How students are using art to channel COVID-19 fears, Biden gives remarks on COVID-19 response and vaccinations, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, 60 Minutes, and Press-Telegram

How students are using art to channel COVID-19 fears, Biden gives remarks on COVID-19 response and vaccinations, PBS News, NBC News, NowThis News, 60 Minutes, and Press-Telegram

Biden gives remarks on COVID-19 response and vaccinations, 3.29.2021, PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 26, 29 & 31, 2021, and PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode March 28, 2021

President Joe Biden’s First News Conference, Mar 26, 2021, Washington Week PBS, and Extra: President Joe Biden’s Foreign Policy, Mar 26, 2021, Washington Week PBS

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 31th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 28th, 2021 | Meet The Press | NBC News

Firefighter Witness ‘Pled’ to Help George Floyd, Mar 31, 2021, NowThis News

Highlights From Day One Of Derek Chauvin’s Trial | NBC News NOW, Mar 29, 2021,  NBC News

How do coronavirus variants form and will the current vaccines work against them? Mar 14, 2021,  60 Minutes

Press-Telegram: How students are using art to channel COVID-19 fears

WATCH LIVE: Biden gives remarks on COVID-19 response and vaccinations

Streamed live 11 hours ago, 3.29.2021, PBS NewsHour

More than two months after taking office, President Joe Biden will hold his first formal news conference March 25, taking questions from reporters in a nationally televised event in the East Room. Biden has answered about as many queries from the press as his predecessors, according to the Associated Press, but they’ve usually come at the end of other events or while traveling. But he’s the first president in four decades to reach this point in his term without a formal Q&A, and has been under increasing pressure to hold one. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 31, 2021

Mar 31, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, we talk to a key cabinet member about President Joe Biden unveils a massive infrastructure package with a $2 trillion price tag. The Pentagon allows transgender troops to serve, and the Supreme Court hears opening arguments on whether college athlete compensation. Then, the uphill battle for those living with intellectual and developmental disabilities to get a vaccine. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Breaking down Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hTyA…? Buttigieg: New infrastructure plan helps long-term job gain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P24GN…? News Wrap: Pfizer says vaccine highly effective in children https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMnIH…? Supreme Court mulls compensation for college athletes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5r_S…? Sen. Duckworth says new book is a ‘love letter’ to America https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tSu8…? Trans recruits celebrate new Pentagon rules allowing service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgOPF…? The uphill battle to get COVID vaccines for people with IDD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSYAK…? One artist merges centuries of art history, his own feelings https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoz0E…? G. Gordon Liddy: The unapologetic criminal behind Watergate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kllqV…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 29, 2021

Mar 29, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, The CDC voices concern as COVID cases, hospitalizations and deaths rise, plus we explore a report into its origins. Then, we cover opening arguments in the trial of the police officer charged in the death of George Floyd, and how Alabama’s Amazon employees face the biggest attempt to organize in the company’s history. Amy Walter and Tamara Keith join us for Politics Monday. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS CDC warns of ‘impending doom’ of COVID surges as deaths rise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUqsn…? News Wrap: Three more men face trial for plot to kidnap Dem. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rfmtq…? Chauvin’s attorneys blame drugs,witnesses in Floyd’s death https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7HtM…? WHO says COVID originated in bats, but critics claim bias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FDFb…? A look into the employee life at Amazon amid union push https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHCA4…? Renters hit by pandemic juggle assistance, eviction laws https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdRhj…? Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on gun law reform, beating COVID https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21qGX…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour Weekend Full Episode March 28, 2021

Mar 28, 2021  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 28th, COVID-19 cases rise as vaccination efforts increase, how the pandemic has impacted economic and gender equity, and in our signature segment: the origins of non-unanimous jury verdicts, ruled to violate the 6th Amendment but not outlawed in two states until recently, and what’s ahead for those people convicted by them. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6?

PBS NewsHour full episode, Mar. 26, 2021

Mar 26, 2021  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, a devastating weather system takes several lives, leaving a path of destruction across the U.S. south. Georgia enacts new legislation that critics say rolls back access to the ballot box. Also, how Trump-era sanctions failed to stall Tehran’s nuclear ambitions, hitting average citizens the hardest. And Brooks and Capehart weigh in on this week in politics. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Six dead, thousands displaced after tornadoes batter south https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbmZy…? News Wrap: Chaos grows as efforts to clear Suez Canal fail https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXCU4…? Outcry mounts over Georgia’s new elections law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Yytm…? Immigrant families in limbo as Biden immigration bill fails https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzLei…? Could a new nuclear deal stem inflation, unrest in Iran? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-b_j…? Brooks and Capehart on voting and gun violence legislation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONfcu…? Remembering five beautiful souls lost to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIF3J…? One monastery shows how faith and science can work together https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiB2c…? Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG? Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Full Episode: President Joe Biden’s First News Conference

Mar 26, 2021  Washington Week PBS

President Biden’s first news conference focused on immigration, voting rights & gun reform. The panel discussed how Biden plans to address these issues. Peter Baker of The New York Times guest moderates. Panel: Zolan Kanno-Youngs of The New York Times, Sahil Kapur of NBC News, Ashley Parker of The Washington Post, Errin Haines of The 19th Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek? Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek?

Extra: President Joe Biden’s Foreign Policy

Mar 26, 2021  Washington Week PBS

President Biden is taking a different approach from former President Trump when it comes to foreign policy. The panel also discussed how the U.S. plans to help move a massive cargo ship stuck in the Suez Canal. Peter Baker of The New York Times guest moderates. Panel: Zolan Kanno-Youngs of The New York Times, Sahil Kapur of NBC News, Ashley Parker of The Washington Post, Errin Haines of The 19th Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek? Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs? Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek? Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek?

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – March 31th, 2021 | NBC Nightly News

Mar 31, 2021  NBC News

Surveillance video shows inside the convenience store in Chauvin trial, Pfizer says its Covid vaccine is 100 percent effective in children ages 12-15, and authorities not releasing details in Tiger Woods crash. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings). 00:00? Intro 02:08? New Video Of George Floyd In Store Before His Death 02:24? Casher Who Allowed Floyd Use Fake $20 Bill Testifies 04:32? Eyewitness Breaks Down In Tears Watching Floyd Video 05:04? Derek Chauvin’s Body Cam Video Shown For First Time 05:13? Juror Suffers ‘Stress-Related’ Reaction In Courtroom 05:43? Americans Under 50 Fueling Rise In New COVID Cases 05:55? Pfizer: Vaccine 100 Percent Effective In Children 12 To 15 06:34? France Imposes New Lockdown As COVID Cases Surge 06:43? COVID Was Thread Leading Cause Of Death In U.S. In 2020 07:04? Doctors: Many Of The Newly Infected Recently Traveled 07:10? Study: Most High-Risk Adults Consistently Wear Masks 07:31? Unknown Number Of J&J Doses Throw Out After MIX-UB 07:55? Sheriff Won’t Release Cause Of Tiger Woods Crash 08:50? Rep. Matt Gaetz Investigated For Possible Sex Trafficking 08:59? Gaetz Denies Sex Trafficking Allegation Involving Minor 09:17? Gaetz Says He’s Victim Of $25 Million Extortion Plot 09:56? House GOP Leader: Gaetz Faces ‘Serious Implications’ 10:20? Report: Gaetz’s Father Says He Wore A Wire For FBI 10:42? Biden Unveils Sweeping $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan 12:20? Suspect Arrested For Hate Crimes Attack On Asian Woman 12:40? Pentagon Reverses Trump-Era Transgender Policies 13:04? New IRS Warning On Scams Targeting Millions 14:56? Will You Need A Vaccine Passport To Travel? 16:40? Mystery Tweet From Nuclear Command Sent By Toddler » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews?

Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 28th, 2021 | Meet The Press | NBC News

Mar 28, 2021  NBC News

In today’s special edition on gun violence, Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.) discuss the spate of mass shootings and the history of Congressional inaction on gun control. Peter Baker, Al Cardenas, Heather McGhee and Vicky Nguyen join the Meet the Press roundtable. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC? Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC? Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC? Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC? Meet The Press Broadcast (Full) – March 28th, 2021 | Meet The Press | NBC News

Firefighter Witness ‘Pled’ to Help George Floyd

Mar 31, 2021  NowThis News

This Minneapolis firefighter says she wasn’t allowed to give medical attention to George Floyd during his fatal arrest — watch part of her powerful testimony at Derek Chauvin’s murder trial (warning: distressing). » Subscribe to NowThis: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe? » Sign up for our newsletter KnowThis to get the biggest stories of the day delivered straight to your inbox: https://go.nowth.is/KnowThis? For more Derek Chauvin Murder Trial coverage and world news, subscribe to NowThis News. #GeorgeFloyd? #DerekChauvin? #BLM? #Politics? #News? #NowThis? Connect with NowThis » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook? » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter? » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram? » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat? NowThis is your premier news outlet providing you with all the videos you need to stay up to date on all the latest in trending news. From entertainment to politics, to viral videos and breaking news stories, we’re delivering all you need to know straight to your social feeds. We live where you live. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisnews? @nowthisnews

Highlights From Day One Of Derek Chauvin’s Trial | NBC News NOW

Mar 29, 2021  NBC News

Watch highlights from the first day of Derek Chauvin’s trial in connection with the death of George Floyd where three witnesses testified. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC? » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews? NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows.

How do coronavirus variants form and will the current vaccines work against them?

Mar 14, 2021  60 Minutes

New, mutated strains of the coronavirus are causing worry around the world as health officials race to vaccinate as many people as possible. Dr. Jon LaPook reports on why the new strains are popping up. “60 Minutes” is the most successful television broadcast in history. Offering hard-hitting investigative reports, interviews, feature segments and profiles of people in the news, the broadcast began in 1968 and is still a hit, over 50 seasons later, regularly making Nielsen’s Top 10. Subscribe to the “60 Minutes” YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1S7CLRu? Watch full episodes: http://cbsn.ws/1Qkjo1F? Get more “60 Minutes” from “60 Minutes: Overtime”: http://cbsn.ws/1KG3sdr? Follow “60 Minutes” on Instagram: http://bit.ly/23Xv8Ry? Like “60 Minutes” on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1Xb1Dao? Follow “60 Minutes” on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1KxUsqX? Subscribe to our newsletter: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T? Download the CBS News app: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8? Try Paramount+ free: https://bit.ly/2OiW1kZ? For licensing inquiries, contact: licensing@veritone.com

Press-Telegram:

How students are using art to channel COVID-19 fears

By ALLYSON ESCOBAR | aescobar@scng.com |

PUBLISHED: March 25, 2021 at 8:05 a.m. | UPDATED: March 26, 2021 at 11:39 a.m.

They say art can express emotions, promote healing or offer a “window into the soul.”

That also can be said of Southern California students who have illustrated the stress and constant changes of these pandemic times in their artwork.

In February, Daniel Richter, a fourth-grade teacher in Wildomar in Riverside County, asked his students to express how they felt through digital art.

Richter, who teaches at Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts — a charter arts school with campuses in Wildomar and Chino Hills — said he was “blown away” by the submissions and conversations about the coronavirus crisis.

“I know how I feel, as an adult,” he said. “But I wanted to know how my 9- and 10-year-olds, and all students, feel about coming to school with masks on, or not being able to see their friends, or be able to sit in a movie theater.”

“A picture is worth a thousand words — so drawing a picture is sometimes easier,” the former child behavioral therapist said. “You can draw a face with multiple emotions, each representing what’s going on in the child. Getting these kids to open up and talk about their emotions (was) a really good reminder that we’re all going through this. We’re all hurting, too.”

Robin Gormin, a teacher at Fairmont Private Schools in Anaheim, said students “are really taking the brunt of this pandemic.”

“They are isolated, lonely and feeling like everything has been taken from them,” she said.

Here’s a sampling of art from students in kindergarten through high school in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, from moving paintings and photography to digital drawings and mixed media.

Lesley Perez Cortez, a senior at Arroyo Valley High School in San Bernardino, painted “Bella Dentro (Beauty Within)” in her advanced art class. She said the painting reflects seniors feeling “faceless and forgotten” during their last years of high school, but still beautiful within. (Photo courtesy of Keith Brockie)

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Lesley Perez Cortez, a senior at Arroyo Valley High School in San Bernardino, painted “Bella Dentro (Beauty Within)” in her advanced art class. She said the painting reflects seniors’ feeling “faceless and forgotten” during their last years of high school, but still beautiful within. (Photo courtesy of Keith Brockie)

Color pencil art from Lizbeth Mancillas, a 9th grader at The School of Arts and Enterprise in Pomona. The artwork was created during the lockdown “to bring some color into her family’s life,” said her teacher, Mark Bunner. (Photo courtesy of Mark Bunner)

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Color pencil art from Lizbeth Mancillas, a ninth grader at The School of Arts and Enterprise in Pomona, created this piece during the lockdown “to bring some color into her family’s life,” teacher Mark Bunner said. (Photo courtesy of Mark Bunner)

Rachel Levine, 16, from Huntington Beach, is a student at Fairmont Preparatory Academy in Anaheim. “The meaning behind my artwork is the leaning state of movement that is shown through the fruit, representing the constant state of imbalance that everyone is experiencing right now. I was inspired by Rene Magritte to put facial features on the fruit to bring a more surreal look, outside of the gravity-defying element that is seen with the tower.” (Photo courtesy of Heather Soodak)

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Rachel Levine, a 16-year-old Huntington Beach resident and student at Fairmont Preparatory Academy in Anaheim, created this piece. “The meaning behind my artwork is the leaning state of movement that is shown through the fruit, representing the constant state of imbalance that everyone is experiencing right now. I was inspired by Rene Magritte to put facial features on the fruit to bring a more surreal look, outside of the gravity-defying element that is seen with the tower.” (Photo courtesy of Heather Soodak)

A mixed media (acrylic paint and embroidery) portrait of a young person during the pandemic. The artist being the work is 18-year-old Joyce Lee, a senior at the Orange County School of the Arts in Santa Ana. (Photo courtesy of Paige Oden)

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A mixed media work, using acrylic paint and embroidery shows a young person during the pandemic. Joyce Lee, an 18-year-old senior at the Orange County School of the Arts in Santa Ana, is the artist. (Photo courtesy of Paige Oden

Nyzell Guzman, 18, from Inner-City Arts in Los Angeles, created ‘Esperanza’ — meaning ‘hope’ in Spanish. “Many of us want to be hopeful during these difficult times. La Virgen de Guadalupe in the center of my piece is a symbol of faith and identity. During these tough times, many people look up to her for peace,” Guzman said. “The Folklorico dancers and roses represent what brings joy to the Latinx community. This piece represents LA’s Latinx community and is a reminder that all will be well.” (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

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Nyzell Guzman, 18, from Inner-City Arts in Los Angeles, created ‘Esperanza,’ which means “hope” in Spanish. “Many of us want to be hopeful during these difficult times. La Virgen de Guadalupe in the center of my piece is a symbol of faith and identity. During these tough times, many people look up to her for peace,” Nyzell said. “The Folklorico dancers and roses represent what brings joy to the Latinx community. This piece represents LA’s Latinx community and is a reminder that all will be well.” (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

Cori Chapman, 16, created a digital comic strip for Inner-City Arts’ in Los Angeles “Art Find A Way” project, expressing her thoughts and challenges during the pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

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Cori Chapman, 16, created a digital comic strip for the Art Find A Way project of Inner-City Arts’ in Los Angeles. It expresses her thoughts and challenges during the pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

“Since I am not able to physically visit my favorite places, I enjoy working them into my art,” said student Melody Esther Chaidez-Hernandez, 17, from Inner-City Arts LA. She submitted her work for an Instagram campaign called #spreadheART. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

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Melody Esther Chaidez-Hernandez, 17, created this piece for Inner-City Arts LA. “Since I am not able to physically visit my favorite places, I enjoy working them into my art,” she said. Melody submitted her work for an Instagram campaign called #spreadheART. (Photo courtesy of Christopher Maikish, Inner-City Arts)

A photo by Isabelle Pruitt, a student at Lancaster High School in Lancaster. Rose Max, Pruitt’s visual imagery teacher, wanted to give her students a creative outlet to process the COVID-19 pandemic and its many after-effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

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A photo by Isabelle Pruitt, a student at Lancaster High School, aims to carry out teacher Rose Max’s assignment to give students a creative outlet to process the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

A photo by Pricilla Palacios, a student at Lancaster High School in Lancaster. Rose Max, Palacios’ visual imagery teacher, wanted to give her students a creative outlet to process the COVID-19 pandemic and its many after-effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

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This photo by Pricilla Palacios, a student at Lancaster High School, was created to document the pandemic and its effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max

A photo by Nathaniel Robles, a student at Lancaster High School in Lancaster. Rose Max, Robles’ visual imagery teacher, wanted to give her students a creative outlet to process the COVID-19 pandemic and its many after-effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

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This photo by Nathaniel Robles, a student at Lancaster High School, was created to document the pandemic and its effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max

A photo by Lance Hidalgo, a student at Lancaster High School in Lancaster. Rose Max, Hidalgo’s visual imagery teacher, wanted to give her students a creative outlet to process the COVID-19 pandemic and its many after-effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

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This photo by Lance Hidalgo, a student at Lancaster High School, was created to document the pandemic and its effects. (Photo courtesy of Rose Max)

“Values of Grief,” an acrylic painting by Jessica Kim, a junior at Portola High School in Irvine. The painting expresses the grief felt by nurses working the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. “The nurses are holding on together and the waves in the back show their emotions and sadness. Their tears are flowing into the ocean… (the colors) starts off as dark, and gradually grow into brighter colors that show that they are getting better and happier,” said Kim. (Photo courtesy of Kearci Moir)

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“Values of Grief” is an acrylic painting by Jessica Kim, a junior at Portola High School in Irvine. The work shows the grief felt by nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. “The nurses are holding on together and the waves in the back show their emotions and sadness. Their tears are flowing into the ocean … (the colors) start off as dark, and gradually grow into brighter colors that show that they are getting better and happier,” Jessica said. (Photo courtesy of Kearci Moir

“This piece is one of the acrylic paintings I’ve completed during my quarantine,” said Elanor Whitesides, a senior at Quartz Hill High School in Lancaster. “By depicting one of many quiet moments during the COVID-19 pandemic, I continue to document my journey as a student artist.” (Photo courtesy of Deepak Dhillonn)

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Elanor Whitesides, a senior at Quartz Hill High School in Lancaster, created this acrylic painting during the pandemic. “By depicting one of many quiet moments during the COVID-19 pandemic, I continue to document my journey as a student artist.” (Photo courtesy of Deepak Dhillonn)

“Dreams for 2021,” a watercolor painting created by Alvin Wang, 15, a ninth-grader California School of the Arts – San Gabriel Valley. “I think that at that point in quarantine, I wasn’t doing the greatest because I had spent so many months at home. When I was painting it, I focused on making it brighter and more saturated to make it seem more cheerful among the issues with quarantine and the pandemic,” said Alvin. “I decided to paint this piece because I really was looking forward to getting back into social activities and simply being around people.” (Photo courtesy of Julia Gutierrez)

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“Dreams for 2021,” is a watercolor painting by Alvin Wang, a 15-year-old ninth-grader at the California School of the Arts – San Gabriel Valley. “I think that at that point in quarantine, I wasn’t doing the greatest because I had spent so many months at home. When I was painting it, I focused on making it brighter and more saturated to make it seem more cheerful among the issues with quarantine and the pandemic,” Alvin said. “I decided to paint this piece because I really was looking forward to getting back into social activities and simply being around people.” (Photo courtesy of Julia Gutierrez)

Annie Liang, a 17-year-old junior at Glen A. Wilson High School in Hacienda Heights, created her watercolor/colored pencil painting “Encore” for a window self-portrait art assignment during the pandemic. “ith this piece, I want to express how people only see a certain side to me,” Liang said. (Photo courtesy of Annie Liang)

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Annie Liang, a 17-year-old junior at Glen A. Wilson High School in Hacienda Heights, created this watercolor/colored pencil painting “Encore” for a window self-portrait art assignment during the pandemic. “I want to express how people only see a certain side to me,” Annie said. (Photo courtesy of Annie Liang

“This work is representative of my experience during the pandemic in that I’d been dead bored over the summer,” said Lauren Villacorte, a sophomore at Glen A Wilson High School in Hacienda Heights, who created this piece for her dad on his wedding day. “This work is representative of my experience during the pandemic, because it proves to me that good things can still happen, despite all the bad. It’s a bit of an understatement to say there’s been a lot of bad this last year, but my dad’s wedding–despite featuring only him, his wife, and myself–was good.” (Photo courtesy of Lauren Villacorte)

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Lauren Villacorte, a sophomore at Glen A. Wilson High School in Hacienda Heights, created this piece for her father on his wedding day. “This work is representative of my experience during the pandemic in that I’d been dead bored over the summer,” Lauren said. “This work is representative of my experience during the pandemic, because it proves to me that good things can still happen, despite all the bad. It’s a bit of an understatement to say there’s been a lot of bad this last year, but my dad’s wedding–despite featuring only him, his wife, and myself – was good.” (Photo courtesy of Lauren Villacorte)

Brittney Smith, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew her piece “Facing Challenges” for an art class project. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler)

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Brittney Smith, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew her piece “Facing Challenges” for an art class project. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler

Jasmine Dobrozdravich, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew “Justice and Freedom” based on class discussions on how justice and freedom have been affected during the pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler)

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Jasmine Dobrozdravich, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew “Justice and Freedom” based on class discussions on how justice and freedom have been affected during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler)

Barbara Markov, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew her experience of being “together, but still separated” for an art class project. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler)

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Barbara Markov, a senior at Highland High School in Palmdale, drew her experience of being “together, but still separated” for an art class project. (Photo courtesy of Pavel Vogler)

“The Island of Façades,” a watercolor painting by Natalie Adriana Salcido, a junior at Cajon H.S. in San Bernardino. Salcido was inspired by current events. “I wanted to capture all the bizzare things that have occurred during 2020. I chose a theme of politics and other topics that have affected our communities. I wanted to show the rift of power between the government and the struggle of the people,” Salcido said. “I also incorporated Edward Hopper’s use of perspective which was always looking into a scene from afar. Due to my interest in community engagement, I wanted to have reflections of all the things that have made this year a roller coaster.” (Photo courtesy of Elisabeth Payne)

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“The Island of Façades,” is a watercolor painting by Natalie Adriana Salcido, a junior at Cajon High School in San Bernardino. Salcido was inspired by current events. “I wanted to capture all the bizarre things that have occurred during 2020. I chose a theme of politics and other topics that have affected our communities. I wanted to show the rift of power between the government and the struggle of the people,” Natalie said. “I also incorporated Edward Hopper’s use of perspective, which was always looking into a scene from afar. Due to my interest in community engagement, I wanted to have reflections of all the things that have made this year a roller coaster.” (Photo courtesy of Elisabeth Payne)

“Lockdown Emotions” by Faith Crocker, 15, a student at Eastside H.S. in Lancaster, expresses many high school students’ feelings during this time of distance learning. (Photo courtesy of Faith Crocker)

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“Lockdown Emotions” was created by Faith Crocker, a 15-year-old student at Eastside High School in Lancaster to express his feelings during distance learning. (Photo courtesy of Faith Crocker

A pen drawing by Brenna Corcoran, 17, a senior in the Visual Arts Conservatory at the California School of the Arts – San Gabriel Valley. Corcoran says she was inspired by “Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd’s murder, the continuation of a global pandemic, the beginnings of a pivotal election, and the pressures of school.” (Photo courtesy of Julia Gutierrez)

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This pen drawing is by Brenna Corcoran, 17, a senior in the Visual Arts Conservatory at the California School of the Arts – San Gabriel Valley. Brenna was inspired by “Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd’s murder, the continuation of a global pandemic, the beginnings of a pivotal election, and the pressures of school.” (Photo courtesy of Julia Gutierrez

“If I was given a chance to go back to that fateful day, I would’ve done things differently. I would’ve shared a more meaningful goodbye with my friends,” said Italy White, a senior at Vista del Lago High School, who submitted this piece as part of Moreno Valley Unified’s artful healing initiative. “I also wouldn’t have treated COVID-19 as a joke and rooted for an extra week of Spring Break.” (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco)

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Italy White, a senior at Vista del Lago High School in Moreno Valley, submitted this piece for Moreno Valley Unified School District’s artful healing initiative. “If I was given a chance to go back to that fateful day, I would’ve done things differently. I would’ve shared a more meaningful goodbye with my friends,” Italy said. “I also wouldn’t have treated COVID-19 as a joke and rooted for an extra week of Spring Break.” (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco

“The work represented the thoughts and events going through quarantine and transitioning into senior year during quarantine, knowing our senior year isn’t going to be the same as the others,” said Mathew Banagudos, a senior at Vista del Lago High School. Banagudos submitted this artwork as part of Moreno Valley Unified’s artful healing initiative. (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco)

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Mathew Banagudos, a senior at Vista del Lago High School in Moreno Vally submitted this piece as part of the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s artful healing initiative. “The work represented the thoughts and events going through quarantine and transitioning into senior year during quarantine, knowing our senior year isn’t going to be the same as the others,” Matthew said. (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco)

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Mixed media (paint and paper on a birch panel) self-portrait collage by Ciel Mitrovich, a freshman at Orange County School of the Arts in Santa Ana. This was a self-motivated summer project to help students find creativity during the pandemic and isolation at home, her teacher says. (Photo courtesy of Paige Oden)

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A digital drawing by Daria Kosianenko, a sophomore at Fairmont Preparatory Academy in Anaheim, who is living in Moscow, Russia due to the pandemic. The drawing, “Waiting in the Shadows,” shows the COVID-19 virus in the form of a horse hiding its true face before revealing her essence, responsible for the death of thousands. A bell hangs in her ear as a warning, but not everyone wants to listen to its sound. For Daria, this work and the situation that we all experienced means the word: despair. (Photo courtesy of Heather Soodak)

“My best friend Liam and I can’t see each other in person, so I’m sad. We can only talk to each other through the phone and through our computers, and I felt sad,” said Morgan Steig, 9, of Lake Elsinore, a student at Sycamore Academy in Wildomar. “It’s sometimes easier for me to draw out my emotions than explain them in words.” (Photo courtesy of Daniel Richter)

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“My best friend Liam and I can’t see each other in person, so I’m sad,” said Morgan Steig, a 9-year-old Lake Elsinore resident and student at Sycamore Academy in Wildomar. “We can only talk to each other through the phone and through our computers, and I felt sad.” (Photo courtesy of Daniel Richter)

Ellie Kim, 8, a third-grader at Fairmont Private School in Anaheim, created her own version of Edvard Munch’s famous expressionist painting, “The Scream.” Teacher Robin Gormin prompted her students to draw something that would make them scream. Ellie, who has been in online learning, depicted viruses and COVID-19 in her piece. “We talked about Expressionism and how it is important to put your feelings down on paper, rather than physically showing your feelings. The face Ellie drew shows it all,” said Gormin. (Photo courtesy of Robin Gormin)

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Ellie Kim, 8, a third grader at Fairmont Private School in Anaheim, created her own version of Edvard Munch’s famous expressionist painting, “The Scream.” Teacher Robin Gormin prompted students to draw something that would make them scream. Ellie, who has been in online learning, drew viruses and COVID-19 in her piece. “We talked about Expressionism and how it is important to put your feelings down on paper, rather than physically showing your feelings. The face Ellie drew shows it all,” Gormin said. (Photo courtesy of Robin Gormin)

“My art piece is about feeling really trapped in the first few weeks. When COVID first started it was really pretty outside, I wanted to go outside and play with my friends but we couldn’t because we were all social distancing,” said Sycamore Academy fourth-grader Zoey Carroll, 10, frm Canyon Lake. (Photo courtesy of Daniel Richter)

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“My art piece is about feeling really trapped in the first few weeks,” said Sycamore Academy fourth grader Zoey Carroll, a 10-year-old Canyon Lake resident. “When COVID first started it was really pretty outside, I wanted to go outside and play with my friends but we couldn’t because we were all social distancing.” (Photo courtesy of Daniel Richter

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Rocia Han, a middle school student at the California School of the Arts in the San Gabriel Valley, drew “True Hero” as part of her studies in conservatory. She was inspired by the struggle of medical workers risking their lives in the pandemic. “I drew a girl inside a COVID cell to show she’s infected, and many cells in the background to show how dangerous it is,” Rocia said. “The doctor is the one who is saving the girl’s life. Doctors are true heroes and they are the ones who make this world a better place.” (Photo courtesy of Julia Gutierrez)

A drawing by Nataly Sanchez, a fourth-grader at Barton Elementary School in San Bernardino. “She wanted to express what is happening to the earth during the pandemic,” said her teacher, Grace Schmidt. (Photo courtesy of Grace Schmidt)

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Nataly Sanchez, a fourth grader at Barton Elementary School in San Bernardino, drew this to “to express what is happening to the earth during the pandemic,” teacher Grace Schmidt said. (Photo courtesy of Grace Schmidt)

Diego Lorenzo, a fifth-grader in Covina, submitted this piece as an entry for a school art poster competition. He was inspired to draw after witnessing the division in the U.S. during the past year. He won 1st place at the elementary level. (Photo courtesy of Claudia Gonzales)

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Diego Lorenzo, a fifth grader in Covina, submitted this piece in a school pandemic art contest. He was inspired after witnessing division in the U.S. in the past year. He won first place for the elementary school level. (Photo courtesy of Claudia Gonzales)

7 of 14

A watercolor painting by fourth grader Anndrea Castaneda shows a coronavirus replacing the cornea of a weeping girl’s eye. She attends Barton Elementary School in San Bernardino. (Photo courtesy of Grace Schmidt)

A visual drawing of a speech by Isaac Rickard, a sixth-grader at the Vista Heights Middle School, who took part in a healing arts initiative from the Moreno Valley Unified School District called “Document Today.” Rickard, 11, talked about having good physical and mental health during the pandemic and created a drawing with highlights and tips from his speech. (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco)

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A drawing of a speech by Isaac Rickard, a sixth grader at Vista Heights Middle School in Moreno Valley, comes from a healing arts initiative called “Document Today.” Isaac, 11, talked about having good physical and mental health in the pandemic and created a drawing with highlights and tips from his speech. (Photo courtesy of Anahi Velasco)

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Jurupa Middle School eighth grader Dylan Smith’s drawing won first in the Riverside County Arts Connect Visual Student Art Competition, middle school category. “My drawing represents possibilities of what the world could become in the future. The left side is bad things happening in the world. The right side is good things happening in the world.” (Photo courtesy of Riverside County Office of Education)

“R is for Rusty Boy” is the name of this photo taken by 9-year-old Tyler Koon, a 3rd grader in Riverside County, who has struggled with distance learning, but gets through with help from his pet Rusty. An artistic student with an early interest in photography, Koon received an old Nikon 5100 from his mom, who said Tyler wanted to highlight the “fur heroes” giving families comfort in hard times. (Photo courtesy of Launa Koon)

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“R is for Rusty Boy” is the name of this photo taken by 9-year-old Tyler Koon, a third grader in Riverside County, who struggled with distance learning, but got through with help from his pet, Rusty. Tyler got an old Nikon 5100 camera from his mother, who said he wanted to highlight the “fur heroes” giving families comfort in hard times. (Photo courtesy of Launa Koon)

5-year-old Calder Eaton from West L.A. created “Spider Monster” as a part of the Hammer Museum’s Family Day: Make in L.A. 2020. The project, imagined by artist Umar Rashid, prompted families to create monsters that would help in a battle against shape-shifters who were making everyone too sick to celebrate Halloween. Hearing a call for heroism, Calder was inspired by his favorite superhero, Spiderman, to create a figure that could see in many directions as it battled against its foe. Umar wanted to make sure the kids and families could practice storytelling, while feeling empowered during challenging times. (Photo courtesy of Tara Burns)

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5-year-old Calder Eaton from West Los Angeles created “Spider Monster” as a part of the Hammer Museum’s Family Day: Make in L.A. 2020. The project, imagined by artist Umar Rashid, prompted families to create monsters that would help in a battle against shape-shifters who were making everyone too sick to celebrate Halloween. Calder was inspired by his favorite superhero, Spider-Man, to create a figure that could see in many directions as it battled its foe. (Photo courtesy of Tara Burns)

The art I am submitting are posters focused on social issues that the students chose. They designed their posters around issues that they were passionate about. They are created using a range of art mediums. Student art from South Lake Middle School. (Photo courtesy of Amberleigh Adoff)

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This poster by Emy Bellehumeur, 13, a seventh grader at South Lake Middle School in Irvine is titled “Humanity.” It was created in an art class where students were asked to design mixed-media posters about social issues they were passionate about. “I want people to see my art and realize that really we are just all humans with feelings that try to leave their best lives in peace,” Emy said. “My artwork represents a skeleton with a heart and montages of discrimination. I was hoping the skeleton will make everyone realize that your appearance doesn’t matter and the heart show that we all have a heart no matter who we are.” (Photo courtesy of Amberleigh Adoff)

A mixed-media watercolor by Jimena Lemus Perez, 6, a first-grader at Santiago Elementary in Santa Ana. As part of the Santa Ana Unified School District’s Extended Learning Program with OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center, students made artwork about unity and diversity, inspired by Mexican mythology and art. Combining majestic animal creatures, they created a species “strengthened by unity.” A lesson we can all learn from during the pandemic’s divisive times. (Photo courtesy of Mark Dominic Dimalanta, Santa Ana Unified/OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center)

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Jimena Lemus Perez, 6, a first grader at Santiago Elementary School in Santa Ana, created a mixed-media watercolor. As part of the Santa Ana Unified School District’s Extended Learning Program with OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center, students made art about unity and diversity, inspired by Mexican mythology and art. Combining majestic animal creatures, they created a species “strengthened by unity.” The project aimed to help youths with “social-emotional learning” during the pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Mark Dominic Dimalanta, Santa Ana Unified/OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center)

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A mixed-media watercolor by Paola Sanchez, 10, a fourth grader at Adams Elementary School in Santa Ana was part of the Santa Ana Unified School District’s Extended Learning Program with OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center. The project aimed to help youths with “social-emotional learning” during the pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Mark Dominic Dimalanta, Santa Ana Unified/OC Children’s Therapeutic Arts Center)

Allyson Escobar

Allyson Escobar | Reporter

Allyson Escobar covers local news in the I-15 freeway cities, including Corona, Norco, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Murrieta, Wildomar and Temecula, for The Press-Enterprise/Southern California News Group. She has covered Asian and Latino American issues and culture, the Filipino community in Los Angeles, and religion in Brooklyn and Queens, NY. She has also written for local and national outlets including NBC News, the LA Times, Angelus News, KCETLink, The Daily Pilot, America Magazine, National Catholic Reporter, The Tablet and Asian Journal.

and Asian Journal.

aescobar@scng.com

 Follow Allyson Escobar @heyallysonrae

 

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