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PBS News: August 13-14, 2020

NBC News: Nightly News Full Broadcast (August 14th, 2020)

MSNBC: Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: August 13 |Aug 14, 2020, and Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: August 12 | Aug 13, 2020

Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

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The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates – The deadliest day since May, August 13, 2020

The New York Times:  The Morning, August 13, 2020

Bored Panda: People Are Sharing “Do’s And Don’t’s” From 1918-1920 During The Spanish Flu, It Shows How History Repeats Itself

PBS NewsHour full episode, August 14, 2020

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Aug 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the U.S. Postal Service warns state officials it may not be able to deliver all mail-in ballots in time for the November election. Plus: A brutal crackdown in Belarus, NBA commissioner Adam Silver on the league’s playoffs, pandemic summer jobs, Americans’ economic struggles, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and remembering victims of the coronavirus. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: 3 wildfires rage in Southern California https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mt_e0… Detained protesters in Belarus tell of government torture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=filmp… Why USPS is warning of issues with ballot delivery this fall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTySo… NBA commissioner Adam Silver on playing in a pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIikn… The pandemic’s unexpected summer jobs for young people https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAikF… Voices of Americans suffering the pandemic’s economic harm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzWOr… Shields and Brooks on Kamala Harris, mail-in voting worries https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_97oj… Remembering 5 lives lost to the coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOyUz… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 13, 2020

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Aug 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, a conversation with Dr. Anthony Fauci about the current state of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States. Plus: An agreement between Israel and the United Arab Emirates, analyzing the deal with National Security Advisor Robert O’Brien, funding for the U.S. Postal Service to support increased voting by mail and the perilous migrant journey through the Darien Gap. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Fauci: Despite election, science won’t be politicized https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zi_3s… News Wrap: Firefighters battle new Southern California blaze https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsAMT… Is Israel-UAE deal a ‘seismic shift’ in the Middle East? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kjsm… Robert O’Brien on ‘very courageous’ deal between Israel, UAE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nudnU… How election officials and USPS handle mail-in ballots https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5jia… U.S. immigration policy can seal fate of Darien Gap migrants https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsgaE… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

NBC Nightly News Broadcast (Full) – August 14th, 2020 | NBC Nightly News

Aug 14, 2020  NBC News

U.S. Postal Service warns mail-in ballots may be too late, President Trump fuels baseless birther theory about Senator Kamala Harris, and inside the plan to open New York’s schools. Watch “NBC Nightly News With Lester Holt” at 6:30 p.m. ET / 5:30 p.m. CT (or check your local listings).

Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: August 13 | MSNBC

Aug 14, 2020  MSNBC

Watch the top news stories and highlights from The Rachel Maddow Show, airing weeknights at 9 p.m. on MSNBC. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news and in-depth analysis of the headlines, as well as informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

Watch Rachel Maddow Highlights: August 12 | MSNBC

Aug 13, 2020  MSNBC

Watch the top news stories and highlights from The Rachel Maddow Show, airing weeknights at 9 p.m. on MSNBC. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news and in-depth analysis of the headlines, as well as informed perspectives. Find video clips and segments from The Rachel Maddow Show, Morning Joe, All In, Last Word, 11th Hour, and more.

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Aug 9, 2020  Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates – The deadliest day since May, August 13, 2020

By Avi Selk
with Angela Fritz
 Email

The latest

The United States recorded the most covid-19 deaths in a single day since mid-May on Wednesday: nearly 1,500 fatalities. 

The toll escalated as a new study found that New York City’s death rate in the first two months of its outbreak rivaled that of the infamous 1918 flu pandemic. “For anyone who doesn’t understand the magnitude of what we’re living through, this pandemic is comparable in its effect on mortality to what everyone agrees is the previous worst pandemic,” said Jeremy S. Faust, an emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who led the research team.

In extraordinary comments to Fox News, President Trump said he is trying to prevent the U.S. Postal Service from delivering millions of mail-in ballots to voters by holding up $25 billion in emergency funding for the agency. “They need that money in order to make the post office work, so it can take all of these millions and millions of ballots,” Trump said. 

The cash-strapped mail service is already experiencing days-long delays after Trump’s new postmaster general implemented new policies including a ban on overtime pay. Congressional Democrats have insisted on emergency funding for the agency in their negotiations over a new stimulus bill, which collapsed Thursday as the Senate adjourned for the next three and a half weeks. Many health experts say mail-in voting is the safest way for people to vote in November, but Trump has baselessly attacked efforts to expand it as a plot to steal the election. The president’s likely opponent, Joe Biden, called Trump’s latest comments “an assault on our democracy and economy by a desperate man.”

The Supreme Court ruled on pandemic-related voter relief for the first time Thursdaydenying a GOP request that would have required a witness to be present when Rhode Island voters cast absentee ballots.

About 960,000 workers filed for unemployment insurance last week — the first time new claims dropped below 1 million since the outbreak intensified in March.

Hollywood is getting back to work after a five-month hiatus, but its fictional worlds will likely be transformed and restricted by the pandemic. “Crowd scenes are a no-go,” our business desk wrote. “Real-world locations will be limited. On-screen romance will be less common, sometimes restricted to actors who have off-screen relationships.”

Other important news

A Georgia high school made famous by viral photos of barefaced crowds in its hallways on the first day of class will remain closed through the week after 35 people there tested positive for covid-19.

Popular, seemingly high-tech masks with exhalation vents and valves don’t actually protect people from covid-19, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned.

Live updates and more

Track deaths and confirmed cases in the U.S. and across the world. 

Where states reopened and cases spiked.

Post reporters are publishing live dispatches nearly 24 hours a day.

Read the latest about what’s happening in the D.C. area. 

Submit a question and we may answer it in a future story or newsletter.

Your questions, answered

“Could you please discuss the cleaning of masks and the use of masks with filters? Is the recommendation to wash after each use to kill the virus or eliminate the wearer’s own germs? Can surgical masks be washed without ruining their effectiveness?” — Katrinka in Maryland

Numerous studies have shown that a simple cloth mask — without valves, vents or filters — is ideal for controlling the spread of the coronavirus outside health-care settings. In updated guidance, the CDC specifically warns against wearing masks with exhalation valves or vents, even with disposable filters, because “this type of mask does not prevent the person wearing the mask from transmitting COVID-19 to others.”

The truth is that any mask that advertises “breathability” or “better airflow” is likely allowing viral particles through. A mask made up of a few layers of cotton fabric is still the best way to control the spread of the coronavirus.

In terms of cleaning, Post wellness reporter Allyson Chiu published a story today that addresses frequently asked questions about how to take care of your face masks.

What are the general guidelines for proper mask care?

For cloth masks, which have exploded in popularity in recent months, all three experts interviewed say daily washings are a must.

“Treat your mask like your underwear,” said Jade Flinn, a nurse educator for the Biocontainment Unit at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “You want to change it every day.”

Can N95s or surgical masks be washed?

Unlike the cloth variety, these masks cannot be effectively sanitized by a standard washing, said Elizabeth Mullans, a board-certified dermatologist based in Houston.

“Hospitals may be able to disinfect them, but there’s no way that the average person could go ahead and disinfect them,” Mullans said.

How do I wash my cloth mask?

The widely recommended method, which has also been promoted by the CDC, is simple: Throw the dirty mask in warm or hot water with your regular laundry. Health experts suggest using a fragrance-free,

hypoallergenic detergent if your mask has caused skin irritations such as increased acne or rash.

Can sunlight disinfect a mask?

“What I’m seeing is that folks that put it in the sun sometimes are thinking that they are decontaminating the mask,” said Michael Knight, an assistant professor of medicine at George Washington University. “Yes, UV light comes from the sun, but it’s not in a consistent amount to say that ‘yes, this has been decontaminated.’ ”

In the case of surgical or N95 masks, sunlight could be a bad thing, Flinn said, because it can degrade the special materials in some masks.

FAQ: How to care for your face mask (and why you shouldn’t hang it from your rear-view mirror)

Today’s top reads

Find more stories, analysis and op-eds about the outbreak on our coronavirus page, including:

  • How to give kids a sense of routine and stability in a school year that is anything but normal
  • A running list of the college football teams and conferences that have canceled their seasons
  • Britain says it overcounted its coronavirus death toll
·         We are tracking 200 experimental vaccines aimed at ending the pandemic. These are the top coronavirus vaccines to watch.

·         By Washington Post staff ?  Read more »

For dogs, the pandemic means more walks but new anxieties

By Karin Brulliard ?  Read more »

Thanks to coronavirus and Zoom, we’re looking at the end stages of college as a commodity 

Opinion ?  By Megan McArdle ?  Read more »  

Developments on the other side of the world show how the pandemic is altering university life

By John Buckley ?  Read more »

The New York Times   The Morning            August 13, 2020
By Sanam Yar and Ian Prasad Philbrick
Good morning. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their debut as running mates. The British economy sunk into its deepest recession on record. And the QAnon conspiracy theory has found its way to the mainstream.
The rise of QAnon

A man wearing a QAnon shirt at a pro-police rally in Brooklyn on Sunday.Stephanie Keith/Reuters
Over three years, the far-right conspiracy theory QAnon has spread from the outskirts of the internet into the mainstream. And by next year, it will most likely make its way into Congress: A QAnon supporter is almost sure to be elected after winning a Republican House primary runoff in Georgia this week.
It’s a remarkable rise for a group that believes in, among other things, a ring of Satan-worshiping, child-trafficking criminals led by prominent Democrats. We spoke with our colleague Kevin Roose, who has covered QAnon extensively, to get a sense of how the movement expanded its reach.
Social media platforms are a big part of it. “It’s still very fringe in terms of its ideology, but not in terms of its scale,” Kevin said. “We’ve seen QAnon Facebook groups swell to hundreds of thousands of members, and they are routinely driving conversations on social media.”
This week, NBC News reported that an internal Facebook investigation found thousands of QAnon-supporting groups and pages with millions of members and followers. Twitter permanently suspended thousands of accounts associated with the movement last month. And TikTok has blocked searches for QAnon-related hashtags.
But these companies have “realized belatedly that this is a major problem,” Kevin said. “The horse has left the barn.”
The pandemic, which led many people to spend more time online, has also bolstered the movement, Kevin said: “Our social interactions are mostly taking place online, and that means that the communities that have power online, including QAnon, are a much bigger part of the discourse.”
Much of its growth also comes from its ability to attach itself to, and then absorb, both legitimate causes and “every major conspiracy theory of the past 50 years,” Kevin said.
Its followers are “deliberately attempting to radicalize new groups of people,” he noted, by infiltrating Facebook groups focused on vaccine safety, parenting, and natural food and health.
“These are people who might be skeptical of mainstream science or authorities,” Kevin said, “and they’re inserting their messages to those communities. So that’s what people need to be made aware of — these aren’t people hanging out in the dark corners of the internet anymore.”
FOUR MORE BIG STORIES
1.     Biden-Harris ticket makes its debut

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, in their first public event together on Wednesday.Erin Schaff/The New York Times
Joe Biden and Kamala Harris made their first public appearance as running mates on the Democratic ticket in Wilmington, Del., yesterday afternoon. The event included sharp criticisms of President Trump’s handling of the coronavirus and the economic crisis. You can watch highlights of their joint appearance in a Times video.
Reactions from both sides:
  • Progressives, many of whom had disregarded Harris as part of the Democratic establishment, proclaimed their support for the ticket on Wednesday and reiterated that removing Trump from office was their priority.
  • Conservative media figures wasted no time hurling personal attacks at Harris, questioning her racial identity, mispronouncing her name and mocking her voice.
  • Trump called Harris “nasty” at least four times on Tuesday, wrote Katie Rogers, a turn to his preferred misogynistic trope. He also called her the “meanest, most horrible, most disrespectful” member of the Senate.
2. The pandemic’s true toll
The number of U.S. residents who have died since March is now more than 200,000 higher than it would be in a normal year, a Times analysis found. Those “excess deaths” most likely reflect the true cost of the pandemic — and suggest that the official death toll may be a substantial undercount.

By The New York Times | Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
As the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. has moved south from its early epicenter in New York, so have the unusual patterns in deaths from all causes. Many of the recent coronavirus cases and deaths in the South may have been driven largely by reopenings and relaxed social-distancing restrictions.
In other virus developments:
3. Police raid Hong Kong newspaper
Police officers this week raided the newsroom of Apple Daily, Hong Kong’s biggest pro-democracy newspaper, part of a crackdown on free expression under a national security law the Chinese government imposed on the semiautonomous region in June. Jimmy Lai, the paper’s founder, and four executives face possible charges under the new law.
The raid led to a show of support from Hong Kong residents: The paper said it printed 550,000 copies on Tuesday, nearly eight times a regular run. But some reporters worry about its survival in Hong Kong’s newly restrictive climate.
4. American guns invade the U.K.

The National Ballistics Intelligence Service in Birmingham, England.Andrew Testa for The New York Times
Gun deaths in Britain, while still rare, have risen over the last few years. One reason, British authorities say, is an influx of firearms being smuggled from the United States.
At least 782 American guns have been discovered by British police since 2017, data obtained by The Times shows. Some of them can be traced to loosely regulated gun fairs in states like Florida.
“Weapons that don’t matter in the United States, because America deals in millions, routinely have an enormous impact in the U.K., because of the extraordinary scarcity of handguns,” one expert said.
Here’s what else is happening
  • Many children receiving chemotherapy in Beirut now have nowhere to turn for treatment after an explosion last week destroyed hospitals and wiped out medicine stockpiles.
  • Israel said it had thwarted a cyberattack by a North Korea-linked hacking group. Security researchers said the hackers were successful and stole classified data that could be shared with Iran.
  • Sumner Redstone, the billionaire entrepreneur who built a media empire encompassing CBS and Viacom, died in Los Angeles on Tuesday. He was 97.
  • Three people were arrested on charges that they threatened and tried to bribe women who accused the singer R. Kelly of sexual abuse, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.
  • The rapper Kanye West privately met with Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law, in Colorado last weekend. West has filed petitions to get on the November ballots for president in several states in an apparent bid to siphon support from Biden.
  • Lives Lived: Matt Herron, a magazine photojournalist, made one of his most memorable shots in 1965: In it, a white Mississippi police officer tries to seize a small American flag being waved by a Black 5-year-old; next to them, another officer holds a confiscated protester’s sign reading, “No More Police Brutality.” Herron died at 89.
If you enjoy The Morning, please consider subscribing to The Times. Subscriber support helps make work like this possible.
IDEA OF THE DAY: CAN TRUMP COME BACK?
Less than 12 weeks from Election Day, Trump trails Biden by about eight percentage points nationally. Is there still time for him to turn things around?
Yes, some observers say. The polls will most likely tighten as Election Day approaches, and FiveThirtyEight’s forecast currently gives Trump a 28 percent chance to win. Trump could exploit Biden’s long record on trade issues or the Iraq War to close the gap. Or he could try to engineer an October surprise involving a coronavirus vaccine.
Factors outside the president’s direct control could also help him, Ross Douthat, a Times Op-Ed columnist, argued recently. The pandemic or the economy could improve, or public opinion could turn against recent racial-justice protests.
Others think a comeback is unlikely. Given Trump’s unpopularity and the state of the economy, other poll-watchers are skeptical that he can make up much ground. Undecided voters appear less willing to back Trump this year than in 2016. And voters in some states can begin voting as soon as next month.
“The only way Trump could even conceivably eke out a win on Election Day would be through voter suppression on an improbably (perhaps impossibly) massive scale,” The Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson wrote.

Bored Panda: People Are Sharing “Do’s And Don’t’s” From 1918-1920 During The Spanish Flu, It Shows How History Repeats Itself

Rokas Laurinavi?ius and Mindaugas Bal?iauskas

History tends to repeat itself, and even though COVID-19 is not the worst flu whatsoever, we as a society seem to be making the same mistakes we did in 1918 during the Spanish Flu outbreak.

Talya Varga turned to Twitter to share an old newspaper article allegedly showing a list of “do’s and don’t’s” for preventing the Spanish Flu. Sadly, almost all of the entries look painfully familiar.

“Wear a mask,” reads the first. “Wash your hands before each meal”, says another. Not to mention the one that urges to “not disregard the advice of a specialist just because you do not understand.”

After Varga highlighted the issue, her tweet immediately went viral, sparking an important discussion.

Image credits: TalyaVarga

Image credits: TalyaVarga

The 1918 influenza pandemic is one of the most severe pandemics in recent history.

It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is no universal consensus regarding where the virus came from, it spread worldwide from 1918-1919.

In the US, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918.

Some estimates suggest that as many as 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was considered to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

As the tweet started to go viral, more and more people began responding to it

Image credits: Noname06401912

Social distancing saved thousands of American lives during the Spanish flu outbreak. Philadelphia, for example, detected its first case of a deadly, fast-spreading strain of influenza on September 17, 1918. The very next day, in an attempt to halt the virus’ spread, city officials launched a campaign against coughing, spitting, and sneezing in public. Good start. 10 days later, however, despite the potential epidemic, the city hosted a parade that 200,000 people attended.

Flu cases continued to climb until finally, on October 3, schools, churches, theaters, and public gathering spaces were closed.

Two weeks after the first reported case, there were at least 20,000 of them.

For comparison, when a case popped up in St. Louis, the city shut down most public gatherings and quarantined victims in their homes just two days later.

By the end of the pandemic, the death rate in St. Louis was less than half of the rate in Philadelphia.

About 358 people per 100,000 died in St Louis, while there were about 748 deaths per 100,000 people in Philadelphia.

It’s pretty saddening to see that while technology and medicine have made huge leaps since the beginning of the 20th century, our mindsets have somewhat remained the same, and we can’t come together to fight this microscopic yet very powerful enemy.

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Rokas Laurinavi?ius

Writer, BoredPanda staff

Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 235 million people have read the posts he’s written, which is probably more than he could count to.

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Black Lives Matter, PBS News, DW News, Amanpour and Company, The Washington Post,  The Associated Press and The New York Times

PBS News: June 19 – 21, 2020, Leaders debate police reform,  Atlanta erupts in protest after another black man dies at the hands of police, How Minneapolis is trying to reimagine the future of policing, The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now.- Tulsa Public Schools, and Jim Crow of the North – Full-Length Documentary – Premiered Feb 25, 2019 – TPT Originals

 DW News: Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, fails to draw large crowd

 Amanpour and Company: Evangelical Reverend Robert Schenck: Trump “Using Bible as a Prop”

 The Washington Post: Must Reads: Why it matters that Trump chose Tulsa

 The Associated Press: Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now protest across the US

  The New York Times: Andre D. Wagner – City Summer, Country Summer – A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

PBS NewsHour Weekend June 21, 2020

Jun 21, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, June 21, President Trump hits the reelection campaign trail despite concerns from health experts, COVID_19 cases surge across the country as states reopen, and parents of Asian-American children fear racism in the classroom as schools plan to reopen in the fall. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode June 20, 2020

Jun 20, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, June 20, Attorney General William Barr tries to oust a top U.S. attorney, weeks-long protests over George Floyd’s murder continue around the world, and why the Paycheck Protection Program is failing minority-owned businesses. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from Florida. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 19, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 19, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, Americans mark the Juneteenth holiday with both celebration and urgent demands for change. Plus: Observing Juneteenth in Tulsa ahead of President Trump’s rally there, Tulsa’s history of violence against Black residents, African reaction to American racial unrest, why some Americans object to wearing face masks, Shields and Brooks and remembering victims of COVID-19. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Officer in Breonna Taylor killing to be fired https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6ytb… Americans observe Juneteenth with calls for racial justice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGKsy… Black Tulsa residents mark Juneteenth with sorrow and hope https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAnLp… How pandemic, police protests created an ‘alignment’ for racial change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnHTB… How African countries are reacting to American racial unrest https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iOso… How wearing a face mask became politically fraught https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDroN… Shields and Brooks on Bolton’s claims, observing Juneteenth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aN5e0… Remembering 5 more victims of the COVID-19 pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNeh_… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Leaders debate police reform

Jun 19, 2020  Washington Week

President Donald Trump will take the stage in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday – his first rally in the era of the novel coronavirus. It comes amid reporting on explosive allegations from the forthcoming book by his former National Security Adviser, John Bolton. The panel also discussed where Washington leaders stand on police reform legislation. Panel: Yamiche Alcindor, White House Correspondent for The PBS NewsHour Geoff Bennett, White House Correspondent for NBC News Josh Dawsey, White House Reporter for The Washington Post Susan Page, Washington Bureau Chief for USA Today Watch the latest full show and Extra here: https://pbs.org/washingtonweek Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2ZEPJNs Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonweek Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonweek

Trump rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, fails to draw large crowd | DW News

Jun 21, 2020  DW News

US President Donald Trump has held his first campaign rally in more than three months, addressing a smaller than predicted crowd of supporters at an arena in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Trump took aim at the media, blaming them for the low turnout with talk of violent protests and the dangers of coronavirus. Infections are on the rise in Tulsa, including six staffers on Trump’s advance team who tested positive. While there were some confrontations between Trump supporters and Black Lives Matters protesters, demonstrations outside the venue were peaceful. Both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were scheduled to speak to supporters at an outdoor overflow area. But that part of the rally was abruptly canceled due to low attendance. DW’s Stefan Simons is on the ground in Tulsa. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ?Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ?Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ?Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Trump #Tulsa #UsElections2020

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

Atlanta erupts in protest after another black man dies at the hands of police

Jun 15, 2020   PBS NewsHour

Atlanta has become the new epicenter of a growing campaign for racial justice. Thousands of protesters marched there after the fatal police shooting of Rayshard Brooks on Friday night. Meanwhile, pressure continues to build in Minneapolis for the city to overhaul its police department following the death of George Floyd, which sparked a national social movement. William Brangham reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

How Minneapolis is trying to reimagine the future of policing

Jun 15, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Since the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers, calls have grown for that city to overhaul its police department. Now, the effort to “dismantle the police department as we know it” has gained the support of a majority of city council members. What does that mean in terms of actual policy? Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Evangelical Reverend Robert Schenck: Trump “Using Bible as a Prop” | Amanpour and Company

Jun 16, 2020  Amanpour and Company

White evangelical Christians represent a key support group for President Trump. The Reverend Robert Schenck is a clergyman from this very group. His rhetoric and zeal to shut down abortion clinics helped motivate the 1998 murder of Dr. Barnett Slepian, an OB/GYN in Buffalo, NY. Since then, Rev. Schenck’s soul-searching has led him to a new ideology. Today, he leads an educational nonprofit which takes inspiration from anti-Nazi dissident Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who was executed for plotting against Hitler. Schenck speaks with Michel Martin about the importance of embracing empathy in our time. Originally aired on June 16, 2020. Subscribe to the Amanpour and Company. channel here: https://bit.ly/2EMIkTJ

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

The Tulsa Race Massacre; Then and now.

Jun 1, 2018   Tulsa Public Schools

REMEMBER “BLACK WALL STREET.” It’s the 97th anniversary of the horrific 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. While much has changed, it’s not enough. Be a part of a better tomorrow; WATCH, LEARN, & SHARE.

view-source:https://www.youtube.com/user/PBSNewsHour

Jim Crow of the North – Full-Length Documentary

Premiered Feb 25, 2019   TPT Originals

Roots of racial disparities are seen through a new lens in this film that explores the origins of housing segregation in the Minneapolis area. But the story also illustrates how African-American families and leaders resisted this insidious practice, and how Black people built community — within and despite — the red lines that these restrictive covenants created. Dive into more local history: https://tinyurl.com/minnesotahistory. #MNExperienceTPT #MNHistory #tptoriginals See inside our world on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mnexperienc… Become our neighbor on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MinnesotaExp… Give us a shout on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MNExperienceTPT Discover more Minnesota stories: https://www.tptoriginals.org/

Must Reads: Why it matters that Trump chose Tulsa

The Washington Post <email@washingtonpost.com> 

Sat, Jun 20, 2020

Compelling, ambitious stories you can’t afford to miss.
By T.J. Ortenzi
 Email

DeNeen Brown was sitting across from her father and staring out of the restaurant window as lunch service hummed in a soul food cafe.

It was midday in Tulsa’s Greenwood neighborhood and Brown, a Post reporter, was in town for a quick visit with her father. She was surprised to see a gleaming new apartment complex and a frozen yogurt shop along the city’s historic Black Wall Street, the epicenter of the Tulsa Race Massacre, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in U.S. history.

In 1921, mobs of white people killed as many as 300 black people and set fires that consumed hundreds of homes and businesses, leaving more than 10,000 African Americans homeless in a place so affluent it was nicknamed Black Wall Street. Witnesses later recounted bodies being dumped into mass graves.

National Guard troops escort unarmed African American men after the massacre. (Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty)

But when Brown looked out the window, she didn’t see any signs of that painful history. Instead, she saw a yoga studio, a burger shop and brand new stadium. And it hit her.

“I thought ‘Oh, my God, Black Wall Street has been gentrified,’” says Brown.

When Brown returned to Washington, she relayed that observation to her editor Lynda Robinson, who suggested there might be something to it. Did Brown want to write about the massacre and the gentrifying neighborhood? She did.

Soon, Brown was on a flight back to Oklahoma. When she told her father what she was working on, he had just the person in mind: a Tulsa city council member who had been pressing the city for answers about what had happened in 1921 and whether mass graves really existed.

Brown discovered that the city’s former mayor had denied requests to excavate the site of a suspected mass grave and reported it out.

In September 2018, Brown’s story was published on the front page of The Washington Post.

The next day, Tulsa’s mayor was meeting with black religious leaders about a new real estate development and a pastor held up a copy of Brown’s front page story and asked about the role the massacre played in the city’s planning.

The mayor agreed to launch a new investigation into the existence of mass graves. Excavations were scheduled to begin in April 2020, but were put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.

And this is the city where President Trump is scheduled to hold his first campaign rally in months.

Read Brown’s coverage of the rally and catch up with her previous reporting about the massacre and possible mass graves.

1. Black leaders in Tulsa are outraged by Trump’s planned rally during a pandemic

The event has drawn outrage from black Tulsans, who say it will stoke tensions during a weekend that celebrates freedom for enslaved black people.

By DeNeen L. Brown ?  Read more »

 

2. An original ‘Juneteenth’ order found in the National Archives

National Archives finds the original hand written Juneteeth order. Proclamation informed last Texas enslaved they were free.

By Michael Ruane ?  Read more »

3. Coronavirus has come to Trump country

After being centered in blue states, cases are now being added faster in red ones.

Analysis ?  By Philip Bump ?  Read more »

“A lot of cycling enthusiasts are on what amounts to a very long detour, returning, eventually, to what they knew the first time they kept their balance on two wheels: A bike is a bike, and every ride is a victory,” he said.

 

The Associated Press    
JUNE 19, 2020 View in Browser

Friday AP Morning

Good morning. In today’s AP Morning Wire:

·         Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now US national action.

·         Atlanta police call out sick to protest murder charges in shooting.

·         Decline in US virus deaths may reverse; India cases soar.

·         Court rejects Trump bid to end young immigrants’ protections.

TAMER FAKAHANY
DEPUTY DIRECTOR – GLOBAL NEWS COORDINATION, LONDON

The Rundown
AP PHOTO/CHRIS PIZZELLO
Juneteenth: A day of joy and pain – and now protest across the US

In any other year, Juneteenth, the holiday celebrating the day in 1865 that all enslaved black people learned they had been freed from bondage, would be marked by African American families across the nation with a parade or a community festival.

But today, Juneteenth 2020 will be a day of protest in many places. From coast to coast, celebrations will include marches and demonstrations of civil disobedience.

And like the nationwide protests that followed the recent deaths of black men and women in Minnesota, Kentucky and Georgia at the hands of white police, Juneteenth celebrations are likely to be strikingly more multiracial this year, Aaron Morrison and Kat Stafford report.

One black Army veteran told AP he will be treating “Juneteenth with the same fanfare as the Fourth of July or Memorial Day” for the first time this year.

AP Explains: Juneteenth commemorates when the last enslaved African Americans learned they were free 155 years ago. 2020 may be the year it reaches a new decisive moment of epoch-making recognition.

Atlanta Police: Officers have called out sick to protest the filing of murder charges against a white officer who shot Rayshard Brooks in the back and kicked him as he lay mortally wounded on the ground. The interim chief told the AP in an interview that members of the force feel abandoned amid protests demanding massive changes to policing.

An interview with Brooks, conducted four months before he was killed, has emerged. Reconnect, a company that focuses on fighting incarceration and addiction, interviewed him about the year he spent in jail. Brooks said the criminal justice system treats the people incarcerated within it like “animals.”

Trump Poll: A new poll from The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that Americans are deeply unhappy about the state of their country. The survey also reveals that a majority think President Trump is exacerbating tensions in a moment of national crisis.

Klobuchar-Biden: Amy Klobuchar is dropping out of vice presidential contention and urging Democrat Joe Biden to select a woman of color instead. The Minnesota senator said that she called the presumptive presidential nominee and made the suggestion. She says it would be a step Biden could take to help “heal this nation.”

School Curriculum: A national conversation on racial injustice is bringing new scrutiny to how African American history is taught in schools around the country. There is no national curriculum or set of standards for teaching black history in America. Only a small number of states, including Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi and New York, have laws requiring that black history be taught in public schools.

Confederate Monument: As midnight approached on the eve of Juneteenth, the obelisk glorifying the Lost Cause was laid on its side and slid to a waiting truck in Decatur, Georgia. The figure had been a flashpoint for protests in the city after the police killing of George Floyd, and was often vandalized and marked by graffiti. It was removed by crane from the town square near Atlanta amid cheers from the watching crowd.

Hollywood: As protests erupted across the country, every major entertainment company in Hollywood issued statements of support for the black community. But as unanimous as that show of solidarity was, the movie industry has a past — and present — to reckon with. Hollywood’s record in diversity and inclusion has improved in recent years, but it still lags behind the population.

Follow all of AP’s Racial Injustice coverage here.

The New York Times: Andre D. Wagner – City Summer, Country Summer – A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

City Summer, Country Summer

A photographer and a writer separately explore black boyhood and the season.

Photographs by Andre D. Wagner

Text by Kiese Laymon

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Black boys from Mississippi know the Black boys from New York. When we were young, their parents sent them down south one summer. We were as afraid of calling them beautiful as we were of calling them by their real names.

If they were Chaka, Marcus, Stephon, Akil or Damon, we called them New York. Whether we were from Jackson, Memphis, Birmingham or Atlanta, they called us country. They were quick. We were fast. We were strong. They were tough. They talked with their hands. We listened with our chests. We were singular people — New York and I — but we were also representations of actual distinct places, and every meaty assumption that those two places hold.

We were Mississippi Black boys visiting Grandmama. They were New York Black boys visiting Mama Lara. All of us were they. All of us were them. By the end of one Saturday in the summer, New York Black boys and Mississippi Black boys wandered through woods, and woulds and coulds, through the kind of freeing friendship that is love.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

This was five years before that stranger at Battlefield Park called us slurs, rhyming triggers and figures, with no fathers at home; 11 years before the police placed guns to our head for throwing invisible rocks of crack out of windows; six months after our teacher threatened to hold us back because we refused to write ourselves out of the assignments they gave; and two weeks after we tried to humiliate Octavia in the lunchroom to make ourselves feel harder, impenetrable, like men.

Every weekday summer morning, when Grandmama went to work at the chicken plant, we jumped off the porch of her pink shotgun house and sprinted 20 yards to Mama Lara’s tiny off-white house. Nothing separated Grandmama and Mama Lara houses, other than the largest, greenest garden in Forest, Miss.

This Saturday morning, we were out on Grandmama’s porch getting our cardboard sled ready to slide down the underpass on Highway 35 when New York walked up on the porch shirtless, wearing what looked like off-brand Buddies and fluorescent wristbands.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

On the way to the underpass, we walked through the woods.

New York asked why some places in the woods were cooler than a fan, but not cool as air-conditioning.

We laughed, thinking New York was joking.

New York wandered away from us and walked closer to the edge of the woods. You good? we asked them.

I’m ready to go home, New York said.

They jumped the ditch and headed back toward Mama Lara’s house. We tried to make ourselves laugh because laughing was how we worried, how we consented to love and how we said I’d like you to love me.

New York did not laugh.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

They stopped next to my grandmother’s side of the garden and just watched the sunflowers, the greens, the black-eyed peas, beans, the cucumbers, the green tomatoes, the gangly stalks of corn twice as tall as any of us.

What you run up on? we asked New York. A snake? Copperhead?

New York ignored us and walked into the garden until we couldn’t see his fluorescent wristbands or the wet brown of his chest.

We followed, looking for New York.

Where you at, we asked. You need to stop playing. My grandmama don’t like when folks be messing in her garden.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

We were behind the house when we heard, “Marco?” coming from the front of right of the garden.

Polo, we said.

Marco?

There they go over there, we whispered to one another.

Polo!

Marco?

Where this fool at?

Marco?

Polo!

I think they bread ain’t all the way done.

Polo!

Polo?

Marco!

We looked down every row in that garden looking for New York until we got to the front of the garden, on Mama Lara’s side.

“Marco?” we heard from where we’d just left.

Polo?

Polo?

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

We walked back to the middle of the garden afraid that New York had been taken by Wayne Williams, white folks or white folks’ god.

Something in those central Mississippi woods reminded New York of the language of home. Being reminded of home, so far away from the bodegas, the apartments that scraped the clouds, the fire hydrants and actual blocks, terrified or satisfied New York. Whether it was absolute fear or exquisite satisfaction, wandering through the cool spots in those Mississippi woods was too much for New York’s body.

We didn’t speak this.

New York didn’t speak this.

But our bodies knew.

In the middle of the garden, we felt a forceful wind getting closer to us and when we turned around, New York tackled us and laughed so hard as we all tumbled on a row of my grandmother’s butter beans.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

On the ground of that garden, covered in vegetables and dirt, coated in so much laughter, I want to say that the Mississippi and New York in our Black boy bodies were indistinguishable from each other. That would be a lie. We absolutely contrasted. But the sight, tastes and smells of our contrasts felt like safeness.

Not safety.

Safeness. And safeness sounded like love. When we stood up, the rain dropped thicker.

Grandmama and Mama Lara were standing on the outside of the garden, pillars of our safeness, longing for more safeness themselves, each spraying us with water from their water hoses. “If y’all don’t get y’all behind from out our garden,” Mama Lara said, laughing, “we know something.”

We all knew something, too, and what we knew was more than short trailers and shotgun houses, more than magnolias and pines trees, more than semi-trucks filled with chickens headed to be slaughtered at the plant. We knew another way for Black boys in America to say I love you and I am afraid. And we kept saying I love you and I am afraid in as many different ways as we could that Saturday in the summer until it was time for New York to go home.

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner for The New York Times

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Credit…Andre D. Wagner

Andre D. Wagner is a photographer working in New York City. These images were taken between 2015 and 2020. Kiese Laymon is the author of “Heavy: An American Memoir” and the novel “Long Division.”

The Look is a column that examines identity through a visual-first lens. This year, the column is focused on the relationship between American culture and politics in the run-up to the 2020 presidential election, produced by Eve Lyons and Tanner Curtis.

A version of this article appears in print on June 7, 2020, Section ST, Page 4 of the New York edition. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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Black Lives Matter, PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats,  Google News, TED Talks, and The Washington Post

PBS News: June 10 – 12, 2020

Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

TED Talks: Shantell Martin How drawing can set you free?

The Washington Post: The Post Most and A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years By David Montgomery

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 12, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Warning: Tonight’s In Focus segment contains disturbing imagery. Friday on the NewsHour, the movement to eliminate symbols of the Confederacy continues to gain steam. Plus: NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace on changing his sport, how young Americans are approaching this pivotal moment in culture and society, the analysis of Mark Shields and David Brooks, remembering victims of the coronavirus and a look at photography’s role in documenting social change. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS News Wrap: Trump defends planned rally in Tulsa on June 19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvkgU… Is this the end for public monuments to the Confederacy? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwHts… Driver Bubba Wallace on welcoming new fans to NASCAR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYLd4… How Gen-Z is approaching this historic moment of change https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydG1W… Shields and Brooks on Americans’ changing views of policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ycQM… Remembering 5 more victims of the coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hTRf… The camera’s role in documenting a critical social movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBhdk… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 11, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, the top U.S. military officer apologizes for joining President Trump in a controversial June 1 photo op amid protests in Washington, D.C. Plus: Unemployment in America, protests against racism extend beyond the U.S., the struggles of black-owned businesses, dealing with addiction during the pandemic, strengthening American democracy and community in New York’s Chinatown. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How Gen. Mark Milley became a ‘prop’ during Trump photo op https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI-W8… News Wrap: COVID-19 cases continue to surge in Brazil, India https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvlxh… What latest jobs numbers say about a U.S. economic recovery https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuSj_… George Floyd catalyzes global movement for racial justice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwof9… Pandemic highlights hardships black business owners face https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3B5n… How Americans’ drinking habits have changed during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArHTQ… Policy recommendations to strengthen American democracy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4TBt… A Brief But Spectacular take on the Chinatown Block Watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdmsB… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 10, 2020

Fundraiser

Jun 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, George Floyd’s brother headlines a congressional hearing as lawmakers consider action to address police brutality and racial profiling. Plus: Voting chaos in the Georgia primary, Alabama’s rising COVID-19 cases, the risks of reopening society amid coronavirus, grappling with a pandemic during the war in Syria and the therapeutic value of gardening in turbulent times. Support your local PBS station here: https://pbs.org/donate WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS How close is Congress to taking action on police brutality? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhoZP… News Wrap: Ex-DOJ employees call for investigation of Barr https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndJ9W… What went wrong in Georgia’s chaotic primary election? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRQhC… Why COVID-19 cases are rising in Alabama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fq4XJ… What this global health expert sees in state COVID-19 surges https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMCDA… Syrians prepare for new battle with invisible foe: COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjq27… Disability advocates lobby for more support during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGLDP… Landscape designer Piet Oudolf on the solace of gardening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJo9Q… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Sorted by Confirmed in descending order
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths New cases (last 60 days)
Worldwide 7,410,510 953 418,294
United States 2,103,926 6,384 647,309 116,795
Brazil 832,866 3,941 427,610 42,055
Russia 520,129 3,544 274,641 6,829
India 308,993 227 154,330 8,884
United Kingdom 294,375 4,431 41,662
Spain 243,605 5,172 150,376 27,136
Italy 236,651 3,928 174,865 34,301
Peru 220,749 6,870 107,133 6,308
Germany 187,388 2,254 171,897 8,866
Iran 184,955 2,220 146,748 8,730
Turkey 176,677 2,125 150,087 4,792
Chile 167,355 8,759 3,101
France 156,813 2,338 72,808 29,389
Mexico 139,196 1,100 101,767 16,448
Pakistan 132,405 604 50,056 2,551
Saudi Arabia 123,308 3,604 82,548 932
Canada 98,373 2,590 59,334 8,106
Bangladesh 84,379 501 17,827 1,139
Mainland China 83,075 59 78,367 4,634
Qatar 78,416 28,543 55,252 70
South Africa 65,736 1,118 36,850 1,423
Belgium 59,918 5,199 16,547 9,650
Belarus 53,241 5,656 29,111 303
Sweden 50,931 4,929 4,874
Netherlands 48,640 2,787 6,057
Colombia 46,858 949 18,715 1,545
Ecuador 45,778 2,622 4,600 3,828
Egypt 42,980 429 11,529 1,484
United Arab Emirates 41,990 4,246 26,761 288
Singapore 40,197 7,048 28,808 26
Indonesia 37,420 140 13,776 2,091
Portugal 36,463 3,548 22,438 1,512
Kuwait 35,466 8,024 25,882 289
Switzerland 31,094 3,621 28,800 1,677
Ukraine 30,506 728 13,976 880
Poland 29,017 756 14,104 1,237
Argentina 28,751 640 8,730 785
Philippines 25,392 234 5,706 1,074
Ireland 25,295 5,140 23,213 1,705
Afghanistan 24,102 748 4,201 451
Dominican Republic 22,572 2,179 13,084 577
Romania 21,679 1,117 15,635 1,394
Panama 19,211 4,554 13,759 421
Iraq 18,950 484 7,515 549
Israel 18,876 2,056 15,319 300
Japan 17,382 138 15,580 924
Austria 17,078 1,918 16,012 677
Bolivia 16,929 1,476 2,431 559
Nigeria 15,181 74 4,891 399
Algeria 10,810 251 7,420 760
Honduras 8,132 888 844 306
Finland 7,087 1,282 6,200 325
Sudan 6,879 162 2,416 433
Hungary 4,064 416 2,476 559

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Who are you? To answer this question, artist Shantell Martin followed her pen. In this brilliantly visual talk featuring her signature freestyle line work — drawn across everything from the screens of Times Square to the bodies of New York City Ballet dancers — Martin shares how she found freedom and a new perspective through art. See how drawing can connect your heart to your hand and deepen your connection with the world.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Shantell Martin · Artist

Shantell Martin forges new connections between fine art, education, philosophy and technology to establish an environment that values artists as integral contributors to a healthy society.

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Shantell Martin: Lines

Shantell Martin, Katharine Stout, Hans Ulrich Obrist

HENI Publishing (2020)

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The Washington Post    The Post Most    June 11, 2020

(National Defense University)

Pentagon’s top general apologizes for appearing alongside Trump in Lafayette Square

“I should not have been there. My presence in that moment, and in that environment, created the perception of the military involved in domestic politics,” said Gen. Mark A. Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

By Dan Lamothe ?  Read more »

Doctors aren’t sure why some coronavirus patients have been ill for more than 60 days

By Ariana Eunjung Cha and Lenny Bernstein ?  Read more »

Know The Signs: How to tell if your grandparent has become an antifa agent

Opinion ?  By Alexandra Petri ?  Read more »

NASCAR bans display of Confederate flag at all events and properties

By Liz Clarke and Des Bieler ?  Read more »

Trump won’t rename Army posts that honor Confederates. Here’s why they’re named after traitors.

By Alex Horton ?  Read more »

George Floyd’s brother came to Washington to speak. But his power was in the silences.

Perspective ?  By Robin Givhan ?  Read more »

Joe Biden warns that President Trump ‘is going to try to steal this election’

By Matt Viser ?  Read more »

Animal Crossing’s massive popularity has made it less like paradise and more like Wall Street

By Shelly Tan and Joe Fox ?  Read more »

Surgeons perform first known U.S. lung transplant for covid-19 patient

By Lenny Bernstein and Martine Powers ?  Read more »

‘Labor of Love’ breaks from the typical reality dating show — by taking a woman older than 40 seriously

By Lisa Bonos ?  Read more »

Tim Scott, only black GOP senator, seeks to answer national call to fix racist policing

By Mike DeBonis and Seung Min Kim ?  Read more »

Beleaguered and besieged, police try to come to grips with a nation’s anger

By Griff Witte and Nick Miroff ?  Read more »

Ice-T on protests, police brutality and ‘Cop Killer’ 28 years later

By Helena Andrews-Dyer ?  Read more »

Grim numbers and signs of hope signal a complicated economic recovery from coronavirus

Live updates ?  By Washington Post staff ?  Read more »

Remember Neli Latson, the black teen with autism who seemed ‘suspicious’ sitting outside a library? Ten years after his arrest, he still isn’t fully free.

Perspective ?  By Theresa Vargas ?  Read more »

Trump threatens to ‘take back’ Seattle as protesters set up ‘autonomous zone’

By Tim Elfrink ?  Read more »

A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years

From the Magazine ?  By David Montgomery ?  Read more »

‘Gone With the Wind’ will probably be back on HBO Max next week, with an African American scholar at the front of it

By Steven Zeitchik ?  Read more »

Media  (Goldin Solutions)

Heath Freeman is the hedge fund guy who says he wants to save local news. Somehow, no one’s buying it.

How a former Duke place kicker took control of one of the biggest newspaper groups in America — and what it means for democracy.

By Sarah Ellison ?  Read more »

When Fox News disappoints, Trump has a backup: the conspiracy theory-peddling OANN

Perspective ?  By Margaret Sullivan ?  Read more »

What insanity did Kayleigh McEnany just suggest?

Opinion ?  By Erik Wemple ?  Read more »

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A photo essay from the last two weeks, but the quotes paired with them span 100 years By David Montgomery

From the Magazine ?  By David Montgomery ?  Read more »

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/lifestyle/magazine/the-endless-call-for-racial-equity-and-justice-in-photos-and-quotes/?utm_campaign=wp_post_most&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_most

The Endless Call

Demands for racial equity and justice have always been part of the American story.

While the images here span the past two weeks, the words paired with them span the past 100 years.

Turn music on

By David Montgomery    June 11, 2020

Ninety-nine years ago, in Tulsa, white mobs torched the black side of town and killed as many as 300 residents, with the tacit support of some in law enforcement, in one of the worst spasms of racial violence in American history. Last month in Minneapolis, George Floyd died with a police officer’s knee pressed to his neck, just days ahead of the May 31-June 1 anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Those two episodes bookend nearly a century in which civil rights progress has been fitful, hard-fought and unfinished. Across 10 decades, from Tulsa to today — against a backdrop of lynching and cross burning, more recently replaced by police chokeholds and vigilante gunshots, amid the subtler violence of systemic racism — voices have been raised in protest and defiance.

Words spoken in times of uplift or assault, hope or despair, can crystallize a moment or a movement: I have a dream. … Black Power. … I can’t breathe. Black Lives Matter. The voices collected here elaborate and extend the mantras, such as Langston Hughes versifying his insistence that America live up to its myth, and James Baldwin defining protest as a duty.

But how many other voices have been lost? For a long time the Tulsa massacre was barely mentioned in history books. The account of eyewitness B.C. Franklin quoted here surfaced only in 2015. Today it’s harder for people and events to be ignored because another phrase from protests past — The whole world is watching — has literally come true, thanks to the cameras in every potential witness’s pocket. The recent demonstrations were sparked by a bystander’s video of George Floyd’s death — and they have ended up generating more evidence of excessive force used by police against demonstrators in Washington, Buffalo, Philadelphia, New York and Atlanta.

The images presented here, photographed in late May and early June, capture the passion, anger and hope of new voices demanding to be heard. The raised fists communicate as directly as the cardboard signs — hand-lettered with yet more indelible words — while the fleeting tears of a young demonstrator and the warm embrace of comrade marchers speak of the vulnerability and pain at the root of any protest.

Washington, D.C., June 2. (Photo by Kian Kelley-Chung, son of André Chung, who took the photo at top)

Paris, June 6. (Photo by Peter Turnley)

Houston, June 2. (Photo by Greg Noire)

The juxtaposition of the historic voices and contemporary images underscores how much work is left to be done. Read in the context of today’s clamors for justice, the decades-old diagnoses and laments sound remarkably — and wrenchingly — fresh and relevant. That those dreams remain unfulfilled speaks to an American futility and systemic failure. Seen in that light, the images of today become part of the canon of timeless illustrations documenting the unfinished struggle.

The killing of George Floyd offers yet another tragic opportunity to continue an erratic process of change begun long ago. No one can say if this time will be different. All we can know is that these voices echoing from the past put their faith in the future — and that these demonstrators insist that the future is now.

Minneapolis, May 28. (Photo by Joshua Lott for The Washington Post)

For fully forty eight hours, the fires raged and burned everything in its path and it left nothing but ashes and burned safes and trunks and the like where once stood beautiful homes and business houses. And so proud, rich, black Tulsa was destroyed by fire — that is its buildings and property; but its spirit was neither killed nor daunted.

B.C. Franklin, a black lawyer who witnessed a white mob’s attack on the black section of Tulsa in 1921

Atlanta, June 7. (Photo by Sheila Pree Bright)

Let America be America again.

Let it be the dream it used to be.

Let it be the pioneer on the plain

Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

From the poem “Let America Be America Again” by Langston Hughes, 1936

Miami, May 30. (Photos by Jonathan Frydman)

Seattle, June 8. (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)

Though I have found no Negroes who want to see the United Nations lose this war, I have found many who, before the war ends, want to see the stuffing knocked out of white supremacy and of empire over subject peoples. American Negroes, involved as we are in the general issues of the conflict, are confronted not with a choice but with the challenge both to win democracy for ourselves at home and to help win the war for democracy the world over.

  1. Philip Randolph, union leader and civil rights organizer, calling for an end to discrimination in defense jobs and the military, 1942

Tucson, May 30. (Photo by Josh Galemore/Arizona Daily Star/AP)

I had been pushed around all my life and felt at this moment that I couldn’t take it anymore. When I asked the policeman why we had to be pushed around? He said he didn’t know. “The law is the law. You are under arrest.”

Rosa Parks, from her handwritten account of refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus in 1955

Atlanta, May 31. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

I love America more than any other country in the world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.

James Baldwin, from “Notes of a Native Son,” 1955

Minneapolis, June 3. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

No, I’m not an American. I’m one of the 22 million black people who are the victims of Americanism. One of the 22 million black people who are the victims of democracy, nothing but disguised hypocrisy. So, I’m not standing here speaking to you as an American, or a patriot, or a flag saluter, or a flag waver — no, not I. I’m speaking as a victim of this American system. And I see America through the eyes of the victim. I don’t see any American Dream; I see an American nightmare.

Malcolm X, from a speech in Cleveland, 1964

Portland, Ore., June 2. (Photo by Andrew Wallner)

See, it’s time for America to wake up and know that we’re not going to tolerate — we’re not begging anymore. And I’m not going to say it’s not any more of us going to die, because I’m never sure when I leave home whether I’ll get back home or not. But if I fall while I’m in Kentucky, I’ll fall five feet and four inches forward for freedom, and I’m not backing off it. And nobody will have to cover the ground that I walk on as far as freedom is concerned because I know as well as you should know that no man is an island to himself, and until I’m free in Mississippi, you’re not free in no other place.

Fannie Lou Hamer, from a speech in Kentucky, 1968

New York, June 5. (Photos by Celeste Sloman)

Let me speak of a recent, a very recent black dream: The waiting for the Messiah, some leader. Now nobody — Martin Luther King did not tell Rosa Parks to stay in her seat. That came first. Then he came. She just didn’t move. We didn’t used to have to wait for the word. And the history of black people in this country is those people who got up and moved, all over this country.

Toni Morrison, from a speech in Portland, Ore., 1975

Atlanta, June 2. (Photo by Lynsey Weatherspoon)

We imagined a more humane future, but we also risked our very lives to defeat racism and U.S. military aggression against Southeast Asia. Now, it is your turn to imagine a more humane future — a future of justice, equality and peace. And if you wish to fulfill your dreams, which remain the dreams of my generation as well, you must also stand up and speak out against war, against joblessness and against racism.

Angela Davis, from a commencement address to the Berkeley High School graduating class, 1983

Brooklyn, June 2. (Photo by Yunghi Kim/Contact Press Images)

What happened in Los Angeles in April of 1992 was neither a race riot nor a class rebellion. Rather, this monumental upheaval was a multiracial, trans-class, and largely male display of justified social rage. For all its ugly, xenophobic resentment, its air of adolescent carnival, and its downright barbaric behavior, it signified the sense of powerlessness in American society.

Cornel West, from “Race Matters,” on the reaction to the acquittal of white police officers in the beating of Rodney King, 1993

New York, June 1. (Photo by Jelani Rice)

This is where we are right now. It’s a racial stalemate we’ve been stuck in for years. … But I have asserted a firm conviction, a conviction rooted in my faith in God and my faith in the American people, that working together we can move beyond some of our old racial wounds and that, in fact, we have no choice — we have no choice if we are to continue on the path of a more perfect union.

Barack Obama, from a speech on race during the 2008 presidential campaign

Washington, D.C., June 3. (Photo by Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

We know how to be racist. We know how to pretend to be not racist. Now let’s know how to be antiracist.

Ibram X. Kendi, from “How to Be an Antiracist,” 2019

Minneapolis, June 7. (Photo by Russell Frederick)

I came to this city in 1955, which was the year that the body of Emmett Till was found in a body of water in Mississippi, same year that Rosa Parks refused to give up the back seat on the bus. … Since that time, I have seen any number of struggles against racism, and they have all ended up with relatively little outcome. So the question is valid, it’s a reasonable question: Is this going to be just like so many other movements, a moment of anger and rage and then back to business as usual? … [But] his death did not simply start a bunch of good speeches, a bunch of tributes. Out of his death has come a movement, a worldwide movement. And that movement is not going to stop after two weeks, three weeks, a month. That movement is going to change the world.

Rev. William A. Lawson, pastor emeritus of Houston’s Wheeler Avenue Baptist Church, from his address at the funeral for George Floyd, Houston, June 9, 2020  David Montgomery   David Montgomery writes general features, profiles and arts stories for the Washington Post Magazine, including pieces on the Latino community. He joined The Washington Post in 1993 and has covered Prince George’s County, politics in Maryland and life in the District.       About this story  Design by Christian Font. Photo editing by Dudley M. Brooks. Audio editing by Linah Mohammad.                                                       Go to the top

No Justice – No Peace, PBS News, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Associated Press  

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 3, 2020

Jun 3, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, violent confrontations diminish, but mass protests over George Floyd’s death continue in cities across the U.S. — and the world. Plus: A South Carolina mayor on what’s happening in his city, racial disparities in American policing, how the U.S. can address structural racism and analyzing results from Tuesday’s elections. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Charges against police added, upgraded in Floyd case https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03D6K… How this South Carolina mayor is fostering dialogue on race https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHRug… News Wrap: Florida reports 1,300 new coronavirus cases https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHDqV… How to address racial disparities in American policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnlO0… Leveraging family, community to overcome American racism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEqFE… Amy Walter on the ‘symbolism’ of Tuesday’s election results https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNLca… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 2, 2020

Jun 2, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, it has been a full week of protests across parts of the U.S. in response to the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police. Plus: A controversial law enforcement response to protesters near the White House, Sen. John Thune on the national unrest, Bishop Mariann Budde on the role of the church amid protest and using the U.S. military to quell demonstrations. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Political divide over best response to protests widens https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0Doz… D.C. protests grow a day after controversial Trump photo op https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVFQE… Thune on Trump’s rhetoric: The country needs healing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpbU7… Bishop Budde on Trump’s rhetoric and healing the nation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1Fbz… News Wrap: Birx wants more COVID-19 testing amid protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fVQK9… Current protests highlight risks of militarizing the police https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yhnB… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, June 1, 2020

Jun 1, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, unrest spreads across the U.S. in response to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody. Plus: What reporters are seeing on the ground, the role of law enforcement during protests, systemic issues of race and privilege in the U.S. and the long roots of racial tension in Minneapolis. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Cities brace for continued unrest over police violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ueIS… 3 reporters share what’s happening at their cities’ protests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7lJs… 2 voices on how to hear protesters while maintaining peace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1BTF… What’s different about these protests — and what isn’t https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FI0O… News Wrap: Health officials fear protests will spread virus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=febJw… Minneapolis’ troubled history of unequal policing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-9vp… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 31, 2020

May 31, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 31, chaos and clashes across the nation continue as some protests over the murder of George Floyd turn violent, the history of activism and its influence on political change. Also, creative and safe ways to celebrate graduation. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode May 30, 2020

May 30, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, May 30, the latest on the nationwide protests as demonstrations flare across the country over the killing of George Floyd, a black man, by a white police officer in Minneapolis. Several cities and states are mobilizing the National Guard after protests turned violent on Friday night. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Shields and Brooks on George Floyd, 100K coronavirus deaths   May 29, 2020

PBS NewsHourSyndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including former Vice President Joe Biden’s comments on the death of George Floyd and what action it should prompt, President Trump’s approach toward Twitter and truth and the milestone of 100,000 American deaths from COVID-19. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

‘Not the America that we want to live in,’ says St. Paul mayor of George Floyd’s death

May 26, 2020  PBS NewsHour

An African American man in Minneapolis died Monday night after a police officer kneeled on his neck while apprehending him. Echoing the 2014 Eric Garner case, George Floyd told the officer, “I can’t breathe.” The incident, captured on video, prompted outrage in the Twin Cities and beyond — and led to the dismissal of four police officers involved. Amna Nawaz talks to St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

How Trump leverages Twitter to spread misinformation

May 26, 2020  PBS NewsHour

President Trump’s messages to his more than 80 million Twitter followers can carry a lot of weight — but don’t always represent the truth. Controversy recently erupted over a Trump tweet that had no basis in fact. Now, the social media platform is applying a note to it that directs users to more information. Yamiche Alcindor reports and speaks with Craig Silverman, media editor for BuzzFeed News. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The New York Times           The  Morning         June 2, 2020
By David Leonhardt
Good morning. Protests continued overnight despite curfews. President Trump threatened to send the military into cities. Let’s start with the words of the protesters.
Voices from the protests

Demonstrations near the White House in Washington on Sunday.Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
The anger is different this time. After years of Americans being killed by the police — more than 1,000 per year, for as long as statistics exist — something has changed over the past week.
The gruesome video of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on George Floyd’s neck plays a role. So does a pandemic that’s disproportionately killing African-Americans. And so do the angry, racialized politics that President Trump encourages.
Here are some of the voices from the protests, which have included many people who say they’ve never protested before:
“In every city, there’s a George Floyd,” said Michael Sampson II, 30, of Jacksonville, Fla.
“It could be my father, my brother, my uncle, my cousin, my friend,” said Victoria Sloan, 27, of Brooklyn. “It makes me angry.”
“I’m speaking for everybody, all my kinfolk, all my brothers and sisters who’ve gotten beaten up by police,” said Cory Thomas, 40, who said the police beat him when he was a teenager in Brooklyn. “I don’t condone the violence,” or the looting, he said, “but at the end of the day, no 14-year-old should be beat up by police.”
“There are people out there who are very negative,” D.J. Elliott, 30, a gym manager in Harlem said, in frustration about a small number of late-arriving, violent protesters. “And this is their golden opportunity.”
“If we don’t fight for change we’re not going to get it,” Douglas Golliday, a 65-year-old resident of a Minneapolis suburb, told The Star Tribune while waiting to be taken to jail along with his 44-year-old son, Robert, and other protesters.
“I took six rubber bullets, but do you know what didn’t happen to me?” Elizabeth Ferris, a 36-year-old Georgetown University student, told The Washington Post. “No one kneeled on my neck.”
Ashley Gary of Minneapolis said: “We’ve been through Jamar Clark, we’ve been through Philando Castile, and there was no justice whatsoever. We’re tired of it, we are very tired. My son, he’s 16 and six feet tall, and I don’t want him to be taken as somebody bad because he’s a bigger black man.”
“I came out peacefully to show my support, and the police are aiming right at me,” Mariana Solaris, a 20-year-old from San Bernardino, Calif., told The Los Angeles Times, after the police fired foam pellets at her. “I saw this on the news earlier tonight,” she said, “and I thought, ‘No way is it really like that out there with the police.’ So I came out to see. And, yeah, it’s really like that.”
The Times has collected portraits of the protesters here.
THREE MORE BIG STORIES
1.                 Overnight developments

Kentucky State Troopers fire tear gas to disperse protesters after curfew in Louisville, Ky.Luke Sharrett for The New York Times
Protesters faced off against the police for a seventh straight night in cities across the country.
  • In Washington, police officers used tear gas and flash grenades to clear a path through a peaceful protest so President Trump could visit a nearby Episcopal church, St. John’s, where he posed for photos holding a Bible. An Episcopal bishop in Washington said she was “outraged” that he used the church “as a backdrop for a message antithetical to the teachings of Jesus.” Trump also warned he would order the military into cities if local officials could not control their streets.
  • In New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio acknowledged that an 11 p.m. curfew had failed to prevent widespread looting, including along Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. As a result, the curfew will begin at 8 tonight.
  • In a shootout at a protest in St. Louis, four police officers were injured. In Buffalo, an S.U.V. sped through a line of officers in riot gear, injuring two of them, in an episode caught on video. In Las Vegas, the authorities are investigating the shootings of two officers, although the details are unclear.
  • The mayor of Louisville, Ky., fired the city’s police chief after the owner of a local barbecue restaurant was killed when police officers and National Guard troops shot toward protesters.
  • In the Times Opinion section, Tonya Russell asks companies to understand the toll that police brutality videos have on their black employees. “They should encourage self-care,” she writes, “and make clear there will be no penalties for those who may need to take a mental health day or temporarily take on a lighter workload.”
  • The Times will be providing updates all day here.
2.               A private autopsy of George Floyd

The site where George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis on Friday.Caroline Yang for The New York Times
Both a government autopsy and an autopsy commissioned by Floyd’s family concluded that his death was a homicide. The experts hired by the family say he was asphyxiated; the autopsy by the county says his heart stopped while officers were kneeling on him and notes Floyd’s underlying heart condition.
Video: The Times’s visual investigations team has reconstructed Floyd’s death using security footage, witness videos and official documents. “It’s hard to watch this. Really hard,” Marc Lacey, The Times’s national editor writes. “But here’s the most comprehensive reconstruct you’ll find of what happened.”
3. ‘Illiberal populists’ and the virus
The four large countries where coronavirus cases have been increasing fastest — Brazil, the U.S., Russia and Britain — have something in common: They are all run by populist male leaders who cast themselves as anti-elite and anti-establishment.
“Very often they rail against intellectuals and experts of nearly all types,” Steven Levitsky, a Harvard political scientist, told us. The leaders, he said, “claim to have a kind of common-sense wisdom that the experts lack. This doesn’t work very well versus Covid-19.” We explain — with a chart — here.
Another phone call: Trump also spoke by phone yesterday with President Vladimir Putin of Russia about the pandemic, the global economy and Trump’s desire to let Russia attend an upcoming G7 meeting.
What we’ve learned: Times journalists have summarized what scientists know about the virus, as well as the important mysteries that remain.

PBS NewsHour follow@newshour.org via gmail.mcsv.net 

June 2, 2020

Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

WHO HOLDS SEATS OF POWER IN AMERICA?
By Lisa Desjardins, 
@LisaDNews
Correspondent

Consider two lists of names.

First: George Floyd, Donnie SandersBreonna TaylorWilliam Howard GreenChristopher Whitfield

Atatiana JeffersonChannara “Philly” PheapRyan TwynmanIsaiah Lewis, Marcus McVae.

These are the names of 10 black men and women who were killed by police in just more than a year.  

Next: Hiram Revels, Blanche Bruce, Edward Brooke, Carol Moseley Braun, Barack Obama, Roland Burris,

Tim Scott, WIlliam “Mo” Cowan, Cory Booker, Kamala Harris. This is a list of every black American who has

ever served in the U.S. senate. There have been 10. 

It is a stark reminder that people who are often the victims of police violence are not proportionally

represented in our government.

Looking only at police shooting deaths, something this Washington Post database has tracked carefully

since 2015, 235 black people were shot and killed by police in the U.S. in 2019. That is 23.5 percent of all

police shooting deaths, nearly double the percentage of the U.S. population that is black.

And that figure dwarfs the number of black Americans — again, 10 — who have ever had a seat in the U.S. Senate, considered to be the most powerful elected body in the U.S.

As protests over the death of George Floyd continue this week, we looked at how black Americans are represented in our democracy. The numbers show glaring disparities continue, though there are instances of proportional representation.  

·  Overall: 13 percent of the U.S. population is black or African American, according to the official people counters: the Census

White House: 4 percent of President Donald Trump’s cabinet is black. That is one official —- HUD Secretary Ben Carson — out of 23 cabinet positions. Carson has announced he intends to leave the job at the end of this year.

·  House of Representatives. The House of Representatives nearly has proportional representation, with 12.5 percent of the lawmakers there being black.  

·  U.S. Senate. In the Senate, however, that figure is 3 percent, with just three black senators currently in the chamber — three of 10 to ever hold a seat in the body. 

·  Federal Courts: About 13 percent of federal judges are black, according to recent data from the Center for American Progress, a left-leaning think tank, as well as 2017 data cited by the Congressional Research Service.

·  Governors: There are currently no black governors.

·  State legislatures.  About 9 percent of lawmakers in state houses are black, according to the National Council of State Legislatures.

·  Big City Mayors: According to the data we reviewed from the 50 largest cities, 11 of them have black mayors. That’s 22 percent.

IN MINNEAPOLIS, PROTESTS OVER GEORGE FLOYD’S DEATH ‘A LONG TIME COMING’
By Daniel Bush, 
@DanielBush
Senior Political Reporter

MINNEAPOLIS — It’s the way George Floyd died that hurts the most.

“To see a man being held down that way, it’s just too much,” said Franklin Bridgeman, 53, who is black and a longtime resident of Minneapolis, Floyd’s hometown. “Of all the police shootings and killings, it’s the most painful. This was just so blatant.”

“This could have been my dad. This could have been my brothers, my nephews. George Floyd feels like my family,” Dha’Manique Evans said.

The police “don’t care about us at all. They know they can get away with it,” Evans, 21, added, and for that reason, she’s glad her city decided to protest. “They hear us now. They see what we’re doing.”

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died on May 25 after a white police officer, Derek Chauvin, held him to the ground with a knee on his neck for nearly nine minutes as Floyd said several times, “I can’t breathe.” Video of the incident captured by bystanders quickly went viral, spurring protests in Minneapolis and dozens of cities across the country, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, New York, Atlanta and Washington, D.C.

Chauvin, 44, and three other officers who were present at the arrest were fired the day after Floyd’s  death. Chauvin was charged on May 29 with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

But by then, the protests in Minneapolis that had started peacefully were increasingly punctuated by confrontations between residents and police. Swaths of the city were set on fire and looted. Police fired tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets to disperse crowds. The governor imposed a curfew and ordered the largest deployment of the National Guard in state history.

In interviews around Minneapolis, many white residents expressed shock that something like this could happen in their city. Black residents said the anger and pain underlying the protests were both familiar and misunderstood. READ THE FULL STORY. 

 FIVE OVERLOOKED POLITICAL STORIES FROM THE PAST WEEK
By Alex D’Elia, 
@AlexDEliaNews
Politics production assistant

Trump vetoes student loan forgiveness bill — May 29. The president rejected Congress’ bipartisan legislation, which would have kept in place an existing Obama administration loan forgiveness plan. Why it matters: Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ narrower loan forgiveness rules — which stay in place because of Trump’s action — limit students’ ability to get their loans forgiven when schools shut down due to fraud. — Forbes

Supreme Court upholds Puerto Rico oversight board from constitutional challenge — June 1. The board was formed by then-President Barack Obama in 2016 to oversee Puerto Rico’s  debt restructuring, a process that has been complicated by Hurricane Maria, earthquakes and now the coronavirus. Why it matters: The Supreme Court ruling allows for the oversight board to continue restructuring hundreds of billions in debt and bankruptcy to help the island emerge from its financial crisis. — The Washington Post

Lawmakers begin bipartisan push to cut off police access to military-style gear — June 1.Local law enforcement receive military weaponry — like bayonets and grenade launchers — through a Pentagon program that was shut down by Obama but revived by Trump. Why it matters: The program is being scrutinized amid concerns about aggressive use of force by police around the country as they are dispersing often non-violent protesters. — The New York Times

Senate Democrats pump brakes on new stimulus checks — May 29. Though House Democrats want to include more $1,200 checks in the next economic stimulus bill, some Senate Democrats would rather focus the relief effort specifically on  those who have been hit the hardest. Why it matters: The conflict demonstrates difficult negotiations surrounding coronavirus relief that could stall aid as the pandemic’s economic impacts linger. — The HIll 

Justice Department closing insider-trading investigations into three U.S. senators — May 26. Investigations into the stock sales of Sens. Kelly Loeffler, Jim Inhofe and Dianne Feinstein at the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak have concluded. Why it matters: The end of the investigation is welcome news particularly for Loeffler, a Republican who is facing a challenger from her own party for her Georgia Senate seat and has politically suffered in the polls in part because of the insider-trading scandal.  — The Wall Street Journal

#POLITICSTRIVIA
By Kate Grumke, @KGrumke
Politics producer

On this day in 1774, the British government renewed an act that allowed British troops to stay housed in private American residences. This was the fourth in a series of legislation known as the Intolerable Acts or the Coercive Acts, which spurred the first meeting of the Continental Congress.

Our question: What was this act called?

Send your answers to NewsHourPolitics@newshour.org or tweet using #PoliticsTrivia. The first correct answers will earn a shout-out next week.

Last week, we asked: On this day in 1868, Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial ended. The Senate voted on three articles of impeachment, and failed to get the necessary two-thirds majority on any of them to convict Johnson and remove him from office. How many votes did each article fail by?

The answer: Each article failed by just one vote.

This was the first impeachment trial in our nation’s history, and a majority of Senators voted to convict the president of “high crimes and misdemeanors.” But the final roll call was 35-19 for the three articles of impeachment.

Johnson served out the rest of his term, and five years after leaving office, won a Senate seat and returned to the capitol.

Congratulations to our winners: Tim Smith and Mary Hubbard!!

Thank you all for reading and watching. We’ll drop into your Inbox next week.

The Washington Post         The Post Most      June 3, 2020
 
(Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

Pentagon chief breaks from Trump over use of active-duty military forces to quell unrest

After a week of violent unrest, peace largely prevailed amid acts of civil disobedience in New York, Los Angeles, Washington and other major cities

Live updates ?  By Washington Post staff ?  Read more »

 

 

CIA veterans who monitored crackdowns abroad see troubling parallels in Trump’s handling of protests

By Greg Miller ?  Read more »

 

 

For 200 years, the Insurrection Act has given presidents the power to deploy the military to quell unrest

By Ian Shapira ?  Read more »

 

 

Secretary Esper, you violated your oath in aiding Trump’s photo op. That’s why I’m resigning.

Opinion ?  By James N. Miller ?  Read more »

 

 ‘This can’t be happening’: An oral history of 48 surreal, violent, biblical minutes in Washington

By Dan Zak, Monica Hesse, Ben Terris, Maura Judkis and Travis Andrews ?  Read more »
 

 Didn’t get your stimulus payment? Here’s how to find it.

Perspective ?  By Michelle Singletary ?  Read more »
 

 America is awash in cameras, a double-edged sword for protesters and police

By Heather Kelly and Rachel Lerman ?  Read more »
 

 Boris Johnson offers refuge, British citizenship path for nearly 3 million Hong Kongers

By Shibani Mahtani ?  Read more »
 

 The global race for a coronavirus vaccine could lead to this generation’s Sputnik moment

By Carolyn Y. Johnson and Eva Dou ?  Read more »
 

 Rosenstein says, in hindsight, he would not have signed application to surveil former Trump campaign adviser

By Matt Zapotosky ?  Read more »
 

 

 

 Americans are delaying medical care, and it’s devastating health-care providers

By Ted Mellnik, Laris Karklis and Andrew Ba Tran ?  Read more »
 

 Trump says Republicans will pull convention from Charlotte; U.S. coronavirus cases pass 1.8 million

Live updates ?  By Washington Post staff ?  Read more »
 

 Men wearing Hawaiian shirts and carrying guns add a volatile new element to protests

By Craig Timberg, Elizabeth Dwoskin and Souad Mekhennet ?  Read more »
 

 When life gives you herbs by the fistful, put them to use in sauces, salads and drinks

By Becky Krystal ?  Read more »
 

 Trump administration bans flights by Chinese airlines

By Lori Aratani ?  Read more »
 

 Biden begins to map out ‘revolutionary’ agenda, reimagining his presidency amid national upheaval

By Matt Viser ?  Read more »
 

 Latin America had time to prepare for the coronavirus. It couldn’t stop the inevitable.

By Terrence McCoy ?  Read more »
 
 
More on the unrest in Lafayette Square

(Chip Somodevilla/Getty)

Trump’s photo with his loyalists was a vulgar mess. And Ivanka brought a handbag.

The president’s photo op at St. John’s Episcopal Church was a whole new level of strange costuming.

Perspective ?  By Robin Givhan ?  Read more »

 The New York Times           The  Morning         June 3, 2020

  By David Leonhardt

 Good morning. Protests continued late into the night, without the destruction of recent days. George W. Bush offered praise for the protesters. Let’s start by looking at how mass incarceration has shaped black Americans’ lives.

When jail becomes normal

The exercise yard at California Medical Facility in Vacaville, Calif.Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

 For most white Americans, interactions with the police happen rarely, and they’re often respectful or even friendly. Many white people don’t know a single person who’s currently behind bars.

In many black communities — and especially for black men — the situation is entirely different. Some of the statistics can be hard to fathom:

 Close to 10 percent of black men in their 30s are behind bars on any given day, according to the Sentencing Project.

  • Incarceration rates for black men are about twice as high as those of Hispanic men, five times higher than those of white men and at least 25 times higher than those of black women, Hispanic women or white women.

 When the government last counted how many black men had ever spent time in state or federal prison — in 2001 — the share was 17 percent. Today, it’s likely closer to 20 percent (and this number doesn’t include people who’ve spent time in jail without being sentenced to prison). The comparable number for white men is about 3 percent.

The rise of mass incarceration over the last half-century has turned imprisonment into a dominant feature of modern life for black Americans. Large numbers of black men are missing from their communities — unable to marry, care for children or see their aging parents. Many others suffer from permanent economic or psychological damage, struggling to find work after they leave prison.

 A recent study by the economists Patrick Bayer and Kerwin Kofi Charles found that 27 percent of black men in the prime working years of their lives — between the ages of 25 and 54 — didn’t report earning a single dollar of income in 2014. “That’s a massive number,” Charles, the dean of the Yale School of Management, told me. Incarceration, including the aftereffects, was a major reason.

The anger coursing through America’s streets over the past week has many causes, starting with a gruesome video showing the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. But that anger has also been building up for a long time. It is, in part, anger about incarceration having become normal.

 An explainer podcast: How has mass incarceration happened? “Justice in America” — hosted by Josie Duffy Rice of The Appeal — tries to answer the question. The Times’s Caity Weaver recommends starting with the first episode, about bail. “I learn so much from this freaking podcast,” Caity tweeted yesterday.

FOUR MORE BIG STORIES

 1.                  Less violence on Tuesday night

People gather during a peace march honoring Minneapolis man George Floyd Tuesday in Houston.David J. Phillip/Associated Press

 The amount of violence, fires and looting declined last night, relative to the chaos of previous nights. Instead, peaceful protesters in many cities defied curfews and remained on the streets late into the night to protest police violence.

Other protest developments:

 Minneapolis police used force against black people at a rate at least seven times that of white people during the past five years, city data show.

  • In his first speech outside his home since the coronavirus lockdown, Joe Biden likened President Trump’s language to that of Southern racists of the 1960s. “We cannot let our rage consume us,” Biden said.
  • Former President George W. Bush praised peaceful protesters. He said that he and his wife, Laura, were “anguished by the brutal suffocation of George Floyd and disturbed by the injustice and fear that suffocate our country.”
2. Fears of ‘autocracy’
Attorney General William Barr gave the order to clear the square across from the White House on Monday night, The Times explains, in a story reconstructing the incident. The order led law enforcement to use smoke and flash grenades to scatter peaceful protesters so that Trump could appear at a church for a photo opportunity.

 Former military leaders and democracy experts condemned the use of force against citizens. Retired Adm. Mike Mullen wrote in The Atlantic that Trump had “laid bare his disdain for the rights of peaceful protest in this country.” Kori Schake, a former Pentagon official and Republican policy adviser, said, “If we were seeing this in another country, we would be deeply concerned.” Gail Helt, a former C.I.A. analyst, told The Washington Post: “This is what autocrats do. This is what happens in countries before a collapse. It really does unnerve me.”

3. Voting in a shaken country
People in eight states and Washington, D.C., cast ballots in extraordinary circumstances yesterday, and it seemed to go more smoothly than some people feared. “If Tuesday’s vote-by-mail primaries were a test for November, elections officials have reason to be encouraged: a few bumps but no major disasters,” said Stephanie Saul, a Times reporter.

 Among the results:

4. Zuckerberg defends his approach

 In a tense company meeting, the Facebook C.E.O. Mark Zuckerberg stood by his decision not to remove or flag Trump’s inflammatory posts.

Some Facebook employees have been in open revolt over the policy. “Mark always told us that he would draw the line at speech that calls for violence,” said one engineer in a resignation note this week. “He showed us on Friday that this was a lie.”

 

Here’s what else is happening

 

Workers at the Atlantic Blueberry Company are tested prior to the picking season, in Hammonton, N.J.Chang W. Lee/The New York Times
  • A Times’s investigation explains how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention fumbled its response to the coronavirus, leaving the country without adequate testing early in the crisis. Here are five takeaways from the reporting.
  • Republicans said they were moving Trump’s convention speech out of Charlotte, after a stalemate with Democratic officials in North Carolina about virus restrictions.
  • The College Board is postponing plans for an online version of the SAT because of technological challenges, further complicating the college-application process for students stuck at home.
  • Lives lived: Elsa Dorfman used a 200-pound Polaroid camera to create a brand of photographic art all her own, making instantaneous giant, natural-looking portraits of celebrities and everyday people — even while Polaroid, outpaced by technology, was fast going out of business. She died on May 30 at 83.

 The Associated Press   May 30, 2020

https://apnews.com/bee77c500c44054c48448d6f1f2602b7

Marcus Lavon of Des Moines raises his hands during a protest in Des Moines, May 29, 2020. (Bryon Houlgrave/The Des Moines Register via AP)

AP PHOTOS: Images from protests across a traumatized nation

By The Associated Press   May 30, 2020

In cities across the United States, protesters angered over the killing of George Floyd faced off against heavily-armed officers, with some smashing police cars, ransacking businesses and setting fires that smoldered through the night.

Fears of another cycle of violence were palpable on Saturday as cities from Atlanta to Minneapolis grappled with the scope of the damage, and pleas for calm from elected officials and others seemed to do little to dampen the anger.

In Minnesota, where Floyd died Monday after a police officer pressed down on his neck for more than eight minutes, Gov. Tim Walz activated more than a thousand national guardsmen early Saturday, promising a massive show of force to protect the city.

Protesters refuse to allow National Guard personnel to advance towards Hiawatha Avenue along East Lake Street, Friday, May 29, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler also declared an emergency and ordered a nighttime curfew for the city. And in Washington, D.C., the guard was on standby as a crowd gathered outside the White House and chanted curses at President Donald Trump.

In all, more than two dozen cities experienced racially diverse protests, many peaceful but some of violent.

Full Coverage: Photography

Many of those out on the streets spoke of frustration that Floyd’s death was one more in a litany. It came in the wake of the killing in Georgia of Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot after being pursued by two white men while running in their neighborhood, and in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic that has thrown millions out of work, killed more than 100,000 people in the U.S. and disproportionately affected black people.

Trump was again under criticism for stoking the racial discord with a series of tweets Saturday belittling the protesters outside, claiming many of the Secret Service agents were “just waiting for action” and ready to unleash “the most vicious dogs, and the most ominous weapons, I have ever seen” if protesters try to breech the White House’s security fence.

Donald Trump supporter Michael Rooney of Des Moines argues with protesters outside of the Des Moines Police Department during a protest on Friday, May 29, 2020, in Des Moines. (Bryon Houlgrave/The Des Moines Register via AP)

Protesters move along a highway Friday, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

A Police officer warns a protester during an arrest at a rally Friday, May 29, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Police react to protesters in Atlanta on May 29, 2020. Protesters carried signs and chanted their messages of outrage over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (Ben Gray/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

A protester is arrested near Barclays Center in the Brooklyn borough of New York on Friday, May 29, 2020, following a rally to protest the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

A man throws a hand truck into the window of vandalized CVS store during a protest over the death of George Floyd Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Los Angeles. Floyd died in police custody Monday in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Protesters and National Guardsmen face off on East Lake Street, Friday, May 29, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Demonstrators burn garbage in Oakland, Calif., on Friday, May 29, 2020, while protesting the Monday death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

A protester rides his bike past a burning building that housed a check cashing business, Friday, May 29, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

A woman flashes the peace sign while walking backwards in a cloud of tear gas during a protest at 72nd and Dodge Streets on Friday, May 29, 2020. (Chris Machian/Omaha World-Herald via AP)

Police officers and protesters clash near CNN Center, Friday, May 29, 2020, in Atlanta, in response to George Floyd’s death in police custody in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Demonstrators rally in Oakland, Calif., on Friday, May 29, 2020, to protest the Monday death of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man in police custody in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

A protester confronts Kansas City police during a George Floyd protest at the Country Club Plaza in Kansas City, May 29, 2020. (Tammy Ljungblad/The Kansas City Star via AP)

A demonstrator attacks a police car during a protest over the death of George Floyd in downtown Los Angeles, Friday, May 29, 2020. Floyd died in the custody of the Minneapolis police on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Police officers rush past a burning police vehicle to disperse protesters during a protest over the death of George Floyd Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Los Angeles. Floyd died in police custody Monday in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

>A man runs out of a convenience store Friday, May 29, 2020, in Minneapolis. Protests continued following the death of George Floyd, who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on Memorial Day. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Red handprints cover a window at the Hall of Justice building in downtown Louisville, Ky., Friday, May 29, 2020. Breonna Taylor, a black woman, was fatally shot by police in her home in March. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

A Police vehicle burns after protesters rallied at Barclays Center over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died Memorial Day while in Minneapolis police custody, Friday, May 29, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Medical examiner: Floyd’s heart stopped while restrainedMINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A medical examiner on Monday classified George Floyd’s death as a homicide, saying his heart stopped as police restrained him and compressed his neck, in a widely seen video…  yesterday

 Go to the top

 

PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats, TED-Ed,  Google News, The Washington Post, and Colossal

PBS News: April 13 – 16, 2020, and Plastic Wars (full film) | FRONTLINE

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 TED-Ed: How pandemics spread

 Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Colossal: Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 16, 2020

Apr 16, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Thursday on the NewsHour, President Trump announces guidelines for ending pandemic shutdowns, as officials continue to debate when it will be safe to reopen businesses. Plus: Stories from Americans suffering the pandemic’s economic fallout, aid dries up for small businesses, can the airline industry survive COVID-19, ongoing debate over the origins of the novel coronavirus and much more. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Virus has taken millions of U.S. jobs, over 32,000 lives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d36tL… Personal stories of the pandemic’s economic fallout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl4tP… Why congressional relief for small business ran out so fast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQ3wh… Pandemic’s economic devastation even broader than it appears https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ6xH… Evaporation of travel sector threatens airlines’ survival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO2SK… News Wrap: Election victory for South Korea’s ruling party https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjVi8… Debate resurfaces over origins of novel coronavirus https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tyc5P… A Brooklyn ICU nurse on not feeling like a superhero https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZ8jB… Desperate for N95 masks, researchers test decontamination https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88ANm… Testing still a roadblock for Trump plan to reopen economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-MId… A Brief But Spectacular take on surviving COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSyU7… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 15, 2020

Apr 15, 2020 PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, President Trump seeks to reopen the U.S. economy soon, but state and local officials have concerns. Plus: Behind Trump’s criticism of the WHO, why the U.S. needs better COVID-19 testing, health care workers are stressed by PPE, how South Korea has controlled its outbreak, viewer COVID-19 questions, a White House update, life imitating art and teens cope with quarantine. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump says working groups planning U.S. economic resurgence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBLYH… News Wrap: Notre Dame Cathedral marks 1 year since fire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6bF_… Why Trump is criticizing WHO’s pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sX6HZ… Testing, treatment progress key to resuming American life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5n7S… Preparing to care for COVID-19 patients takes physical toll https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6fBN… How South Korea became a global leader in pandemic response https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqcru… A doctor answers viewer questions about COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5DPO… Trump says he’s confident U.S. is past the peak of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ycPe… In this quarantine art challenge, creativity begins at home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVXuu… How these teenagers are coping with social distancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2fWE… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 14, 2020

Apr 14, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, President Trump clashes with some state governors about when and how the U.S. economy should reopen. Plus: The damage COVID-19 has wrought in nursing homes, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont, a business view on lifting pandemic restrictions, college students struggle with an interrupted school year, locusts ravage East Africa, a White House update and #SongsOfComfort. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Trump, governors clash over path to reopening U.S. economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XsSA… News Wrap: Obama endorses Biden for president  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TF01u… ‘Incredibly alarming’ rise in nursing home COVID-19 deaths https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvD0J… How Gov. Ned Lamont says he’ll decide when to reopen Conn. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ty4u… After COVID-19, businesses will have to adapt to a new world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ueky… What interrupted school year means for some college students https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLRnk… East Africa faces dual threats of COVID-19 and locust swarms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO775… Trump says U.S. won’t fund WHO during pandemic https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzO7F… Accentuating the positive with #SongsOfComfort https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Hb_O… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 13, 2020

Apr 13, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Monday on the NewsHour, officials in the U.S. and across the globe weigh the risks of easing COVID-19 restrictions as the pandemic grinds on. Plus: Poor families suffer more from COVID-19, on the medical front lines in Detroit, how Spain is coping with coronavirus devastation, the Trump administration’s preparedness for crisis, a White House update, Politics Monday and a New Orleans grocery store. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Officials worldwide weigh risks of easing COVID-19 rules https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9Lsr… COVID-19 is exacerbating Detroit’s poverty and inequality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoVB3… Some encouraging signs emerge in Detroit’s coronavirus fight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ddjl… News Wrap: At least 30 dead as severe storms rake Deep South https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrAMj… How Spain is coping with the devastation of COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNvcR… What new reports reveal about Trump’s response to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GD3rn… Trump defends his initial pandemic response amid criticism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dSjq… Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on Sanders’ Biden endorsement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tZ8_… A New Orleans grocery store trying to sustain its community https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwAkC… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

How pandemics spread

Mar 11, 2012  TED-Ed

Dig into the history of pandemics to learn how viruses and disease spreads and what we can do to stop future outbreaks. — In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a plane and spread a virus across continents. Mark Honigsbaum describes the history of pandemics and how that knowledge can help halt future outbreaks. Lesson by Mark Honigsbaum, directed by Patrick Blower. Animator’s website: http://www.patrickblower.com Educator’s website: http://www.markhonigsbaum.co.uk Sign up for our newsletter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter Support us on Patreon: http://bit.ly/TEDEdPatreon Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/TEDEdFacebook Find us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TEDEdTwitter Peep us on Instagram: http://bit.ly/TEDEdInstagram View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemi…

Category  Education

Google News: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Worldwide cases

Cases
Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 2,157,108 277.41 543,519 144,047
United States 675,243 2,048.95 55,561 34,562
Spain 185,309 3,934.34 74,797 19,516
Italy 168,941 2,804.31 40,164 22,170
Germany 137,698 1,656.03 66,500 4,052
France 108,847 1,622.74 32,812 17,920
United Kingdom 103,093 1,551.77 13,729
China 82,367 58.75 77,944 3,342
Iran 77,995 935.97 52,229 4,869
Turkey 74,193 892.23 7,089 1,643
Belgium 34,809 3,020.45 7,526 4,857
Brazil 30,683 145.19 14,026 1,947

 Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

Plastic Wars (full film) | FRONTLINE

Premiered Mar 31, 2020  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Have efforts to solve the plastic pollution problem made it worse? Go inside the battle over plastics, recycling and what’s at stake. This journalism is made possible by viewers like you. Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate Love FRONTLINE? Find us on the PBS Video App where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/1BycsJW #RecyclingDocumentary #PlasticWars #frontlinePBS Despite efforts spreading across America to reduce the use of plastic and the crisis of ocean pollution growing, the plastics industry is rapidly scaling up new production and promoting a familiar solution: recycling. But it’s estimated that no more than 10% of plastic produced has ever been recycled. The documentary “Plastic Wars,” from FRONTLINE and NPR, reveals how plastic makers for decades have publicly promoted recycling, despite privately expressing doubts that widespread plastic recycling would ever be economically viable. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/frontlinepbs Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontlinepbs Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/frontline FRONTLINE is streaming more than 200 documentaries online, for free, here: http://to.pbs.org/hxRvQP Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Abrams Foundation, the Park Foundation, The John and Helen Glessner Family Trust, the Heising-Simons Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Category  News & Politics

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack

 

 

  By Angela Fritz
with Avi Selk
 Email

The latest

Covid-19 kills by inflaming and clogging the tiny air sacs in the lungs, choking off the body’s oxygen supply until it causes organ failure. But doctors are seeing that the virus may be causing heart inflammation, acute kidney disease, neurological malfunction, blood clots, intestinal damage and liver problems. Read about the new observations, which complicate treatment and make recovery less certain.

Trump on Tuesday ordered a halt on payments to the World Health Organization for what he called mismanagement of the pandemic. Although some countries have also been critical of the WHO, close U.S. allies said they vehemently disagreed with a suspension of payments and were not planning to follow suit. Bill Gates called the decision dangerous. “Halting funding for the World Health Organization during a world health crisis is as dangerous as it sounds,” he tweeted. “The world needs @WHO now more than ever.”

President Trump has been adamant in private discussions that he wants to lift distancing restrictions on May 1In response, FEMA and the CDC created a public health strategy to reopen parts of the country. Read what’s in the plan and how it would work.

As U.S. leaders discouraged mask use for the public in mid-March, the White House was racing to secure face coverings from Taiwan for senior staff. National Security Council officials worried that there were not enough masks at the White House complex, so they turned to a foreign government for help.

Now that billions of people all over the world are isolating in their homes, animals are roaming free. Wild boar has descended onto the streets of Barcelona. Mountain goats have overtaken a town in Wales. Whales are chugging into Mediterranean shipping lanes. And turtles are finally getting some peace. Read (and check out photos and video) about how the outbreak has allowed animals to take back what was once theirs.

A small-business program intended to swiftly fuel struggling companies has all but collapsed due to the enormous number of applications and the shortage of federal funds. The office usually assists businesses with geographically contained disasters such as hurricanes, but the coronavirus is widespread, which has it overwhelmed. Here’s what we know about the backlog and the proposals to keep the program afloat.

More than 9,000 health-care workers in the United States have tested positive for covid-19, the CDC found. They are mostly white, female and in their 40s, and although most were not sick enough to be hospitalized, 27 died. But the numbers could be a gross undercount, since some facilities are no longer testing their own employees due to lack of capability. Read the latest on how the outbreak is affecting the people on the front lines.

More important reads

In an unprecedented move, the Treasury Department ordered President Trump’s name to be printed on stimulus checks, a process that could slow their delivery by a few days, senior IRS officials said. 

Covid-19 checkpoints at state borders for non-residents are drawing complaints and legal scrutiny.

Grocery delivery was supposed to be the ultimate pandemic lifeline. But customers are reporting weeks-long waits on leading platforms.

The U.S. Postal Service needs a bailout if it’s going to survive in its current form after the coronavirus.

‘I’m a miracle walking’: A woman gave birth in a coma while fighting the covid-19. 

One tip: Arduous exercise can lower immunity, so don’t overdo it during the pandemic.

Banksy’s wife hates when he works from home

Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

Thick Greenery Swathes a Bamboo-and-Steel Complex in Indonesia

APRIL 13, 2020  GRACE EBERT

Images © Eric Dinardi and Ernest Theofilus

Realrich Architecture Workshop, aka RAW Architecture, completed Guha Bambu just this year, but the cascading vines, luxuriant shrubs, and grass-covered facades on the new project make it appear as an old building overtaken by nature. Each room of the nearly 6,500 square-foot complex has at least two entrances that often face north and south to exhibit the overflowing greenery.

Spanning three upper floors and two basement levels, the multi-use structure incorporates modern and traditional techniques like the fish mouth joint, which cuts the end of wood-like substance in a U-shape and positions another piece on top. It’s constructed using a combination of steel, wood, glass, metal, gypsum, bamboo, plastic, stone, and concrete.

Located in Tangerang, Indonesia, the new project is actually a renovation of the firm’s existing building named The Guild. It continues to house Omah Library, a dentist’s office, a private apartment, and RAW Architecture’s studio, which are separated at the entrance to prohibit the public from entering the private spaces. Each space is designed to be converted and reused for new tenants.

Follow RAW Architecture on Facebook for updates on its projects that merge lush botanicals and nature-based materials.  (via designboom)

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PBS News, Africanews, ABC (Australia), Sky News, Roylab Stats, Google, Nucleus Medical Media, The Washington Post and Late Night with Seth Meyers

 PBS News: April 11 – 12, 2020

 Africanews Live

 ABC (Australia) Live

 Sky News Live

 Roylab Stats: Coronavirus LIVE Count [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Nucleus Medical Media: COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Late Night with Seth Meyers: The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition

NewsHour Weekend full episode April 12, 2020

Apr 12, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, April 12, worshippers observe Easter Sunday from a distance as stay-at-home orders remain in place globally, and the coronavirus spreads in central Africa, just as the region nearly hit a milestone by defeating the Ebola virus. Also, social “dis-dancing” and the global disco that’s bringing people together. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode April 11, 2020

Apr 11, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, April 11, coronavirus cases in the U.S. grow to more than half a million, some people are turning to social media for financial help during the outbreak, what the data is telling us about being asymptomatic, and keeping the faith during the holidays in changing times. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics

Watch ABC News live

Started streaming on Mar 19, 2020  ABC News (Australia)

ABC News channel provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad. Including the latest coronavirus updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: http://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

  • Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019 Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

Google News

https://news.google.com/covid19/map?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US:en

Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 1,846,680 237.49 421,497 114,090
United States 559,409 1,697.46 33,115 22,071
Spain 166,831 3,542.03 62,391 17,209
Italy 156,363 2,595.52 34,211 19,899
Germany 127,854 1,537.64 52,889 3,022
France 95,403 1,422.31 27,186 14,393
United Kingdom 84,279 1,268.58 10,612
China 82,160 58.6 77,663 3,341
Iran 71,686 860.26 43,894 4,474
Turkey 56,956 684.94 3,446 1,198
Belgium 29,647 2,572.53 6,463 3,600
Netherlands 25,587 1,466.22 2,737
Switzerland 25,398 2,957.88 12,100 1,103
Canada 24,366 641.56 7,172 717
Brazil 22,169 104.9 1,223

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic

Presented by Slack
Friday, April 10, 2020 

By Avi Selk   Email

The latest

The economy is deteriorating “with alarming speed,” Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome H. Powell said Thursday, as nationwide quarantines have caused more than 17 million people to file jobless claims and some economists believe we are in a depressionWe report that “the nation has not experienced this magnitude of layoffs and economic contraction since the Great Depression, many experts say, and recovery is unlikely to be swift.”

The collapse is manifesting itself in eye-popping financial reports from states and cities: Illinois owes $8.3 billion in unpaid bills. New York could lose billions in tax revenue. Pennsylvania has stopped paying 9,000 quarantined state employees. Find further details on shortages in other parts of the country, as well as on the split in Congress over what to do about it.

Worried about the economy’s effect on his reelection prospects, President Trump is pushing to send Americans back to work before many health experts believe is safe. He has publicly suggested the worst of the outbreak will soon be over, and has privately asked aides for a strategy to resume business activity by May 1. Read about the White House push to reopen the country.

Lifting quarantines just as they are showing signs of reducing infections would lead to disaster, experts warn, because the United States still lacks the testing capabilities needed to identify and contain new outbreaks. It’s also unclear how Trump would force governors to relax stay-at-home orders in their states.

Ohio is emerging as a model example of how to manage the virus: identify it early, plan for the worst and hope for the best. Gov. Mike DeWine (R) shut down a major convention in early March, before the state had a single confirmed infection, and the Cleveland Clinic began planning to add hundreds of new hospital beds even earlier. That head start appears to be paying off, with Ohio reporting dramatically lower infection and death rates than similarly sized states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Illinois. More on its aggressive strategy here. Then check out a video from the state’s Department of Health that has gone viral as a crystal-clear visualization of how social distancing is meant to fight the virus’s spread.

More important reads

·  One chart puts this week’s awful unemployment numbers in perspective

·  Apple, Google debut major effort to help people track if they’ve been in contact with virus

·  Analysis: How advocates of a return to normal misrepresent death tolls

·  Rare voices from Iran’s outbreak tell of stumbling government, deluged hospitals

·  The European Union struck a deal to help its worst-hit countries, but still risks fracturing

·  “Speak the truth,” Obama tells mayors in coronavirus address. The biggest mistake any [of] us can make in these situations is to misinform. 

If you or someone you know would like to read Post coverage on the pandemic in Spanish, sign up for the Post Opinión, Edición Coronavirus newsletter to get updates and commentary straight to your inbox on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Your questions, answered

“The coronavirus started in bats, traveled around the world in people and has also infected felines. Could the corona end up infecting and spreading in our own bat population?”  — Susan Wetmore in Nebraska

Yes it could, and thank you for asking about the bats, which have been unfairly demonized for their role in the virus’s origin story.

The novel coronavirus is a species-hopper. Scientists believe it first incubated inside horseshoe bats in China — which have amazing immune systems that makes them unwitting hosts for many pathogens — and mutated to spread to humans last year.

Since then, the virus has infected at least 1.5 million people, but also some dogs, cats — even a tiger at the Bronx Zoo.

Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is worried the coronavirus could spread to North American bats such as the vesper bat, which last shared a common ancestor with the horseshoe bats of China approximately 50 million years ago. “They are about as different as bats get from one another,” Bruce Patterson, a curator of mammals at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, told The Post.

The chance is fairly low of the virus going full circle — from bats to people then back into bats on the other side of the planet. But, as The Post reports, it would be bad for bats and non-bats alike if it happened.

The North American bat population is already being decimated by an unrelated fungal disease, and their long-distance flight patterns could spread the coronavirus over a huge area if they became incubators.

There could even be a spill-back of [the novel coronavirus] from bats back into humans … which would make eradication of [the virus] unlikely,” U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service veterinarian Samantha Gibbs wrote in a notice to researchers, asking them to suspend all bat fieldwork, lest an infected scientist sicken a bat. Read the whole story for more.

Saturday, April 11, 2020 The latest

The United States has more confirmed covid-19 deaths than any other nationwith nearly 19,000 fatal cases, including more than 2,000 reported on Friday alone. The country also accounts for nearly 30 percent of the world’s known infections: about 500,000 out of more than 1.7 million, although all these figures are probably too low due to a general scarcity of coronavirus testing and suspect reports from such countries as China.

U.S. governors have asked Congress for $500 billion in rescue funds, as many states face massive budget shortfalls after paying for the public health responses at the outbreak’s front lines. The economic crisis has also pushed the Postal Service to the brink of collapse, we report in a story about President Trump’s refusal to bail out the mail service.

The IRS has created an online tool to help people who don’t file taxes, such as many Social Security recipients, get their stimulus payments sooner. Payments of up to $1,200 a person will be sent to most people’s bank accounts starting next week, according to the tax agency. Find out more about how you can track your payment.

Another stimulus program to loan $349 billion to small businesses is faltering, The Post reports: “Banks, tasked with disbursing the money, have been confused about the rules, which has delayed lending. Entrepreneurs are reporting troubles applying. And even some who make it through the application process say they’re facing dilemmas about how to use the money.” Read more here.

Concerned that last month’s stimulus package was too generous with unemployment benefits, Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia has tweaked rules to make it more difficult for gig workers to get money and easier for businesses to avoid paying workers sick and family leave. The full report can be found here.

The pandemic has turbocharged a movement to eliminate SAT and ACT testing requirements for college applicants. Advocates have argued for years that the tests penalize freshmen who lack access to good teachers and prep courses. We report that a record number of schools have made the tests optional in the past few weeks — “actions that could presage a broad shift away from admissions testing in higher education.”

A psychologist explains why the pandemic is making you dream about organizing a duck boat tour at an eerily deserted shopping mall where all the stores are shrouded in wrapping paper, or, you know, whatever’s on your subconscious.

Sunday, April 12, 2020 The latest

The brain trust behind the federal government’s war on the coronavirus is “a bureaucratic nesting doll” of oft-competing task forces that have produced no clear plan to end the crisis, The Washington Post reports. There is the official task force led by Vice President Pence; the “shadow task force” led by presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner; the new “Opening Our Country Council”; and a splinter group of medical professionals. And then there is President Trump, who often overrides and undermines whatever decisions these groups manage to make. Read our story on the problems with this system, based on interviews with 22 White House insiders.

Live updates

Track deaths and confirmed cases in the United States at the county level.

Follow the spread of the outbreak worldwide with our updating map.

Post reporters across the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day.

Read the latest about the cases and impact in the D.C. area.

How you can help people in need The Washington Post Helping Hand covid-19 relief campaign

Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.

Your questions, answered

I have heard that pollution has greatly decreased recently as a result of reduced air and vehicular traffic. Is this so? Is the impact large enough to convince those who do not ‘believe’ in global warming to see the wisdom in reducing emissions? — Christine in California

We can’t predict how people will respond to the evidence, but yes, the global economic shutdown appears to be significantly reducing all the muck in the atmosphere.

The notoriously smoggy Los Angeles region has seen marked drops in nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate pollution since residents were ordered to stay at home  — “the longest stretch of ‘good’ air quality in March seen since at least 1995,” The Post writes.

Similar improvements have been mapped in the Mid-Atlantic, Northeast, Ohio Valley and Southwest — and across the world as far away as China. And carbon dioxide emissions that drive global warming have temporarily relented, somewhat, after many flights were grounded.

It’s still unclear what this data means for the long-term health of the planet, but if there is any silver lining to the global crisis, it’s been the chance for scientists to study a drastic reduction in pollution in real time. Read our story for more details and check out maps comparing March 2019 to March 2020.

COVID-19 Animation: What Happens If You Get Coronavirus?

Mar 28, 2020  Nucleus Medical Media

This video animation on COVID-19 and the coronavirus is a collaboration between Nucleus Medical Media and our friends at the What If Channel. To watch super interesting hypothetical scenarios on the human body, humanity, the planet and the cosmos, please visit the What If Channel at https://www.youtube.com/WhatIfScience….

Category   Education

The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition

Apr 8, 2020  Late Night with Seth Meyers

Seth steps away from bleak and depressing news to share news stories about a Rhode Island liquor distillery making free hand sanitizer, a bagpipe player celebrating St. Patrick’s Day and a socially distant wedding. Subscribe to Late Night: http://bit.ly/LateNightSeth Watch Late Night with Seth Meyers Weeknights 12:35/11:35c on NBC. Get more Late Night with Seth Meyers: http://www.nbc.com/late-night-with-se… LATE NIGHT ON SOCIAL Follow Late Night on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LateNightSeth Like Late Night on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LateNightSeth Follow Late Night Instagram: http://instagram.com/LateNightSeth Late Night on Tumblr: http://latenightseth.tumblr.com/ Late Night with Seth Meyers on YouTube features A-list celebrity guests, memorable comedy, and topical monologue jokes. GET MORE NBC Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://NBCtv.tumblr.com/ YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/nbc NBC Instagram: http://instagram.com/nbctv The Kind of Story We Need Right Now: Coronavirus Good News Edition- Late Night with Seth Meyers https://youtu.be/aamLkhipjjg Late Night with Seth Meyers http://www.youtube.com/user/latenight…

Category   Comedy

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PBS News, Al Jazeera, DW News,  Roylab Stats, Google, The Washington Post, and Thisiscolossal  

PBS News: April 7 – 10, 2020, The potential consequences of the auto emissions rollback, and As the world stays home, will the environment improve?

 Al Jazeera English | Live

 DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

 Roylab Stats: [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

 Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Thisiscolossal: Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest, and An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 10, 2020

Apr 10, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Friday on the NewsHour, the global death toll from coronavirus passes the 100,000 mark. Plus: Sen. Bernie Sanders on ending his presidential campaign and responding to the pandemic, small business owners struggle for economic relief, sacred sites are empty and quiet during Holy Week, political analysis with Mark Shields and David Brooks and how Ina Garten is cooking through social distancing. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS Global deaths top 100,000; Trump talks of reopening economy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN5zX… Bernie Sanders on how he will support Joe Biden’s campaign https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHkim… News Wrap: Oil producers agree to cut global supply https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zvaL… Why it’s difficult for small businesses to get federal aid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bhrz… Pandemic turns Holy Week celebrations empty and silent https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWSA-… Shields and Brooks on COVID-19 suffering, Sanders’ exit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8aok… How Ina Garten is cooking through social distancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbmQD… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour live episode, Apr 9, 2020

Streamed live 9 hours ago

PBS NewsHour

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 8, 2020

Apr 8, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Wednesday on the NewsHour, the human cost of the novel coronavirus pandemic continues to rise worldwide, but there are some signs of hope. Plus: Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., ends his presidential bid, Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on his state’s pandemic response, an ER doctor in New York on treating and surviving COVID-19, homeless in a pandemic, U.S. Navy upheaval and coronavirus in Scandinavia. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour full episode, Apr 7, 2020

Apr 7, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Tuesday on the NewsHour, although U.S. coronavirus deaths keep rising, there are signs of hope in the New York epicenter. Plus: A conversation with Bill Gates about responding to COVID-19, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on the effort to find PPE, EMTs on the front lines of the health crisis and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on what early COVID-19 data tells us about racial disparities in health care. WATCH TODAY’S SEGMENTS New York sees signs of virus plateau; Wuhan lockdown lifted https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cio3J… Bill Gates on where the COVID-19 pandemic will hurt the most https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3qz9… News Wrap: Acting Navy secretary resigns after controversy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tw4AX… Md. Gov. Larry Hogan on efforts to catch up to COVID-19 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wqrwt… What 2 EMTs are seeing as they respond to NY virus outbreak https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAZEK… Chicago’s mayor on racial disparities in COVID-19 data https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9t0j… 2 views on Wisconsin’s holding in-person voting Tuesday  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s98nF… Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

The potential consequences of the auto emissions rollback

Apr 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

Earlier this week, in the midst of the global coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration relaxed automobile fuel efficiency standards that were put in place under the Obama administration to combat climate change. Coral Davenport, energy and environment policy reporter for The New York Times, joins Hari Sreenivasan for more on the potential consequences of the decision. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

As the world stays home, will the environment improve?

Apr 4, 2020  PBS NewsHour

As more and more people stay at home during the pandemic, millions of vehicles are no longer on the roads and the skies are comparatively free of airplanes. Many other human activities that cause air pollution also have been scaled back. But will this lull in activity make a difference in the air we breathe or the future of climate change? NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker reports. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020 Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019  DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming 15 hours ago   Roylab Stats

Coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases and recovered cases. I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the spread of coronavirus. For anyone that wants to know the real-time progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. The purpose of this stream is to show basic information and data to understand the situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites.

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

Google: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) information

Worldwide cases

 Cases

Location Confirmed Cases per 1M people Recovered Deaths
Worldwide 1,696,139 218.13 376,200 102,669
United States 504,780 1,531.7 28,993 18,763
Spain 158,273 3,360.33 55,668 16,081
Italy 147,577 2,449.68 30,445 18,849
Germany 122,215 1,469.83 42,155 2,707
France 90,676 1,351.84 24,932 13,197
China 81,953 58.45 77,525 3,339
United Kingdom 73,758 1,110.22 8,958
Iran 68,192 818.33 35,465 4,232

Source:Wikipedia·

About this data

Description

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a new virus.

The disease causes respiratory illness (like the flu) with symptoms such as a cough, fever, and in more severe cases, difficulty breathing. You can protect yourself by washing your hands frequently, avoiding touching your face, and avoiding close contact (1 meter or 3 feet) with people who are unwell.

HOW IT SPREADS

Coronavirus disease spreads primarily through contact with an infected person when they cough or sneeze. It also spreads when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Learn more on who.int

For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.

Source: World Health OrganizationLearn more

Resources from Google

Google tools and resources to help you stay informed and connected

COVID-19 resources

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.google.com/search?q=coronavirus+tips&oi=ddle&ct=153021071&hl=en&source=doodle-ntp&ved=0ahUKEwinkaaq39LoAhVOmHIEHRYHDQIQPQgB

The Washington Post: Coronavirus Updates

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack
Saturday, April 4, 2020

By Avi Selk   Email
The latest

This newsletter usually opens with the U.S. death toll, but today let’s spend a moment on the day toll: The early days of the spread of the coronavirus in which crucial opportunities to respond were squandered by systemic federal government failures, as chronicled in several new stories.

Seventy days elapsed from the first time the White House was formally notified of the outbreak in China on Jan. 3 until President Trump began to treat the virus “as a lethal force that had outflanked America’s defenses and was poised to kill tens of thousands of citizens,” according to Washington Post reporting based on 47 interviews with administration officials, public health experts, intelligence officers and others.

Twenty-one days in February were lost as the administration relied on a coronavirus test known to be flawed and prevented private labs from deploying better ones, blinding doctors and scientists as the virus spread across the country. Read our deep dive into scientists’ alarm and exasperation during that period.

Eighteen months ago — long before the outbreak — “the Trump administration received detailed plans for a new machine designed to churn out millions of protective respirator masks at high speed during a pandemic,” we report in another story. It was never built, and the U.S. government is now so desperate for masks it has asked 3M to stop sending them to Canada and other countries, prompting Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to warn the United States would be “hurting itself as much as Canada” because essential goods and services flow both ways.

Eleven days from now, the country will need 32,000 ventilators, far more than are in the government stockpile, according to an estimate by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Because U.S. officials played down the virus for so long, Ford and General Motors only recently overhauled their factories to make the machines, and the bulk of their production won’t come on line until May. Read more here.

These cumulative problems mean “the United States will likely go down as the country that was supposedly best prepared to fight a pandemic but ended up catastrophically overmatched by the novel coronavirus, sustaining heavier casualties than any other nation,” we write in our story on the 70 lost days.

Other numbers: The U.S. has suffered more than 7,800 deaths and more than 290,000 confirmed infections from the virus. The jobless rate jumped to 4.4 percent in March, its sharpest one-month rise since 1975. Millions of Americans have been laid off or furloughed, more than 60,000 stores have shuttered, and analysts say many of them will never open again. A week after Trump signed a $2.2 trillion stimulus bill, key Democrats are already talking about another one.

And new signs of dysfunction: After a behind-the-scenes debate between officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and White House officials, Trump unenthusiastically announced the agency’s recommendation that Americans start wearing face coverings in public. Even as he shared the guidance, Trump said he would not follow it himself. Read more about that here.

Live updates

Track deaths and confirmed cases in the U.S. at the county level.

Follow the spread of the outbreak worldwide with our updating map.

Post reporters across the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day.

Read live updates about the cases and impact in the D.C. area.

How you can help people in need The Washington Post Helping Hand covid-19 relief campaign

Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.

 

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic.
Presented by Slack

Sunday, April 5, 2020

By Avi Selk   Email

 

The latest

“This is going to be the hardest and saddest week of most Americans’ lives, Surgeon General Jerome M. Adams said on Fox News today, as hospitals in the New York region and other high-infection areas brace for an expected surge in patients and deaths. “This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment, only it’s not going to be localized. It’s going to be happening all over the country.”

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) said his state could run out of ventilators as soon as Thursday, and ICU beds two days later. Some other states are projecting the crisis to peak in late April or May.

We sent reporters to the front lines: two rarely-seen treatment centers in New York, which already accounts for almost half the nation’s 9,000-plus coronavirus deaths. Read what it’s like inside Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, where 80 percent of patients have the virus, visitors are banned and an ICU nurse sings to the dying, though most can no longer hear her.

Then read about the surreal scene in Manhattan, where a 2.1 million-square-foot convention center has been turned into a militarized hospital: “Here, if someone ‘pops hot,’ as one soldier said, they’ll be descended upon by medics and rushed to an isolation tent.”

President Trump said 1,000 military doctors and nurses will deploy to New York City, and urged states to share any spare ventilators with others amid a national shortage. Oregon has pledged to donate most of its reserve supply of ventilators to New York — though those 140 machines will still leave the nation’s coronavirus epicenter far short of what state officials say are needed.

A Post analysis of more than 3,600 deaths in 13 states found evidence of a strange pattern that doctors have been reporting anecdotally: The virus appears to be killing significantly more men than women, for reasons no one can explain. The U.S. death toll is almost certainly being undercounted due to a shortage of tests, federal health officials acknowledge. Read about what that means here.

We have another insider piece, in the form of a column by David Ignatius, on the unusual ouster of Navy Capt. Brett Crozier, who was removed from command of a virus-stricken aircraft carrier in Guam after he wrote a plea for help to his superiors that leaked to the media. “Breaking news: Trump wants him fired,” Acting Navy secretary Thomas Modly reportedly told a colleague the day before he personally removed Crozier from the ship.

Mental health check: It’s not easy for any of us to contend with all the grim news while we watch everything that was familiar about our daily lives fade away. It can actually be dangerous, if we fail to recognize signs of serious maladies amid the chaos. We talked with mental health professionals about how you can take an honest look at yourself and determine what type of help you might need. Please read it, and be safe.

Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

Stunning Shots Take Top Prizes in the 2019 Natural History Museum Wildlife Photographer of the Year Contest

OCTOBER 17, 2019  LAURA STAUGAITIS

Land of the eagle by Audun Rikardsen, Norway. Winner 2019, Behaviour: Birds. All images © their respective photographers, and shared courtesy of Natural History Museum, London

This week, London’s Natural History Museum announced the winners of its 55th Wildlife Photographer of the Year showcase. More than 48,000 amateur and professional photographers from 100 countries shared their best shots and a jury of nine experts selected the winners. Some of this year’s jurors included Kathy Moran, Senior Editor for Natural History at National Geographic Magazine; nature photographer Theo Bosboom; Melissa Dale, Acting Director of Photography at The Nature Conservancy; conservation photojournalist Paul Hilton; and writer and editor Rosamund ‘Roz’ Kidman Cox OBE, who chaired the committee.

The nineteen winners were selected across categories including animal behavior of mammals, birds, and invertebrates, along with animal portraits, plants and fungi, earth’s environment, and special categories for youth and emerging photographers. We’ve included 10 of our favorites here, including a golden eagle about to land by Audun Rikardsen, a life-or-death duel between a marmot and a fox by Yongqing Bao, and a hummingbird hawkmoth caught mid-sip by Thomas Easterbrook. To see more of the top finishers, check out our September coverage of this year’s finalists, and see the full show at the Natural History Museum in London now through May 31, 2020. Submissions for the 2020 competition open on October 21, 2019.

The architectural army by Daniel Kronauer, USA. Winner 2019, Behaviour: Invertebrates

The equal match by Ingo Arndt, Germany. Joint Winner 2019, Behaviour: Mammals

Tapestry of life by Zorica Kovacevic, Serbia/USA. Winner 2019, Plants and Fungi

Snow-plateau nomads by Shangzhen Fan China. Winner 2019, Animals in Their Environment

The moment by Yongqing Bao, China. Joint Winner 2019, Behaviour: Mammals

Early riser by Riccardo Marchgiani, Italy. Winner 2019, 15-17 years old

Face of deception by Ripan Biswas, India. Winner 2019, Animal Portraits

The huddle by Stefan Christmann, Germany. Winner 2019, Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio Award

Humming surprise by Thomas Easterbrook, UK. Winner 2019, 10 years and under

Pennsylvania man captures all walks of life crossing log bridge

Aug 30, 2019  WSLS 10

The video, taken year-round, shows bears, deer, bobcats, grouse, beavers and many other wildlife crossing the bridge, or swimming underneath in their natural habitats. Credit: Robert Bush.

Category  Pets & Animals

An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

An Almost Comically Diverse Parade of Wildlife Crosses a Log Bridge in Pennsylvania

MARCH 3, 2020  GRACE EBERT

A log in Pennsylvania has gotten a lot of foot—and talon and paw—traffic during the last year. In trail camera footage captured by photographer Robert Bush Sr., local wildlife is shown crossing the downed tree throughout 2018 and 2019. A black bear frequents the location, in addition to grouse, bobcats, deer, squirrels, and beavers, which all are caught scurrying over the log or wading through the water. Despite their regular visits, though, none of the species seem to run into each other. For more clips of the animals’ travel routines, head to Bush’s Facebook and YouTube pages. (via Laughing Squid)

Go to the top

PBS News, Africanews, Al Jazeera, ABC (Australia), CNA 24/7, Sky News, DW News, CTV News, Roylab Stats, CNN – Fareed Zakaria and The Washington Post

PBS News, Africanews, Al Jazeera, ABC (Australia), CNA 24/7, Sky News, DW News, CTV News, Roylab Stats, CNN – Fareed Zakaria and The Washington Post

PBS News: March 28 – 29, 2020

africanews Live,

Al Jazeera English – Live

ABC News (Australia) Live

 [CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries,

Sky News live

CTV News Channel: ongoing coverage and LIVE updates of the COVID-19 outbreak.

DW News Livestream – Latest news and breaking stories

TED Talks: Seth Berkley The quest for the coronavirus vaccine?, and  Seth Berkley The troubling reason  why vaccines are made too late if they re made at all

CNN:  CNN’s Fareed Zakaria gives his take on why the US has struggled to mount an effective response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Washington Post: Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic by Slack

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 29, 2020

•Mar 29, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Sunday, March 29, the latest on the coronavirus outbreak, how renters are impacted by the pandemic, the complications of the virus for incarcerated people, and welcoming a bundle of joy in trying times. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode March 28, 2020

Mar 28, 2020  PBS NewsHour

On this edition for Saturday, March 28, more than 600,000 people around the world are now infected with the coronavirus, the pandemic strains the health care safety net as people file for unemployment by the millions, and will the new federal stimulus package give a boost to the concept of universal basic income? Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6

africanews Live

Started streaming on Feb 20, 2020

africanews

Africanews is a new pan-African media pioneering multilingual and independent news telling expertise in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subscribe on ourYoutube channel : https://www.youtube.com/c/africanews?… Africanews is available in English and French. Website : www.africanews.com Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/africanews.c… Twitter : https://twitter.com/africanews

Category  News & Politics 

Al Jazeera English | Live

Started streaming on Jan 15, 2020   Al Jazeera English

@Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people’s lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a ‘voice to the voiceless’. Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world’s most respected news and current affairs channels. Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ #AlJazeeraEnglish #BreakingNews #AlJazeeraLive

Category  News & Politics

Watch ABC News live

Started streaming on Mar 19, 2020  ABC News (Australia)

ABC News channel provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad. Including the latest coronavirus updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. This embedding tool is not for use by commercial parties. ABC News Homepage: http://abc.net.au/news Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au

Category  News & Politics

[CNA 24/7 LIVE] Breaking news, top stories and documentaries

Started streaming on Jan 1, 2020  CNA

Watch CNA’s 24-hour live coverage of the latest headlines and top stories from Singapore, Asia and around the world, as well as documentaries and features that bring you a deeper look at Singapore and Asian issues. CNA is a regional broadcaster headquartered in Singapore. Get the programming schedule here: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/… Subscribe to our channel here: https://cna.asia/youtubesub Subscribe to our news service on Telegram: https://cna.asia/telegram Follow us: CNA: https://cna.asia CNA Lifestyle: http://www.cnalifestyle.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/channelnewsasia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/channelnews… Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/channelnewsasia

Category  News & Politics

Watch Sky News live

Started streaming on Nov 2, 2019   Sky News

Today’s top stories: Boris tells adults the best present they can give their mother for Mother’s Day is to stay away, the health secretary has said 4,500 retired healthcare workers have signed up to help battle coronavirus and lockdown in the Italian region of Lombardy has been tightened as the country confirmed more than 53,500 cases of COVID-19. ? Boris Johnson warns of ‘stark’ and ‘accelerating’ coronavirus numbers ahead of Mother’s Day https://trib.al/lrbMq77 ? 4,500 retired doctors and nurses sign up to battle COVID-19 pandemic https://trib.al/LYsfa83 ? Lockdown tightens in parts of Italy hardest hit by COVID-19 https://trib.al/oBdZFdy SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skynews Sky News videos are now available in Spanish here/Los video de Sky News están disponibles en español aquí https://www.youtube.com/skynewsespanol For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: Apple https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n… Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de…

Category  News & Politics

DW News Livestream | Latest news and breaking stories

Started streaming on Jan 21, 2019   DW News

DW News goes deep beneath the surface, providing the key stories from Europe and around the world. Exciting reports and interviews from the worlds of politics, business, sports, culture and social media are presented by our DW anchors in 15-, 30- and 60-minute shows. Correspondents on the ground and experts in the studio deliver detailed insights and analysis of issues that affect our viewers around the world. We combine our expertise on Germany and Europe with a special interest in Africa and Asia while keeping track of stories from the rest of the world. Informative, entertaining and up-to-date – DW News, connecting the dots for our viewers across the globe. Deutsche Welle is Germany’s international broadcaster. We convey a comprehensive image of Germany, report events and developments, incorporate German and other perspectives in a journalistically independent manner. By doing so we promote understanding between cultures and peoples. #dwNews #LiveNews #NewsToday

Category  News & Politics

https://www.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=64268

CTV News Channel LIVE | CP24.com

www.cp24.com › video (Canada)

Jun 7, 2016

CTV News Channel ongoing coverage and LIVE updates of the COVID-19 outbreak.

[LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News

Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

Novel coronavirus Live Streaming: Breaking news, world Map and live counter on confirmed cases, recovered cases(COVID-19). I started this live stream on Jan 26th, and since Jan 30th I have been streaming this without stopping. Many people are worried about the coronavirus spreading. For anyone that wants to know the numbers and progression of the worldwide spread of this virus, I offer this live stream. The purpose is not to instill fear or panic, nor is it to necessarily comfort; I just want to present the data to help inform the public of the current situation. At first, I tried to show only official data from governments without any manipulation. But many people wanted to apply an up-to-date format of data to stream. I added a procedure to manually manipulate data with my computer. After seeing the inflicted countries numbers had sharply increased, I realized that I could no longer keep up with new information from 100 countries. So I made another procedure which enables moderators the ability to manipulate the numbers on screen remotely. Not only the moderators who willingly accepted the hard work, but also everyone that gave us reliable information were able to add streaming data. The role of this streaming is to show basic information to undertand situation easily. For detail information, please visit our reference sites. References: 1. WORLDOMETER: https://www.worldometers.info/coronav… 2. BNO News: https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/02… 3. JHU CSEE: https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/ap… 4. 1point3acres (for USA/CAN):https://coronavirus.1point3acres.com/en 5. RiskLayer (DEU): http://www.risklayer-explorer.com/eve… 6. MorgenPost (DEU): https://interaktiv.morgenpost.de/coro… 7. DXY (CHN): https://ncov.dxy.cn/ncovh5/view/pneum… 8. J.A.G Japan (JPN): https://jagjapan.maps.arcgis.com/apps… 9. VG (NOR): https://www.vg.no/spesial/2020/corona… 10. Wiki – Brazil page (BRA): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_co… I majored in life science and joined bioinformatics laboratory for master degree. At that time I used python. Since I decided to change my career as dentist, I have been stopped programming for 15 years. Now, I start to learn more about python with googling. Because my job doesn’t allow mistakes, I won’t try something new works. Still I am wondering how can i start this live streaming. Sometimes python program doesn’t work as i intended. If I can devote all my free time to this live stream, I would give more accurate and faster information. But please understand that I can’t manipulate data all day. While I am working and sleeping, data gathering is done automatically. I live in South Korea. At the beginning of streaming, the number of confirmed cases were not so high in South Korea. After sudden appearing local transmission that can’t be trackable, the number has been dramatically increased. Please be warned that COVID-19 is highly contagious disease. Although the stream started off crude and basic, many people have supported me in improving and maintaining this. It is because of your support that I am encouraged to keep streaming. I especially appreciate all moderators for willingly accepting the role. They have given their precious time to making this live stream better – Max Mustermann, Stephanie Hughes, Random, Entrenched Trader, Droid Knight, Craft Fan, Fries, jlpowell73, The NCV, Josh Leathers,The Eldritch God, srpk khin, Hitz1001, Red Chiref, GildArt by Gilda, emmamec, lambi, AmberLeanne, DukeHeart, Green Rock Films, Charlie and amithist57. I hope this live stream can be a useful source of information for you. Please keep track of the numbers that impact you and let them inform the decisions you make when you have to make them. Please take care. Keeping good immunity is very important!!! Please sleep, eat and rest fully for resilience. Keep those affected by this unfortunate outbreak in your thoughts. Data1 – screen numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Data2 – Daily numbers https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/… Eyes_of_Glory/ Heaven_and_Hell / Heaven_and_Hell_Part_2 / Hero_Down/ Into_the_Sky / Lonely_Troutman / Lonely_Troutman_II / Parzival / Mountain/The_Heartache Hero Down: http://incompetech.com/ from www.bensound.com from www.epidemicsound.com

Category  News & Politics

When will the coronavirus vaccine be ready? Epidemiologist Seth Berkley (head of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance) takes us inside the effort to create a vaccine for COVID-19. With clarity and urgency, he explains what makes it so challenging to develop, when we can expect it to be rolled out at scale and why we’ll need global collaboration to get it done. (This virtual conversation is part of the TED Connects series, hosted by head of TED Chris Anderson and current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers. Recorded March 26, 2020)

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

Chris Anderson · Head of TED

After a long career in journalism and publishing, Chris Anderson became the curator of the TED Conference in 2002 and has developed it as a platform for identifying and disseminating ideas worth spreading.

Whitney Pennington Rodgers · TED Current Affairs Curator

Whitney Pennington Rodgers is an award-winning journalist and media professional.

MORE RESOURCES

TED Connects

TED Connects is a live, daily conversation series featuring experts whose ideas can help us reflect and work through this coronavirus pandemic with a sense of responsibility, compassion and wisdom.

More at TED.com ?

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LEARN

Learn more about Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and their work creating life-saving vaccines.

Learn more ?

82,801 views

TED Connects | March 2020

It seems like we wait for a disastrous disease outbreak before we get serious about making a vaccine for it. Seth Berkley lays out the market realities and unbalanced risks behind why we aren’t making vaccines for the world’s biggest diseases.

This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Seth Berkley · Vaccine visionary

Epidemiologist Seth Berkley is leading the charge to make sure vaccines are available to everyone, including those living in the developing world.

TED2015 | March 2015

Fareed Zakaria: Trump’s claim turned out to be a cruel hoax

Mar 29, 2020  CNN

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria gives his take on why the US has struggled to mount an effective response to the coronavirus pandemic. ? #CNN #News

Category  News & Politics

The Washington Post

Important developments in the coronavirus pandemic. Presented by Slack

 
By Avi Selk
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The latest The White House will decide this week whether to relax national social distancing guidelines against the advice of medical experts, even as the coronavirus death toll accelerates in the United States, with more than 2,200 fatalities among 130,000 confirmed infections. State officials reported nearly 450 deaths on Saturday alone. A 15-day plan advising most Americans to slow the virus’s spread by staying at home and avoiding groups of more than 10 people expires Monday. With the economy in tatters, Republican lawmakers and conservative economists have urged President Trump to roll the measures back. Doctors and public health officials warn any rollback could trigger new waves of disease and death. Even now, the virus is overwhelming hospitals, draining medical supply stockpiles and spreading undetected due to a shortage of tests. The United States could record 100,000 to 200,000 deaths and millions of infections, according to current but rapidly evolving projections, White House task force member Anthony S. Fauci said Sunday on CNN. His comments came as another prominent member of the task force, Deborah Birx, offered a similarly grim assessment: “No state, no metro area, will be spared.” Trump will review infection data before making a decision, Vice President Pence, who leads the coronavirus task force, said on Fox News this weekend. “While the president has said he’d like to open the country up in weeks not months,” Pence said, “ultimately, the president will make a decision that he believes is in the best interest of all of the American people.” Trump has whipsawed between contradictory plans in his comments, sowing confusion among state officials and the public. He said last week he would like to open things up to very large sections of our country” as soon as Easter. On Saturday, the president said he might quarantine New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut from the rest of the country by the end of the day, blindsiding governors in those states andcausing some people to flee New York City. Ultimately, he scrapped the idea hours later, via tweet. The president might lack the power to send the country back to work, even if he decides to try. Governors “will have the final say on when restaurants, stores and other gathering places in their states can reopen,” The Washington Post reported. Some governors have been coordinating with each other across party lines, creating an alternate power center to the White House. Meanwhile, the virus is spreading from coastal hotspots into the country’s interior. We report that “officials in Boston, Detroit, Chicago, Atlanta, Milwaukee and Los Angeles are watching caseloads climb and taking extraordinary measures to prepare,” including turning the continent’s largest convention center into a makeshift hospital. Millions of Americans are on the move to less infected towns and cities, or even to the edge of wilderness — a mass migration that “might contain the seeds of a wholesale shift in where and how Americans live.” A Post analysis of more than a dozen large cities found a notable decline in crime since mass quarantines went into effect. Police officers, however, have been catching the virus in some of those same cities. Three officers in Houston, for example, tested positive after fighting a suspect with feverlike symptoms.  Other countries face their own forms of chaos. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi apologized “to my underprivileged brothers and sisters” after a lockdown of the country’s 1.3 billion residents and its train system forced tens of thousands of migrants to walk back to their villages — some for hundreds of miles. Thousands of American travelers have been stranded in the country.  In Europe, Spain and Italy still face daily death tolls in the hundreds despite lockdowns. Australia has told people not to go outside in groups of more than two as the infection proliferates in every corner of the world. Still, there is some good news. South Korea, with a viral tracking system far better than most countries, announced this weekend that its recoveries now outpace and outnumber infections. China’s infection rate appears to have stabilized after an ultra-strict quarantine program, though visitors from abroad are still spreading the disease, and some doubt the accuracy of the government’s reports. And a 101-year old man in Italy recovered from the virus, according to local authorities. Identified only as “Mr. P,” he was born during the 20th century’s greatest pandemic, in 1919. Content from Slack How to work from home while being your best self Working from home can feel isolating, but it doesn’t have to. We’ve compiled our top tips for connecting with coworkers.   Get more done with Slack, the channel-based messaging platform that helps you work better together.
 
Live updates Track deaths and confirmed cases in the United States at the county level. Follow the spread of the outbreak around the world with our updating map. Post reporters around the world are publishing live dispatches 24 hours a day. Read live updates about the cases and impact in the D.C. area. How you can help people in needduring the outbreak. Submit a question and The Post may answer it in a future story, live chat or newsletter.
 
Your questions, answeredI read that you can self-test yourself by holding your breath for 10 seconds. If you can hold your breath for 10 seconds, then you don’t have respiratory problem and don’t have covid-19. Is this true? — Larry, California No, this is bad information that has been spreading over social media. “Most young patients with coronavirus will be able to hold their breaths for much longer than 10 seconds. And many elderly without the virus won’t be able to do it,” the University of Maryland’s chief of infectious diseases, Faheem Younus, tweeted last week. (Read that thread for other bogus coronavirus tips.) The early covid-19 symptoms to watch for are a fever, cough and shortness of breath, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  However, research suggests that even people with no apparent symptoms could have the disease and spread it to others. That’s why medical experts recommend behaving as if you have the virus: avoid contact with others as much as possible, wash your hands thoroughly and consult a medical professional if you show symptoms.
 
Today’s top reads Find more stories, analysis and op-eds about the outbreak on our coronavirus page, including: What to do if you don’t have money for rent or your mortgageA history of the Trump War on Media — the obsession not even coronavirus could stopThe toilet paper crisis Hawaii has never forgottenAs cases explode in Iran, U.S. sanctions hinder its access to drugs and medical equipment

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