Black Lives Matter, PBS News, DW News, Amanpour and Company, The Washington Post,  The Associated Press and The New York Times

PBS News: June 19 – 21, 2020, Leaders debate police reform,  Atlanta erupts in protest after another black man dies at the hands of police, How Minneapolis is trying to reimagine the future of policing, The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now.- Tulsa Public Schools, and Jim Crow of the North – Full-Length Documentary – Premiered Feb 25, 2019 – TPT Originals

 DW News: Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, fails to draw large crowd

 Amanpour and Company: Evangelical Reverend Robert Schenck: Trump “Using Bible as a Prop”

 The Washington Post: Must Reads: Why it matters that Trump chose Tulsa

 The Associated Press: Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now protest across the US

  The New York Times: Andre D. Wagner – City Summer, Country Summer – A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

PBS NewsHour Weekend June 21, 2020

Jun 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, June 21, President Trump hits the reelection campaign trail despite concerns from health experts, COVID_19 cases surge across the country as states reopen, and parents of Asian-American children fear racism in the classroom as schools plan to reopen in the fall. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 20, 2020

Jun 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, June 20, Attorney General William Barr tries to oust a top U.S. attorney, weeks-long protests over George Floyd’s murder continue around the world, and why the Paycheck Protection Program is failing minority-owned businesses. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 19, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Americans mark the Juneteenth holiday with both celebration and urgent demands for change. Plus: Observing Juneteenth in Tulsa ahead of President Trump’s rally there, Tulsa’s history of violence against Black residents, African reaction to American racial unrest, why some Americans object to wearing face masks, Shields and Brooks and remembering victims of COVID-19. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Officer in Breonna Taylor killing to be fired https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6ytb… Americans observe Juneteenth with calls for racial justice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGKsy… Black Tulsa residents mark Juneteenth with sorrow and hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAnLp… How pandemic, police protests created an ‘alignment’ for racial change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnHTB… How African countries are reacting to American racial unrest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iOso… How wearing a face mask became politically fraught https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDroN… Shields and Brooks on Bolton’s claims, observing Juneteenth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aN5e0… Remembering 5 more victims of the COVID-19 pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNeh_… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Leaders debate police reform

Jun 19, 2020  Washington Week

President Donald Trump will take the stage in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday – his first rally in the era of the novel coronavirus. It comes amid reporting on explosive allegations from the forthcoming book by his former National Security Adviser, John Bolton. The panel also discussed where Washington leaders stand on police reform legislation. Panel: Yamiche Alcindor, White House Correspondent for The PBS NewsHour Geoff Bennett, White House Correspondent for NBC News Josh Dawsey, White House Reporter for The Washington Post Susan Page, Washington Bureau Chief for USA Today Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, fails to draw large crowd | DW News

Jun 21, 2020  DW News

US President Donald Trump has held his first campaign rally in more than three months, addressing a smaller than predicted crowd of supporters at an arena in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Trump took aim at the media, blaming them for the low turnout with talk of violent protests and the dangers of coronavirus. Infections are on the rise in Tulsa, including six staffers on Trump’s advance team who tested positive. While there were some confrontations between Trump supporters and Black Lives Matters protesters, demonstrations outside the venue were peaceful. Both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were scheduled to speak to supporters at an outdoor overflow area. But that part of the rally was abruptly canceled due to low attendance. DW’s Stefan Simons is on the ground in Tulsa. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Trump #Tulsa #UsElections2020

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

Atlanta erupts in protest after another black man dies at the hands of police

Jun 15, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Atlanta has become the new epicenter of a growing campaign for racial justice. Thousands of protesters marched there after the fatal police shooting of Rayshard Brooks on Friday night. Meanwhile, pressure continues to build in Minneapolis for the city to overhaul its police department following the death of George Floyd, which sparked a national social movement. William Brangham reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

How Minneapolis is trying to reimagine the future of policing

Jun 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Since the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, calls have grown for that city to overhaul its police department. Now, the effort to “dismantle the police department as we know it” has gained the support of a majority of city council members. What does that mean in terms of actual policy? Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Evangelical Reverend Robert Schenck: Trump “Using Bible as a Prop” | Amanpour and Company

Jun 16, 2020  Amanpour and Company

White evangelical Christians represent a key support group for President Trump. The Reverend Robert Schenck is a clergyman from this very group. His rhetoric and zeal to shut down abortion clinics helped motivate the 1998 murder of Dr. Barnett Slepian, an OB/GYN in Buffalo, NY. Since then, Rev. Schenck’s soul-searching has led him to a new ideology. Today, he leads an educational nonprofit which takes inspiration from anti-Nazi dissident Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who was executed for plotting against Hitler. Schenck speaks with Michel Martin about the importance of embracing empathy in our time. Originally aired on June 16, 2020. Subscribe to the Amanpour and Company. channel here: https://bit.ly/2EMIkTJ

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now.

Jun 1, 2018   Tulsa Public Schools

REMEMBER “BLACK WALL STREET.” It’s the 97th anniversary of the horrific 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. While much has changed, it’s not enough. Be a part of a better tomorrow; WATCH, LEARN, & SHARE.

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

Jim Crow of the North – Full-Length Documentary

Premiered Feb 25, 2019   TPT Originals

Roots of racial disparities are seen through a new lens in this film that explores the origins of housing segregation in the Minneapolis area. But the story also illustrates how African-American families and leaders resisted this insidious practice, and how Black people built community — within and despite — the red lines that these restrictive covenants created. Dive into more local history: https://tinyurl.com/minnesotahistory. #MNExperienceTPT #MNHistory #tptoriginals See inside our world on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mnexperienc… Become our neighbor on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaExp… Give us a shout on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MNExperienceTPT Discover more Minnesota stories: https://www.tptoriginals.org/

Must Reads: Why it matters that Trump chose Tulsa

The Washington Post <email@washingtonpost.com> 

Sat, Jun 20, 2020

Compelling, ambitious stories you can’t afford to miss.
By T.J. Ortenzi
 Email

DeNeen Brown was sitting across from her father and staring out of the restaurant window as lunch service hummed in a soul food cafe.

It was midday in Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood and Brown, a Post reporter, was in town for a quick visit with her father. She was surprised to see a gleaming new apartment complex and a frozen yogurt shop along the city’s historic Black Wall Street, the epicenter of the Tulsa Race Massacre, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in U.S. history.

In 1921, mobs of white people killed as many as 300 black people and set fires that consumed hundreds of homes and businesses, leaving more than 10,000 African Americans homeless in a place so affluent it was nicknamed Black Wall Street. Witnesses later recounted bodies being dumped into mass graves.

National Guard troops escort unarmed African American men after the massacre. (Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty)

But when Brown looked out the window, she didn’t see any signs of that painful history. Instead, she saw a yoga studio, a burger shop and brand new stadium. And it hit her.

“I thought ‘Oh, my God, Black Wall Street has been gentrified,’” says Brown.

When Brown returned to Washington, she relayed that observation to her editor Lynda Robinson, who suggested there might be something to it. Did Brown want to write about the massacre and the gentrifying neighborhood? She did.

Soon, Brown was on a flight back to Oklahoma. When she told her father what she was working on, he had just the person in mind: a Tulsa city council member who had been pressing the city for answers about what had happened in 1921 and whether mass graves really existed.

Brown discovered that the city’s former mayor had denied requests to excavate the site of a suspected mass grave and reported it out.

In September 2018, Brown’s story was published on the front page of The Washington Post.

The next day, Tulsa’s mayor was meeting with black religious leaders about a new real estate development and a pastor held up a copy of Brown’s front page story and asked about the role the massacre played in the city’s planning.

The mayor agreed to launch a new investigation into the existence of mass graves. Excavations were scheduled to begin in April 2020, but were put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.

And this is the city where President Trump is scheduled to hold his first campaign rally in months.

Read Brown’s coverage of the rally and catch up with her previous reporting about the massacre and possible mass graves.

1. Black leaders in Tulsa are outraged by Trump’s planned rally during a pandemic

The event has drawn outrage from black Tulsans, who say it will stoke tensions during a weekend that celebrates freedom for enslaved black people.

By DeNeen L. Brown ?  Read more »

 

2. An original ‘Juneteenth’ order found in the National Archives

National Archives finds the original hand written Juneteeth order. Proclamation informed last Texas enslaved they were free.

By Michael Ruane ?  Read more »

3. Coronavirus has come to Trump country

After being centered in blue states, cases are now being added faster in red ones.

Analysis ?  By Philip Bump ?  Read more »

“A lot of cycling enthusiasts are on what amounts to a very long detour, returning, eventually, to what they knew the first time they kept their balance on two wheels: A bike is a bike, and every ride is a victory,” he said.

 

The Associated Press    
JUNE 19, 2020 View in Browser

Friday AP Morning

Good morning. In today’s AP Morning Wire:

·         Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now US national action.

·         Atlanta police call out sick to protest murder charges in shooting.

·         Decline in US virus deaths may reverse; India cases soar.

·         Court rejects Trump bid to end young immigrants’ protections.

TAMER FAKAHANY
DEPUTY DIRECTOR – GLOBAL NEWS COORDINATION, LONDON

The Rundown
AP PHOTO/CHRIS PIZZELLO
Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now protest across the US

In any other year, Juneteenth, the holiday celebrating the day in 1865 that all enslaved black people learned they had been freed from bondage, would be marked by African American families across the nation with a parade or a community festival.

But today, Juneteenth 2020 will be a day of protest in many places. From coast to coast, celebrations will include marches and demonstrations of civil disobedience.

And like the nationwide protests that followed the recent deaths of black men and women in Minnesota, Kentucky and Georgia at the hands of white police, Juneteenth celebrations are likely to be strikingly more multiracial this year, Aaron Morrison and Kat Stafford report.

One black Army veteran told AP he will be treating “Juneteenth with the same fanfare as the Fourth of July or Memorial Day” for the first time this year.

AP Explains: Juneteenth commemorates when the last enslaved African Americans learned they were free 155 years ago. 2020 may be the year it reaches a new decisive moment of epoch-making recognition.

Atlanta Police: Officers have called out sick to protest the filing of murder charges against a white officer who shot Rayshard Brooks in the back and kicked him as he lay mortally wounded on the ground. The interim chief told the AP in an interview that members of the force feel abandoned amid protests demanding massive changes to policing.

An interview with Brooks, conducted four months before he was killed, has emerged. Reconnect, a company that focuses on fighting incarceration and addiction, interviewed him about the year he spent in jail. Brooks said the criminal justice system treats the people incarcerated within it like “animals.”

Trump Poll: A new poll from The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that Americans are deeply unhappy about the state of their country. The survey also reveals that a majority think President Trump is exacerbating tensions in a moment of national crisis.

Klobuchar-Biden: Amy Klobuchar is dropping out of vice presidential contention and urging Democrat Joe Biden to select a woman of color instead. The Minnesota senator said that she called the presumptive presidential nominee and made the suggestion. She says it would be a step Biden could take to help “heal this nation.”

School Curriculum: A national conversation on racial injustice is bringing new scrutiny to how African American history is taught in schools around the country. There is no national curriculum or set of standards for teaching black history in America. Only a small number of states, including Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi and New York, have laws requiring that black history be taught in public schools.

Confederate Monument: As midnight approached on the eve of Juneteenth, the obelisk glorifying the Lost Cause was laid on its side and slid to a waiting truck in Decatur, Georgia. The figure had been a flashpoint for protests in the city after the police killing of George Floyd, and was often vandalized and marked by graffiti. It was removed by crane from the town square near Atlanta amid cheers from the watching crowd.

Hollywood: As protests erupted across the country, every major entertainment company in Hollywood issued statements of support for the black community. But as unanimous as that show of solidarity was, the movie industry has a past — and present — to reckon with. Hollywood’s record in diversity and inclusion has improved in recent years, but it still lags behind the population.

Follow all of AP’s Racial Injustice coverage here.

The New York Times: Andre D. Wagner – City Summer, Country Summer – A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

City Summer, Country Summer

A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

Photographs by Andre D. Wagner

Text by Kiese Laymon

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Black boys from Mississippi know the Black boys from New York. When we were young, their parents sent them down south one summer. We were as afraid of calling them beautiful as we were of calling them by their real names.

If they were Chaka, Marcus, Stephon, Akil or Damon, we called them New York. Whether we were from Jackson, Memphis, Birmingham or Atlanta, they called us country. They were quick. We were fast. We were strong. They were tough. They talked with their hands. We listened with our chests. We were singular people — New York and I — but we were also representations of actual distinct places, and every meaty assumption that those two places hold.

We were Mississippi Black boys visiting Grandmama. They were New York Black boys visiting Mama Lara. All of us were they. All of us were them. By the end of one Saturday in the summer, New York Black boys and Mississippi Black boys wandered through woods, and woulds and coulds, through the kind of freeing friendship that is love.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

This was five years before that stranger at Battlefield Park called us slurs, rhyming triggers and figures, with no fathers at home; 11 years before the police placed guns to our head for throwing invisible rocks of crack out of windows; six months after our teacher threatened to hold us back because we refused to write ourselves out of the assignments they gave; and two weeks after we tried to humiliate Octavia in the lunchroom to make ourselves feel harder, impenetrable, like men.

Every weekday summer morning, when Grandmama went to work at the chicken plant, we jumped off the porch of her pink shotgun house and sprinted 20 yards to Mama Lara’s tiny off-white house. Nothing separated Grandmama and Mama Lara houses, other than the largest, greenest garden in Forest, Miss.

This Saturday morning, we were out on Grandmama’s porch getting our cardboard sled ready to slide down the underpass on Highway 35 when New York walked up on the porch shirtless, wearing what looked like off-brand Buddies and fluorescent wristbands.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

On the way to the underpass, we walked through the woods.

New York asked why some places in the woods were cooler than a fan, but not cool as air-conditioning.

We laughed, thinking New York was joking.

New York wandered away from us and walked closer to the edge of the woods. You good? we asked them.

I’m ready to go home, New York said.

They jumped the ditch and headed back toward Mama Lara’s house. We tried to make ourselves laugh because laughing was how we worried, how we consented to love and how we said I’d like you to love me.

New York did not laugh.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

They stopped next to my grandmother’s side of the garden and just watched the sunflowers, the greens, the black-eyed peas, beans, the cucumbers, the green tomatoes, the gangly stalks of corn twice as tall as any of us.

What you run up on? we asked New York. A snake? Copperhead?

New York ignored us and walked into the garden until we couldn’t see his fluorescent wristbands or the wet brown of his chest.

We followed, looking for New York.

Where you at, we asked. You need to stop playing. My grandmama don’t like when folks be messing in her garden.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

We were behind the house when we heard, “Marco?” coming from the front of right of the garden.

Polo, we said.

Marco?

There they go over there, we whispered to one another.

Polo!

Marco?

Where this fool at?

Marco?

Polo!

I think they bread ain’t all the way done.

Polo!

Polo?

Marco!

We looked down every row in that garden looking for New York until we got to the front of the garden, on Mama Lara’s side.

“Marco?” we heard from where we’d just left.

Polo?

Polo?

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

We walked back to the middle of the garden afraid that New York had been taken by Wayne Williams, white folks or white folks’ god.

Something in those central Mississippi woods reminded New York of the language of home. Being reminded of home, so far away from the bodegas, the apartments that scraped the clouds, the fire hydrants and actual blocks, terrified or satisfied New York. Whether it was absolute fear or exquisite satisfaction, wandering through the cool spots in those Mississippi woods was too much for New York’s body.

We didn’t speak this.

New York didn’t speak this.

But our bodies knew.

In the middle of the garden, we felt a forceful wind getting closer to us and when we turned around, New York tackled us and laughed so hard as we all tumbled on a row of my grandmother’s butter beans.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

On the ground of that garden, covered in vegetables and dirt, coated in so much laughter, I want to say that the Mississippi and New York in our Black boy bodies were indistinguishable from each other. That would be a lie. We absolutely contrasted. But the sight, tastes and smells of our contrasts felt like safeness.

Not safety.

Safeness. And safeness sounded like love. When we stood up, the rain dropped thicker.

Grandmama and Mama Lara were standing on the outside of the garden, pillars of our safeness, longing for more safeness themselves, each spraying us with water from their water hoses. “If y’all don’t get y’all behind from out our garden,” Mama Lara said, laughing, “we know something.”

We all knew something, too, and what we knew was more than short trailers and shotgun houses, more than magnolias and pines trees, more than semi-trucks filled with chickens headed to be slaughtered at the plant. We knew another way for Black boys in America to say I love you and I am afraid. And we kept saying I love you and I am afraid in as many different ways as we could that Saturday in the summer until it was time for New York to go home.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Andre D. Wagner is a photographer working in New York City. These images were taken between 2015 and 2020. Kiese Laymon is the author of “Heavy: An American Memoir” and the novel “Long Division.”

The Look is a column that examines identity through a visual-first lens. This year, the column is focused on the relationship between American culture and politics in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election, produced by Eve Lyons and Tanner Curtis.

A version of this article appears in print on June 7, 2020, Section ST, Page 4 of the New York edition. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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