern border with Carmarthenshire.[34]
In the local authority area, the geology is complex, providing diverse scenery. The Gower Peninsula was the first area in the United Kingdom to be designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Excluding the urbanised area in the south-eastern corner, the whole of the Gower Peninsula is part of an AONB.[35] Swansea has numerous urban and country parklands.[36] The region has featured regularly in the Wales in Bloom awards.[37]”

 

 Swansea Shopping Center, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Three Cliffs Bay
Swansea can be roughly divided into four physical areas. To the north are the Lliw uplands which are mainly open moorland, reaching the foothills of the Black Mountain. To the west is the Gower Peninsula with its rural landscape dotted with small villages. To the east is the coastal strip around Swansea Bay. Cutting though the middle from the south-east to the north-west is the urban and suburban zone stretching from the Swansea city centre to the towns of Gorseinon and Pontarddulais.[34]
The most populated areas of Swansea are Morriston, Sketty and the city centre. The chief urbanised area radiates from the city centre towards the north, south and west; along the coast of Swansea Bay to Mumbles; up the Swansea Valley past Landoreand Morriston to Clydach; over Townhill to Cwmbwrla, Penlan, Treboeth and Fforestfach; through Uplands, Sketty, Killay to Dunvant; and east of the river from St. Thomas to Bonymaen, Llansamlet and Birchgrove. A second urbanised area is focused on a triangle defined by Gowerton, Gorseinon and Loughor along with the satellite communities of Penllergaer and Pontarddulais.[34]””

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Market, Oxford Street, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Religion
The city is home to 10% of the total Welsh Muslim population;[68] Swansea’s Muslim community is raising money to open a new central mosque and community centre in the former St. Andrew’s United Reformed Church. This would replace the existing central Mosque on St Helens Road and be in addition to the other three existing mosques (Swansea University Mosque, Hafod Mosque, Imam Khoei Mosque).[69]
Swansea is represented in Buddhism with the Dharmavajra Kadampa Buddhist Centre, Pulpung Changchub Dargyeling (Kagyu Tradition) and a branch of the international Dzogchen Community (Nyingma Tradition). Swansea Synagogue and Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall are both located in the Uplands area.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Market, Oxford Street, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
“Swansea: Notable people
See also Category:People from Swansea and List of people from Swansea.
People from Swansea are known locally as Swansea Jacks, or just Jacks. The source of this nickname is not clear. Some attribute it to Swansea Jack, the life-saving dog.[57][58]
Throughout the 19th century, the Vivian family did much to develop Swansea into a city. Their wealth and influence came from large copper mining, smelting and trading businesses in Swansea (Vivian & Sons), and is still visible today in their former family residences: Singleton Abbey (now used by Swansea University), Sketty Hall, Clyne Castle and Clyne Gardens. Henry Vivianbecame the first Lord Swansea in 1893.
Swansea’s most famous daughter is Hollywood actress Catherine Zeta-Jones who still owns a home in Mumbles. Swansea is also the home town of 2013 ITU Triathlon World Champion Non Stanford.[59] The thriller writer, Mark Ellis was educated in Swansea.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Shopping Center, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Geography
Boundaries[edit]
The “City and County of Swansea” local authority area is bordered by unitary authorities of Carmarthenshire to the north, and Neath Port Talbot to the east. Swansea is bounded by Swansea Bay and the Bristol Channel to the south. The Urban Subdivision of Swansea covers all urbanised areas within the city boundary, with a population of 179,485, it is considerably smaller than the unitary authority.
Physical description[edit]
See also: List of places in Swansea
The local government area is 378 square kilometres (146 sq mi) in size, about 2% of the area of Wales. It includes a large amount of open countryside and a central urban and suburban belt.[34]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Shopping Center, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Welsh politics[edit]
The National Assembly constituencies are:
• Gower, current AM is Rebecca Evans, Labour since 2016
• Swansea East, current AM is Mike Hedges, Labour since 2011
• Swansea West, current AM is Julie James, Labour since 2011
The city is also part of the South Wales West regional constituency and is served by Suzy Davies AM (Conservative), Bethan Jenkins AM (Plaid Cymru), Caroline Jones AM (UKIP) and Dai Lloyd AM (Plaid Cymru).
UK politics]

Lock bridge over the river Tawe
The UK parliamentary constituencies in Swansea are:
• Gower, current MP is Antonia Antoniazzi, Labour since 2017
• Swansea East, current MP is, Carolyn Harris, Labour since 2015
• Swansea West, current MP is Geraint Davies, Labour since 2010
Twinning
See also: List of twin towns and sister cities in the United Kingdom
Swansea is twinned with:[29]
• Cork, County Cork, Munster, Ireland[30]
• Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany;[31]
• Pau, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France
• Bydgoszcz, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland.[32]
It also has a friendship link with Nantong, China.[33]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea is also the home to Swansea Rugby Football Club (Swansea RFC), a founder member of the Welsh Rugby Union and one of the most important teams in the early history of Welsh rugby union. Playing out of St Helens Rugby and Cricket Ground the club not only produced several of the greatest Welsh rugby superstars, including Billy Bancroft and Billy Trew, they also hosted national touring sides from Australia, South Africa and New Zealand. Known as the ‘All Whites’, Swansea kept a constant supply of players that filled the Welsh ranks in the early history of the game. In 1935 Swansea became the first club side to beat the All Blacks.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“In 2003, Swansea RFC merged with Neath RFC to form the Ospreys. Swansea RFC remained at St Helen’s in semi-professional form, but the Ospreys moved into the Liberty Stadium in Landore for the start of the 2005–2006 season. Neath-Swansea rugby games used to be hotly contested matches, such that there was some debate about whether a team incorporating both areas was possible. The team came fifth in the Celtic League in their first year of existence and topped that league in their second year. By 2012 they had won the league a record four times.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“St Helens Rugby and Cricket Ground is the home of Swansea RFC and Glamorgan County Cricket Club have previously played matches there.[61] In this ground, Sir Garfield Sobers hit six sixes in one over; the first time this was achieved in a game of first-class cricket. The final ball landed on the ground past the Cricketers’ pub just outside the ground.[62] It is also the home of the tallest floodlight stand in Europe.[63]
Swansea’s rugby league side plays 13 miles (21 km) from Swansea in the small town of Ystalyfera. They are known as the Swansea Valley Miners but were formed as the Swansea Bulls in 2002.
The Swansea Bowls Stadium opened in early 2008. The stadium hosted the World Indoor Singles and Mixed Pairs Championship in April 2008 and the Gravelles Welsh International Open Bowls Championships in 2009.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017
Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts
“Swansea: Notable people
On the literary stage, the poet Dylan Thomas is perhaps the best-known. He was born in the town and grew up at 5 Cwmdonkin Drive, Uplands where he lived for 23 years and produced two thirds of his published work from his tiny bedroom which has been faithfully recreated as it may have been in 1934 and is open for house tours, events, Edwardian dinner parties and overnight stays. There is a memorial to him in the nearby Cwmdonkin Park; his take on Swansea was that it was an “ugly lovely town”. In the 1930s Thomas was a member of a group of local artists, writers and musicians known as The Kardomah Gang, as they frequently met in the Kardomah Café which was in Castle Street, Swansea until bombed during the second World War.[60]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea: Beaches
Oxwich Bay on the Gower Peninsula was named the most beautiful beach in Britain by travel writers who visited more than 1,000 beaches around the world in search of the perfect sands (2007). The Travel Magazine praised Oxwich for “magnificent and unspoilt” scenery and as a “great place for adults and children to explore”.[128] It has over three miles (5 km) of soft, golden sands, making it the ideal family getaway. The Guardian named it one of Britain’s blue-riband top 10 category beaches (2007).[129] The Independent newspaper hailed Rhossili Bay as “the British supermodel of beaches” (2006) and the best beach in Britain for breathtaking cliffs (2007),[130] whilst The Sunday Times listed it as one of the 25 best beaches in the world (2006).[131] Thanks to its clear air and lovely golden sand, this romantic stretch of sand was voted the best place in the UK to watch the sun set (Country Living magazine 2005)[131] and one of the top romantic spots in the country (The Guardian2007).[132]
Llangennith Beach, with its soft sands, consistent beach break and great facilities, was listed as the best place to learn how to surf in Britain by The Observer (2006)[133] and one of the 10 ‘classic surfing beaches by The Guardian (2007).[134] Gower also claims Britain’s Best Beach, Three Cliffs Bay. The Gower landmark topped the BBC Holiday Hit Squad nationwide competition (2006)[135] and was voted Britain’s best camping beach by The Independent thanks to its superb setting and quiet location (2007).[136] Three Cliffs Bay also made the final of the ITV series Britain’s Favourite View – the only nomination in Wales and backed by singer Katherine Jenkins.[137] Nearby Brandy Cove came sixth in an online poll to find the UK’s top beach for the baby boomer generation (2006).[138] Beaches which won 2006 Blue Flag Beach Awards are: Bracelet Bay, Caswell Bay, Langland Bay, Port Eynon Bay and Swansea Marina (one of the few Blue Flag Marinas in Wales). All of these beaches also won a Seaside Award 2006. Limesladewas awarded the Rural Seaside Award and the Green Coast Award. Other Green Coast Awards went to Pwll Du, Rhossili Bay and Tor Bay.”

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Swansea:Plans
Swansea City Centre is undergoing a £1 billion transformation scheme.[70] A large area of the city is earmarked for redevelopment. A new city-centre retail precinct is planned involving demolition of the dilapidated St. David’s Shopping Centrewhich has three or four traders, about 13% of the retail space in the centre and the Quadrant Shopping Centre. Including relocation of the Tesco Superstore near to the city’s Sainsbury’s store in Parc Tawe, the new retail precinct will be almost four times the size of the Quadrant Centre. The city centre is also being brightened up with street art and new walkways, along with the first phase of the David Evans – Castle Street development. New green spaces will be provided in conjunction with the proposed Quadrant Square and Grand Theatre Square. Redevelopment of the Oxford Street car park and Lower Oxford Street arcades are also planned.[71]
At the sea front, The Tower, Meridian Quay is now Wales’s tallest building at a height of 107 metres (351 ft) with a restaurant on the top (29th) floor. It was under construction adjacent Swansea Marina until 2010.[72]”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

Swansea Shopping Center, Oxford, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

“Sport
Further information: Swansea City A.F.C., Swansea RFC, and Ospreys
The Liberty Stadium.
Swansea City A.F.C. (founded 1912) is the city’s main football association team. Originally playing at the Vetch Field, they moved to the Liberty Stadium at the start of the 2005–2006 season, winning promotion to League One in their final year at their old stadium. The team presently play in the Premier League, after being promoted during the 2010/11 season. The Football Association of Wales had decided that for the Euro 2012 qualifying campaign, Wales would play all of their home ties at either the Cardiff City Stadium or the Liberty Stadium.
Swansea has three association football clubs that play in the Welsh Football League: Garden Village, South Gower and West End.”
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Bus Station, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Railways
Swansea railway station has trains mostly run by Arriva Trains Wales a Deutsche Bahn Company, on the West Wales Line to Llanelli, Carmarthen, and branches to, (a) Tenby and Pembroke Dock, (b) Haverfordwest and Milford Haven and (c) Fishguard Harbour with connecting Stena Line ferries to Rosslare Europort and Iarnród Éireann trains via Wexford to Dublin Connolly.
To the north along the Heart of Wales Line via Llanelli, and onwards via Llandovery, Llandrindod and Craven Arms to Shrewsbury.
Along the South Wales Main Line to Neath and stations to Cardiff Central (for connections to other parts of the United Kingdom), Newport, Reading and London Paddington to the east. Mostly run by Great Western Railway (train operating company).
There are also suburban stations in Gowerton, Llansamlet and in Pontarddulais which are served by Arriva Trains Wales.
Transport]
See also: Transport in Wales
Roads
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Swansea Bus Station, Swansea, Wales, UK on Monday, October 9, 2017

Buses
Bus routes within Swansea are operated predominantly by First Cymru, while smaller bus and coach operators such as NAT Group, South Wales Transport, Lewis Coaches, First Call Travel and DANSA also operate some routes in the city, most of which serving Swansea bus station. First operates the Swansea Metro, a road-based FTR bus rapid transit route, introduced between Morriston Hospital and Singleton Hospital in 2009,[91] and a shuttle bus (Service X10) to Cardiff Central bus station calling at Bridgend Designer Outlet. In late 2015 the fleet of Wright StreetCar articulated buses that served the Swansea Metro route were removed from service and replaced with standard non-articulated Wright StreetLite vehicles.
Veolia used to operate the rural services around the Gower Peninsula and the Lliw Valley branded Gower Explorer and Lliw Link respectively. Since Veolia’s withdrawal from Swansea, these services were operated by First Cymru for several years, and are now operated by NAT Group.
For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swansea

 

 Peace Will Come Alive
Poem and Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Such a delicate!!!
A soft light pink flower stands alone
Contrasting with surrounding dark green leaves
To accent the beauty of nature

Please stop a minute
Relax your mind
From all human problems

Look at me and smile
Think pretty!
With soft wind
That cools your mind

Think pretty
With sunshine on your face
Let the world go by
A minute relax with me
Peace will come alive!

 

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 4:24 am

Pink flower from our backyard garden

Go to the top