PBS News, BBC Click, BBC Horizon, DW Documentary, My Modern Met, TED Talks, Design Bolts, Thisiscolossal and NAD Lembeh Resort

PBS News: February 25- 27.2020 and India’s immigrant crackdown leaves nearly 2 million in limbo

BBC Click: Click At CES in Las Vegas

BBC Horizon: Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity — Jim Al-Khalili

DW Documentary: Soyalism

My Modern Met: Bees Create Heart-Shaped Hive When There Aren’t Frames Up to Guide Them

TED Talks: Annie Murphy Paul What we learn before we reborn?, Laura Schulz The surprisingly logical minds of babies?, and How fast are you moving right now? – Tucker-Hiatt – TED-Ed

Design Bolts: Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Thisiscolossal: Pouring a Thermos of Hot Tea at -40°C Near the Arctic Circle  and Underwater Footage Captures a Blanket Octopus Revealing Her Billowing Iridescent Membrane

NAD Lembeh Resort: The Blanket Octopus and it’s AMAZING Blanket!!

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 27, 2020

Feb 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, an infectious disease specialist on novel coronavirus transmission and severity. Plus: Virus fears cause economic instability, 2020 Democrats make their final pitches in South Carolina, a conversation with Mike Bloomberg, should foreign ISIS fighters return home for trial and a new book explores the reckless financial dealings that contributed to the 2008 economic crash. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How Americans can prepare for broader outbreak of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhe78… What novel coronavirus might mean for 2020 global economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXOpz… News Wrap: Major military clash erupts between Turkey, Syria https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cegP2… 2020 Democrats chase votes in SC, Super Tuesday states https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5p5bO… Michael Bloomberg on crisis preparation, management skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWGC3… Kosovo offers Europe a test run for handling former jihadis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-Ava… New book explores the schemes and scandals of Deutsche Bank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zkzR… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 26, 2020

Feb 26, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, China’s novel coronavirus outbreak has slowed, but the information battle between Chinese activists and the government continues. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a raucous Charleston debate ahead of the South Carolina primary, the medicine of migraine disease, a Silicon Valley whistleblower, the film “Seberg” and how U.S. officials are planning for possible pandemic. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Deadly shooting at Molson Coors in Milwaukee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtOyb… In China, critics of state virus response have disappeared https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dywyh… How 2020 Democrats are reacting to combative SC debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=houOy… Why migraine disease involves more than just a headache https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8K-7… How Uber whistleblower Susan Fowler took on toxic culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jhc77… How American actress Jean Seberg became a target of the FBI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtj3G… Trump defends virus response, announces new measures https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhUo3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 25, 2020

Feb 25, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, U.S. health officials express rising alarm over the possibility that novel coronavirus could become a global pandemic. Plus: Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak dies at age 91, previewing the 2020 Democrats’ South Carolina debate, conversations with a prosecutor and a defense attorney in the Harvey Weinstein sex crimes case and Venezuela’s crumbling health system. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Why U.S. officials are escalating concerns over COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKt5h… News Wrap: Trump criticizes Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC1uc… Polarizing former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak dies at 91 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjs3R… Is South Carolina still Joe Biden’s firewall?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wy3J… Manhattan DA on Weinstein conviction, prosecuting sex crimes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifaIn… Weinstein defense attorney says media ‘pressure’ swayed jury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLHdC… Sick Venezuelans lack power, water, medicine — and hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtmWa… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

India’s immigrant crackdown leaves nearly 2 million in limbo

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Immigration from Bangladesh into India’s northeastern state of Assam has long been a contentious issue, often boiling over into violence. Last year the government declared nearly 2 million people there to be non-citizens in an effort that has been widely criticized. Many now fear similar measures across the country. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Click At CES in Las Vegas – BBC Click

Jan 17, 2020  BBC Click

Click comes from CES in Las Vegas, the world’s largest tech show. With the latest announcements from the show and a look at trends for the year ahead. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Soyalism | DW Documentary

Feb 21, 2020  DW Documentary

Industrial agriculture is increasingly dominating the world market. It’s forcing small farmers to quit and taking over vast swathes of land. This documentary shows how destructive the lucrative agribusiness is. Whether in the USA, Brazil, Mozambique or China, agricultural giants rule the market. Food production has become a gigantic business as climate change and population growth continue. This is having devastating consequences for small farmers and for the environment. On the banks of North Carolina’s New River, there’s a vile stench. Clean water activist Rick Dove takes a flight to show us what’s causing the smell. Scores and scores of pigs are living upriver, in so many pens the farms look more like small towns. “We have eight to ten million pigs here. And the problem is that they are kept so close together and their excrement pollutes and threatens the water and natural life on the North Carolina coastline.” From above, you can see large cesspools everywhere, shimmering red-brown in the sun. Dove is giving us a bird’s-eye view of industrialized agriculture. In the late 1970s, companies in the US began to industrialize farming. Large corporations like Smithfield built entire value chains, from raising livestock to slaughter to packaging and sales. A Chinese holding company bought Smithfield a few years ago. Industrial meat production is supposed to support increased Chinese demand for meat as the country’s prosperity grows. Dan Basse is the head of a company analyses global agriculture. He says calorie demand will also increase in countries like India, Bangladesh and Nigeria in the next few years.” And with it, the demand for even more inexpensive meat of the kind agribusinesses produce and market. ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia

Shock and Awe: The Story of Electricity — Jim Al-Khalili BBC Horizon

•May 27, 2015  Trev M

Part 1 – Spark 0:00 Part 2 – The Age of Invention 58:30 Part 3 – Revelations and Revolutions 1:56:50 ——— In this three-part BBC Horizon documentary physicist and science communicator Jim Al-Khalili takes the viewer on a journey exploring the most important historical developments in electricity and magnetism. This documentary discusses how the physics (and the people behind the physics) changed the world forever. ——— BBC Horizon 2011

https://mymodernmet.com/heart-shaped-beehive/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_term=2020-02-21

Category  Science & Technology

Bees Create Heart-Shaped Hive When There Aren’t Frames Up to Guide Them

By Jessica Stewart on February 10, 2020

If you ever needed evidence that bees were artists, take a look at this incredible photograph posted by The National Trust. Left to their own devices, the bees at Bodiam Castle in Robertsbridge, United Kingdom made quite the spectacle. Within the structure of their hive, they created a delightful heart-shaped honeycomb that looks as sweet as it tastes.

This may seem like an odd sight, but that’s only because we’re used to beekeepers placing rectangular frames within the hive. The bees then deposit their honey and build a comb directly onto the frame, which can be easily taken out and harvested by the beekeeper. But the reality is, bees will use as much space as they have to store honey. In fact, natural hives can take on all shapes and sizes.

For instance, sugarbag bees, which are native to Australia, make hives that form large spiraling structures. In temperate climates, some bees will even form an “open colony” where the entire hive is exposed. These can hang off of trees, fences, or overhangs and take on impressive oblong shapes.

Still, the photograph from Bodiam Castle is fascinating because it was formed within the wood frame of a hive. Beekeeper gregthegregest2 mentioned on Reddit that this is a common occurrence when the bees are left a large gap between the top of the frames and the roof of the hive. Of course, it makes good sense that these hard workers would take advantage of every inch given to them. While the shape is beautiful, this can be a headache for beekeepers when looking to harvest their honey. They need to cut away the extra honeycomb in order to free the frames below.

Of course, the skill of bees is well known. In fact, even artists have taken advantage of their capabilities by working with bees to create everything from sculptures to embroidery. So the next time you see a honey bee buzzing from flower to flower, just imagine what interesting artistry might happen when it makes its way back to the hive.

When left to their own devices, bees are incredible architects.

They can create incredible shapes from their honeycomb, whether in boxes or out in nature.

How fast are you moving right now? – Tucker Hiatt

Jan 27, 2014  TED-Ed

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-fast-ar… “How fast are you moving?” seems like an easy question, but it’s actually quite complicated — and perhaps best answered by another question: “Relative to what?” Even when you think you’re standing still, the Earth is moving relative to the Sun, which is moving relative to the Milky Way, which is…you get the idea. Tucker Hiatt unravels the concepts of absolute and relative speed. Lesson by Tucker Hiatt, animation by Zedem Media.

Category  Education

Pop quiz: When does learning begin? Answer: Before we are born. Science writer Annie Murphy Paul talks through new research that shows how much we learn in the womb — from the lilt of our native language to our soon-to-be-favorite foods.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Annie Murphy Paul · Science author

Annie Murphy Paul investigates how life in the womb shapes who we become.

TEDGlobal 2011 | July 2011

How do babies learn so much from so little so quickly? In a fun, experiment-filled talk, cognitive scientist Laura Schulz shows how our young ones make decisions with a surprisingly strong sense of logic, well before they can talk.

Show 1 correction

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Laura Schulz · Cognitive scientist

Developmental behavior studies spearheaded by Laura Schulz are changing our notions of how children learn.

https://www.designbolts.com/2020/02/16/awe-inspiring-nokia-5g-paper-cut-creative-illustrations-by-eiko-ojala

TED2015 | March 2015

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Hey there guys! So, we are back with yet another interesting blog of ours and we are hopeful that you are going to love it as much as we do – mainly because it is one of our favorite topics to cover (and we are sure that you know this too!) and also because well, it feels so great to come across artists who put in their brain, heart and hands to create magic. Our today’s blog will cover Nokia 5G paper cut illustrations by Eiko Ojala and we would like to get started right now.

Before we start explaining what paper cut illustrations really are and introduce you guys with Eiko’s work, let’s have a look at Eiko Ojala as an illustrator first. So, he is an Estonian artist who was born in 1982 in Tallinn. He has studied interior design and it was prior to when he brought himself to the world of creating illustrations (read: stunning). Eiko knows how to create amazing digital paper cut illustrations by combining them with his traditional techniques and making sure that his work speaks volumes.

We would also like to share this here that Eiko has been working with The New York Times, the Harvard Business Review, the Weird Magazine and has also been associated with the V&A Museum. Oh, and just by the way the master of creating paper cut illustrations has also won a Young Illustrators award in 2013 and an ADC Young Gun award by the Art Directors Club.

Isn’t it just great that all the artists around the world stun us with their creativity, imagination and work on a daily basis and we share that here on our blog because we want to inspire you guys and to encourage you too so that you can also get into the field and see if that is working for you.

As far as the paper cut illustrations are concerned, we believe that, this technique requires a lot of time, efforts and patience especially when you are creating your illustrations on digital mediums. There are a number of layers involved in order to recreate the original idea by adding depth and meaning to the illustrations.

Now, we know that different artists have different tricks to work on what they love to create but about Eiko’s illustrations, one thing is for final that you will require a great deal of time to tell if the illustrations were made using paper or did Eiko created them using his digital editing skills. Yes, you read that right. That is how clean and real his illustrations are that you cannot differentiate between a paper one and a digital one.

You must be wondering that only a few artists could create paper cut illustrations as this requires time, skills and a lot more than that but believe us when we say this, that nothing is impossible or too difficult if we really want to do it for ourselves and once you find your peace and happiness in the things that you do and create then there is no going back. It becomes interesting, it becomes fun and you want to improve yourself in order to get to the bigger goal and that is how it should be.

We can bet that even Eiko must have created illustrations which he would not have considered anything, he must have also discarded a few of his creations here and a few of them there because well, we judge ourselves more than others do and while we are evaluating our work and thought process, we tend to exclude most of the stuff because we want perfection.

What we are trying to say here is that if you think that you have it in you to try out a new skill in 2020 then make it more about paper cut illustrations – both with actual paper as well as on digital platforms like Illustrator. In this way, you will be able to know if you can do it or not and although we know that you are going to ace it, we would also want to say that go easy on yourself and also be patient if you fail because that is going to help you in the longer run.

Coming back to Eiko’s illustrations, we love each one of them and we are sharing them in our blog as well but let’s take a cursory glance too before we leave you with the magical illustrations for you to look at in detail. The first one is the Nokia 5G one in which you can see the number and the alphabet and there is world in these two elements. Vehicles, humans, trees and birds as well as the scenery is making this illustration that has a story to tell.

Moving on, you can see multiple shapes and backgrounds on which Eiko has used his imagination to create illustrations that are significant and interesting to look at. And from building and monuments to human beings and their cars, trees, birds and clouds – we think that looking at these mind blowing illustrations is a treat for the eyes. So, feel free to share the blog with your friends and family members too and we are sure they are going to like it too.

Credit: be.net/eiko

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala
Awe-Inspiring Nokia 5G Paper Cut Creative Illustrations by Eiko Ojala

Pouring a Thermos of Hot Tea at -40°C Near the Arctic Circle

DECEMBER 21, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

ice-1

Ontario-based photographer Michael Davies timed this impressive shot of his friend Markus hurling a thermos of hot tea through the air yesterday in -40°C weather. At such frigid temperatures water freezes instantly to form a dramatic plume of ice. For the last decade Davies has worked as a photographer in the fly-in community of Pangnirtung in Canada’s High Arctic, only 20km south of the Arctic Circle, a place that sees about two hours of sunlight each day during the winter. He shares via email that almost nothing was left to chance in creating the photo, as so many things had to be perfectly timed:

Around 1pm I jumped on my skidoo along with my friend Markus and we drove 45 minutes to the top of a nearby mountain where the light (which is almost always pink near the solstice) would hit the hills. Prepared with multiple thermoses filled with tea, we began tossing the water and shooting. Nothing of this shot was to chance, I followed the temperature, watched for calm wind, and planned the shot and set it up. Even the sun in the middle of the spray was something I was hoping for, even though it’s impossible to control.

You can see more of Davies’ most recent photography over on Flickr.

23261605704_e253b00e5d_b

Underwater Footage Captures a Blanket Octopus Revealing Her Billowing Iridescent Membrane

FEBRUARY 24, 2020  GRACE EBERT

In a short clip captured during a blackwater night dive in the Lembeh Straita blanket octopus unfolds and displays a colorful web multiple times her original size. The aquatic animal’s iridescent body and

tentacles glow against the nighttime water before she releases her translucent blanket that connects her dorsal and dorsolateral arms. Only adult females are equipped with the lengthy membrane that reaches as long as six feet and dwarfs male octopi, which are less than an inch in size and most often die immediately after mating. Generally, the females only unfurl their color-changing blankets to appear larger and more intimidating to potential predators. Shared by NAD Lembeh Resort, the underwater video was taken on a RED Gemini with a 50 millimeter Zeiss Macro lens. You might also want to check out this footage of a blanket octopus in waters near the Philippines. (via The Kids Should See This)

The Blanket Octopus and it’s AMAZING Blanket!!

Mar 24, 2019  NAD Lembeh Resort

The Blanket Octopus, shot in the Lembeh Straits on a Blackwater Night Dive with NAD Lembeh. Footage shot on RED Gemini with 50mm Zeiss Macro lens. Copyright Simon Buxton 2019.

Category  Pets & Animals

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PBS News, BBC Click, The New York Times, My Modern Met, China Icons, TED Talks, To Scale, Thisiscolossal and Adrien M & Claire B

PBS News: February 21 – 24, 2020

BBC Click: Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry

The New York Times: Morning Briefing by Chris Stanford – Learning how to reverse an overdose

My Modern Met: Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

China Icons: FAST – The World’s Largest Telescope

TED Talks: Alexander Tsiaras Conception to birth visualized

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Thisiscolossal: Go See This Eclipse, Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse and The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

Adrien M & Claire B – Vimeo:  The movement of air / The movement of air

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 24, 2020

Feb 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, as novel coronavirus spreads far beyond China, how is it affecting the global economy? Plus: The latest medical concerns about COVID-19, Harvey Weinstein’s conviction, Sen. Bernie Sanders’ Nevada caucus victory, political analysis with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, President Trump’s trip to India and Los Angeles remembers NBA legend Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS With COVID-19 outbreaks, are we on ‘precipice’ of pandemic? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hewq… Why economic impact of COVID-19 might outlast the outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NQ_F… News Wrap: Man drives into German parade, injuring dozens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wi-TD… Mogul Harvey Weinstein convicted on 2 felony sex charges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=La6iR… What Weinstein verdict means for the MeToo movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp2ua… After Nevada win, how strong is Sanders’ 2020 momentum? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfdVZ… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sanders’ Nevada victory https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cwEG… Trump’s India visit prompts both hero’s welcome and protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jogSC… In Los Angeles, 20,000 gather to honor Kobe, Gianna Bryant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbSDg… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 23, 2020

Feb 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 23, Sen. Bernie Sanders gains a foothold after the Nevada caucuses, a new documentary explores who killed Malcolm X, and a new concept in caring for people with dementia. Plus, updates on the novel Coronavirus’ spread in Italy and Asia. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 22, 2020

Feb 22, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 22nd, voters turnout for Saturday’s Democratic caucuses in Nevada, and a look at how gender is playing a role in local Nevada and South Carolina politics. Also, the first report in our series of stories from India explores exclusionary citizenship laws that are leaving nearly 2 million people in limbo. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 21, 2020

Feb 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. and the Taliban begin a week-long “reduction in violence” in Afghanistan. Plus: Political uproar over a report that Russia is again trying to intervene in a U.S. election on behalf of President Trump, a Nevada caucus preview, political analysis with Shields and Brooks, the suffering of Venezuela’s children and Major League Baseball’s cheating scandal. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: WHO warns about novel coronavirus’ global spread https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVziw… What’s in short-term U.S.-Taliban deal over Afghanistan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQkLD… Why politicization of intelligence leaves U.S. ‘vulnerable’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyB2k… How will 2020 Democrats fare in more diverse Nevada? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLYp7… Shields and Brooks on Las Vegas debate, Trump’s pardons https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-xxw… Venezuela’s suffering children could yield lost generation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKs82… Why MLB players are upset over Astros’ lack of punishment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBIld… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Inside Taiwan’s Tech Industry – BBC Click

Nov 7, 2019  BBC Click

We head to Taiwan to find out what ‘Made in Taiwan’ really means in the 21st century; from healthcare artificial intelligence to solving the pollution crisis. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

Learning how to reverse an overdose nytimes.com Morning Briefing Monday, February 24, 2020, by Chris Stanford
Mike Belleme for The New York Times Carter County, Tenn., is one of many American communities hit hard by the opioid crisis. In an effort to save lives, county health officials have embraced a practical — if radical — strategy: teaching children as young as 6 how to reverse an overdose, using a nasal spray called Narcan. Above, after a training session at a library, each child received a blue bag containing two doses of Narcan to take home.
But in a socially conservative region, where addiction is often seen as a sin, health workers have encountered strong opposition to the training.

Finland Solves Its Homelessness by Providing Apartments for Anyone Who Needs One

By Emma Taggart on February 14, 2020

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Followtheflow/Shutterstock

Homelessness is a problem all over the world, but Finland is leading the way with an initiative that could provide a long-term solution. In 2008, the Northern European nation introduced the “Housing First” policy. The concept is simple: everyone is entitled to a small apartment, even those with mental health and financial issues. Since then, the number of homeless people has fallen drastically, and continues to decline.

Like most cities, Finland previously provided short-term shelters for the homeless, but found that the quick fix didn’t help people to get back on their feet permanently and build a stable life. Affordable rental housing providers such as Y-Foundation began renovating old flats, and the NGO even turned former emergency shelters into apartments in order to offer long-term housing. “It was clear to everyone that the old system wasn’t working; we needed radical change,” says Juha Kaakinen, CEO of Y-Foundation. “We had to get rid of the night shelters and short-term hostels we still had back then. They had a very long history in Finland, and everyone could see they were not getting people out of homelessness. We decided to reverse the assumptions.”

In the last 10 years, the Housing First initiative provided 4,600 homes in Finland, making it the only country in Europe where homelessness is on the decline. Not only does the country now provide shelter to anyone that needs it, but the government also helps support people to integrate into their community. Social workers are available for counseling and to help people apply for social benefits. The extra support helps encourage people to find a job and become financially independent, as well as to take care of their physical and mental health.

Find out more about Housing First on the Y-Foundation website.

Thanks to its Housing First policy, Finland is the only country in Europe where homelessness is in decline.

Housing First Finland Solves Homelessness

Stock Photos from Subodh Agnihotri/Shutterstock

h/t: [Reddit]

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Finland Is Offering Free Trips to Teach People the Finnish Art of Happiness

FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope | A China Icons Video

Sep 25, 2016  China Icons

What’s really out there? In September 2016, China unveiled the world’s largest telescope – an instrument engineered so finely it is 3 times more sensitive than Arecibo and may help in the international search for understanding more on the origin of the universe and the Big Bang. Sadly, since filming this video, FAST’s chief engineer and scientist, Professor Nan Rendong lost his fight with cancer. Not only was Professor Nan a talented and well-respected scientist who dedicated over 20 years to the FAST project, but we found him to be a kind, intelligent and dedicated man who took the time to explain his work and the importance of it to us. The Five-Hundred-Metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, known as FAST had been constructed over five years in a remote area of Guizhou province, south central China. It was built in a 45 million year old crater, unlikely to be affected by flooding and far from human interference. The 500m dish surpasses Arecibo radio telescope, built in Puerto Rico in 1963, as the world’s largest and is three times more sensitive in detecting radio waves thousands of light years away. FAST consists of 4450 individual panels and Chinese project engineers had to design a cable net of ten thousand cables to manipulate it to detect signals. FAST’s focus cabin is also unique thanks to a directional tracking system. A key mission for the telescope will be detecting pulsars, the matter that remains when a star eight times the size of the sun explodes. These pulsars rotate thousands of times per second and are the universe’s most accurate clock. Experience the construction and meet the creators of FAST: The World’s Largest Telescope. For more insights and guides to China, SUBSCRIBE to China Icons. Join in the conversation on our Facebook site www.facebook.com/ChinaIcons. Get the latest news as it happens from our Twitter page https://twitter.com/chinaicons. We’re also on Instagram! Follow us for exclusive behind-the-scenes photography and more. www.instagram.com/china_icons. Remember to check out our official website too with our blog! www.chinaicons.com.

Category  Science & Technology

Image-maker Alexander Tsiaras shares a powerful medical visualization, showing human development from conception to birth and beyond. (Some graphic images.)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Alexander Tsiaras · Medical image maker

Using art and technology, Alexander Tsiaras visualizes the unseen human body.

MORE RESOURCES BOOK

From Conception to Birth

Alexander Tsiaras

Doubleday (2002)

INK Conference | December 2010

To Scale: Go See This Eclipse

Aug 14, 2017   To Scale:

On August 21st, 2017, the United States will host its first total solar eclipse in nearly forty years. While a partial eclipse will be visible throughout the continental US, only a thin strip across fourteen states will experience what is regarded as the most astounding celestial event one can witness: a total solar eclipse. This film is about why you should do everything you can to go see it. “Seeing a partial eclipse bears the same relation to seeing a total eclipse as kissing a man does to marrying him, or as flying in an airplane does to falling out of an airplane.” — Annie Dillard

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh

AUGUST 15, 2017  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. Just make sure you’re prepared.

Composite Image of the Moon Taken from 47 Photos Reveals Solar Corona During a Total Solar Eclipse

MAY 9, 2013  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

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corona-4

Shot by Czech photographer Miloslav Druckmüller from the Brno University of Technology, these amazing composite images capture the moon during a total solar eclipse revealing a vast solar corona. To achieve the crystal clear effect the shots are comprised from some 40+ photos taken with two different lenses. Additional clarity was achieved due to the incredibly remote location chosen to view the eclipse from, a pier just outside the Enewetak Radiological Observatory on the Marshall Islands, smack dab in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. You can see several more images from the project at Druckmüller’s website and don’t miss this much higher resolution version including some 209 stars. All images courtesy the photographer. (via this isn’t happiness)

The Movement of Air: A New Dance Performance Incorporating Interactive Digital Projection from Adrien M & Claire B

NOVEMBER 11, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

Artist duo Adrien M & Claire B have lifted the curtain on their latest acrobatic dance performance utilizing digital projection titled The Movement of Air. Seen in this video is a handful of moments taken from an hour-long piece performed in France last month by a trio dancers. Unlike more common uses of digital project mapping where a recorded animation or scene is projected in a space, Adrien M & Claire B instead utilize fully interactive “scenes” that respond to human interaction. Nothing you see on the set is animated beforehand.

“This ‘living light’ is produced by video projectors and generated in real time by a set of algorithms,” Adrien shares with us. “It is a mix of control room operated human interventions and onstage data sensors that outlines a precise writing of motions and generative behaviors. Thus, the images are never pre-recorded for a rigid show on an imposed rhythm: on the contrary, they breathe and move with the dancers and organize a new space for them to explore.”

The overall effect is dizzying, and in many ways enhances the dancer’s work instead of looking like a gimmick added as an afterthought. A great marriage of physical performance and digital special effects. You can watch several earlier interactive creations by Adrien & Claire here on Colossal including Pixel and Kinetic Sand.

RESIDENCE CREATION CIE AM-CBADRIEN MONDOT / CLAIRE BARDAINNELE MOUVEMENT DE L AIRTHEATRE DE L ARCHIPEL / SCENE NATIONALEPERPIGNAN 01/02 OCTBORE 2015.
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The movement of air / The movement of air

Adrien M & Claire B PLUS

2015 creation of the company Adrien M / Claire B

Conception, artistic direction, scenography and staging: Claire Bardainne & Adrien Mondot
IT design: Adrien Mondot
Choreography: Yan Raballand
Dance: Rémi Boissy, Farid-Ayelem Rahmouni, Maëlle Reymond
Choreographic collaboration: Guillaume Bertrand
Original music and interpretation: Jérémy Chartier
Lumière : David Debrinay
Costumes: Marina Pujadas
Construction & flight systems: Silvain Ohl and Eric Noël
Light management: alternating
General management: Pierre Xucla
Sound management, alternating: Christophe Sartori, Régis Estreich
Stage management & flight systems : Arnaud Gonzalez
Technical director: Alexis Bergeron
Production and distribution: Charlotte Auché, Marek Vuiton, Margaux Létang
The IT development of the show was carried out with the help of the Anomes team and Millumin v2 software.

Production
Adrien M / Claire B

Coproductions
Théâtre de L’Archipel, national stage of Perpignan
Le Cirque-Théâtre d’Elbeuf
La Brèche, National Pole of Circus Arts, Cherbourg-Octeville
GREC Festival, Barcelona (Spain)
With the support of Adami. The Adami, society of performers, manages and develops their rights in France and around the world for fair compensation for their talent. It also supports them with its financial aid for artistic projects.
With the participation of DICRéAM
Fondazione Romaeuropa – Arte e Cultura (Italy)
Center des Arts d’Enghien-les-Bains, scene approved for digital writing
Maison des Arts, national scene of Créteil and Val-de-Marne
Espace Jean Legendre Theater of Compiegne, national stage of the Oise foreshadowing
Odyssey, National Institute of Arts of mime and gesture Périgueux
L’Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts-Sciences – Meylan
National Choreographic Center of Créteil and Val de-Marne / Cie Käfig, as part of Accueil Studio

Support
Le Toboggan, scene approved by Décines
Les Subsistances, international laboratory for artistic creation, Lyon

The company Adrien M / Claire B is approved by the DRAC Rhône-Alpes, by the Rhône-Alpes Region and supported by the City of Lyon.

Photos © Romain Etienne / item and © AMCB
Video © Adrien M / Claire B – with the precious help of Guillaume Faure

“The movement of the air” is a frontal spectacle for three dancers evolving according to a choreographic score in an immersive environment made up of projected images, generated and animated live.
The purpose of the show is to give body to the imperceptible: to make visible the invisible of a movement of air, in its trajectories with infinite nuances, imaginary varying from the most gentle and slow, to the most lively and transparent, from the most powerful at the most subtle. A journey between the dream of flight and the anxiety of falling.
A suspension device allows the bodies to get rid of their weight.
The original music is performed live on stage.

2 Credits  Adrien M & Claire B,  Design  Millumin, Software dev

4 Categories  Arts & Design  Animation  Projection Mapping

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PBS News, BBC News, Scientific American, TED Talks, Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids, Abolitionist, Biography, Thisiscolossal, and Dezeen

PBS News: February 14 – 20, 2020

BBC News: How mattresses could solve hunger 

Scientific American: The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

TED Talks: Debbie  Millman How Symbols and brands shape our humanity?, Rayma Suprani dictators hate political cartoons so I keep drawing them#t-87937 and Patrick Chappatte A free world needs satire

Google, Wikipedia, Simon Kids , Abolitionist – Mini Bio: Susan B. Anthony

Biography: Grant Wood

Thisiscolossal: 50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles and Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Dezeen: Second Home Hollywood – Architecture

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 20, 2020

Feb 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, Trump associate Roger Stone is sentenced to 40 months in prison after a public drama involving commentary from President Trump. Plus: 2020 Democrats engage in a fiery Las Vegas debate, analyzing the 2020 Democratic race, Venezuela’s political dynamics a year after Juan Guaido tried to seize power, California’s homelessness problem and saving for retirement after job loss. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Stone sentenced to 40 months in prison after DOJ drama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6VH4… News Wrap: Germany reels from deadly shooting rampage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4xHK… Bloomberg takes criticism at Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=086dG… 3 political experts on 2020 Democrats’ Las Vegas debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kosiH… A year after Guaido’s rise, Venezuelans wait for change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kPne… Can California solve its major problem with homelessness? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SoEP… When older workers are laid off and can’t afford to retire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFGf8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 19, 2020

Feb 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, six Democratic rivals face off in Las Vegas ahead of the Nevada caucuses. Also: A look at the billionaire businessman shaking up the presidential race, the world-wide spread of novel coronavirus, inhuman conditions grow bleaker in a Greek migrant camp, the melting block of ice threatening the world’s sea level and author Kevin Wilson on his new novel. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Pentagon official resigns in impeachment fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXkzD… What to watch as Democrats’ Nevada competition ramps up https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VzS6V… What Bloomberg’s record means for his White House bid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8X2A… People may be catching novel coronavirus without symptoms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6-De… Children yearn for peace in hellish Greek refugee camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwLdu… Visiting the ‘doomsday glacier’ that’s melting away https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ782… This novel makes fun of your child’s meltdown https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pie33… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 17, 2020

Feb 17, 2020

PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, hundreds of American passengers are evacuated from cruise ships stranded by novel coronavirus in Asia. Plus: 2020 Democrats prepare for the Nevada caucuses, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith, a migrant crisis builds on the Greek island of Lesbos, a book about presidential authors and the moment comedians Steve Martin and Martin Short became friends. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6 Follow us: Facebook: http://www.pbs.org/newshour Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/newshour Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/newshour Snapchat: @pbsnews Subscribe: PBS NewsHour podcasts: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/podcasts Newsletters: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/subscribe

Category  News & Politics

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 16, 2020

Feb 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 16, the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates turn to Nevada as early voting takes place ahead of the upcoming caucuses, a look back at the historic Baldwin-Buckley race debate and how it is still resonating, and in Arizona an experimental program is being used to battle a decades-long drought. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 15, 2020

Feb 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 15, new cases of the coronavirus decrease in China, early voting begins in Nevada’s caucuses, the intersection of politics and architecture in North Macedonia, the Trump administration plans to ramp up enforcement in sanctuary cities, and a vital tuna industry struggles to stay afloat amid a perfect storm of obstacles. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 14, 2020

Feb 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, conflict looms over the Justice Department, as President Trump continues to tweet about pending cases. Plus: The U.S. reaches an agreement with the Taliban to wind down the war in Afghanistan, 2020 Democrats head south and west, political analysis with Mark Shields and Michael Gerson, consequences of Trump’s asylum policies and why young Brits are playing the cello. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS 2 former DOJ officials on Trump, Barr and the rule of law https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlRDX… News Wrap: Army says Vindman won’t be investigated https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ4XS… U.S., Taliban agree on short-term plan to pave way for peace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFhes… Nevada, South Carolina offer next tests for 2020 Democrats https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oez9… Mark Shields and Michael Gerson on NH primary, Trump v. DOJ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9asIb… What’s happening to asylum seekers forced to wait in Mexico https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VkvS… A 20-year-old classical cellist inspires other youth to play  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZYgi… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.bbc.com/news/video_and_audio/headlines/51466978/how-mattresses-could-solve-hunger

How mattresses could solve hunger 

BBC News

Syrian refugees at Zaatari camp in Jordan and scientists from the University of Sheffield are working together to create a way to grow healthy, fresh food with nothing but water and old mattress foam.

These ‘recycled gardens’ use the mattresses in place of the soil, which solves two problems in one: It reuses the mountain of plastic mattresses that have piled up in the camp and it allows everyone to grow fresh food in a crowded, desert environment.

Victoria Gill has been to the camp in Jordan to see how it’s working.

Produced by Vanessa Clarke. Filmed and edited by Stephen Fildes.

12 Feb 2020

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/eye-of-the-storm/january-2020-earths-warmest-january-on-record/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-02-13_top-stories

January 2020: Earth’s Warmest January on Record

The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present

      By Jeff Masters on February 13, 2020

January 2020: Earth's Warmest January on Record

Fire and Rescue personnel run to move their truck as a bushfire burns on December 19, 2019 near Sydney, Australia. Fires in Australia were the most expensive weather-related disaster so far in 2020, with damages estimated in the billions by insurance broker Aon. Credit: David Gray Getty Images

January 2020 was the planet’s warmest January since record keeping began in 1880, said NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) on Thursday. Global ocean temperatures during January 2020 were the second warmest on record, and global land temperatures were the warmest on record. Global satellite-measured temperatures in January 2020 for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were the warmest or second warmest in the 42-year record, according to the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) and RSS, respectively.

January 2020 had the fourth highest departure of temperature from average of any month since 1880. Only March 2016, February 2016 and December 2015 had a greater temperature departure. Impressively, the warmth of January 2020 came without an El Niño event being present. Furthermore, we are also near the nadir of one of the least active solar cycles in the past century–a time when it is more difficult to set global heat records, due to the reduced amount of solar energy Earth receives. Thus, the remarkable warmth of January 2020 is a strong reminder that human-caused global warming is the primary driver of our warming climate.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 1. Departure of temperature from average for January 2020, the warmest January for the globe since record keeping began in 1880. Record warm January surface temperatures were present across parts of Scandinavia, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the central and western Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, and Central and South America. No land or ocean areas had record cold January temperatures. Credit: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

TWO BILLION-DOLLAR WEATHER DISASTERS IN JANUARY 2020

Two billion-dollar weather-related disaster hit the Earth last month, according to the January 2020 Catastrophe Report from insurance broker Aon:

U.S. severe weather outbreak: A powerful winter storm over central and eastern sections of the U.S. from January 10 – 12 killed 12 and did $1.2 billion in damage. The storm brought a multi-day severe weather outbreak to parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia, with 79 confirmed tornadoes.

Australia wildfires: Intense heat and drought over much of Australia in January caused destructive wildfires blamed for billions of dollars in damages. The combined death toll for the 2019/20 Australia bushfire season stands at 34, with more than 5,900 homes and other structures destroyed. Guardian Australia has launched the first of six very impressive immersive multimedia features on climate change, reported through the experiences of people living through it in Australia. The first episode–on bushfires–is best viewed on a large screen (not mobile) with the sound on.

NEUTRAL EL NIÑO CONDITIONS REIGN

NOAA’s February 13 monthly discussion of the state of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) stated that neutral ENSO conditions existed, with neither an El Niño nor a La Niña event in progress. Over the past month, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño3.4 region of the eastern tropical Pacific, though warmer than average, have been below the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions.

Forecasters at NOAA and the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) are calling for a roughly 60% chance of neutral conditions continuing through Northern Hemisphere spring, and a 50% chance of continuing through summer. They put the odds of an El Niño event during the August-September-October peak of the hurricane season at 23%, and the odds of a La Niña event during that period at 33%.

Departure of temperature from average

Figure 2. Departure of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the benchmark Niño 3.4 region (in the equatorial Pacific) ending on February 13, 2020. Over the past month, SSTs were about 0.3°C above average, falling short of the 0.5°C above-average threshold need to be considered El Niño conditions. Credit: Levi Cowan, tropicaltidbits.com.

ARCTIC SEA ICE: EIGHTH LOWEST JANUARY EXTENT ON RECORD

Arctic sea ice extent during January 2020 was tied for eighth lowest in the 41-year satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The ice extent was higher than seen in recent years thanks to a strongly positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which kept cold air bottled up in the Arctic. Antarctic sea ice extent in January 2020 was the tenth lowest on record.

NOTABLE GLOBAL HEAT AND COLD MARKS FOR JANUARY 2020

Hottest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January
Coldest temperature in the Northern Hemisphere: -66.0°C (-86.8°F) at Geo Summit, Greenland, 3 January (dubious data)
Hottest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: 48.9°C (120.0°F) at Penrith, Australia, 4 January
Coldest temperature in the Southern Hemisphere: -47.4°C (-53.3°F) at Concordia, Antarctica, 31 January

 (Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

MAJOR WEATHER STATIONS THAT SET (NOT TIED) NEW ALL-TIME HEAT OR COLD RECORDS IN JANUARY 2020

Among global stations with a period of record of at least 40 years, 28 set new all-time heat records in January, and 3 set all-time cold records:

Canberra (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Newcastle (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January    
Katoomba (Australia) max. 39.8°C, 4 January   
Parramatta (Australia) max. 47.0°C, 4 January  
Bankstown (Australia) max. 47.0 °C, 4 January  
Taralga (Australia) max. 40.5°C, 4 January
Goulburn Airport (Australia) max. 42.0°C, 4 January  
Albury (Australia) max. 46.1°C, 4 January
Burrinjuck Dam (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Grenfell (Australia) max. 44.0°C, 4 January
Young (Australia) max. 44.9°C, 4 January  
Gundagai (Australia) max. 45.2°C, 4 January  
Cootamundra (Australia) max. 45.0°C, 4 January  
Temora (Australia) max. 46.4°C, 4 January
Narrandera (Australia) max. 47.4°C, 4 January  
Griffith (Australia) max. 47.2°C, 4 January
Calama (Chile) max. 31.2 °C, 12 January
Fraserburg (South Africa) max. 42.4°C, 16 January
Pofadder (South Africa) max. 43.0°C, 16 January
Willowmore (South Africa) max. 42.2°C, 16 January
Beaufort West (South Africa) max. 44.5°C, 16 January
Saint Raphael-Cargados Islands (Mauritius) max. 35.6°C, 9 January
Honiara Downtown (Solomon Islands) max. 35.4°C, 3 January
Veguitas (Cuba) min. 7.0 °C, 23 January
Pinares de Mayari (Cuba) min. 6.5°C, 23 January
Conakry Airport (Guinea) max. 38.0°C, 24 January
Kalewa (Myanmar) min. 6.6°C, 26 January
Cabramurra (Australia) max. 34.0°C, 31 January
Hobart Airport (Australia) max. 41.4°C, 31 January
Maydena (Australia) max. 38.2°C, 31 January
Gisborne (New Zealand) max. 38.2°C, 31 January

No all-time national heat or cold records have been set thus far in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

THIRTEEN MONTHLY NATIONAL/TERRITORIAL HEAT RECORD BEATEN OR TIED IN 2020 AS OF FEBRUARY 13

As of February 13, 13 national monthly all-time heat records have been beaten or tied in 2020:

January (10): Norway, South Korea, Angola, Congo Brazzaville, Dominica, Mexico, Indonesia, Guinea Bissau, Gambia, Sao Tome and Principe

February (3): Spain, Antarctica, Azerbaijan

No monthly national cold records have been beaten or tied in 2020.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

HEMISPHERICAL AND CONTINENTAL TEMPERATURE RECORDS IN 2020

Highest minimum temperature ever recorded the Northern Hemisphere in January: 29.1°C (84.4°F) at Bonriki, Kiribati, 17 January.

Highest maximum temperature ever recorded in North America in January: 42.0°C (107.6°F) at Vicente Guerrero, Mexico, 21 January.

Highest temperature ever recorded in continental Antarctica and highest February temperature ever recorded in Antarctica plus the surrounding islands: 18.4°C (65.1°F) at Base Esperanza, 6 February.

(Courtesy of Maximiliano Herrera.)

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S)

Jeff Masters

Jeff Masters worked as a hurricane scientist with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. After a near-fatal flight into category 5 Hurricane Hugo, he left the Hurricane Hunters to pursue a safer passion–a 1997 Ph.D. in air pollution meteorology from the University of Michigan. In 1995, he co-founded the Weather Underground, and served as its chief meteorologist until the company was sold to the Weather Company in 2012. Since 2005, his Wunderblog (now called Category 6) has been one of the Internet’s most popular sources of extreme weather and climate change information, and he is one of the most widely quoted experts in the field. He can be reached at weatherman.masters@gmail.com.

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“Branding is the profound manifestation of the human spirit,” says designer and podcaster Debbie Millman. In a historical odyssey that she illustrated herself, Millman traces the evolution of branding, from cave paintings to flags to beer labels and beyond. She explores the power of symbols to unite people, beginning with prehistoric communities who used them to represent beliefs and identify affiliations to modern companies that adopt logos and trademarks to market their products — and explains how branding reflects the state of humanity.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Debbie Millman · Design evangelist

As host of the long-running podcast “Design Matters,” Debbie Millman illuminates the creative processes of some of our era’s most intriguing artists, designers and icons.

TEDWomen 2019 | December 2019

“A political cartoon is a barometer of freedom,” says Rayma Suprani, who was exiled from her native Venezuela for publishing work critical of the government. “That’s why dictators hate cartoonists.” In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent railing against totalitarianism, Suprani explores how cartoons hold a mirror to society and reveal hidden truths — and discusses why she keeps drawing even when it comes at a high personal cost. (In Spanish with consecutive English translation)

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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Rayma Suprani · Political cartoonist

An award-winning satirist, Venezuelan cartoonist Rayma Suprani’s life’s work is speaking truth to power — even when being outspoken comes at a steep price.

Check out more of Rayma Suprani’s political cartoons and graphic work.

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Follow Rayma Suprani on Twitter.

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We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. “Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is,” he says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susan_B._Anthony

Susan B. Anthony

American women’s rights activist

Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women’s rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. Wikipedia

BornFebruary 15, 1820, Adams, MA

DiedMarch 13, 1906, Rochester, NY

Full nameSusan Brownell Anthony

SiblingsMary Stafford AnthonyDaniel Read AnthonyMORE

Quotes

Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.

I declare to you that woman must not depend upon the protection of man, but must be taught to protect herself, and there I take my stand.

Independence is happiness.

Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO

Oct 17, 2012  Biography

Susan Brownell Anthony (February 15, 1820 to March 13, 1906), better known as Susan B. Anthony, was an American writer, lecturer and abolitionist who was a leading figure in the women’s voting rights movement. Raised in a Quaker household, Anthony went on to work as a teacher. She later partnered with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and would eventually lead the National American Woman Suffrage Association. #Biography Subscribe for more Biography: http://aetv.us/2AsWMPH Delve deeper into Biography on our site: http://www.biography.com Follow Biography for more surprising stories from fascinating lives: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Biography Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/biography Twitter – https://twitter.com/biography Biography.com captures the most gripping, surprising, and fascinating stories about famous people: The biggest break. The defining opportunity. The most shattering failure. The unexpected connection. The decision that changed everything. With over 7,000 biographies and daily features that highlight newsworthy and compelling points-of-view, we are the digital source for true stories about people that matter. Susan B. Anthony – Abolitionist | Mini Bio | BIO https://www.youtube.com/user/Biograph…

Rating  No mature content   Category  Entertainment

Susan B. Anthony, Fighter for Women’s Rights!

Mar 9, 2017 Simon Kids

Susan B. Anthony knew from a young age that women deserved the same rights as men, especially the right to vote! Read along as Susan strives for equality through delivering speeches, handing in a new declaration to Congress and even getting arrested! Come #readalong with us in SUSAN B. ANTHONY, FIGHTER FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS by Deborah Hopkinson! To find more great Ready-to-Read books visit http://www.readytoread.com .

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Grant-Wood

Grant Wood AMERICAN ARTIST

WRITTEN BY: The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

LAST UPDATED: Feb 9, 2020 See Article History

Grant Wood, (born February 13, 1891, near Anamosa, Iowa, U.S.—died February 12, 1942, Iowa City, Iowa), American painter who was one of the major exponents of Midwestern Regionalism, a movement that flourished in the United States during the 1930s.

Wood was trained as a craftsman and designer as well as a painter. After spending a year (1923) at the Académie Julian in Paris, he returned to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where in 1927 he was commissioned to do a stained-glass window. Knowing little about stained glass, he went to Germany to seek craftsmen to assist him. While there he was deeply influenced by the sharply detailed paintings of various German and Flemish masters of the 16th century. Wood subsequently abandoned his Impressionist style and began to paint in the sharply detailed, realistic manner by which he is now known.

A portrait of his mother in this style, Woman with Plants (1929), did not attract attention, but in 1930 his American Gothic caused a sensation when it was exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago. The hard, cold realism of this painting and the honest, direct, earthy quality of its subject were unusual in American art. The work ostensibly portrays a farmer and his daughter—modelled for Wood by his dentist, B.H. McKeeby, and Wood’s sister, Nan—in front of their farmhouse. As a telling portrait of the sober and hardworking rural dwellers of the Midwest, the painting has become one of the best-known icons of American art.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.

American Gothic, oil on beaverboard by Grant Wood, 1930; in the Art Institute of Chicago.SuperStock

The meaning of American Gothic has been subjected to scrutiny since Wood painted it. Was it meant to be an homage to the strong values in the Midwest or was it a satire? Is it a husband and wife or a father and daughter? Wood’s own statements on its meaning were wishy-washy, leading to further ambiguity and debate. Open to so much interpretation, the American Gothic trope lent itself to countless parodies in popular culture as well as in the political arena, in advertisements, in television shows such as The Simpsons, in albums, in comic books, on magazine covers, and by Jim Henson’s Muppets.

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Wood became one of the leading figures of the Regionalist movement.

Daughters of Revolution

Painting by Grant Wood

Daughters of Revolution is a painting by American artist Grant Wood; he claimed it as his only satire. Wikipedia

ArtistGrant Wood

Created1932

PeriodRegionalism

GenrePortrait

MediumMasonite

Dimensions50.8 cm × 101.4 cm (20.0 in × 39.9 in)

Another well-known painting by him is Daughters of Revolution (1932), a satirical portrait of three unattractive old women who appear smugly satisfied with their American Revolutionary ancestry. In 1934 Wood was made assistant professor of fine arts at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. Among his other principal works are several paintings illustrating episodes from American history and a series of Midwestern rural landscapes that communicate a strong sense of American ambience by means of a skillful simplification of form.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Naomi Blumberg, Assistant Editor.

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Grant Wood American Gothic Paintings,  Art….biography.com

From 1920 to 1928 he made four trips to Europe, where he studied many styles of painting, especially impressionism and post- impressionism. Influenced by the work of Jan Van Eyck. From 1924 to 1935 he lived in the loft of a carriage house that he turned into his personal studio Wood helped found the Stone City Art Colony near his hometown to help artists get through the Great Depression. He became a great proponent of regionalism in the arts.

50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles

DECEMBER 12, 2019   GRACE EBERT

Designed by Spanish architects SelgasCano, a Los Angeles workspace has popped up in a formerly empty parking lot in Hollywood. The recently opened SecondHome Hollywood boasts a 50,000-square-foot garden of 6,500 trees and plants and 700 tons of soil and vegetation. It is Los Angeles’s densest urban forest and is also home to 112 native species.

The Hollywood location, which is the first in the United States, contains sixty yellow-roofed office pods. It also encompasses the Anne Banning Community House, a ’60s building designed by prominent architect Paul Williams who is known for defining much of Los Angeles’s architectural aesthetic throughout the 20th century. (via Jeroen Apers)

Second Home Hollywood | Architecture | Dezeen

•Dec 4, 2019  Dezeen

Second Home Hollywood, the first US location from the British co-working company, is revealed in this captioned video produced by Dezeen for Second Home. Spanish architecture practice SelgasCano transformed a former Hollywood parking-lot into a sprawling co-working complex that will house 250 companies. It has previously worked with Second Home to create other spaces in London and Lisbon. In Los Angeles, the architects filled the site with sixty oval-shaped office pods of varying sizes, which are topped with bright-yellow rooftops that resemble a cluster of lily pads when seen from above. The site has been populated with more than 6,500 plants and trees from 112 species native to Los Angeles, in order to create a tranquil working environment for members. The site also incorporates the former Anne Banning Community House, a historic 1960s building which SelgasCano renovated to accommodate 30 additional office spaces for Second Home members. Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1442212 WATCH NEXT: Watch our talk with Thomas Heatherwick from Second Home LA – https://youtu.be/Blx2gF63xJ4 Subscribe to our YouTube channel for the latest architecture and design movies: http://bit.ly/1tcULvh Like Dezeen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dezeen/ Follow Dezeen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Dezeen/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dezeen/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/dezeen/

Category  Entertainment

https://theinspirationgrid.com/food-artworks-by-tatiana-shkondina-sasha-tivanov/

Food Artworks by Tatiana Shkondina & Sasha Tivanov

Published Oct 3, 2017

Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov worked in collaboration to produce incredible food artworks inspired by famous paintings.

More food art via Behance

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PBS News, Scientific American, Ted Talks, Genius Channel, DW Documentary, Indian Diplomacy, mortrek, and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: February 8 – 13, 2020

Scientific American: The World Health Organization chose the name based on the type of virus and the year the first cases were seen

TED Talks: Alicia Eggert  Imaginative sculptures that explore how  we perceive reality? and Alejandro Duran How I use art to tackle plastic pollution in our oceans

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DW Documentary: Oil and ruin — exodus from Venezuela

Indian Diplomacy: Mahatma – A Great Soul of 20th Century

mortrek: Time Lapse of Sunflower from Seed to Flower

Thisiscolossal: Remarkable High Speed Photos of Birds Catching Fish by Salah Baazizi and Miniature Seascapes and Cities Top Elaborate Paper Wigs by Asya Kozina and Dmitriy Kozin

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 13, 2020

Feb 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 12, 2020

Feb 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 11, 2020

Feb 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, voting is underway in New Hampshire, the first state to hold a primary during the 2020 election cycle. Plus: Controversy over Roger Stone’s sentence, how China is coping with its deadly novel coronavirus outbreak, Sudan’s Omar al-Bashir is closer to facing prosecution, new efforts to clean India’s Ganga River and a woman helping perfect technology for a bionic limb. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 10, 2020

Feb 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, 2020 Democrats make final pitches to voters in New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday’s first-in-the-nation primary. Plus: The death toll from novel coronavirus surpasses that of SARS as China struggles to contain the outbreak, what’s in President Trump’s proposed 2021 budget, Politics Monday, Denmark’s rising anti-Semitism troubles Auschwitz survivors and a milestone Oscars night. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS NH voters battle indecision as Democratic primary nears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bvs21… News Wrap: Turkish, Syrian forces clash again in Idlib https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nx-EG… Can China’s information about novel coronavirus be trusted? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onE6X… What’s in Trump’s proposed 2021 budget https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgVDh… Lauren Chooljian and James Pindell preview NH primary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_x4n… In Denmark, Auschwitz survivors lament rise of anti-Semitism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ycxV… What best picture for ‘Parasite’ means for foreign films https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsL8o… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 9, 2020

Feb 9, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 9, Democratic presidential candidates canvass New Hampshire in the final push ahead of Tuesday’s primary, the death toll from the novel coronavirus continues to climb, a 15-year battle heats up over Oregon’s Jordan Cove pipeline project, and a look at misconceptions about race and culture. Alison Stewart anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 8, 2020

Feb 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 8, the Democratic presidential candidates look to New Hampshire for support, new cases of the novel coronavirus emerge, Louisiana oyster farmers feel a changing tide along the Mississippi Delta, and internet satellites are launched into space with the hope of expanding broadband coverage. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/disease-caused-by-the-novel-coronavirus-officially-has-a-name-covid-19/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-02-11_top-stories&spMailingID=63452364&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1821626956&spReportId=MTgyMTYyNjk1NgS2

Disease Caused by the Novel Coronavirus Officially Has a Name: COVID-19

The World Health Organization chose the name based on the type of virus and the year the first cases were seen

     By Andrew JosephSTAT on February 11, 2020

Disease Caused by the Novel Coronavirus Officially Has a Name: COVID-19

Coronavirus. Credit: Getty Images

The disease caused by the novel coronavirus has a name: COVID-19.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organization, announced the name Tuesday, giving a specific identifier to a disease that has been confirmed in more than 42,000 people and caused more than 1,000 deaths in China. There have been fewer than 400 cases in 24 other countries, with one death.

In choosing the name, WHO advisers focused simply on the type of virus that causes the disease. Co and Vi come from coronavirus, Tedros explained, with D meaning disease and 19 standing for 2019, the year the first cases were seen.

The virus that causes the disease has been known provisionally as 2019-nCoV. Also on Tuesday, a coronavirus group from the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses, which is responsible for naming new viruses, proposed designating the novel coronavirus as SARS-CoV-2, according to a preprint of a paper posted online. (Preprints are versions of papers that have not yet been peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal.) The name reflects the genetic similarities between the new coronavirus and the coronavirus that caused the SARS outbreak of 2002-2003.

In selecting COVID-19 as the name of the disease, the WHO name-givers steered clear of linking the outbreak to China or the city of Wuhan, where the illness was first identified. Although origin sites have been used in the past to identify new viruses, such a namesake is now seen as denigrating. Some experts have come to regret naming the infection caused by a different coronavirus the Middle East respiratory syndrome.

“Having a name matters to prevent the use of other names that can be inaccurate or stigmatizing,” Tedros said. “It also gives us a standard format to use for any future coronavirus outbreaks.”

Viruses and the disease they cause do not have to have related names—think HIV and AIDS—but more recently those responsible for the formal naming process have kept them associated. For example, SARS, the disease, is caused by SARS-CoV, the virus.

The provisional name of the new virus stemmed from the year it was first seen (2019), the fact that it was new (n), and a member of the coronavirus family (CoV).

A clear name could also stop the ad hoc identifiers that have sprung up in the press and online, many of which, like the Wuhan virus or Wu Flu, linked the virus to the city.

Republished with permission from STAT. This article originally appeared on February 11 2020

Andrew Joseph

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Oil and ruin — exodus from Venezuela | DW Documentary

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Venezuela is experiencing an unprecedented humanitarian crisis. Hunger is widespread and there is a severe shortage of medicines. The UN estimates that more than four million people have now fled what was once South America’s richest nation. Venezuela is in the grips of what is now the world’s second largest refugee crisis after Syria. But unlike Syria, Venezuela is not mired in civil war, and the country is sitting on the world’s largest proven oil reserves. How could such a rich nation be driven into ruin? Where has the country’s wealth gone, and why are its people starving? Corruption and mismanagement are driving displacement worldwide. The majority of the world’s refugees and migrants are fleeing from countries in the top 10 of Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index – places like Afghanistan, Syria, South Sudan and Somalia. Venezuela was once one of the world’s wealthiest countries and a showcase of democracy. The country enjoys an abundance of natural resources, including oil, gold, diamonds and coltan. But rather than invest in its people and economy, this wealth has been squandered. Today Venezuela is mired in corruption, and deindustrialization, debt, political conflict, authoritarianism and poverty are the order of the day. The billions in profits generated by the oil business during the boom years between 2003 and 2014 have largely ended up in private pockets. And once oil prices collapsed in 2014, Venezuela was plunged into economic crisis. Nicolás Maduro, who rose to the presidency after Hugo Chávez died in 2013, has installed loyal military officers in key economic positions. Venezuela is now little more than a state-run criminal enterprise. At the same time, the country has become a pawn in a geopolitical contest over power and natural resources, with the US, Russia and China all looking to assert their own interests. Every two seconds, a person is forced to flee their home. Today, more than 70 million people have been displaced worldwide. The DW documentary series ‘Displaced’ sheds light on the causes of this crisis and traces how wealthy industrialized countries are contributing to the exodus from the Global South. Tomatoes and greed – the exodus of Ghana’s farmers: https://youtu.be/rlPZ0Bev99s Drought and floods — the climate exodus: https://youtu.be/PjyX5dnhaMw ——————————————————————– DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to: DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39… DW Documental (Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumental DW Documentary ??????? ?? ?????: (Arabic): https://www.youtube.com/dwdocarabia For more visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://p.dw.com/p/MF1G

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Aug 7, 2012  Indian Diplomacy

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Science & Technology

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2015  CHRISTOPHER JOBSON

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Double-crested Cormorant working on its catch, Bolsa Chica (CA)

birds-6

Elegant Tern, Double Crested Cormorant and a fish

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birds-5

Elegant Tern, Bolsa Chica (CA)

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birds-2

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birds-8

Elegant Tern, Bolsa Chica (CA)

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Elegant Tern, Bolsa Chica (CA)

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Elegant Tern displaying its acrobatic aerial skills after a fish escaped from its beak

Miniature Seascapes and Cities Top Elaborate Paper Wigs by Asya Kozina and Dmitriy Kozin

FEBRUARY 10, 2020  GRACE EBERT

All images © Asya Kozina and Dmitry Kozin, shared with permission

Saint Petersburg-based paper artists Asya Kozina and Dmitriy Kozin situate miniature worlds atop their towering paper wigs. The detailed headdresses combine contemporary themes with historical elements, resembling the extravagant hair and head pieces of the Baroque period. A recent series crafted for Dolce & Gabanna features a whale and lobster with fins and claws woven through and sticking out from the tops of the elaborate pieces. Both have ships, as well, to add a human element. “We did this work and had (the) idea to do works with various marine monsters,” Kozina says. “In the old times, sailors believed in gigantic sea monsters… All characters are taken from folk myths.”

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PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 5, 2020

Feb 5, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump concludes with a majority of senators voting to acquit him of both obstruction of Congress and abuse of power. Plus: Analysis of the Senate’s decision to acquit Trump of impeachment charges, evaluating the president’s State of the Union address and land management in Australia, where a devastating bushfire season continues. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Romney provokes Republican wrath by voting to convict Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7B6w4… Emotions flare at divided State of the Union https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZhO5… News Wrap: Buttigieg maintains lead in latest Iowa results https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK2Kh… Trump ‘acquitted forever,’ says Kellyanne Conway https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rcatv… Schiff lauds Romney’s ‘moral courage’ on conviction vote https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvTVn… What Trump’s impeachment, acquittal say about U.S. politics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUwm-… Australian bushfires prompt conversation on land management https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj-2Z… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 4, 2020

•Feb 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, Iowa’s delay in reporting Democratic caucus results prompts questions and criticism and leaves candidates in limbo. Plus: What senators are saying ahead of Wednesday’s vote to acquit or convict President Trump of impeachment charges, how the novel coronavirus outbreak is affecting the global economy and what’s happening in the sexual assault trial of Harvey Weinstein. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

WFP uses new tech to fight refugee food shortages in Jordan

Feb 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Jordan is home to an estimated 3 million refugees, and the country’s harsh terrain makes supplying food for them difficult. But to combat the food shortages, the U.N. World Food Program is using technologies like iris scans to track refugee spending habits and hydroponics to grow livestock feed. Christopher Livesay reports as part of our “Future of Food” series with Pulitzer Center support. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Imagine waking in the middle of the night to an elephant ripping the roof from your house in search of food. This is a reality in some communities in Africa where, as wild spaces shrink, people and elephants are competing for space and resources like never before. In this engaging talk, zoologist Lucy King shares her solution to the rising conflict: fences made from beehives that keep elephants at bay while also helping farmers establish new livelihoods.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Lucy King · Human-elephant ambassador

Zoologist Dr. Lucy King helms the Human-Elephant Coexistence Program for the Kenyan research charity Save the Elephants.

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Sponsor a rural farmer with a beehive fence to help reduce conflict with elephants.

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In the past decade, the US honeybee population has been decreasing at an alarming and unprecedented rate. While this is obviously bad news for honeypots everywhere, bees also help feed us in a bigger way — by pollinating our nation’s crops. Emma Bryce investigates potential causes for this widespread colony collapse disorder. [Directed by Lillian Chan, narrated by Derek Gebhart, music by John Poon].

MEET THE EDUCATOR

Emma Bryce · Educator

ABOUT TED-ED

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators.

417,578 views

TED-Ed | March 2014

Paul Krugman Explains Why Cutting Taxes for the Wealthy Doesn’t Work

Feb 4, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Paul Krugman explains why economies are so difficult to predict and discuses an idea in politics that won’t die. Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se… LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/ Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. GET MORE NBC Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbctv Paul Krugman Explains Why Cutting Taxes for the Wealthy Doesn’t Work- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/Ndja2v3urV4 Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenight…

Category  Comedy

Made In Bangladesh – BBC Click

•Feb 3, 2020   BBC Click

Click is in Bangladesh to see how automation will impact over four million workers in the garment industry. Plus new ways data will help teams at the Superbowl. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category  Science & Technology

3D Printing In Space – BBC Click

•Jan 31, 2020  BBC Click

We’re in LA to meet the company with the biggest 3D printer in the world being used to print space rockets! Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category

Science & Technology

?Design Photography

Dramatic Views of Worldwide Architecture Captured by Gareth Pon (with a Hidden Twist)

JANUARY 27, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Ponte, Johannesburg. All images © Gareth Pon, shared with permission

Photographer Gareth Pon (previously) encourages his audience to join in his reinvention of Where’s Waldo. His architectural photography relies on depth, pattern, and symmetry, often framing a small piece of the city he’s visiting, like the water-covered street below Chicago’s “L” or a multi-colored building complex replete with balconies and air conditioners in Hong Kong. But every image has one signature twist: Pon hides a small rocket in each of his structural pieces. On his wildly popular Instagram, the photographer shares that his lifelong dream is space travel, perhaps explaining his use of the flying object. To join Pon’s ongoing game of spot the rocket, check out his Facebook.

Chicago, Illinois

Atlanta, Georgia

Chicago, Illinois

Hong Kong

Atlanta, Georgia

Hong Kong

Chicago, Illinois

OK, this is ridiculous, but in the best way possible. Spending too much time describing this short film by French animator Nicolas Deveaux would ruin it, so it’s probably best to just watch it. Created over a period of 1.5 years 5 Mètres 80 is a follow-up to a shorter animation he made 10 years ago about an elephant on a trampoline. Deveaux is widely known for his realistic animation of animals for both film and commercials, many more of which he shares on Vimeo. 5 Mètres 80 has toured film festivals around the world since 2013 picking up numerous awards and nominations including the Best in Show Award at SIGGRAPH Asia. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

Mètres 5,80 – Giraffen Turmspringer – giraffes doing diving

Jan 18, 2015  MikeUdine

5.85K subscribers

Netter Kurzfilm über Giraffen Turnspringer im Hallenbad, ausgestrahlt auf arte HD am 31.12.2014. Von Auteur Réalisateur Nicolas Deveaux Cube Creative Productions – Orange – 2012 Nice short film about giraffes doing diving in an indoor swimming pool. Cortometraggio carino su giraffe tuffatrici in piscina coperta.

Category   Pets & Animals

Netflix “Disjointed” Season 1 Episode10 Animation

kanahebiPlus

Animation/Director: Hideki Inaba?
Music: Alexander Scriabin?
Creative Director: Dave Hughes?
Sound Design: Brent Busby

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hide.tokyo

A Verdant Botanical Animation Takes a Macro View of Nature’s Cycles

FEBRUARY 4, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Spanning from day to night and from sunshine to rain and wind, “Story of Flowers” shows the various stages of botanical growth and the help plants get along the way. The instructional project—which was illustrated by Katie Scott, animated by James Paulley, and directed by Azuma Makoto—depicts the interconnected networks within an ecosystem, like the organisms underground fertilizing the soil or a bumblebee landing atop and pollinating a pistil. Each stage of the germination process is shot with an enlarged view to magnify roots stretching out, sprouts poking through the ground, and flowers opening up to bloom. As rain falls, the petals drop and plants release their seeds, which then are embedded into the soil, beginning the cycle once again. Head to Instagram to check out more work from ScottPaulley, and Makoto. (via The Kids Should See This)

AMKK presents: Botanical animation “Story of Flowers” full ver.

May 20, 2017  AMKK000

AMKK Presents: Botanical animation “Story of Flowers” The animation was developed for kids to show the life cycle of flowers. -Story- Many different flowers are growing beautifully and strongly in this world. Taking their roots in the earth, sprouting, blooming, pollination by birds and insects, living on in spite of rain, wind and storms. They pass on the baton of life, rebirth and decay. Everything is so in a continuous, endless cycle. This is the story and message of this animation. Directed by : Azuma Makoto Illustration by : Katie Scott Animation by : James Paulley Visual Supervisor : Shunsuke Shiinoki Project Management by : Eri Narita

Category  Film & Animation

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PBS News, Aspeer, The Farmacy, Roald Boom, TED Talks, Charlotte Observer, Thisiscolossal, Bloom PicturesPRO

PBS News: January 31 and February 1 – 3, 2020

Aspeer: This Helipad in Bangkok has been Transformed into a 4000 sqm Hydroponic Farm

The Farmacy: HYDROPONIC Farm Tour

Roald Boom: Commercial Hydroponics on Bonaire – part 1 & 2

TED Talks:  Dena Simmons How students of color confront impostor syndrome. Victor Rios Help for kids the education system ignores, Sal Khan let’s teach for mastery not test scores, and Sal Khan let’s use video to reinvent education

Charlotte Observer: Sixty years ago, four college students sat at a lunch counter — and made history

Thisiscolossal: ? Portraits of Venezuelan Families Reframe the Harrowing Journey of Immigrants, The Extraordinary Details of Tiny Creatures Captured with a Laser-Scanning Microscope by Igor Siwanowicz, ? Striking Photographs Capture Ornate Patterns of Historic Iranian Mosques and Palaces and Forest Creatures Gather Together to Perform a Moonlit Rendition of an Opera

Bloom PicturesPRO: Maestro, Maestro – Making of, and Garden Party

PBS NewsHour full episode, Feb 3, 2020

Feb 3, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Iowa Democrats caucus in the country’s first 2020 primary voting. Plus: What happens next in President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial, Politics Monday analyzes the Iowa Democratic caucuses and the Senate trial, how U.S. public health officials are reacting to the novel coronavirus threat and an artist and benefactor steps out from the shadows to support her female peers. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 2, 2020

•Feb 2, 2020   PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, February 2, a look ahead to the Iowa caucuses and how they have changed, international quarantines expand as the death toll from the novel coronavirus rises, Venezuela’s opposition leader visits the U.S., how misconceptions impact gender in sports, and what Lebanon is doing to fight food insecurity among refugees. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode February 1, 2020

Feb 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, February 1, the Senate impeachment trial winds down after Republicans vote to exclude new evidence, Brexit is official as Britain charts a new course amid divisions in the country, and our “Future of Food series” looks at how Jordan is using technology and innovation to help refugees facing food shortages. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 31, 2020

Jan 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the Senate has decided not to allow the subpoenaing of witnesses in President Trump’s impeachment trial, which could end more quickly as a result. Plus: The Trump administration adds limitations on travel to the U.S. from certain countries, a preview of Monday’s Iowa Democratic caucuses, the political analysis of David Brooks and Ruth Marcus and honoring Jim Lehrer. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Why a Senate majority rejected impeachment trial witnesses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF2jm… News Wrap: United Kingdom officially exits European Union https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TStEA… How Trump’s new visa restrictions will affect U.S. families https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gifwh… Iowa voters excited, anxious before critical Dem caucuses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fatIM… David Brooks and Ruth Marcus on impeachment witnesses, Iowa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YupGo… Loving tributes to Jim Lehrer from those who knew him best https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ6NO… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

This Helipad in Bangkok has been Transformed into a 4000 sqm Hydroponic Farm

Jun 10, 2017  Aspeer

music credits: Central Park – Instrumental | Blockhead # About Aspeer Aspeer is a platform dedicated to sharing sustainable and tangible initiatives favouring a transition towards a new model of society. A model reconciling the social, environmental and economic issues. # Subscribe Subscribe to our Newsletters: http://eepurl.com/cEPcYz Youtube Channel: https://goo.gl/mYp5ag Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aspeer.co Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/_aspeer Website: https://www.aspeer.co

Category  People & Blogs

HYDROPONIC Farm Tour

Mar 1, 2018  The Farmacy

People & Blogs

Commercial Hydroponics on Bonaire – part 1

Aug 4, 2014  Roald Boom

http://roaldboom.com/ https://www.facebook.com/roald.boom This video is the first part of a series of videos demonstrating the setup of a 5000 square foot greenhouse on Bonaire. Green Bonaire is building 5 greenhouses of each 500 square feet at Krusada. They have contracted me as a consultant to help them install a DWC hydroponic system in one of the greenhouses. The greenhouse will be able to produce over 1000 heads a week. This first video shows the progress of the construction of the greenhouse structures themselves.

Howto & Style

Commercial Hydroponics on Bonaire – part 2

Jan 29, 2016  Roald Boom

This is the part 2 of the Commercial Hydroponics on Bonaire project at Krusada. The owners of Green Bonaire are Jaap and Pieter. Jaap has a background in Agriculture and he is the one in charge of the whole operation. Jaap contacted me many months ago for consulting and I have assisted them with this one tunnel greenhouse. They have several tunnels and this one is setup as 100% hydroponics using the methods that I have been using at my own greenhouse at URD Solution. The greenhouse is now fully operational and has a full cycle that produces over 150 heads of lettuce a day, excluding Saturday and Sunday. It is a non-circulating hydroponics system and it is working very well.

Howto & Style

As a black woman from a tough part of the Bronx who grew up to attain all the markers of academic prestige, Dena Simmons knows that for students of color, success in school sometimes comes at the cost of living authentically. Now an educator herself, Simmons discusses how we might create a classroom that makes all students feel proud of who they are. “Every child deserves an education that guarantees the safety to learn in the comfort of one’s own skin,” she says.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dena Simmons · Educator

Dena Simmons believes that creating a safe environment for children is an essential component of education.

TED Talks Live | November 2015

Define students by what they contribute, not what they lack — especially those with difficult upbringings, says educator Victor Rios. Interweaved with his personal tale of perseverance as an inner-city youth, Rios identifies three straightforward strategies to shift attitudes in education and calls for fellow educators to see “at-risk” students as “at-promise” individuals brimming with resilience, character and grit.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Victor Rios · Educator, author

Victor Rios seeks to uncover how to best support the lives of young people who experience poverty, stigma and social exclusion.

Would you choose to build a house on top of an unfinished foundation? Of course not. Why, then, do we rush students through education when they haven’t always grasped the basics? Yes, it’s complicated, but educator Sal Khan shares his plan to turn struggling students into scholars by helping them master concepts at their own pace.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sal Khan · Educator and social entrepreneur

In 2004, Sal Khan, a hedge fund analyst, began making math tutorials for his cousins. Twelve years later, Khan Academy has more than 42 million registered users from 190 countries, with tutorials on subjects from basic math through economics, art history, computer science, health, medicine and more.

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LEARN

You can learn anything. Your brain is like a muscle. The more you use it, the more it grows.

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Donate to Khan Academy and help provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.

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3,619,583 views

TED Talks Live | November 2015

Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects. He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script — give students video lectures to watch at home, and do “homework” in the classroom with the teacher available to help.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Sal Khan · Educator and social entrepreneur

In 2004, Sal Khan, a hedge fund analyst, began making math tutorials for his cousins. Twelve years later, Khan Academy has more than 42 million registered users from 190 countries, with tutorials on subjects from basic math through economics, art history, computer science, health, medicine and more.

https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article239561018.html

Sixty years ago, four college students sat at a lunch counter — and made history

BY JIM MORRILL   JANUARY 29, 2020 05:30 AM Loaded: 52.78%

WBTV reporter Steve Crump is currently completing two documentary projects on the Greensboro sit-ins and on civil rights icon U.S. Rep. John Lewis, while battling cancer. He sees this work as a gift to making a positive difference in the community. BY DAVID T. FOSTER III

Sixty years ago, Saturday, four black college students sat down at a lunch counter in Greensboro and ordered coffee.

Their simple act launched a sit-in movement that swept the Jim Crow South and made the four student’s icons in America’s civil rights history.

Now the event is the heart of two new documentaries by Charlotte journalist Steve Crump, a longtime chronicler of the civil rights years. In many ways they reflect his own personal journey.

The first features the late Franklin McCain, a former Charlottean who led the four N.C. A&T students into the segregated Woolworth on that February day. It debuts Feb. 5 at the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts and Culture.

The other focuses on U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, a veteran of the sit-ins, Freedom Rides and Martin Luther King’s 1963 March on Washington.

The men who became known as the Greensboro Four — McCain, Ezell Blair Jr., David Richmond and Joseph McNeil — started a movement that within weeks would spread to 55 cities in 13 states.

“To me it was one of the turning points in history,” said Clayborne Carson, director of Stanford University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Institute. “That’s just as remarkable as Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat. It’s an example of how movements are often started by people dealing with problems right in front of them.”

A portion of Greensboro’s once whites-only lunch counter is at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The old downtown Woolworth is now the site of the International Civil Rights Center & Museum, which will mark the occasion with its annual gala.

A statue of the four students who staged a civil rights sit-in at a Greensboro lunch counter in 1960 stands on the campus at N.C. A&T University in Greensboro NC on Jan. 23, 2014. They are (L:R) David Richmond, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr., and Joseph McNeil. For story on the state of historically black universities in North Carolina, of which A&T is one. Chris Seward CSEWARD@NEWSOBSERVER.COM

On the N.C. A&T campus, the four men are commemorated in a 15-foot bronze statue.

In Greensboro, it took almost six months for Woolworth to finally desegregate its lunch counter. But the galvanizing effect of the Greensboro Four happened fast.

Not only was it followed by a wave of sit-ins, but 10 weeks later fueled the start in Raleigh of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which would become a driving force of the civil rights movement throughout the South. John Lewis became its chairman in 1963, the year it organized the March on Washington, where a quarter-million people gathered at the Lincoln Memorial and heard Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. deliver his “I Have a Dream” speech.

In the documentary, Lewis says he was inspired by the Greensboro Four while a student at Nashville’s Fisk University.

“We, too, were going to start sitting-in,” he recalled. “And we kept sitting-in.”

In December, Lewis, 79, announced that he has stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Crump alluded to it at the end of his documentary.

“He now faces a new challenge,” Crump said. “It is clearly a very private and personal fight for an individual who’s left a remarkable and stellar legacy.”

DURHAM, NC — 11/17/99 — Franklin McCain, one of the original lunch counter protesters from the Greensboro Woolworth, sits in a small portion of the lunch counter from the Durham Woolworth, which is at NCCU now in the Jones Building. Vicki Cheng story. JOHN ROTTET JOHN ROTTET

A PERSONAL JOURNEY

Crump, 62, has faced his own fight.

He’s battled colon cancer for more than a year, first privately and then more publicly. He continues to undergo chemotherapy and wrote the scripts for the documentaries from a hospital bed set up at his home.

For Crump, the stories he tells in these and other documentaries hit close to home.

“My dad came home from the (Korean) war. He has to ride in the back of a bus, didn’t have the right to vote and couldn’t sit down at a lunch counter,” Crump said in a recent interview in an empty studio at WBTV. “I didn’t have the opportunity to sit-in. I probably would have.”

To him there’s a straight line from that winter day in Greensboro to a historic photograph in the John Lewis documentary: President Lyndon Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

“As a result of the action these courageous students took, the impact was changing laws regarding segregation and redefining public policy,” Crump said.

Both documentaries feature Crump’s archival interviews with McCain, who died in 2014, and Charles Jones, a civil rights activist from Charlotte who died in January. Crump was a friend of each. He was a pallbearer for McCain and spoke at Jones’ funeral.

“Steve is an institution, especially in the black community,” said Glenn Burkins, publisher of Qcitymetro, an online news site aimed at African Americans.

“So often our stories don’t get told and when they are told they aren’t told by us. What Steve has done is turn that narrative on its head. He’s an African American newsman, journalist (and) story-teller who is telling our story. And that mean a lot.”

Some of those stories are frequently overlooked.

“Often we assume that history is what’s in the history books,” said historian Tom Hanchett. “History is what we create in our community. The civil rights movement, as much as we talk about Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, was bubbling in every African American community in the United States.”

Crump said the prospect of his own mortality has given new resonance to his documentaries and the movement they chronicle.

“If you use the time you have left to inspire and make people think and to bring about change,” he said, “hopefully it’s time well spent.”

The Franklin McCain documentary will debut Feb. 5 at the Harvey B. Gantt Center. It airs on WBTV Bounce 7 p.m. Feb. 20.

The John Lewis documentary will air on WBTV Bounce 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20 and on WBTV 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21.

A statue of the four students who staged a civil rights sit-in at a Greensboro lunch counter in 1960 stands on the campus at N.C. A&T University in Greensboro NC on Jan. 23, 2014. They are (L:R) David Richmond, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr., and Joseph McNeil. For story on the state of historically black universities in North Carolina, of which A&T is one.
A group of 20 A&T College students occupied lunch counter seats at the downtown F.W. Woolworth Co. store. They are, from left, Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Billy Smith and Clarence Henderson.

A group of 20 A&T College students occupied lunch counter seats at the downtown F.W. Woolworth Co. store. They are, from left, Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Billy Smith and Clarence Henderson. JACK MOEBES/NEWS & RECORD

JIM MORRILL  704-358-5059

Jim Morrill, who grew up near Chicago, covers state and local politics. He’s worked at the Observer since 1981 and taught courses on North Carolina politics at UNC Charlotte and Davidson College.

? Portraits of Venezuelan Families Reframe the Harrowing Journey of Immigrants

January 10, 2020   Grace Ebert

“Arianny Torres packed a few changes of clothes, a couple toys, medicine, diapers, a baby bottle, photos of relatives and her bible into her backpack. With her son, Lucas and daughter, Alesia, she traveled 976 kilometers from Maracaibo to Bogotá. Sometimes they hitched a ride. Other times they caught a bus, cutting into the small amount of money Arianny had put aside for food. Now she sells candy in Bolivar Square and though things could be better, at least life is more stable than it was in Venezuela and her kids are able to eat three times a day. I see Arianny’s determination to find a more hopeful life in her fixed gaze.” All images © Gregg Segal, shared with permission

In his Undaily Bread series, Gregg Segal photographs Venezuelan immigrants with the entirety of their belongings lying around them. Created in collaboration with UNHCR, an organization that helps refugees worldwide, the affective project shows a glimpse at what life as a Venezuelan refugee looks like, from the meager ingredients of their daily meals to the battered sneakers on their feet. Every image posted on Segal’s Instagram also includes a lengthy caption describing each family’s difficult journey.

“For me, photography communicates better than simply words. Statistics are important, but people are not that interested in statistics,” Segal tells Colossal. “They’re emotional because they describe how little the people have.” This consequential series is an offshoot of Daily Bread, Segal’s well-known project that captures images of kids from around the world surrounded by what they eat each day.

“Nathalia Rodriguez (9) who walked from Barquisimeto, Venezuela to Bogota with her mom, ate only bread, crackers, arepas, chips, water, juice, lollipops and the one fruit they could afford, bananas. It’s been 3 years since Nathalia’s eaten an apple. Apples run 5,000 Bolivas now in Venezuela, about $12 US. Despite the harsh road she traveled, Nathalia projects resilience and resolve.”

“Yosiahanny’s daughter feels for the kick of her brother or sister in her mother’s womb. They made the journey from Venezuela surviving on arepas and water. Though life in Bogotá is difficult, Yosiahanny is grateful she’s able to eat more than once a day. What makes the crisis tolerable is love, she says.”

“When I met 7 year old Williams, he showed me his backpack in which he carried a few things from home including his last homework assignment. He misses his grandmother’s arepas and stewed chicken. On the long walk from Venezuela, there was only bread, water, cookies and fruit to eat.”

“Michell, a single mom, made the trip with her two kids twice. During the 2nd attempt, Michell had an epileptic seizure and lost consciousness. 16 days later she made it to Bogotá and was admitted. In her portrait, Michell contends with the dueling energy of her kids, trying to soothe her daughter while her son appears to be driving the bus. After the shoot, her little boy held onto two loaves of bread, carrying them around the studio, tucked under his arms for later.”

The Extraordinary Details of Tiny Creatures Captured with a Laser-Scanning Microscope by Igor Siwanowicz

October 12, 2016  Christopher Jobson

igor-1

Acilius diving beetle male front tarsus (foot) 100x

If you’ve ever wondered how a diving beetle swims through the water or manages to rest just on the surface, the answer is in part because its foot is infinitely more complicated than your own. As seen above, this microscopic image of a male Acilius sulcatus (diving beetle) by photographer Igor Siwanowicz reveals the extraordinary complexity of this aquatic insect’s tiny appendage. This is just one of many examples of Siwanowicz’s work as a neurobiologist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus. His brilliantly colored images show the tree-like structures of moth antennas, the wild details of barnacle legs, and the otherworldly shapes of plant spores. The photos are made with a confocal laser-scanning microscope capable of “seeing” vast amounts of detail beyond what you might capture with a traditional lens-based microscope. You can see much more of his nature photography here. (via Synaptic Stimuli, Wired)

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Barnacle

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Midge Pupa

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Paraphyses & Sporangia

Isopod appendage

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Front leg of whirligig beetle

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Moth antennae

Moth antennae, detail

? Striking Photographs Capture Ornate Patterns of Historic Iranian Mosques and Palaces

December 30, 2019  Grace Ebert

All images © Fatemeh Hosein Aghaei, shared with permission. Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque in Isfahan, Iran

Iran-based artist Fatemeh Hosein Aghaei takes mesmerizing photographs that showcase the intricate patterns inside the country’s ancient buildings. The artist mostly features mosques in the Iranian city of Isfahan, which is located about 250 miles south of Tehran and is known for its Perso–Islamic designed structures, boulevards, covered bridges, palaces, tile-filled mosques, and minarets. In her photographs, Hosein Aghaei often looks upward to frame the building’s domes and arches complete with complex colorful designs, sometimes even adding glimpses of the city’s blue skies. The artist tells Colossal that she wants her work to capture and share the beauty of Iran’s historic architecture. Keep up with Hosein Aghaei’s captivating images on Instagram.

Sheykh Abdussamad Mausoleum

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque in Isfahan, Iran

Dowlatabad Garden of Yazd

Ali Qapu Palace of Isfahan, Iran

Jameh Mosque of Isfahan, Iran

Emam Mosque of Isfahan, Iran

Agha Bozorg Mosque of Kashan

Agha Bozorg Mosque of Kashan 

? Forest Creatures Gather Together to Perform a Moonlit Rendition of an Opera

October 31, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

A songbird soloist accompanied by choruses of toads, turtles, and hedgehogs are conducted by a squirrel in Maestro, a delightful new animated short by Illogic. Set in a moonlit forest, the wild symphony performs a war anthem from Vincenzo Bellini’s opera Norma. In an interview with Vimeo, the team explained that they sought to balance imaginativeness with believability within the confines of  their realistic universe. Illogic is based in Montpellier, France, where they recently opened an animation studio called Bloom Pictures. Take a behind-the-scenes look at how Maestro was made in the video below, and see more from Illogic, including the Oscar-nominated Garden Party, on Vimeo.

Bloom PicturesPRO

A Bloom Pictures short film directed by Illogic.

“Maestro” is this week’s Staff Pick Premiere. Read more about it on the Vimeo Blog: vimeo.com/blog/post/staff-pick-premiere-maestro-from-illogic

Making of :
vimeo.com/bloompictures/maestromakingof

Musical adaptation : Mael Oudin
Sound editing : Jérôme Navarro
Sound mixing : Studio le Refuge

You want to collaborate?
Send us a message at : hello@bloompictures.tv

For festivals and screenings, please contact :
festival@miyu.fr

Press/Media requests :
benoit@animationshowcase.com

bloompictures.tv

©Bloom Pictures 2019

Maestro – Making of

Bloom PicturesPRO

A Bloom Pictures short film directed by Illogic.

Maestro link :
vimeo.com/bloompictures/maestro

You want to collaborate?
Send us a message at : hello@bloompictures.tv

For festivals and screenings, please contact :
festival@miyu.fr

Press/Media requests :
benoit@animationshowcase.com

bloompictures.tv

©Bloom Pictures 2019

https://vimeo.com/bloompictures

Garden Party

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PBS News, TED Talks, BBC Click, Pocket, New York Times, Thisiscolossal, Derek Hugger, Frist Art Museum, and Creators

PBS News: January 24 – 30, 2020, The extraordinary legacy and unique voice of Jim Lehrer, and Idlib is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing Assad — and it is barely livable,

TED Talks: Stuart Oda Are indoor vertical farms the future of agriculture?, Mohammad Modarres Why you should shop at your local farmers market, Wevita Davison how urban agriculture is transforming Detroit

BBC Click: The Self-Driving Car Revolution & More

Pocket: Invasion of the ‘Frankenbees’: The Danger of Building a Better Bee

New York Times: Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

Thisiscolossal: A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf and A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle Urban Species: Kinetic Lifeforms Created by U-Ram Choe and Slowly Rising: A Mesmerizing New Music Video by Hideki Inaba

Derek Hugger: Carapace – an organic motion sculpture

Frist Art Museum: URAM Choe – New Urban Species Exhibition

Creators: Kinetic Sculptor Puts Cyber Dreams In Motion

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 30, 2020

Jan 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, senators continue asking questions in President Trump’s impeachment trial as a pivotal vote on witnesses looms. Plus: Legal experts analyze the latest impeachment trial developments, a preview of the Iowa caucus, novel coronavirus is now a global health emergency, the economic power of peer pressure, Malcolm Gladwell on meeting strangers and Gwen Ifill forever remembered. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 29, 2020

•Jan 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, carefully scripted legal arguments give way to senator questions in President Trump’s impeachment trial. Plus: Legal experts analyze the latest from the impeachment trial, how China and the global health community are responding to the outbreak of novel coronavirus, understanding traumatic brain injury, saving Australian wildlife after bushfires and Now Read This. Editor’s Note: The first segment of tonight’s show incorrectly identified the location of the bakery sending cakes to lawmakers in the Senate. The cakes did not come from a bakery in Washington, D.C., but rather from one in New York. The segment’s transcript has been corrected. NewsHour regrets the error. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Senators begin question period in Trump impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrVi0… 2 legal experts on the latest from Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BVXe… News Wrap: Trump touts USMCA trade deal at signing ceremony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IUnH… How China is responding to rapid spread of novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIROm… The challenge traumatic brain injury poses for U.S. troops https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VAa8c… Australians rush to rescue wildlife imperiled by bushfires https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDKyy… ‘Heart Berries’ author Terese Mailhot on reader questions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y73WI… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode Jan 28, 2020

Jan 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team concludes its defense, arguing that Trump’s impeachment was motivated by political differences and that conviction would set a dangerous precedent. Plus: Sen. Elizabeth Warren on the Senate impeachment trial, reaction to Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan, the battle over Huawei and 5G technology and a conversation with Robert DeNiro. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Witness question remains unsettled in Trump’s Senate trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCX8x… Sen. Warren on Trump’s trial and why ‘women win’ elections  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6nhN… News Wrap: U.S. steps up screenings for novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCF2I… 2 reactions to Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-9TV… Why the U.S. doesn’t want Huawei building 5G networks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNUWU… Robert De Niro on ‘The Irishman’ and his prolific career https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4g6X_… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 27, 2020

Jan 27, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team presents its defense in his Senate impeachment trial. Plus: China’s coronavirus is still spreading as the city of Wuhan remains closed, previewing Trump’s long-awaited Middle East peace plan, remembering the horror of Auschwitz-Birkenau, 2020 Democrats in Iowa, Politics Monday with Amy Walter and Tamara Keith and the world grieves Kobe Bryant. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 26, 2020

Jan 26, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, January 26, President Trump’s impeachment trial enters a second week, retired NBA superstar Kobe Bryant dies in a helicopter crash, new limits in China amid a widening coronavirus outbreak, Philadelphia’s famed Sigma Sound Studios lives, and award-winning vocalist Shemekia Copeland brings the blues into the 21st century. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 25, 2019

PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 25, President Trump’s legal team lays out their defense in the Senate impeachment trial, the wind energy industry faces the loss of decades-old tax incentives, the coronavirus continues to spread internationally, and one young lion dancer is impacting the Chinese Lunar New Year. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 24, 2020

Jan 24, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, House impeachment managers complete their third and final day of arguments in President Trump’s Senate trial. Plus: China’s new coronavirus outbreak continues to spread as new U.S. cases are confirmed, a drug company CEO is sentenced to prison for his role in prescribing deadly opioid drugs and the NewsHour family remembers co-founder, anchor, mentor and friend Jim Lehrer. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The extraordinary legacy and unique voice of Jim Lehrer

Jan 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

It is impossible to quantify Jim Lehrer’s influence on this news program, American journalism, presidential debates or the lives of so many of us. He was an extraordinary journalist, writer, collaborator and friend. Robert MacNeil, Lehrer’s NewsHour co-founder, longtime Lehrer friend Justice Stephen Breyer and Sharon Percy Rockefeller, president and CEO of WETA, join Judy Woodruff to remember him. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Idlib is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing Assad — and it is barely livable

Jan 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

The war in Syria has waged for almost nine years and claimed millions of lives. Northwest Idlib province is the last refuge for Syrians fleeing attacks by President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. But the crowded, muddy refugee camps there offer little shelter or support, and to the north, Turkey’s border is closed to those seeking better conditions. Nick Schifrin reports on Idlib’s “fragile stability.” Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

By 2050, the global population is projected to reach 9.8 billion. How are we going to feed everyone? Investment-banker-turned-farmer Stuart Oda points to indoor vertical farming: growing food on tiered racks in a controlled, climate-proof environment. In a forward-looking talk, he explains how this method can maintain better safety standards, save money, use less water and help us provide for future generations.

This talk was presented at a TED Salon event given in partnership with Brightline Initiative. TED editors featured it among our selections on the home page. Read more about TED Salons.

About the speaker

Stuart Oda · Entrepreneur, urban farmer

Stuart Oda is an indoor urban farmer with a passion for innovation and sustainability. His goal: democratize access to fresh and nutritious food by democratizing the means and knowledge of production.

Take Action   learn

Learn more about indoor vertical farming by joining a community engagement event in your area.  Learn more ?

About TED Salon

TED Salons welcome an intimate audience for an afternoon or evening of highly-curated TED Talks revolving around a globally relevant theme. A condensed version of a TED flagship conference, they are distinct in their brevity, opportunities for conversation, and heightened interaction between the speaker and audience.

608,448 views

TED Salon: Brightline Initiative | June 2019

https://www.ted.com/talks/mohammad_modarres_why_you_should_shop_at_your_local_farmers_market#t-3081

he average farmer in America makes less than 15 cents of every dollar on a product that you purchase at a store. They feed our communities, but farmers often cannot afford the very foods they grow. In this actionable talk, social entrepreneur Mohammad Modarres shows how to put your purchasing power into action to save local agriculture from collapse and transform the food industry from the bottom up.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Mohammad Modarres · Social entrepreneur

Mohammad Modarres developed the first-ever Zabihah Halal and Glatt Kosher “Interfaith Meat” to make faith-based foods more accessible.

More Resources

How to build a more inclusive dinner tableIn his first TED Talk, Mohammad Modarres discusses why he produced the Shabbat Salaam interfaith dinner series, where he premiered Interfaith Meat to help Muslim and Jewish communities eat from the same plate.

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Take Action

participate

Support Abe’s Eats in their mission to make high-quality, inclusive foods accessible to all.

Learn more ?

learn

Learn more about the Farmers Market Coalition, dedicated to strengthening farmers markets across the US.

Learn more ?

1,209,420 views

TED Residency | May 2019

There’s something amazing growing in the city of Detroit: healthy, accessible, delicious, fresh food. In a spirited talk, fearless farmer Devita Davison explains how features of Detroit’s decay actually make it an ideal spot for urban agriculture. Join Davison for a walk through neighborhoods in transformation as she shares stories of opportunity and hope. “These aren’t plots of land where we’re just growing tomatoes and carrots,” Davison says. “We’re building social cohesion as well as providing healthy, fresh food.”

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Devita Davison · Food activist

At FoodLab Detroit, Devita Davison supports local entrepreneurs and imagines a new future for food justice.

Take Action  learn  Learn more about how FoodLab Detroit is using food as a catalyst for community change.  Learn more ?

participate

Donate to FoodLab Detroit and help strengthen our ability to support, improve and grow resources for our network of good food entrepreneurs.

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TED2017 | April 2017

The Self-Driving Car Revolution – BBC Click

Jan 23, 2020  BBC Click

Click looks at the battle for self-driving car supremacy between the USA and China. Subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1uNQEWR Find us online at www.bbc.com/click Twitter: @bbcclick Facebook: www.facebook.com/BBCClick

Category    Science & Technology

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/invasion-of-the-frankenbees-the-danger-of-building-a-better-bee?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy  Stories to fuel your mind.

Invasion of the ‘Frankenbees’: The Danger of Building a Better Bee

Beekeepers are sounding the alarm about the latest developments in genetically modified pollinators. 

The Guardian |  Bernhard Warner

GettyImages-167524958.jpg
BLANKENFELDE, GERMANY – APRIL 25: Worker bees surround a queen, who is marked with a yellow spot on her back, in the colony of beekeper Reiner Gabriel in the garden of his home near Berlin on April 25, 2013 in Blankenfelde, Germany. Local beekeepers claim their yearly loss rates within their bee populations has gone from an average of 10% per year to 30% per year over the last 10 years, though they are unsure whether the cause lies with a mite and a virus it might be spreading or with the increased use of certain pesticides by local farmers. According to a recent report prepared by Greenpeace seven pesticides currently in use in Europe present a real danger to bees. Bees are essential in nature in pollinating a wide variety of plants and trees. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The spring of 2008 was brutal for Europe’s honeybees. In late April and early May, during the corn-planting season, dismayed beekeepers in Germany’s upper Rhine valley looked on as whole colonies perished. Millions of bees died. France, the Netherlands and Italy reported big losses, but in Germany the incident took on the urgency of a national crisis. “It was a disaster,” recalled Walter Haefeker, German president of the European Professional Beekeepers Association. “The government had to set up containers along the autobahn where beekeepers could dump their hives.”

An investigation in July of that year concluded that the bees in Germany died of mass poisoning by the pesticide clothianidin, which can be 10,000 times more potent than DDT. In the months leading up to the bee crisis, clothianidin, developed by Bayer Crop Science from a class of insecticides called neonicotinoids, had been used up and down the Rhine following an outbreak of corn rootworm. The pesticide is designed to attack the nervous system of crop-munching pests, but studies have shown it can be harmful to insects such as the European honeybee. It muddles the bees’ super-acute sense of direction and upsets their feeding habits, while it can also alter the queen’s reproductive anatomy and sterilise males. As contaminated beehives piled up, Bayer paid €2m (£1.76m) into a compensation fund for beekeepers in the affected area, but offered no admission of guilt.

The die-off forced a reckoning among European farmers. Hundreds of studies examined the safety of neonicotinoids, known as neonics, and their links to colony collapse disorder (CCD), in which worker bees abandon the hive, leaving the queen and her recent offspring unprotected, to starve. In 2013, the evidence led to a landmark European commission ruling, imposing a moratorium on clothianidin and two other major neonics – the world’s most popular pesticides. In April 2018, Europe went a step further. The commission extended the ban on the trio of neonics to virtually everywhere outside greenhouses, citing evidence that by harming pollinating insects, neonics interfere with the pollination of crops to the value of €15bn a year. Environmentalists cheered the victory. Regulators beyond Europe plan to follow.

For Haefeker at the beekeepers association, who had spent years campaigning against the use of neonics, victory was sweet, but short-lived: faced with multiple threats from modern farming methods, beekeepers know the insecticide ban alone is not enough to save the honeybee.

Honeybees originated in Eurasia roughly 35m years ago, and as long as they have had steady access to flowering plants, they have thrived. But in the modern world, bees face all kinds of dangers. Colony collapse is not a single malady, but rather an amalgamation of different challenges. Alongside the dangers of pesticides, diseases such as Israeli acute paralysis virus, gut parasites and invasive parasites such as the varroa mite can overwhelm the bees’ immune systems. Industrial agriculture imposes its own threats: a mania for monocultures has led to shrinking foraging habitats, while, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency, bees employed in commercial pollination, in which hives are stacked high on trucks and driven around the country to pollinate almond trees and other crops, get highly stressed, which damages their resilience and eating habits.

Since the EU began phasing out neonics, in 2014, the honeybees’ recovery has not been as dramatic as hoped. Neonics are probably not the biggest factor in the demise of bees, but they are the easiest to outlaw. To farmers, this seems outrageously unfair. Citing an industry-funded study, they say the ban will cost the EU agriculture sector €880bn annually in diminished crop yields.

Another, more controversial, response to the slump in bee populations is in the works. This is the plan to create a more resilient strain of honeybee – a genetically modified superbee. The technology for creating GM honeybees is in its infancy, and still confined to the laboratory. But, if successful, it could lead to a hardier species, one that is resistant to natural and manmade hazards: viruses, varroa mites, pesticides and so on. If we can’t change modern farming practices, the thinking goes, maybe we should change the bees.

The prospect horrifies many bee people – from commercial beekeepers such as Haefeker to passionate amateurs – who see a lab-made superbee as a direct threat to the smaller, struggling bee species. Traditional beekeepers have a name for them that expresses their fear and suspicion: Frankenbees.

Like many beekeepers, Haefeker is an activist and conservationist. A kind of bearded Lorax, Dr Seuss’s valiant spokesman for threatened trees, Haefeker speaks for the bees. For much of the past two decades, he has sounded the alarm on declining bee health, bringing his message to lawmakers in Brussels, Berlin and Munich, before judges at the European court of justice in Luxembourg, to investor roundtables in London, to beekeeper conferences in Istanbul, Austria and Rome, and to corporate gatherings of the agrichemical industry around Europe.

When we met in Bavaria a week after the EU extended its neonics ban, I expected Haefeker to be in celebratory mood. But over lunch at a favourite roadway tavern an hour outside Munich, he explained that he considers the development of GM bees – however long it takes to get them in production – an even greater threat to the humble honeybee. “I don’t expect it to be commercialised next week, but then I don’t want to leave anything up to chance,” Haefeker said. “The public has been pretty late on a whole bunch of bad ideas. We don’t want to be late on this one.”

Some beekeepers worry that, if the agriculture industry succeeds in building and patenting a blockbuster, mite-free, pesticide-proof superbee, it would dominate and destroy the vibrant local market in conventional bee strains. There are health fears, too: the sting of GM bees may introduce new allergy risks. And beekeepers are afraid they would not be able to protect the gene pool of traditional strains such as the beloved Apis mellifera, the scientific name for the European honeybee, against a dominant, pesticide resistant, lab-designed version.

Jay Evans heads the bee research lab at the US Department of Agriculture, where they are looking at various threats to bee health. Designing a truly pesticide-resistant honeybee, a “bulletproof bee”, as Evans calls them, would “throw a lot of nature under the bus”.

It is always hive-like – 30C and humid – in the narrow, windowless laboratory where genetically engineered honeybees are created on the campus of Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. One June day, three students in T-shirts were on the morning shift. Two of them silently inspected plastic honeycomb discs. Each disc contained 140 tiny plug holes, in each of which a single honeybee embryo was growing. These discs were then passed to a third student at a separate workstation, where, with remarkable dexterity, she injected each egg with an sgRNA gene-manipulation solution, a main ingredient in a revolutionary new gene-editing technique called Crispr-Cas9.

Crispr technology has transformed microbiology in recent years by allowing scientists to copy a desirable part of the DNA strand and insert it directly into the chromosome of the target specimen. Now, with great precision, scientists can remove harmful mutations or unwanted traits, or insert a desired trait. In the US, you can buy a Crispr apple that doesn’t brown. Medical researchers, meanwhile, see Crispr as a promising route to making mosquitos resistant to the malaria parasite.

The director of the Düsseldorf lab is Martin Beye, a giant in the field of evolutionary genetics. In 2003, Beye and his colleagues were the first to pinpoint the gene variants, or alleles, that determine the sex of honeybees. Three years later (coincidentally, just as scientists determined the likely causes of colony collapse disorder), Beye and an international team of biologists decoded the Apis mellifera honeybee genome, a breakthrough that transformed the field of bee biology. Scientists now have an understanding of bee health down to the chromosomal level, enabling them, for example, to analyse precisely how pathogens and parasites affect their bee hosts. Genomics can take much of the guesswork out of breeding, too, revealing the precise gene markers that make stocks more resilient to stressors and disease. Once the genome was cracked, it was only a matter of time before the scientific community would build a designer bee. In 2014, Beye’s lab claimed that crown.

The gene-injection method Beye’s team pioneered, and laid out in their 2014 research paper, is painstaking and fraught with risk. To demonstrate, a student motioned for me to peer into her microscope. The faint outline of a tiny needle and its intended target, the egg, came into focus. Magnified, the egg looked like a smooth grey balloon, the kind performers at children’s parties tie into poodles and giraffes. Poke the egg at the wrong angle, or with too much pressure, or with an imprecise dosage, and it will pop. And the injection has to be stealthy enough to leave no marks. If the worker bees, the hive’s fastidious caretakers, sense in any way the pupae are not perfect, they cast them from the nest, leaving them for dead. Only the pristine survive.

To increase the odds of success, Beye’s team keep their injected embryos away from the workers at first, incubating in an artificial hive. Only after 72 hours do they slip the fittest of their modified larvae specimens into a queen-rearing colony. What happens next is similar to the conventional queen-breeding method. The researchers graft the larvae into cell cups lined with royal jelly, the nutrient rich compound that young larvae gorge on to become queens. Even so, the workers, on average, rejected three out of four mutant larvae. But the survival rate was enough to guarantee the birth, in 2014, of the world’s first genetically modified honeybee queens.

I was also shown the transgenic queens. Up close, they looked vigorous, but unremarkable. The researchers affixed a magenta-coloured ID tag to the queen’s back, between the base of her wings. She mingled with ordinary worker bees in a small wooden nucleus hive. The sides were made of a hard plastic for viewing. Beye’s research team told me their transgenic bees behave no differently than any other Apis mellifera honeybees. The queen and the workers covered every inch of their cramped confines, popping in and out of a small well containing water. After a week or so, the queen would be moved outside to a flight cage.

Beye’s researchers believe manipulating the genome of the European honeybee will lead to new insights into what makes this species unique – which genes make them such meticulous groomers, or which genes programme the worker bees’ super-assiduous attention to looking after their young. They want to know why bees are so good to each other. Is this instinct to work tirelessly for the good of the hive something learned, or genetic?

Beekeepers, dismayed at the prospect of GM bees becoming a reality, made a huge fuss about Beye’s work. Many suspected his lab was bankrolled by the agriculture industry, or “Big Ag”.

“The beekeeper associations … ” Beye said, shaking his head in lingering disbelief. In person, he is affable and professorial. “They thought we were working with Bayer. I mean, they’re very close by: Bayer’s headquarters is maybe 20km from here.” He insisted inferences of a Bayer connection were totally false.

Beye and Marianne Otte, his research partner, explained that the purpose of their work was to understand the genetic basis for bee behaviour and health. It was never to build a pesticide-resistant bee. Building a GM bee, Beye said, is “a stupid idea”. The world doesn’t need chemical-resistant bees, he says. It needs farming practices that don’t harm bees. “They should be working on that. Not on manipulating the bee.”

But the truth is that Beye’s highly detailed paper serves as a kind of blueprint for how to build a bee. Thanks to research like his, and the emergence of tools such as Crispr, it has never been cheaper or so straightforward for a chemical company to pursue a superbee resistant to, say, the chemicals it makes. Takeo Kubo, a professor of molecular biology at the University of Tokyo, was the second scientist in the world to make a genetically modified bee in his lab. He told me that he, too, is focused on basic research, and has no ties to the agriculture industry. But, unlike Beye, he welcomes the prospect of GM bee swarms buzzing around the countryside. Lab-made, pesticide-resistant bees could be a real saviour for beekeepers and farmers, he says. And, he adds, the science is no more than three years away. “I’m now 57 years old,” he told me via email, “and completely optimistic to see such transgenic bees in the marketplace in my lifetime!”

It is not yet legal to release genetically engineered bees into the wild, but the private sector is already watching closely. One US startup contacted Beye’s lab offering to help commercialise their breakthrough research. Beye said no.

Beekeepers tend to see the world through the eyes of their bees. After a few hours in their presence, you too begin to re-evaluate your surroundings. The monochrome sameness of our farmlands – that vast, neat checkerboard of green and brown that feeds us mammals so well – can be a desert for foraging pollinators. The shocking yellow brilliance of rapeseed in blossom each spring can be a reservoir of pesticides. Beekeepers have learned to mitigate the risks and adapt, mainly by moving their hives around an ever-dwindling patch of safe zones. But the genetically modified bee, which can breed with other species and looks just like bees hand-raised from carefully chosen strains, is an altogether more dangerous challenge.

Jay Evans at the US agriculture department, an entomologist and beekeeper, admires Beye’s work, but thinks his breakthrough GM bee should remain confined to the lab. “The road to making a superbee looks really long to me, and probably not necessary,” he said. “I don’t see the justification.”

Haefeker, a former tech entrepreneur, came to beekeeping late in life, around his 40th birthday. After spending two decades in Silicon Valley, he, his wife and two sons returned home to Germany in 2001, settling in a picturesque village on Lake Starnberg, halfway between Munich and the Bavarian Alps. What started as a backyard hobby quickly became an obsession, then a growing business. Haefeker studied everything about beekeeping, from hive maintenance to nutrition. Later, he developed an iPhone app for breeders called iQueen and started a podcast called Bienenpolitik, or Beekeeping and Politics. One of the few tech-savvy beekeepers in bucolic Upper Bavaria, in 2003 Haefeker was recruited to join the local professional beekeepers association where second- and third-generation beekeepers routinely grumbled about modern farming practices gobbling up open space. His first assignment was to investigate an issue that nobody at the organisation knew much about: GM crops. “I had no opinion of GMOs (genetically modified organisms),” he recalls. “But as the new kid on the block it was my job to figure out: is this going to have an impact on us?”.

Haefeker’s investigations into GMOs turned into a decade-long crusade. What began as a local case involving a Bavarian beekeeper with GMO-contaminated honey grew into an epic battle, pitting Europe’s beekeepers against two giants: Monsanto, the biotech giant that markets MON810, the pest-resistant genetically modified maize, and the World Trade Organization, which, at the time, was pressuring the EU to give GM crops a chance. The beekeepers eventually won a huge victory in 2011 in the European court of justice, keeping European honey, for now, virtually GMO-free. The fight continues, but the beekeepers’ message was clear: don’t underestimate us.

8013dd3d4d810e14af0fa1063213b487ff4b9527_1000.jpg
A beekeeper in California with his hives. Photograph: Brett Murphy © Guardian / eyevine Contact eyevine for more information about using this image: T: +44 (0) 20 8709 8709 E: info@eyevine.com http://www.eyevine.com

A beekeeper in California with his hives. Photograph: Brett Murphy

The agrichemical companies’ business model is to dominate both ends of the market. They sell the farmer the chemical that kills the pests, and then they sell them their patented seeds, genetically engineered to withstand those very chemicals. (Monsanto’s top-selling line of Roundup Ready herbicide-resistant seeds are marketed as the best defence against Roundup, Monsanto’s top-selling herbicide.) The multinationals have locked farmers into contracts that prevent them from manipulating the seeds to develop their own cross-breed.

Beekeepers fear genetic engineering of honeybees will introduce patents and privatisation to one of the last bastions of agriculture that is collectively managed and owned by no one. “Think about it,” Haefeker told me, “the one area Big Ag doesn’t yet control is pollination.” And pollination is huge. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that pollinators help farmers grow crops worth up to $577bn (£437bn) annually.

Damage to the bee population, by harming a vital pollinator, is already threatening crops worldwide. Outside FAO’s headquarters in Rome, a neon billboard flashes in English, Italian and Arabic a series of urgent save-the-planet messages. Save the bees tops the list. If bees disappear, food crops and animal feeds, not to mention the raw materials for biofuels (from canola and palm oil), textiles (cotton) and medicines, will simply vanish from much of the planet. It has got so bad in some parts of China that humans already pollinate some crops by hand. In what feels like a riff on a Black Mirror episode, Harvard researchers are working on the RoboBee, a flying robotic pollinator that is half the size of a paperclip and weighs less than one-tenth of a gram. In March 2018, Walmart filed a series of patents for its own tiny robotic pollinators.

Beekeepers and conservationists believe bees should be left to evolve on their own, helped only by protection of open spaces and best-practice natural breeding methods. Conventional bee breeding has embraced technology in recent years via the introduction of apps, tracking software and temperature-controlled “finishing” incubators. But the method is otherwise little changed from ancient times. During the year, beekeepers will perform what they call “splitting the hive”, or separating a portion of the colony, frame by frame, and putting the frames in new hives with new inhabitants. This can invigorate the gene pool by introducing hardy newcomers.

“Before the introduction of neonicotinoids,” Haefeker said, “about 15 years ago, you’d open up the hive and it was bursting with healthy bees. That level of reproductive energy is really crucial.”

During 2008, Germany’s infamous season of heavy colony losses, the dead piled up on the ground under Haefeker’s hives and along the hive’s inner floor. “It’s got better in recent years, since the bans went into place. But we’re not yet back to where we were in the days before neonics,” he said. “That will take years.” He tests the spring pollen for traces of neonics and other chemicals. The level of contamination is much improved, he says. On his property in Bavaria, he offered me a pinch of raw pollen. The sharp, sweet taste lingered on my tongue. I peered down to get a good look at the workers entering one of the hives. They streamed in one by one, their thighs weighed down with yellow balls of dandelion pollen. “It’s good, isn’t it?” Haefeker chuckled proudly.

By late July, cracks had appeared in the new neonics law. More than a dozen EU member states sought loopholes to stay the ban, and Bayer pledged to appeal against its legal basis, warning that the ban would limit our ability to grow the quantities of “safe, affordable” food we need.

Despite the setback, Haefeker remains defiant. “Their business model is obsolete,” he told me on the phone in July 2018. The “big six” companies of Big Ag are in the process of merging into three, forming Bayer-Monsanto, Dow-DuPont and Syngenta-ChemChina. This historic, quarter-of-a-trillion-dollar spending spree is a sign of market uncertainty, Haefeker asserts, not strength. The future, he says, is big data. Sensor- and computer-assisted crop care – digital crop protection, as it is known, in which tiny robots and drones will tend to rows and rows of crops round the clock, picking off pests and releasing super-precise flows of irrigation – will feed the planet’s billions, not chemicals. “I’ve been telling them this for years.”

However ground down by Haefeker’s tireless advocacy for bees they may be, Bayer officials told me they largely concur with his view that the industry is beginning to grow less reliant on chemicals, and investing more in big data and tiny robots. They even let Haefeker in the building from time to time to discuss that digital future.

Humans have been consuming honey since our hunter-gatherer days. Not long after we began farming, we started keeping bees (sugar came several millennia later). About 10,000 years ago artists depicted apiculture on the walls of Spanish caves, and, centuries after that, demand for bees wax and honey drove commerce across the empires of ancient Greece and Rome. In the 20th century, apiology, the study of bees, took off. In the 1920s, Austrian zoologist Karl von Frisch was the first to explain the meaning of the honeybees’ waggle dance, which communicates to other bees the direction and distance of a food source; a half-century later he won the Nobel Prize. Honeybees are eusocial creatures, making them one of the most studied insects on the planet. Researchers study the species to understand how the human brain works and to improve the design of supercomputers. Bees, it turns out, can even do abstract maths.There are 22 million beekeepers across 146 countries, estimates Apimondia, a 123-year-old organisation that protects and promotes the livelihood of beekeepers, and lately they have been seeing a dramatic rise in membership. “During a downturn in the economy of a country, the number of new members increases,” Philip McCabe, an Irish beekeeper and president of Apimondia, told me. The media attention around colony collapse and bee health continues to bring in new members as well.

In October 2017, Haefeker delivered a presentation at Apimondia’s International Apicultural Congress in Istanbul, unveiling Apimondia’s answer to Frankenbees. Like Haefeker himself, the fix he proposes is geeky and left-leaning: an open-source license for honeybees. A software engineer, he takes inspiration from the free software movement of the 1980s and 90s, which gave birth to the “open source” concept. Now, he sees such a licence promoting open collaboration as the perfect model to protect the beekeepers from a nightmare scenario – powerful corporations building a genetically engineered bee that they then commercialise and lock down with patents and trademarks.

In his opening remarks, Haefeker launched into what he called “the big question”. “Did anybody ask our permission before they took our bees, the bees we have been working on, selecting and breeding within Apimondia, before the scientists decided to take these bees and modify them?” The answer was, of course, no. Until that moment, nobody, not even beekeepers, claimed an ownership stake on the bees’ genetic code. Anyone can start a hive, which might explain why you can find beekeepers tending to hives in Yemeni war zones, on the roof of Paris’ Bastille opera house and in Tanzanian refugee camps. The free exchange of breeding materials – from the queens and her eggs to the drones’ sperm – has long been encouraged to keep colonies genetically diverse. Through this free exchange, we preserve a common resource, benefitting everyone and everything. The beekeepers get healthier colonies out of the arrangement. We get flowers, food and honey.

To get around any attempt by the agriculture industry to distribute and license superbees, Apimondia is seeking to enshrine this freedom as a right in the form of an open-source contract, establishing bee breeding as a public good that nobody can own outright.

“This is the most efficient way to legally protect our bees from patenting and privatisation by commercial interests,” Haefeker insists. Later, he told me, “we don’t want to get screwed, the way farmers did by corporations and their GM patented seeds.”

Apimondia has minuscule lobbying resources, but it has lined up powerful allies, including the FAO, environmental NGOs and scientific advisers. Together, they press for international treaties to protect vital pollinators. Now Apimondia, too, is sounding the alarm on GM honeybees. Radical bee-breeding experiments don’t always end well, McCabe reminded me. Beekeepers won’t soon forget the story of the Africanised bee, a cross-breed between the African bee and European strains introduced in South America in the 1950s. It escaped quarantine, mated with indigenous species and then multiplied and multiplied, venturing thousands of miles north into the US, breeding with local species and quickly coming to dominate their gene pool. It landed the unfortunate, even nativist, nickname “African killer bee” for the aggressive manner in which it defends its nest. “That’s what we’re concerned with,” McCabe says, “any inter-breeding that messes with the genetics of indigenous bee populations.”

Jay Evans keeps bees on the grounds of his job at the USDA, at the government research facility in Maryland, 30 minutes north of Washington DC. I contacted him by phone and asked how things were going.

“Terribly,” he said with a wry laugh. “The losses have doubled in the last 10 years.” He blames a host of factors, with disease and parasites such as the varroa mite chief among them. Beekeepers, he added, are closely watching what happens next in Europe. “I go to beekeepers’ meetings all the time. They’re suffering. They’re trying to keep their operations afloat. They’re desperate for a new solution, or technology, or regulation. Anything,” he says. But there’s consensus on what they don’t want. “When I talk to a group, I talk a lot about genetics. And occasionally they’ll say: ‘Are you making a transgenic bee, one of those Frankenbees?’”

Haefeker and his business partner, Arno Bruder, run their beekeeping enterprise on a field bordering two organic farms in Upper Bavaria. Their colonies have recovered somewhat since the neonics ban went into effect, he said, but they take steps to protect their hives. A lot of beekeepers pack their hives on to trailers and position them near nature reserves or in fields like the one in which we stood. “Over time you learn where you have the worst exposure to whatever it is that harms the bees,” Haefeker said.

He pulled out a frame to reveal a queen. Like an awkward commuter on the tube, she brushed up against every inhabitant near her as she made her way from one end of the frame to the other. The jostling has a purpose; it reassures the cavorting masses. “It’s the queen’s pheromones,” he explained. It makes them relaxed and productive. “The pheromones affect us beekeepers, too.” He says he plans to harness this anti-stress essence and build a kind of a bee-powered wellness centre on the two-hectare property. I pictured Munich’s pampered classes soaking up queen-bee pheromones in a lodge in the hills around Lake Starnberg. A moment later, Haefeker put the frame back, closed the lid, and surveyed his hives with satisfaction. He and Bruder then discussed what’s next.

Keeping bees safe from pesticides is labour-intensive and requires specialist local knowledge. Bruder agreed to wake before dawn the following morning and pack up some of the hives, load them on to a trailer and drive the bees to higher ground. They had decided on a region in the foothills of the Alps, about an hour away, near the Wieskirche, an 18th-century church on the Unesco world heritage list. There would be fresh dandelion flowers up there. The bees would be further away from intensive agriculture, said Haefeker. “We’ve scouted out the locations.”

Meanwhile, it is possible that humankind has even more extreme designs on bees. In October 2018, Haefeker sent me a message pointing to something called Insect Allies, a $45m research project sponsored by Darpa, the US Department of Defense’s military research department. It proposes using insects to carry immune-boosting mutations designed to protect crops from drought, flooding, pathogens and bioweapons. In essence, the visiting insects would modify the plant’s genetic makeup. A group of academics from universities in Germany and France declared the programme’s existence alarming, saying it turns the insects themselves into bioweapons.

Darpa does not say what kind of insects it plans to use, but Haefeker did not like the sound of it. “We need to keep an eye on this craziness,” his text read, “in case they want to use bees to transport their genetically modified viruses into crops.”

This article was originally published on October 16, 2018, by The Guardian, and is republished here with permission.

Bricks Alive! Scientists Create Living Concrete

“A Frankenstein material” is teeming with — and ultimately made by — photosynthetic microbes. And it can reproduce.

Wil Srubar, left, a structural engineer at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and materials science and engineering PhD student, Sarah Williams, holding bricks of building matter made from cyanobacteria and other materials.Credit…CU Boulder College of Engineering & Applied Science

By Amos Zeeberg  Jan. 15, 2020

 For centuries, builders have been making concrete roughly the same way: by mixing hard materials like sand with various binders, and hoping it stays fixed and rigid for a long time to come.

Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has created a rather different kind of concrete — one that is alive and can even reproduce.

Minerals in the new material are deposited not by chemistry but by cyanobacteria, a common class of microbes that capture energy through photosynthesis. The photosynthetic process absorbs carbon dioxide, in stark contrast to the production of regular concrete, which spews huge amounts of that greenhouse gas.

Photosynthetic bacteria also give the concrete another unusual feature: a green color. “It really does look like a Frankenstein material,” said Wil Srubar, a structural engineer and the head of the research project. (The green color fades as the material dries.)

Other researchers have worked on incorporating biology into concrete, especially concrete that can heal its own cracks. A major advantage of the new material, its creators say, is that instead of adding bacteria to regular concrete — an inhospitable environment — their process is oriented around bacteria: enlisting them to build the concrete, and keeping them alive so they make more later on.

The new concrete, described Wednesday in the journal Matter, “represents a new and exciting class of low-carbon, designer construction materials,” said Andrea Hamilton, a concrete expert at the University of Strathclyde, in Scotland.

To build the living concrete, the researchers first tried putting cyanobacteria in a mixture of warm water, sand and nutrients. The microbes eagerly absorbed light and began producing calcium carbonate, gradually cementing the sand particles together. But the process was slow — and Darpa, the Department of Defense’s speculative research arm and the project’s funder, wanted the construction to go very quickly. Necessity, happily, birthed invention.

An arch made from living building materials in Dr. Srubar’s lab.

An arch made from living building materials in Dr. Srubar’s lab.Credit…CU Boulder College of Engineering & Applied Science

Dr. Srubar had previously worked with gelatin, a food ingredient that, when dissolved in water and cooled, forms special bonds between its molecules. Importantly, it can be used at moderate temperatures that are gentle on bacteria. He suggested adding gelatin to strengthen the matrix being built by the cyanobacteria, and the team was intrigued.

The researchers bought Knox brand gelatin at a local supermarket and dissolved it in the solution with the bacteria. When they poured the mixture into molds and cooled it in a refrigerator, the gelatin formed its bonds — “just like when you make Jell-O,” Dr. Srubar said. The gelatin provided more structure, and worked with the bacteria to help the living concrete grow stronger and faster.

After about a day, the mixture formed concrete blocks in the shape of whatever molds the group used, including two-inch cubes, shoe box-size blocks and truss pieces with struts and cutouts. Individual two-inch cubes were strong enough for a person to stand on, although the material is weak compared to most conventional concretes. Blocks about the size of a shoe box showed potential for doing real construction.

“The first time we made a big structure using this system, we didn’t know if it was going to work, scaling up from this little-bitty thing to this big brick,” said Chelsea Heveran, a former postdoc with the group — now an engineer at Montana State University — and the lead author of the study. “We took it out of the mold and held it — it was a beautiful, bright green and said ‘Darpa’ on the side.” (The mold featured the name of the project’s funder.) “It was the first time we had the scale we were envisioning, and that was really exciting.”

When the group brought small samples to a regular review meeting with officials from Darpa, they were impressed, Dr. Srubar said: “Everyone wanted one on their desk.”

Stored in relatively dry air at room temperature, the blocks reach their maximum strength over the course of days, and the bacteria gradually begin to die out. But even after a few weeks, the blocks are still alive; when again exposed to high temperature and humidity, many of the bacterial cells perk back up.

The group can take one block, cut it with a diamond-tipped saw, place half back in a warm beaker with more raw materials, pour it in a mold, and begin concrete formation anew. Each block could thus spawn three new generations, yielding eight descendant blocks.

The Department of Defense is interested in using the reproductive ability of these “L.B.M.s” — living building materials — to aid construction in remote or austere environments. “Out in the desert, you don’t want to have to truck in lots of materials,” Dr. Srubar said.

The blocks also have the advantage of being made from a variety of common materials. Most concrete requires virgin sand that comes from rivers, lakes and oceans, which is running short worldwide, largely because of the enormous demand for concrete. The new living material is not so picky. “We’re not pigeonholed into using some particular kind of sand,” Dr. Srubar said. “We could use waste materials like ground glass or recycled concrete.”

The research team is working to make the material more practical by making the concrete stronger; increasing the bacteria’s resistance to dehydration; reconfiguring the materials so they can be flat-packed and easily assembled, like slabs of drywall; and finding a different kind of cyanobacteria that doesn’t require the addition of a gel.

Eventually, Dr. Srubar said, the tools of synthetic biology could dramatically expand the realm of possibilities: for instance, building materials that can detect and respond to toxic chemicals, or that light up to reveal structural damage. Living concrete might help in environments harsher than even the driest deserts: other planets, like Mars.

“There’s no way we’re going to carry building materials to space,” Dr. Srubar said. “We’ll bring biology with us.”

A Towering Turtle of Discarded Industrial Junk Welded by Ono Gaf

July 31, 2014  Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

Indonesian artist Ono Gaf works primarily with metallic junk reclaimed from a trash heap to create his animalistic sculptures. His most recent piece is this giant turtle containing hundreds of individual metal components like car parts, tools, bike parts, instruments, springs, and tractor rotors. You can read a bit more about Gaf over on the Jakarta Post, and see more of this turtle in this set of photos by Gina Sanderson. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

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Photo by Gina Sanderson

A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle

November 2, 2018  Kate Sierzputowski

Carapace is a kinetic sculpture designed by Derek Hugger (previously) that mimics the motion of a sea

turtle gliding through the ocean. The wooden work is composed of over six hundred parts which allow the creature to elegantly tilt its fins, move its body up and down, and even crane its head as if rising above the water for air. A single crank controls the complex structure of gears and mechanisms which were designed to flow as organically as possible.

“A non-trivial amount of time was spent watching and studying videos of turtles swimming,” explains Hugger. “Getting the motions of Carapace to closely resemble the motions of real turtles was a true challenge. Countless hours were spent refining the sculpture’s motion to be as lifelike as possible, even before any mechanisms were developed to drive those motions.”

Hugger has also developed a hummingbird in addition to several abstract wood sculptures. You can see these works in action on his website and Youtube.

Carapace: an organic motion sculpture

Oct 27, 2018  Derek Hugger

Make your own! Woodworking plans are available at http://www.derekhugger.com/carapace.html Carapace is a wooden kinetic sculpture that simulates the motion of a sea turtle swimming. A complex series of mechanisms allows Carapace to swim up and down, tilt forward or back, and even lift its head up for a breath of air. As each mechanism is carefully linked to the next, each of Carapace’s flowing motions are driven by turning a single crank. For more videos and photos of Carapace, check out: https://www.facebook.com/derekhuggerk… The music is “Morning Mist” by Marika Takeuchi.

Category   Science & Technology

Urban Species: Kinetic Lifeforms Created by U-Ram Choe

July 15, 2013  Christopher Jobson

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URAM Choe: New Urban Species Exhibition

Mar 29, 2010  Frist Art Museum

U-Ram Choe: New Urban Species is on view at the Frist Center through May 16, 2010. Korean artist U-Ram Choes kinetic sculptures are made of delicately curved sections of wrought metal, joined together in movable parts that are driven by motors to expand, contract, or otherwise suggest the autonomic motions of such primitive life forms as plants and single-celled aquatic creatures. The intricate workmanship and graceful movements of these mechanical sculptures offer viewers an unparalleled visual delight.

Category   Nonprofits & Activism

Kinetic Sculptor Puts Cyber Dreams In Motion

Nov 19, 2012  Creators

Through his prodigious understanding of robotics, U-ram Choe sees motion as a necessity in his work, creating moving, futuristic sculptures. For more information: http://thecreatorsproject.com/creator… The Creators Project is a partnership between Intel and VICE: http://thecreatorsproject.com/ ** Subscribe to The Creators Project: http://bit.ly/Subscribe_to_TheCreator… Check out our full video catalog: http://youtube.com/user/TheCreatorsPr… Facebook: http://fb.com/thecreatorsproject Twitter: http://twitter.com/creatorsproject Tumblr: http://thecreatorsproject.tumblr.com/

Category   Science & Technology

Korean artist U-Ram Choe lives and works in Seoul where he creates highly ornate kinetic that mimic forms and motions found in nature. Choe uses various metals, motors, gears, and custom CPU boards to control the precise motions of each sculpture that are at times perfectly synchronized and other times completely random. With names like “Unicus – cavum ad initium” and “Arbor Deus Pennatus” it’s clear the artist treats each new work like a brand new species.

The artworks are so complex each “organism” is shipped with a manual to show collectors and galleries how to maintain and fix various components. Choe tells the Creator’s Project in one of the videos above how some of the works in his studio live a complete lifecycle where they are at first born and put on display, but after time begin to degrade as certain parts stop working. Eventually he raids old artworks for parts and uses them to build new ones.

Watch the videos above to see a good sampling of his work both old and new, and he has a huge archive of videos for nearly 50 artworks over on Vimeo.

Animation Music   #music video #psychedelic

Slowly Rising: A Mesmerizing New Music Video by Hideki Inaba

November 3, 2015  Christopher Jobson

Directed and animated by Hideki Inaba, this dense and intensely beautiful music video was created for the track Slowly Rising, off the album Full Circle by BEATSOFREEN. The 3-minute animation features an unceasing barrage of seemingly infinite creatures, hybrids of flora and fauna, that swarm and multiply in space like schools of fish or flowers in a field. (via prosthetic knowledge)

Official music video for BEATSOFREEN ­” Slowly Rising”

directed by Hideki Inaba ?? ??
instagram.com/kanahebi1783/
twitter.com/kanahebi_1783
facebook.com/inabahideki1783
hide.tokyo

“Slowly Rising” suggested to me the image of the sun.

A seed was born beneath the sun, the source of all existence.
The seed absorbed the light. It created more seeds like itself, gradually increasing in number.

Time passed, but still their numbers slowly continued to rise,
and before long they were quietly swallowed up by their own shadows.

After everything that had lived had perished, nothing but an empty world remained.
There, once again, an environment where the next living things could grow silently began to spread.

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PBS News, TED Talks, DW Documentary, My Modern Met, Thisiscolossal, and National Geographic

PBS News: January 19 – 23, 2020, Shields and Brooks on Trump impeachment evidence, Democratic debate, How Trump’s USDA wants to change rules around school nutrition, Australian ecosystems left vulnerable in wake of bushfire catastrophe, Kim Phuc’s Brief but Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness,  News Wrap: Virginia becomes 38th state to ratify Equal Rights Amendment, How war and misinformation are complicating the DRC’s Ebola battle, and Disease threatens Italy’s once booming olive oil industry

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Thisiscolossal: Stunning Photographs from 2019 Ocean Art Contest Explore Depths of Aquatic Life Around the World and Scientists Discover the First Biofluorescent Reptile, a ‘Glowing’ Hawksbill Sea Turtle

National Geographic: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 23, 2020

Jan 23, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump continues, with House managers turning their prosecution to the charge of abuse of power. Plus: PBS NewsHour co-founder Jim Lehrer, a giant of American journalism, dies at age 85, and remembering Lehrer with his news partner Robert MacNeil, Justice Stephen Breyer and Sharon Percy Rockefeller. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 22, 2020

Started streaming 2 hours ago PBS NewsHour   

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the Senate has formalized the rules for the impeachment trial of President Trump, and House managers have begun laying out their case for removing him from office. Plus: Reactions to opening arguments from the impeachment prosecution, Chinese officials race to contain a deadly virus outbreak and the UN says Saudi Arabia’s crown prince may have helped hack Jeff Bezos. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Fiery rules debate over, House managers start prosecution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKmdJ… Former Rep. Bob Barr on ‘fatally flawed’ case against Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQFbi… Analyzing the prosecution in Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xuno… News Wrap: At Davos, Trump urges Europe to liberalize trade https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fb-vO… What we know about deadly coronavirus — and what we don’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW3ux… Did Saudi crown prince help to hack Jeff Bezos’ phone? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvqL1… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 21, 2020

Jan 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump officially begins. Plus: The latest impeachment reporting from the Senate, impeachment trial analysis from political experts and former Senate staffers, what President Trump is saying at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, Syrian refugees suffer in Idlib province and an exhibit on the history of the Polaroid camera. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Senate amends impeachment trial rules, defers on witnesses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0lDJ… What we learned in 1st day of Trump Senate impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T43Oi… In Davos, Trump hails U.S. ‘economic boom,’ downplays trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBP12… News Wrap: China’s viral pneumonia spreads to the U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJmTz… Why refugees in Syria’s Idlib have nowhere else to go https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQWvu… How Polaroid pioneered the instant photography revolution https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhOja… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 20, 2020

Jan 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, President Trump’s legal team releases its first official defense of the president as his Senate impeachment trial nears. Plus: A Virginia gun-rights rally sparks new debate, Australia’s ongoing bushfire disaster, former Defense Sec. William Cohen’s unique impeachment view, 2020 Democrats join together on the campaign trail, Politics Monday and Hollywood agent Nina Shaw. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS What to expect in Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6whnr… News Wrap: 3 dead, dozens injured in Baghdad protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wjelr… Vir. gun control protests heavily armed but peaceful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWHxg… Could bushfires erode Australia’s climate change ‘inertia’? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_cf5… Former Defense Sec. William Cohen on impeachment evidence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jsku6… How 2020 Democrats are making final push before Iowa caucus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Nyss… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Iowa, impeachment politics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_L4a… Nina Shaw on driving ‘real change’ on diversity, inclusion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEYwS… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 19, 2019

Jan 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, January 19, the Trump administration responds to House impeachment filings as the Senate trial is set to begin, violent clashes continue in Hong Kong and Lebanon, and a NewsHour Weekend special on Ukraine, a country caught in the crosshairs of conflict at home and the impeachment inquiry in the United States. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on Trump impeachment evidence, Democratic debate

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the opening of President Trump’s Senate trial and the announcement of his legal team, public opinion on impeachment, 2020 Democrats’ final debate before the Iowa caucuses and Michael Bloomberg’s remarkable ad spend. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How Trump’s USDA wants to change rules around school nutrition

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Improving school meals was among Michelle Obama’s key initiatives during her tenure as first lady. Since then, the Trump administration has rolled back Obama-era school nutrition policies they argued went too far and were ineffective. Now, the Department of Agriculture has made additional major changes. Crystal FitzSimons of the Food Research and Action Center joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Australian ecosystems left vulnerable in wake of bushfire catastrophe

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Firefighters in Australia are finally getting some help from nature, in the form of lower temperatures and rain. But many fires are still burning, and millions of acres have been lost. The blazes have also caused tremendous damage to the surrounding ecosystems and wildlife — some of which don’t exist anywhere else in the world. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Kim Phuc’s Brief but Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness

Jan 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

A photograph of Phan Thi Kim Phuc as a nine-year-old girl enduring a napalm attack became a defining image of the Vietnam War. Healing has been a decades-long process. Now living in Canada, Kim Phuc shares her Brief But Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

News Wrap: Virginia becomes 38th state to ratify Equal Rights Amendment

Jan 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

In our news wrap Wednesday, Virginia became the crucial 38th state to ratify the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex. Three-quarters of the states now approve the amendment. Also, Russia’s government abruptly resigned after President Vladimir Putin proposed sweeping constitutional changes that could keep him in power after his current term ends in 2024. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How war and misinformation are complicating the DRC’s Ebola battle

Jan 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

1.6M subscribers

An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has plagued Democratic Republic of Congo for nearly a year and a half, with more than 3,000 people getting sick and 2,000 dead. Major medical advances in prevention and treatment have kept the disease’s toll from rising, but ongoing war — and attacks on medical teams — have forced the response to a standstill. Special correspondent Monica Villamizar reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Disease threatens Italy’s once booming olive oil industry

Jan 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

More than a third of olive oil in the U.S. comes from Italy, which has kept a longstanding reputation for quality. But the quantity of olive oil made in the south of Italy has been in sharp decline. A disease in the region of Puglia has been attacking olive trees, decimating the industry and causing Italy to import olive oil for the first time. Special correspondent Christopher Livesay reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

A forest planted by humans, then left to nature’s own devices, typically takes at least 100 years to mature. But what if we could make the process happen ten times faster? In this short talk, eco-entrepreneur (and TED Fellow) Shubhendu Sharma explains how to create a mini-forest ecosystem anywhere.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Shubhendu Sharma · Eco-entrepreneur

Shubhendu Sharma creates afforestation methods that make it easy to plant maintenance-free, wild and biodiverse forests.

More Resources

Further reading

How to grow a tiny forest really, really fast

In an article on Medium, Shubhendu Sharma gives a first-hand account of how he is reforesting the world, one tiny patch at a time.

More at medium.com ?

TED Fellow and urban designer Mitchell Joachim presents his vision for sustainable, organic architecture: eco-friendly abodes grown from plants and — wait for it — meat.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Mitchell Joachim · Architect, designer

Soft cars, jet packs and houses made of meat are all in a day’s work for urban designer, architect and TED Fellow Mitchell Joachim.

TED2010 | February 2010

Avocado – a positive superfood trend? | DW Documentary

May 1, 2018  DW Documentary

From avocado toast to guacamole, this superfood has stolen the hearts of foodies and the health conscious around the world. But where do avocados come from? Avocados have become a huge food trend in the Western world, where the creamy fruit has become readily available in shops, cafes and restaurants. The avocado is considered a superfood and is popular in Europe because of its nutritional value. Avocados are high in calories, contain mostly monounsaturated fat and are good for cholesterol. The fruit is full of essential nutrients, including potassium and vitamin C. But there’s a darker side to the fashionable fruit popular on toast or in salads. In Chile, one of the world’s largest suppliers, avocado cultivation has dramatic consequences and has been linked to water shortages, human rights violations and an environmentally damage. The province of Petorca has a long tradition of avocado farming. Once grown by small farmers, production has been soaring since the global avocado boom of the 1990s. Big landowners now dominate the avocado market there. And their business requires large amounts of water. It takes up to 1000 liters of water to grow one kilo of the fruit (about three avocados) – a lot more than for a kilo of tomatoes or potatoes. The region is suffering an acute water shortage, exacerbated by climate change. The riverbeds dried up years ago. Trucks bring tanks of water to families in need, while thousands of hectares of avocado groves just next door are watered with artificial reservoirs. Rodrigo Mundaca founded the NGO Modatima. He fights for the right to water – a right that’s guaranteed by the UN and that Chile has committed to. An aerial survey in 2012 revealed that 64 pipelines were diverting river water underground, apparently to irrigate the avocado fields. When the Modatima activists publicly voiced their criticism, they received death threats. Water became a commodity in Chile in 1981 under the Pinochet dictatorship, meaning it’s privatized. Those who offer the most money get water licenses, even for life, regardless of the potential consequences for the ecosystem. The avocado also has a pretty dire environmental footprint. They’re packaged to prevent damage and transported in air-conditioned cargo ships to Europe. The fruit then ripens in a factory in Rotterdam, before it’s sent “ready to eat” to German supermarkets. “Europe wants to eat healthily – at our expense,” says Mundaca. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary… For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: https://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-p…

Category   Education

Colorful Solo Show Titled “Peace” by Eduardo Kobra

By Katie Hosmer on May 7, 2014


It’s not difficult to identify a mural that has been completed by Eduardo Kobra. The Sao Paulo-based street artist has a signature approach filled with vibrant colors and geometric shapes that merge together to form the portraits of many very prominent figures. He uses a combination of painting, airbrush, and spray paint to produce the enormous works filled with a lively spirit.

His most recent large-scale work will be featured as a solo show, entitled Peace, beginning on May 9, 2014 through June 25, 2014 at Rome’s Dorothy Circus Gallery. The selected portraits will feature people like Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa, Albert Einstein, and the Dalai Lama.

Through his signature style of textured layers, strong lines, and fragmented sections, Kobra gives new life to these very important historical figures and topics which, according to the gallery, include “the fight against pollution, global warming, deforestation, and war, but also the ‘makeover’ of some icons of the time.”


Eduardo Kobra’s website
Dorothy Circus Gallery website
via [Hi-Fructose]

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Stunning Photographs from 2019 Ocean Art Contest Explore Depths of Aquatic Life Around the World

January 15, 2020  Grace Ebert

“Crab-Eater Seal” by Greg Lecoeur, Best of Show. All images © Ocean Art Underwater Photo Competition 2019, shared with permission

A 2019 contest organized by the Underwater Photography Guide has collected some of the best photographs of aquatic life around the globe, from an image capturing a seal maneuvering through a chunk of ice in Antarctic waters to another depicting an octopus resting on the ocean floor. This year’s Ocean Art Underwater Photo Contest drew thousands of entires from 78 countries that were judged by renowned underwater photographers Tony Wu, Martin Edge, and Marty Snyderman, along with Underwater Photography Guide publisher Scott Gietler. It also handed out more than $85,000 to entrants.

We’ve included some of our favorite photographs from across the 17 categories, including marine life behavior, portrait, conservation, and reefscapes, although a full list of winners can be found on the contest’s site. Stay tuned for information on the 2020 contest in September.

“Biodiversity” by Greg Lecoeur, Reefscapes

“Gigantic Aggregation of Munk Devil Rays in Baja California Sur” by Jason Clue, Marine Life Behavior

“Larval tripod fish” by Fabien Michenet, Blackwater

“Radiography” by Stefano Cerbai, Macro

“Strange Encounters” by Hannes Klostermann, Marine Life Behavior

“A friendly ride” by Paula Vianna, Marine Life Behavior

“Leopard Shark” by Jake Wilton, Novice Wide Angle

“Treats from Maloolaba River” by Jenny Stock, Nudibranchs

“Coconut Octopus” by Enrico Somogyi, Compact Wide Angle

“The Hypnotist” by Dave Johnson, Macro

“Eye of the Tornado” by Adam Martin, Wide Angle

“Under the Pier” by Jose Antonio Castellano, Wide Angle

Scientists Discover the First Biofluorescent Reptile, a ‘Glowing’ Hawksbill Sea Turtle

September 28, 2015  Christopher Jobson

No, this isn’t a clip from the latest Miyazaki anime, this is the first sighting of a real fluorescent turtle. Marine biologist David Gruber of City University of New York, was recently in the Solomon Islands to film a variety of biofluorescent fish and coral, when suddenly a completely unexpected sight burst into the frame: a glowing yellow and red sea turtle. The creature is a critically endangered hawksbill sea turtle, and until this sighting last July, the phenomenon had never been documented in turtles, let alone any other reptile.

Biofluorescence is the ability for an organism to reflect blue light and re-emit it as a different color, not to be confused with bioluminescence, where organisms produce their own light.

Many undersea creatures like coral, sharks, and some shrimp have shown the ability to show single green, red, or orange colors under the right lighting conditions, but according to National Geographic, no organisms have shown the ability to emit two distinct colors like the hawksbill. As seen in the video, the coloring appears not only in mottled patterns on the turtle’s shell, but even extends within the cracks of its head and feet. Gruber mentions this could be a mixture of both glowing red glowing algae attached to the turtle, but the yellow fluorescence is undoubtedly part of the animal.

Watch the video above to see the moment of discovery and learn more on Nat Geo.

EXCLUSIVE: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered | National Geographic

Sep 28, 2015  National Geographic

While filming coral off the Solomon Islands, David Gruber, a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, encountered a “bright red-and-green spaceship.” This underwater UFO turned out to be a hawksbill sea turtle, which is significant because it’s the first time that biofluorescence has ever been seen in reptiles, according to Gruber. Gruber is now excited to learn more about this critically endangered species and how it is using biofluorescence. ? Subscribe: https://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #SeaTurtles #Biofluorescence About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world’s premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what’s possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: https://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: https://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: https://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: https://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta David Gruber: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/exp… Click here to read more: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/20… BIOFLUORESCENCE VIDEOGRAPHER: David Gruber SENIOR PRODUCER: Jeff Hertrick EDITOR: Jennifer Murphy EXPEDITION FUNDED BY: TBA21 TBA21 CINEMAPHOTOGRAPHER: Barry Broomfield TBA21 PRODUCERS: Francesca Von Habsburg and Markus Reymann TBA21 LINE PRODUCER: Lauren Matic ADDITIONAL FOOTAGE: National Geographic Creative and Pawel Achtel EXCLUSIVE: “Glowing” Sea Turtle Discovered | National Geographic https://youtu.be/9kmE7D5ulSA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Category  Entertainment

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PBS News, TED Talks, Pocket Worthy – Scientific American, Wikipedia and Thisiscolossal

PBS News: January 13 – 18, 2020, and Nigeria hits polio milestone as the world eyes eradication

TED Talks: Suzanne Lee Why biofabrication is the next industrial revolution?, Grow your own clothes, Angela Belcher Using nature to grow batteries, and Neri Oxman Design at the intersection of technology and biology

Pocket Worthy: The Forgotten Life of Einstein’s First Wife – Scientific American – Pauline Gagnon

Wikipedia: Mileva Mari? – The first wife of Albert Einstein

 Thisiscolossal: An Ancient Chinese Ginkgo Tree Drops an Ocean of Golden Leaves, and Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the World’s Longest Wooden Sculpture

Inspiration Grid: Surreal Paintings by David Lawrence

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode January 18, 2019

Jan 18, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, January 18, Democrats release new evidence as next week’s Senate impeachment trial approaches, an attack on Italy’s olive trees and the battle to save them, a look back at some of 2019’s top stories, and the Black Comic Book Festival draws thousands in Harlem. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 17, 2020

Jan 17, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the catastrophic impact of Australia’s recent bushfires on its landscape and wildlife. Plus: The Trump administration changes federal rules around public school nutrition, how the effects of climate change could alter American business, an interview with Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, Shields and Brooks on the latest political news and a southern rock revival. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: Amid protests, Iran’s Khamenei lashes out at U.S. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-R_yW… Australian ecosystems vulnerable amid bushfire catastrophe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSNrj… How Trump wants to change rules around school nutrition https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=–CvK… Why climate change means new risk for U.S. financial markets https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da5-n… Venezuela’s Guaido on Maduro, U.S. sanctions and ‘anarchy’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpfLe… Shields and Brooks on Trump impeachment evidence, Dem debate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcEKh… Revitalized recording studio puts Macon in the spotlight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X3Nx8… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 16, 2020

Jan 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the impeachment trial of President Trump begins with solemn ceremony in the Senate, as new evidence appears. Plus: How the USMCA differs from its NAFTA predecessor, the impeachment trial role of Chief Justice John Roberts, reviving the Equal Rights Amendment, scientific advances in the fight against Ebola and a Brief But Spectacular take on pain and forgiveness. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS What we learned from opening of Trump’s impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZyXB… News Wrap: Trump seeks new protection for faith-based groups https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4v9e… What are the differences between NAFTA and the USMCA? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVT6w… How John Roberts will approach his role in impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPZP6… After Va. ratifies ERA, what ‘procedural hurdles’ remain? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFH9W… How Ebola advances represent ‘resounding scientific success’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIkR1… Kim Phuc’s Brief But Spectacular take on pain, forgiveness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRtt3… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 15, 2020

Jan 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, a historic day on Capitol Hill as the House voted to send articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate. Plus: How senators are readying for the impeachment trial, the U.S. and China agree to the first phase of a trade deal, how the 2020 Democrats fared in the final debate before the Iowa caucuses and violence slows progress against DRC’s Ebola outbreak. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS What happens next in Trump’s Senate impeachment trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofFz9… News Wrap: Virginia becomes 38th state to ratify ERA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCfnW… Barrasso: Senate GOP can remain impartial on impeachment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11TyO… Durbin: Senate needs witnesses Trump didn’t allow in House https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RL83_… U.S. ‘can’t lose’ in China trade deal, says Trump adviser https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vk0cj… How 2020 Democrats fared in final debate before Iowa caucus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1BN-… How war, misinformation are complicating DRC’s Ebola battle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XONn0… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 14, 2020

Jan 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump inches closer amid new details of how it might proceed. Plus: Trump campaigns in battleground Wisconsin, Apple and the Justice Department debate mobile phone privacy, the pain of surviving a war others didn’t, controversy in the Catholic Church, solving India’s shortage of clean water and the house behind “Little Women.” WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS News Wrap: European leaders pressure Iran over nuclear deal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVklh… What we know about the Senate impeachment trial so far https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijzQq… Trump fans hail Milwaukee rally as Democrats dig in for 2020 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=It8a-… Apple, DOJ battle over access to Pensacola shooter’s phone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32Uyy… A war veteran’s story of survivor’s guilt — and redemption https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xmAL… How clerical celibacy issue is dividing the Catholic Church https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVoeE… Despite monsoons, some Indian cities are desperate for water https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWm4t… The historic real-life house that inspired ‘Little Women’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdsPL… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Jan 13, 2020

Jan 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, Iranians gather in the streets to protest their government after it acknowledges accidentally shooting down a passenger aircraft. Plus: How a Senate impeachment trial against President Trump could proceed, another 2020 Democrat drops out as the Iowa caucuses approach, Politics Monday, the health costs of eviction, Britain’s royal schism and a baseball cheating scandal. WATCH TODAYS SEGMENTS Iranians protest government after it admits downing plane https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcOB5… News Wrap: Philippines volcano forces residents to flee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v35b… How White House, Congress are preparing for Senate trial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbl_F… How 2020 Democrats are facing off as Iowa caucuses approach https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rrtfv… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Iowa and Sanders vs. Warren https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8mW9… The hidden health costs of eviction https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f4SEB… Why the British monarchy is considering unprecedented change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8Tt_… Why Astros scandal is a ‘major black mark’ against baseball https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ze4Ju… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Nigeria hits polio milestone as the world eyes eradication

Jan 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Nigeria once had the most cases of wild polio in Africa, but it has now been three years since the disease was last detected. And as health workers there continue looking for children who have not received polio vaccinations, the WHO may soon certify the country free of the crippling virus. Special correspondent Benedict Moran and video journalist Jorgen Samso report with U.N. Foundation support. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

What if we could “grow” clothes from microbes, furniture from living organisms and buildings with exteriors like tree bark? TED Fellow Suzanne Lee shares exciting developments from the field of biofabrication and shows how it could help us replace major sources of waste, like plastic and cement, with sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Suzanne Lee · Designer, biofabrication pioneer

TED Fellow Suzanne Lee is a fashion designer turned biofabrication pioneer who is nurturing a global community of innovators growing materials.

Designer Suzanne Lee shares her experiments in growing a kombucha-based material that can be used like fabric or vegetable leather to make clothing. The process is fascinating, the results are beautiful (though there’s still one minor drawback …) and the potential is simply stunning.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Suzanne Lee · Designer, biofabrication pioneer

TED Fellow Suzanne Lee is a fashion designer turned biofabrication pioneer who is nurturing a global community of innovators growing materials.

What might our clothes look like in 50 years?

For Suzanne Lee, the answer lies far beyond the traditional borders of fashion design. Might we really wear a bustier made of bacteria? Lee makes her case.

More at ideas.ted.com ?

TED2011 | March 2011

Inspired by an abalone shell, Angela Belcher programs viruses to make elegant nanoscale structures that humans can use. Selecting for high-performing genes through directed evolution, she’s produced viruses that can construct powerful new batteries, clean hydrogen fuels and record-breaking solar cells. In her talk, she shows us how it’s done.

This talk was presented to a local audience at TEDxCaltech, an independent event. TED’s editors chose to feature it for you.

About the speaker

Angela Belcher · Biological engineer

Angela Belcher looks to nature for inspiration on how to engineer viruses to create extraordinary new materials.

About TEDx

TEDx was created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading.” It supports independent organizers who want to create a TED-like event in their own community.

Designer and architect Neri Oxman is leading the search for ways in which digital fabrication technologies can interact with the biological world. Working at the intersection of computational design, additive manufacturing, materials engineering and synthetic biology, her lab is pioneering a new age of symbiosis between microorganisms, our bodies, our products and even our buildings.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

About the speaker

Neri Oxman · Architect, designer

From the micro scale to the building scale, Neri Oxman imagines and creates structures and objects that are inspired, informed and engineered by, for and with nature.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-forgotten-life-of-einstein-s-first-wife?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Pocket Worthy  Stories to fuel your mind.

The Forgotten Life of Einstein’s First Wife

She was a physicist, too—and there is evidence that she contributed significantly to his groundbreaking science.

Scientific American |    Pauline Gagnon

Photo by Tetra Images / Getty Images.

While Albert Einstein is celebrated as perhaps the best physicist of the 20th century, one question about his career remains: How much did his first wife contribute to his groundbreaking science? Mileva Mari? Einstein was a brilliant scientist, but nobody has been able to credit her with any specific part of her husband’s work. Still, their letters and numerous testimonies presented in the books dedicated to her(1-5) provide substantial evidence on how they collaborated from the time they met in 1896 up to their separation in 1914. They depict a couple united by a shared passion for physics, music and for each other. So here is their story.

Mileva Mari? was born in Titel in Serbia in 1875. Her parents, Marija Ruzi? and Miloš Mari?, a wealthy and respected member of his community, had two other children: Zorka and Miloš Jr. Mileva attended high school the last year girls were admitted in Serbia. In 1892, her father obtained the authorization of the Minister of Education to allow her to attend physics lectures reserved to boys. She completed her high school in Zurich in 1894 and her family then moved to Novi Sad. Mileva’s classmates described her as brilliant but not talkative. She liked to get to the bottom of things, was perseverant and worked towards her goals.

Albert Einstein was born in Ulm in Germany in 1879 and had one sister Maja. His father, Hermann, was an industrial. His mother, Pauline Koch came from a rich family. Albert was inquisitive, bohemian and rebel. Being undisciplined, he hated the rigor of German schools so he too finished his high school in Switzerland and his family relocated to Milan.

Albert and Mileva were admitted to the physics-mathematics section of the Polytechnic Institute in Zurich (now ETH) in 1896 with three other students: Marcel Grossmann, Louis Kollros and Jakob Ehrat. Albert and Mileva became inseparable, spending countless hours studying together. He attended only a few lectures, preferring to study at home. Mileva was methodical and organized. She helped him channel his energy and guided his studies as we learn from Albert’s letters, exchanged between 1899-1903 during school holidays: 43 letters from Albert to Mileva have been preserved but only 10 of hers remain(5). These letters provide a first-hand account on how they interacted at the time.

In August 1899, Albert wrote to Mileva: “When I read Helmholtz for the first time, it seemed so odd that you were not at my side and today, this is not getting better. I find the work we do together very good, healing and also easier.” Then on 2 October 1899, he wrote from Milan: “… the climate here does not suit me at all, and while I miss work, I find myself filled with dark thoughts – in other words, I miss having you nearby to kindly keep me in check and prevent me from meandering.”

Mileva boarded in a pension for women where she met her life-long friends Helene Kaufler-Savi? and Milana Bota. Both spoke of Albert’s continuous presence at Mileva’s place, where he would come freely to borrow books in Mileva’s absence. Milan Popovi?, Helene’s grandson, published the letters Mileva exchanged with her throughout her life(4).

By the end of their classes in 1900, Mileva and Albert had similar grades (4.7 and 4.6, respectively) except in applied physics where she got the top mark of 5 but he, only 1. She excelled at experimental work while he did not. But at the oral exam, Professor Minkowski gave 11 out of 12 to the four male students but only 5 to Mileva. Only Albert got his degree.

Meanwhile, Albert’s family strongly opposed their relationship. His mother was adamant. “By the time you’re 30, she’ll already be an old hag!” as Albert reported to Mileva in a letter dated 27 July 1900, as well as « She cannot enter a respectable family ”. Mileva was neither Jewish, nor German. She had a limp and was too intellectual in his mother’s opinion, not to mention prejudices against foreign people. Moreover, Albert’s father insisted his son found work before getting married.

In September 1900, Albert wrote to Mileva: “I look forward to resume our new common work. You must now continue with your research – how proud I will be to have a doctor for my spouse when I’ll only be an ordinary man.“ They both came back to Zurich in October 1900 to start their thesis work. The other three students all received assistant positions at the Institute, but Albert did not. He suspected that professor Weber was blocking him. Without a job, he refused to marry her. They made ends meet by giving private lessons and “continue[d] to live and work as before.” as Mileva wrote to her friend Helene Savi?.

On 13 December 1900, they submitted a first article on capillarity signed only under Albert’s name. Nevertheless, both referred to this article in letters as their common article. Mileva wrote to Helene Savi? on 20 December 1900. “We will send a private copy to Boltzmann to see what he thinks and I hope he will answer us.” Likewise, Albert wrote to Mileva on 4 April 1901, saying that his friend Michele Besso “visited his uncle on my behalf, Prof. Jung, one of the most influential physicists in Italy and gave him a copy of our article.”

The decision to publish only under his name seems to have been taken jointly. Why? Radmila Milentijevi?, a former history professor at City College in New York, published in 2015 Mileva’s most comprehensive biography(1). She suggests that Mileva probably wanted to help Albert make a name for himself, such that he could find a job and marry her. Dord Krsti?, a former physics professor at Ljubljana University, spent 50 years researching Mileva’s life. In his well-documented book(2),he suggests that given the prevalent bias against women at the time, a publication co-signed with a woman might have carried less weight.

We will never know. But nobody made it clearer than Albert Einstein himself that they collaborated on special relativity when he wrote to Mileva on 27 March 1901: “How happy and proud I will be when the two of us together will have brought our work on relative motion to a victorious conclusion.”

Then Mileva’s destiny changed abruptly. She became pregnant after a lovers’ escapade in Lake Como. Unemployed, Albert would still not marry her. With this uncertain future, Mileva took her second and last attempt at the oral exam in July 1901. This time, Prof. Weber, whom Albert suspected of blocking his career, failed her. Forced to abandon her studies, she went back to Serbia, but came back briefly to Zurich to try to persuade Albert to marry her. She gave birth to a girl named Liserl in January 1902. No one knows what happened to her. She was probably given to adoption. No birth or death certificates were ever found.

Earlier in December 1901, their classmate Marcel Grossman’s father intervened to get Albert a post at the Patent Office in Bern. He started work in June 1902. In October, before dying, his father granted him his permission to marry. Albert and Mileva married on 6 January 1903. Albert worked 8 hours a day, 6 days a week at the Patent Office while

Mileva assumed the domestic tasks. In the evenings, they worked together, sometimes late in the night. Both mentioned this to friends, he to Hans Wohlwend, she to Helene Savi? on 20 March 1903 where she expressed how sorry she was to see Albert working so hard at the office. On 14 May 1904, their son Hans-Albert was born.

Despite this, 1905 is now known as Albert’s “miracle year”: he published five articles: one on the photoelectric effect (which led to the 1921 Nobel Prize), two on Brownian motion, one on special relativity and the famous E = mc2. He also commented on 21 scientific papers for a fee and submitted his thesis on the dimensions of molecules. Much later, Albert told R. S. Shankland(6) that relativity had been his life for seven years and the photoelectric effect, for five years. Peter Michelmore, one of his biographers(7), wrote that after having spent five weeks to complete the article containing the basis of special relativity, Albert “went to bed for two weeks. Mileva checked the article again and again, and then mailed it”. Exhausted, the couple made the first of three visits to Serbia where they met numerous relatives and friends, whose testimonies provide a wealth of information on how Albert and Mileva collaborated.

Mileva’s brother, Miloš Jr, a person known for his integrity, stayed on several occasions with the Einstein family while studying medicine in Paris. Krsti?(2) wrote: “[Miloš] described how during the evenings and at night, when silence fell upon the town, the young married couple would sit together at the table and at the light of a kerosene lantern, they would work together on physics problems. Miloš Jr. spoke of how they calculated, wrote, read and debated.” Krsti? heard this directly from relatives of Mileva, Sidonija Gajin and Sofija Gali? Golubovi?.

Zarko Mari?, a cousin of Mileva’s father, lived in the countryside property where the Einsteins stayed during their visit. He told Krsti? how Mileva calculated, wrote and worked with Albert. The couple often sat in the garden to discuss physics. Harmony and mutual respect prevailed.

Gajin and Zarko Mari? also reported hearing from Mileva’s father that during the Einstein’s visit to Novi Sad in 1905, Mileva confided to him: “Before our departure, we finished an important scientific work which will make my husband known around the world.” Krsti? got this same information in 1961 from Mileva’s cousin, Sofija Gali? Golubovi?, who was present when Mileva said it to her father.

Desanka Trbuhovi?-Gjuri? published Mileva’s first biography in Serbian in 1969(3). It later appeared in German and French. She described how Mileva’s brother often hosted gatherings of young intellectuals at his place. During one of these evenings, Albert would have declared: “I need my wife. She solves for me all my mathematical problems”, something Mileva is said to have confirmed.

In 1908, the couple constructed with Conrad Habicht an ultra-sensitive voltmeter. Trbuhovi?-Gjuri? attributes this experimental work to Mileva and Conrad, and wrote: “When they were both satisfied, they left to Albert the task of describing the apparatus, since he was a patent expert.” It was registered under the Einstein-Habicht patent. When Habicht questioned Mileva’s choice not to include her name, she replied making a pun in German: “Warum? Wir beide sind nur ein Stein.“ (“Why? The two of us are but one stone”, meaning, we are one entity).

The first recognition came in 1908. Albert gave unpaid lectures in Bern, then was offered his first academic position in Zurich in 1909. Mileva was still assisting him. Eight pages of Albert’s first lecture notes are in her handwriting. So is a letter drafted in 1910 in reply to Max Planck who had sought Albert’s opinion. Both documents are kept in the Albert Einstein Archives (AEA) in Jerusalem. On 3 September 1909, Mileva confided to Helene Savi?: “He is now regarded as the best of the German-speaking physicists, and they give him a lot of honours. I am very happy for his success, because he fully deserves it; I only hope and wish that fame does not have a harmful effect on his humanity.” Later, she added: “With all this fame, he has little time for his wife. […] What is there to say, with notoriety, one gets the pearl, the other the shell.”

Their second son, Eduard, was born on 28 July 1910. Up to 1911, Albert still sent affectionate postcards to Mileva. But in 1912, he started an affair with his cousin, Elsa Löwenthal while visiting his family who had moved to Berlin. They maintained a secret correspondence over two years. Elsa kept 21 of his letters, now in the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. During this period, Albert held various faculty positions first in Prague, back in Zurich and finally in Berlin in 1914 to be closer to Elsa.

This caused their marriage’s collapse. Mileva moved back to Zurich with her two sons on 29 July 1914. In 1919, she agreed to divorce, with a clause stating that if Albert ever received the Nobel Prize, she would get the money. When she did, she bought two small apartment buildings and lived poorly from their income. Her son, Eduard stayed frequently in a sanatorium. He later developed schizophrenia and was eventually internalised. Due to these medical expenses, Mileva struggled financially all her life and eventually lost both buildings. She survived by giving private lessons and on the alimony Albert sent, albeit irregularly.

In 1925, Albert wrote in his will that the Nobel Prize money was his sons’ inheritance. Mileva strongly objected, stating the money was hers and considered revealing her contributions to his work. Radmila Milentijevi? quote from a letter Albert sent her on 24 October 1925 (AEA 75-364). ”You made me laugh when you started threatening me with your recollections. Have you ever considered, even just for a second, that nobody would ever pay attention to your says if the man you talked about had not accomplished something important. When someone is completely insignificant, there is nothing else to say to this person but to remain modest and silent. This is what I advise you to do.

Mileva remained silent but her friend Milana Bota told a Serbian newspaper in 1929 that they should talk to Mileva to find out about the genesis of special relativity, since she was directly involved. On 13 June 1929, Mileva wrote to Helene Savi?: ”Such publications in newspapers do not suit my nature at all, but I believe that all that was for Milana’s joy, and that she probably thought that this would also be a joy for me, as I can only suppose that she wanted to help me receive some public rights with regard to Einstein. She has written to me in that way, and I let it be accepted that way, for otherwise the whole thing would be nonsense.”

According to Krsti?(2), Mileva spoke of her contributions to her mother and sister. She also wrote to her godparents explaining how she had always collaborated with Albert and how he had ruined her life, but asked them to destroy the letter. Her son, Hans-Albert, told Krsti?(2) how his parents’ “scientific collaboration continued into their marriage, and that he remembered seeing [them] work together in the evenings at the same table.” Hans-Albert’s first wife, Frieda, tried to publish the letters Mileva and Albert had sent to their sons but was blocked in court by the Einstein’s Estate Executors, Helen Dukas and Otto Nathan in an attempt to preserve the “Einstein’s myth”. They prevented other publications, including one from Krsti?(2) on his early findings in 1974. Krsti? mentions that Nathan even “visited” Mileva’s apartment after her death in 1948. On July 1947, Albert wrote to Dr Karl Zürcher, his divorce lawyer: “When Mileva will no longer be there, I’ll be able to die in peace.”

Their letters and the numerous testimonies show that Mileva Mari? and Albert Einstein collaborated closely from their school days up to 1914. Albert referred to it repeatedly in his letters, like when he wrote: « our work on relative motion”. Their union was based on love and mutual respect, which allowed them together to produce such uncommon work. She was the first person to recognize his talent. Without her, he would never have succeeded. She abandoned her own aspirations, happy to work with him and contribute to his success, feeling they were one unique entity. Once started, the process of signing their work under his unique name became impossible to reverse. She probably agreed to it since her own happiness depended on his success. Why did Mileva remain silent? Being reserved and self-effaced, she did not seek honors or public attention. And as is always the case in close collaborations, the individual contributions are nearly impossible to disentangle.

References

(1) Radmila Milentijevi?: Mileva Mari? Einstein: Life with Albert Einstein, United World Press, 2015.

(2) Dord Krsti?: Mileva & Albert Einstein: Their Love and Scientific Collaboration, Didakta, 2004.

(3) Desanka Trbuhovi?-Gjuri? Mileva Mari? Einstein: In Albert Einstein’s shadow): in Serbian, 1969, German, 1982, and French, 1991.

(4) Milan Popovi?: In Albert’s Shadow, the Life and Letters of Mileva Mari?, Einstein’s First Wife, The John Hopkins University Press, 2003.

(5) Renn and Schulmann, Albert Einstein / Mileva Mari?, The Love Letters, Princeton University Press, 1992.

(6) Peter Michelmore, Einstein, Profile of the Man, Dodd, Mead & Company, 1962.

(7) R.S. Shankland, Conversation with Albert Einstein, Am. J. of Physics, 1962.

Pauline Gagnon is a physicist and author of “Who Cares about Particle Physics: Making Sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN,” Oxford University Press, 2016.

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

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This article was originally published on December 19, 2016, by Scientific American, and is republished here with permission.

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Mileva Mari?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mileva Mari? 1896
Born December 19, 1875 Titel, Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Serbia)
Died August 4, 1948 (aged 72) Zürich, Switzerland
Resting place Friedhof Nordheim, Zürich, Switzerland
Other names Mileva Mari?-Einstein,
Mileva Mari?-Ajnštajn
Alma mater Eidgenössisches Polytechnikum (known today as the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule)
Occupation Mathematician
Spouse(s) Albert Einstein
(m. 1903; div. 1919)
Children “Lieserl” Einstein
Hans Albert Einstein
Eduard “Tete” Einstein
Parent(s) Miloš Mari?
Marija Ruži?-Mari?

Mileva Mari? (Serbian Cyrillic: ?????? ?????; December 19, 1875 – August 4, 1948), sometimes called Mileva Mari?-Einstein or Mileva Mari?-Ajnštajn (Serbian Cyrillic: ?????? ?????-????????), was a Serbian physicist and mathematician and the first wife of Albert Einstein from 1903 to 1919. She was the only woman among Einstein’s fellow students at Zürich‘s Polytechnic and was the second woman to finish a full program of study at the Department of Mathematics and Physics.[1] Mari? and Einstein were collaborators and lovers and had a daughter Lieserl in 1902, whose fate is unknown. They later had two sons, Hans Albert and Eduard.

Albert and Mileva Einstein, 1912

They separated in 1914, with Mari? taking the boys and returning to Zurich from Berlin. They divorced in 1919; that year Einstein married again. When he received the Nobel Prize in 1921, he transferred the money to Mari?, chiefly to support their sons; she had access to the interest. In 1930 at about age 20, their second son Eduard had a breakdown and was diagnosed with schizophrenia. With expenses mounting by the late 1930s for his institutional care, Mari? sold two of the three houses she and Einstein had purchased. He made regular contributions to his sons’ care, which he continued after emigrating to the United States with his second wife (Elsa, his first cousin).

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mileva_Mari%C4%87

An Ancient Chinese Ginkgo Tree Drops an Ocean of Golden Leaves

November 24, 2015  Christopher Jobson

This towering ginkgo tree is located within the walls of the Gu Guanyin Buddhist Temple in the Zhongnan Mountains in China. Every autumn the green leaves on the 1,400-year-old tree turn bright yellow and fall into a golden heap on the temple grounds drawing tourists from the surrounding area. You can see more photos here and here. (via F*ck Yeah Chinese Garden)

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Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the World’s Longest Wooden Sculpture

November 18, 2013  Christopher Jobson

tree-1

Photo by Lv Ming

tree-2

Photo by Lv Ming

tree-3

Photo by Lv Ming

tree-4

Photo by Lv Ming

Chinese artist Zheng Chunhui recently unveiled this exceptionally large wooden sculpture that measures some 40 feet (12.286) meters long. Four years in the making, the tree carving is based on a famous painting called “Along the River During the Qingming Festival,” which is a historical holiday reserved to celebrate past ancestors that falls on the 104th day after the winter solstice. On November 14th the Guinness World Records arrived in Fuzhou, Fujian Province where the piece is currently on display to declare it the longest continuous wooden sculpture in the world. You can see many more photos over on China News. (via Shanghaist)

https://theinspirationgrid.com/surreal-paintings-by-david-lawrence/

Surreal Paintings by David Lawrence

Published Jan 8, 2020

Intriguing creations by David Lawrence, a surrealist artist based in Bath, England.More art on the grid Visit his website

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On this edition for Saturday, January 11, Iran says the downing of a Ukrainian passenger plane last week was “human error,” an influx of migrants attempting to head to the U.S. are stuck in limbo in Mexico amid shifting immigration policies, and neuroscientist Daniel Levitin explores how to age successfully. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

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Scientists predict climate change will displace more than 180 million people by 2100 — a crisis of “climate migration” the world isn’t ready for, says disaster recovery lawyer and Louisiana native Colette Pichon Battle. In this passionate, lyrical talk, she urges us to radically restructure the economic and social systems that are driving climate migration — and caused it in the first place — and shares how we can cultivate collective resilience, better prepare before disaster strikes and advance human rights for all.

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Colette Pichon Battle · Climate justice and human rights lawyer

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This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

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https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/to-stop-wildlife-crime-conservationists-ask-why-people-poach/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=today-in-science&utm_content=link&utm_term=2020-01-10_top-stories&spMailingID=62528901&spUserID=NDQwNDA3NDcwNDMzS0&spJobID=1801330883&spReportId=MTgwMTMzMDg4MwS2

Scientific American: To Stop Wildlife Crime, Conservationists Ask Why People Poach

A novel study in Nepal shines light on why people commit wildlife crime and how others might be dissuaded from doing so in the future

By Rachel Nuwer on January 10, 2020

To Stop Wildlife Crime, Conservationists Ask Why People Poach

An Indian one-horned rhinoceroswalking in Chitwan National Park. Credit: Frank Bienewald Getty Images

Most people imprisoned in Nepal for wildlife crime share two things in common: they did not understand the seriousness of their offense, and they had little conception of how profoundly it would impact not only their lives but also the lives of their families. In interviews with more than 100 people convicted of illegally killing or trapping wildlife, researchers found some lost their businesses and land following their imprisonment. A dozen men’s wives left them. Many respondents’ children had to drop out of school, and family members of some took jobs in other countries to survive. One man’s daughter found herself unable to marry because of the stigma of his crime, and another said his mother committed suicide out of shame.

“People really underestimate the risk of getting arrested and all of the social harm that comes from that punishment,” says Kumar Paudel, who led the research and is co-founder and director of Greenhood Nepal, a science-driven nonprofit organization that focuses on the human dimensions of conservation. He is also a graduate student in conservation leadership at the University of Cambridge.

Paudel and his colleagues uncovered these gaps in awareness of the punishments for poaching as part of an effort to better understand the motivations of, and impacts on, the people who are arrested and prosecuted for wildlife crime. Such information is critical for designing effective deterrent strategies yet is often lacking, despite the hundreds of millions of dollars governments and nonprofits have poured into combatting the illegal wildlife trade worldwide.

The researchers also took their findings, published Friday in Conservation Science and Practice, a step further: they teamed up with a well-known local musician to create awareness-raising songs that share key messages from their study. They hope this effort will ultimately benefit both people and wildlife. “I don’t think scientists should wait for decision makers to come and read their paper,” Paudel says. “They should find ways to inform policy and undertake conservation interventions on the ground.”

Prakash Gandharva performing “Ban Ko Katha” at Bharatpur, Chitwan, Nepal. Credit: Kumar Paudel

“Full Force” Crime Fighting

Nepal takes its antipoaching efforts very seriously, particularly for charismatic megafauna such as tigers and rhinoceroses, which receive the majority of global conservation funding and attention. Nearly 7,000 military personnel patrol the country’s protected areas, and wildlife-crime-related arrests increased more than eightfold between 2009 and 2014. Official data now report around 2,000 such arrests annually, and these efforts do seem to be helping. Nepal celebrated zero rhino poaching for the first time in 2011 and has repeated that achievement several times since. Yet the possible social harms of the nation’s militarized conservation approach have gone unexplored. “This is a country that’s going full force, but we don’t know who they’re going full force against,” says Jacob Phelps, an environmental social scientist at Lancaster University in England and senior author of the new study.

Paudel, who has worked in conservation in his native Nepal since 2010, wanted to tackle this question to help develop targeted, fairer ways to combat poaching. Starting in 2016, after securing special permission from the government, he visited seven prisons across the country. He persuaded 116 people who had poached primarily rhinos but also tigers, red pandas and other species to speak with him. Paudel says it helped that he came from a similar rural background as most of the interviewees, 99 percent of whom were men.

Their answers offer nuance to experts’ understanding of the problem. Most respondents were from poor backgrounds, but surprisingly, nearly 90 percent of them said they resorted to breaking the law to make some extra money—not to meet basic economic and nutritional needs. “A really popular narrative in conservation is that poor people poach, but this overlooks other motivations by just blaming poverty,” Paudel says. A lack of awareness also factored in the decision to do so, he found. More than 90 percent of the interviewees said they knew wildlife poaching and trade were illegal, but just 30 percent understood the steep penalties involved, such as the possibility of a five- to 15-year prison sentence. Nearly half of the respondents said their imprisonment had negatively impacted their families’ livelihood, their children’s education or both.

Communities near protected areas have been particularly affected. For example, more than 20 percent of inmates in one prison near Chitwan National Park were jailed for wildlife crime, compared with about 3 percent of Nepal’s total prison population. “That’s mind-boggling, especially if you consider that many people are from the same communities that were originally expropriated” from their land to make way for the park, Phelps says. “We’re hitting them twice. That’s a huge social cost.”

Basudev Dhungana, who lives near Chitwan and is former chair of the Mrigakunja Bufferzone User Committee (which works with communities to use park revenue for local development), says he has seen firsthand the impacts described in the study. He knows several people who have been arrested for poaching, most of them heads of families. “Their arrest affects the livelihood of the family and education of their children,” he says. “Further, it affects the family’s prestige and dignity in society, because they are seen as a family of poachers.”

According to Annette Hübschle, a criminologist at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, who was not involved in the Nepal research but has interviewed rhino poachers in South Africa and Mozambique, the study provides “important, novel perspectives” on the motivations, drivers and impacts of people who engage in wildlife crime in Nepal. Yet she would have liked to see a deeper analysis on whether historical injustices, land evictions and political marginalization motivated people to retaliate or seek to reclaim land perceived as unfairly taken from them. Hübschle also wonders whether offenders agree or disagree with antipoaching rules. In southern Africa, for example, some communities contest the illegality of poaching, pointing out that hunting was their right prior to colonization. In Nepal, she says, “future research might want to explore this in more detail.”

Maheshwar Dhakal, joint secretary of Nepal’s Ministry of Forests and Environment, also believes the findings are important for shining a light on the reasons why individuals in the nation poach. While enforcement is necessary to curtail “greedy people who would like to be rich overnight,” he says, education would go a long way toward stopping others who are simply unaware of the seriousness of wildlife crime.

Singing to Stop Poaching

Paudel and Phelps agree that education could make a crucial difference on the ground, and they both say they felt a responsibility to act on their findings. They launched a fellowship program between Greenhood Nepal and Lancaster University to provide more opportunities to young Nepalese conservationists. Paudel also initiated a collaboration with a musician from the Gandharva ethnic group, whose traveling troubadours are famous in Nepal for their sorrowful ballads, played on a stringed instrument called a sarangi. Paudel wrote five songs based on his interviews. In “Shameful Name,” for example, a farmer in prison for poaching recounts how greed led to the loss of his freedom and his family’s dignity and implores the listener not to make the same mistake.

The songs are now available online as music videos and are being played on the radio and performed live in communities across Nepal. Paudel says more than 1,000 people have already seen the performances, and some were moved to tears. “Music is one of the simplest ways to communicate,” he says. “Even illiterate people can understand our songs.”

Dhungana attended a performance and agrees people responded well to it. “We all love the sarangi music,” he says. “This is a simple and an innovative approach to make communities aware of wildlife conservation.” He wonders, though, whether his neighbors will actually retain the songs’ messages over the long term. What’s really needed, he says, is for the government to invest not only in conservation enforcement but also in education and employment opportunities for communities near national parks. “Local people should be empowered to take advantage of the potential for conservation tourism and nature-based enterprises,” Dhungana says. “I think people will poach less if they get significant benefits from conservation.”

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Rachel Nuwer

Rachel Nuwer is a freelance journalist and author of Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking (Da Capo Press, 2018). She lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Credit: Nick Higgins

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