Cherry Blossoms at Branch Brook Park, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Cherry Blossoms at Branch Brook Park, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

I miss visiting the Cherry Blossoms at Branch Brook Park, Newark, New Jersey in Spring time. We usually started our trips from the beginning of the month of April, almost every year for more than forty years. We enjoyed strolling under the cherry blossom trees, and seeing children running around with parents watching, while wearing their best dresses and suits to welcome the cherry blossoms in spring.  Some Cherry trees often have just started to open the little buds of flowers and some are in full bloom with white, light pink, dark pink and red of little flowers in clusters on every branches of the cherry trees. It is so beautiful!!

I was in awe when I saw the cherry blossoms the first time, and I promised myself that I would visit this magic and beautiful land of cherry blossoms every year.  It was such a happy time that we looked forward to with our family.  There was always a special lunch, on a blanket under the cherry trees with the comfort of spring temperature, and baking the warm sun in the afternoon. We enjoyed seeing other families and people that came to admire the Cherry Blossoms.  Even though we did not know them, there was the feeling of community, we smiled at each other and said hello to the people who passed by us.  It was a time of happiness, harmony, and peace as humanity celebrated nature that provided us peace and comfort in the spring time.


 

John with Hunter, our neighbor’s son who came to see me every Saturday to study beginning math lessons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we know that most of the country is locked down, we can go out only to get food and in emergency situation.  I have been in our apartment since March 12.  On March 10, I went to the hospital for our second grandson’s birth.  Then I stayed two nights with our four-year-old, first grandson.  Since then I did not go out anywhere.  My husband, John Watts are my provider, he went out to get food and necessity items that we need for during this lockdown of Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  The whole world is in the same situation as US.  From the end of December 2019, the coronavirus took place in Wuhan, China and the coronavirus has been spread out all over the world, up to today, Saturday, April 4, 2020, 2:08 P.M.

 [LIVE] Coronavirus Pandemic: Real Time Counter, World Map, News                          Started streaming on Jan 29, 2020   Roylab Stats

 COVID-19 LIVE WORLD MAP/COUNT

 TOTLE CASES: 1,180,725

 TOTLE DEATHS: 63,951

 TOTLE RECOVERIED:  245,344

 TERRITORIES:  208

 I went to view my Cherry Blossom posts in my website and in the photograph files of the Cherry Blossoms that we took for many years.  I enjoy viewing the photographs.  They remind me of happy times we had together with family and the community.  I decided to select some of the photographs to post on my website.  I hope that it will give the viewers some smiles or pleasant feeling that Cherry Blossom in Newark, New Jersey faithfully give pleasure to the community every year in Spring.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, April 4, 2020

For more photographs and information please visit the following link:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/?page_id=124

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Welcome to The World Bodhi

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and Mali DeSantis

Artwork by John Watts

🙂 🙂 🙂Happy Birthday Bodhi 🙂 🙂 🙂

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

🙂 🙂 🙂Happy Birthday Bodhi 🙂 🙂 🙂

Bodhi’s First Day on Earth, Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

New born, Baby Bodhi, Big Brother Kai, Mommy Mali and Daddy Jim (James DeSantis), Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

Big brother, Kai holds Baby Bodhi for the first time on Tuesday, March 10, 2020

New born, Baby Bodhi, Big Brother Kai, Mommy Mali, Grandma Ing from Thailand, Grandma Maria DeSantis from Italy, and Grandpa Jim DeSantis, descendant of Italian and Polish, on Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

Bodhi and Grandma Maria DeSantis

Bodhi and Grandpa Jim DeSantis

Grandma Maria is taking photos of Bodhi.

Grandpa John, from Wales, UK, could not come to the hospital for the birth of Bodhi, Mommy Mali called him on his iPad at home.  He was so glad to see the new born, Bodhi, on Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

New born, Baby Bodhi was born with a full head of spiky red hair.

Big brother, Kai is gently touching Baby Bodhi head and fingers and, in his mind, saying “I will take care of you my little brother.”.

Daddy holds Baby Bodhi’s hand with all his love and care.  Mommy is so happy to see that finally Baby Bodhi is here, joining with all the family and grownups to be healthy and strong like Big brother Kai.

You talking to me Brother Kai?

Brother Kai!  See!  My tongue is coming out just like yours.

Yes Mommy, I am sorry.

Daddy is carrying me carefully and gently to Mommy for my second drink of Mommy’s milk.

                             🙂  Thank you, Mommy, I am very hungry 🙂

Big Brother, Kai is very Happy to have his Baby Brother, Bodhi on Tuesday, March 10, 2020.

I went out to our small garden to take photographs of our little group of daffodils that have some flowers blooming.  I realized that today is the first day of spring.  I would like to welcome the plants that are starting to show their beautiful flowers from the long sleep during the winter cold. 

As I was looking at photographs of our second new born grandson, baby Bodhi, I thought that this is a great time for me to celebrate and share our new born grandson Bodhi with the world.  This healthy human came to the world giving us happiness and joy, despite the circumstances of the world. 

We will overcome the plight of the coronavirus (COVID-19).  Scientists will find some medication to cure the disease.  This moment makes all people realize that we are part of one humanity.  If one country is in trouble, the whole world will feel the consequence.  It is only a matter of time for the ripple effect to reach the whole world. 

Although trouble comes to us, love still prevails. Our little baby grandson, Bodhi heals our suffering.  He gives us happiness, and joy, for the spring that is arriving, with flowers blooming.  Freshness and beauty will be with us all again.

🙂 Have a Happy Spring Everyone 🙂

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Friday, March 19, 2020

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Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17 & 18

Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17

The Halsey Street Festival, Part 3, Thursday, September 19, 2019,

On Halsey Street between Bleaker Street and New Street, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA

John Watts demonstrated pottery,

Ing’s Peace Project, Ing & Johns Artwork,

A lot of Merchants, Food, Music and Fashion Show

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

More people came to enjoy the activities that The Halsey Street Festival presented.  I brought my Peace Poster offering to the participants of the festival to express their thought on “What does Peace mean to You?” or to them.

I brought Kai’s books for the boy to look at in case he got tired of adult business.

I was very glad to see more people were willing to record their thoughts on Peace.

People were lined up to see john throwing a large pot.

I was glad to see the group of young women who are studying at NJIT (New Jersey Institute of Technology) where I graduated with a master’s degree in Polymer Chemistry in 1980.

This artwork is my – Finished “Peace” artwork 8

Shadow of Peace and  La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ Inc., Puerto Rican Festival in Newark on August 6, 2011, organized by Carlos Maldonado Pastrana, President of La Asociación de Barranquiteños de NJ.  Finished artwork, after the written comments by  Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Link to Peace Comes to 5th Annual Arts Music Fair Elwood Park Page:

“Miss. Newark, New Jersey”, & Other people were watching John demonstrate pottery.

I brought Kai, our grandson’s desk chair, and an Alphabet spelling board to the boy and offered him some drink.  He seemed to enjoy playing with the Alphabet spelling board.

Please continue to view The Halsey Street Festival Part 4

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Thursday, February 16, 2020

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 17

Ing & Johns Street Art & International Street Art Part 18

International Street Art Part 18

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year

Published on : January 2, 2020 Published by : laurent jacquet

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year P 3, 4 & 5

We’re at the beginning of 2020 and its time for the Streetart360 team to do a retrospective on the most beautiful urban art murals painted in 2019. We’ve selected 100 murals from around the world, some by renown artists and others by new talents. We based our selection on the number of likes and shares they have received on the StreetArt360 social network pages (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest) Please use the comment section to give us your feed back and remember to visit the artists social networks or websites. Thanks for sharing this Top 100. We wish you all the best for 2020.

41. Den Extralargos aka Eva Mena in Puerto Del Rosario, Canary Islands, Spain

Eva Mena links: Website | Instagram | Facebook  page

Den Extralargos aka Eva Mena in Puerto Del Rosario, Canary Islands, Spain

Eva Mena

42. Leticia Mandragora in Cochabamba, Bolivia

Leticia Mandragora links: Instagram | Facebook page

Leticia Mandragora in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Best urban art 2019

Leticia Mandragora

45. GÔMEZ in Naples, Italy

Gomez links: Instagram | Facebook page

GÔMEZ in Naples, Italy

GÔMEZ

46. Murales Lian in Leitza, Spain

Murales Lian links: Blog | Instagram | Facebook page

Murales Lian in Leitza, Spain

Murales Lian

47. Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

Ozmo links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

Ozmo in Rieti, Italy

54. Ella & Pitr in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Ella et Pitr links: Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook page

urban artwork by Ella & Pitr in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Ella & Pitr

55. DEIH in Casablanca, Morocco

photo: M3ayzo.

Deih links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

DEIH in Casablanca, Morocco

DEIH

56. Iljin in Decazeville, France

photo: m.arya.lv.

Iljin links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

best urban artists 2019 Iljin in Decazeville, France

Iljin

59. Herakut and Nuno Viegas in Berlin, Germany

Links Herakut: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

street art masterpiece by Herakut and Nuno Viegas in Berlin, Germany

Herakut and Nuno Viegas

62. Jacoba Niepoort in Halifax, Canada

photo: Stoo Metz

Jacoba Niepoort links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Jacoba Niepoort

Jacoba Niepoort

63. Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

photo: Maria Shkineva

Bikismo links: Instagram | Facebook page

Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

Bikismo in Odintsovo, Russia

67. Wasp Elder in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Wasp Elder links: Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook page

Wasp Elder in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Wasp Elder

69. Dourone in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Dourone links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Dourone in Rotterdam, Netherlands

Dourone

70. Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

photo: Michael Larsson

Carlos Callizo links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

Carlos Callizo in Istanbul, Turkey

71. Miramar Moh’d & Dalal Mitwally  in Amman, Jordan

Links  Miramar Moh’d:
Instagram | Facebook
Links dalal Mitwally:
Instagram | Facebook

Photo: Emad

urban art best of 2019

Miramar Moh’d & Dalal Mitwally

73. KAY2 in “Korean Demilitarized Zone”, South Korea

KAY2 links:  Website | Instagram | Facebook page

best street art in Korea

Kay2

74. Case Maclaim in Cancun, Mexico

Case Maclaim links: Instagram | Facebook  – Photo: Instagrafite

Case Maclaim in Cancun, Mexico

Case Maclaim

75. Dmitry Levochkin in Odintsovo, Russia

Dmitry Levochkin links:  Instagram | Facebook page

urban art mural by Dmitry Levochkin in Odintsovo, Russia

Dmitry Levochkin

77. Henri Lamy in Boulogne Billancourt, France

Henry Lamy links: Website | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page

Henri Lamy in Boulogne Billancourt, France

Henri Lamy

78. Cee Pil in Bexhill-on-Sea, UK

Cee Pil links: Instagram | Facebook

best of street art in England Cee Pil in Bexhill-on-Sea, UK

Cee Pil

79. Lula Goce in New Rochelle, New York, USA

Lula Goce links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Credits photo: just_a_spectator

Lula Goce in New Rochelle, New York, USA

Lula Goce

80. Piet Rodriguez  in Kramatorsk, Ukraine

Piet Rodriguez links: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook page

Photo: Artem Getman

Piet Rodriguez  in Kramatorsk, Ukraine

Piet Rodriguez

81. Inti  in Santiago, Chile

INTI links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Inti  in Santiago, Chile

Inti

82. Mabel Vicentef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Mabel Vicentef links: Website | Youtube | Tumblr | Instagram | Facebook

Mabel Vicentef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Mabel Vicentef

83. L7matrix in Sao Paulo, Brazil

L7M links: Website | Tumblr | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

L7matrix in Sao Paulo, Brazil

L7matrix

84. Evgeni Sosiura aka Mutus in Minsk, Belarus

Mutus links: Instagram | Facebook page

Evgeni Sosiura aka Mutus in Minsk, Belarus

Mutus

85. Daniel Eime in Nazaré, Portugal

Daniel Eime links: Website | Vimeo | Instagram | Facebook page

Photo: Nelson

Daniel Eime in Nazaré, Portugal

Daniel Eime

86. Case Maclaim in Tbilisi, Georgia

Case Maclaim links: Instagram | Facebook page

Case Maclaim in Tbilisi, Georgia

Case Maclaim

87. Telmo Miel in Ghent, Belgium

Telmo Miel links: Website | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

Photo: M_FRENCHI

Telmo Miel in Ghent, Belgium

Telmo Miel

89. Swed Oner in Nouméa, New Caledonia, France

Guido Van Helten links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Guido Van Helten in Leiria, Portugal

Guido Van Helten

93. Paola Delfin in Tampere, Finland

Paola Delfin links: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook page

Paola Delfin in Tampere, Finland

Paola Delfin

94. Andres Cobre aka NDC media in Modesto, California, USA

photo: Ricardo Ontiveros

Andres Cobre Links: Instagram | Facebook page

Andres Cobre aka NDC media in Modesto, California, USA

Andres Cobre

95. Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

Pichi & Avo links: : Website | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook page

Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

Pichi & Avo in Boras, Sweden

97. Rogue One in Glasgow, UK

Rogue One links: Instagram | Facebook page

Rogue One in Glasgow, UK

Rogue One

98. Smates in Geel, Belgium

Smates links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

street art mural by Smates in Geel, Belgium

Smates

100. Manomatic in Patos, Albania

Manomatic links : WebsiteInstagram |  Facebook page

Festival Internaciona de Street Art Albania I.S.A.F.A. Mural Proyect by Urbanact.gr & VIZart

Manomatic mural artwork in albania

Manomatic

8th Annual Light Festival Illuminates Amsterdam with Glowing Sculptural Installations

December 10, 2019  Laura Staugaitis

“Butterfly Effect” by Masamichi Shimada. All photographs, unless noted, © Janus van den Eijnden

This year’s Amsterdam Light Festival, running November 28, 2019, to January 19, 2020, lights up the European city with illuminated art installations. The festival, now in its eighth year, attracts tourists and engages locals at a time when the city is cloaked in darkness for about sixteen hours each day. Visitors to the Light Festival use a phone app to guide themselves through Amsterdam’s city center, perusing twenty light works by artists from around the world. This year’s show theme was “DISRUPT!” and artists reflected the concept in pieces that ruminate on climate change, national history, technology, and more. See some of our favorites here, by Masamichi Shimada, UxU StudioSergey Kim and others. You can explore the full line-up and programming on the Amsterdam Light Festival website.

“Neighborhood” by Sergey Kim. Photograph courtesy of the artist

“Nacht Tekening” by Krijn de Koning 

“Atlantis” by Utskottet

“Surface Tension” by Tom Biddulph and Barbara Ryan

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 18

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Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15 & 16

Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15

The Halsey Street Festival, Part 2, Thursday, September 19, 2019,

On Halsey Street between Bleaker Street and New Street, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA

John Watts demonstrated pottery,

Ing’s Peace Project, Ing & Johns Artwork,

A lot of Merchants, Food, Music and Fashion Show

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

More people came to enjoy the activities that The Halsey Street Festival presented.  I brought my Peace Poster offering to the participants of the festival to express their thought on “What does Peace mean to You?” or to them.

Thanks to this person who was willingly to record her thoughts on Peace.

John started his performance with a pottery demonstration.

People love to take John’s pictures as he is making his magic pottery.

I love the way John produced his pottery or anybody who can have control and discipline enough to achieve making beautiful objects.  I love to work with clay making my sculptures where I do not have to follow the rule and be well disciplined.  One of these days I am going to ask Master John to teach me how to throw on the wheel and produce the controlled pottery.

More people were interested in recording their Peace comments on my Peace Poster.

People seemed to enjoy taking pictures and watching John demonstrate pottery.

It is so lovely to see a mother holding her child, who shows the happiness and comfort of being embraced by his mother with joy.

“Miss. Newark, New Jersey”, stopped her tour to write her comments about Peace.

Beautiful flowers and beautiful people made the atmosphere of the festival vibrant and Peaceful.  This is the kind of harmony we need when people get together to celebrate life.  (No Fighting, No Conflict and No More Wars)

Please continue to view The Halsey Street Festival Part 3

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Sunday, February 2, 2020

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 15

Streetart360, TOP 100 Urban Art 2019, Toronto Light Festival,

Ing & John’s Street Art & International Street Art Part 16

International Street Art Part 16

Published on : January 2, 2020 Published by : laurent jacquet

TOP 100 Urban Art 2019 – Best artworks and street artists of the year P 1 & 2

We’re at the beginning of 2020 and its time for the Streetart360 team to do a retrospective on the most beautiful urban art murals painted in 2019. We’ve selected 100 murals from around the world, some by renown artists and others by new talents. We based our selection on the number of likes and shares they have received on the StreetArt360 social network pages (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest) Please use the comment section to give us your feed back and remember to visit the artists social networks or websites. Thanks for sharing this Top 100. We wish you all the best for 2020.

2. SimpleG in Athens, Greece

SimpleG links: Website | Behance | Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page – Photo: John Spinoulas

best of Urban art

SimpleG

3. Nick Napoletano in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

photo: Dave Lee

Nick Napoletano links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Nick Napoletano urban artwork

Nick Napoletano

4. Owen Dippie in Los Angeles, CA, USA

photo: Impermanent Art.

Owen Dippie links: Website | Instagram | Facebook

Owen Dippie in Los Angeles, CA, USA

Owen Dippie

7. Saype in Decazeville, France

Saype links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Saype in Decazeville, France

Saype

9. JEKS in Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA

JEKS links: Instagram

best street art in USA - Nasa and street art

Jeks

10. Federico Zenobi aka Kor1 in Marotta, Italy

Kor1 links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Federico Zenobi aka Kor1 in Marotta, Italy

Federico Zenobi aka Kor1

14. Noe Two in Havana, Cuba

Noe Two links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Noe Two in Havana, Cuba

Noe Two

15. Sef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

photo: Agustin Silva.

Sef links: Instagram

Sef in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Sef

19. El Mac in Los Angeles, CA, USA

El Mac links: Instagram | Facebook page

El Mac in Los Angeles, CA, USA

El Mac

26. Xi de Sign aka Die Dixons in Berlin, Germany

photo: Jörn Reiners.

Die Dixons links: Website | Instagram | Facebook page

Xi de Sign aka Die Dixons in Berlin, Germany

Die Dixons

28. Sonny Sundancer in Johannesburg, South Africa

Sonny Sundancer links: Youtube | Instagram | Facebook page

Sonny Sundancer in Johannesburg, South Africa

Sonny Sundancer

31. Fanakapan in Berlin, Germany

photo: Nika Kramer

Fanakapan links: Instagram | Facebook page

Fanakapan in Berlin, Germany

Fanakapan

40. Chisme in Benaguasil, Valencia

Asier: Instagram | Facebook page

MUS: Instagram | Facebook page

Chisme in Valencia

Chisme in Valencia

Local and International Artists Produce 21 Light Installations For the Inaugural Toronto Light Festival

February 10, 2017  Kate Sierzputowski

Images via Thane Lucas/Toronto Light Festival

Set within a district of Victorian industrial buildings, the Toronto Light Festival is a free 45-day festival occurring during this year’s winter months as a way to creatively draw the city’s inhabitants out of their homes. Featuring 21 diverse light installations built by local and international artists and thousands of glowing bulbs, the festival covers a total of 13 acres in the city’s Distillery District. Installations range from a series of lit figures appearing to jump from the roof of one of the historic buildings to two red, geometric cats prowling an included alleyway, with several multi-colored works in-between.

You can catch Toronto’s first ever light art festival until March 12, or follow the festival on Instagram to catch snapshots of the glowing installations.

 Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 16

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Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 13 & 14

Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 13

The Halsey Street Festival, Part 1, Thursday, September 19, 2019

On Halsey Street between Bleaker Street and New Street, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA

John Watts demonstrated pottery,

Ing’s Peace Project, Ing & Johns Artwork,

A lot of Merchants, Food, Music and Fashion Show

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Thursday, September 19, 2019 the music stand came in the early afternoon to begin decorating The Halsey Street Festival with, logo, and music equipment for the event.

John put up my large artwork on our alleyway door with a helping hand from our neighbors.

We were very lucky to have the festival right in front of our shop.  We joined in by adding more artwork and activities to celebrate The Halsey Street Festival.

Some merchants started displaying their merchandise.

John displayed his two tall sculptures and large hand build pottery.  I posted my artwork, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have A Dream.

Left: Impossible Dreamer – John Watts Artwork

Middle: Two of John Watts Sculptures

Right-Inside: Birth of a dragon – John Watts Artwork

I displayed one of my finished Peace Project Artworks and Peace Project Poster for people to write theirs comments on, “What does Peace mean to you?”.

This lady was the first person who wrote her comment on, “What does Peace mean to you?” on the Peace Project Poster.

By the early evening people started to arrive.

Merchants offered a variety of merchandise.

Please continue to view The Halsey Street Festival Part 2

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Thursday, January 18, 2020

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 13

Ing & Johns Street Art & International Street Art Part 14

International Street Art Part 14

street art, graffiti and contemporary art in Russia

I discovered the Russian street art scene a few years ago, when some murals by P183 were becoming popular on social network sites More recently I met Zmogk in Vitry sur Seine while he was busy painting an amazing mural for a small urban art event.

I have also had the pleasure of interviewing both Yulia Vanifatieva and Julia Volchkova, two up-and-coming Russian street artists. They impressed me with their creativity and originality which was so different to anything I had seen before.

Russia is currently one of the most creative urban art hotspots in Europe. It is such a shame that so little is known about many of these artists outside of Russia. I have therefore decided to publish a list of the most interesting and creative artists. I Hope it will help you discover and fall in love with their art, follow their social networks and promote their work around the world. They deserve it!

Pavel P183

Pavel or Paul (P183) was born in Moscow in 1983 and died aged 29 on 1 April 2013. P183 is probably the best known Russian street artist and has been dubbed as the ‘Russian Banksy’ by the British press. This artist was one of the creators of the street art movement in Europe and his untimely death was a major loss to the urban art scene.

RIP P183 you wrote some amazing letters on the wall of Street Art and graffiti history. True art lovers will never forget you.

P183 artwork in Russia Moscow

street art in Russia by P183

Marat “Morik  Danilyan

Marat ‘Morik’ Danilyan is a street artist, graphic designer and illustrator from Russia. He went to art school but then went on to complete degrees in philology and economics from the Novosibirsk State University. With the rise of the Internet in the late 90’s, Morik developed a passion for graffiti through Hip-hop culture. He started to develop spray-painting skills and a love for experimenting with letter forms.

Instagram

Morik street artist from russia. portraits

Morik

Petro

Piotr Gerasimenko (Petro) was born in Zhukovsky in 1984 and is a member of the crew called Aesthetics. He’s been painting on walls for more than a decade and, while developing his style, has gone through many different stages to become one of the most prominent and respected artists on the Russian graffiti scene.

InstagramFacebookFlickr

building painted by Petro Aesthetics

Petro

Dmitry Aske

Dmitri Aske is a versatile artist from Moscow. He started his artistic career in 2000 as a graffiti writer and later moved on to graphic design, typography, illustration, murals and contemporary art.

InstagramWebsiteFacebook

building painted by famous russian urban artist dmitri aske

Dmitry Aske

Alexey Luka

Alexey Luka was born in 1983. He graduated from Moscow Architectural Institute in 2006 and lives and works in Moscow.

InstagramWebsite

graffiti masterpiece in russia by alexey luka . moscow urban art scene

Alexey Luka

VITALY TSARENKOV aka SY

Vitaly Tsarenkov (SY) was born in 1987 and lives and works in St. Petersburg. With a background in street art, he focuses on creating large-scale paintings, murals, and sculptures.

Instagram

abstract geometrical graffit art . Russian contemporary art

SY

Ivan Ninety

Ivan Ninety was born in Protvino. He was initially interested in street art and gradually developed his interest in large-format painting, collage, sculpture or photography, grew.

In his works, a mix of geometric abstraction and figurative realism can be seen. The technique he uses most often is collage.

Instagramfacebook

russian mural artwork by ivan ninety

Ivan Ninety

Nikita Nomerz

Nikita Nomerz lives in Nizhny Novgorod. The Media started getting excited about this young artist, after seeing just two of his murals in 2011.

InstagramWebsite

street art masterpiece by nikita nomerz

Nikita Nomerz

Sergey Akramov

Sergey is a Russian graffiti artist from Ekaterinburg, who specialises in abstract lettering. He paints complex murals showcasing many techniques. He loves to paint vegetation combined with abstract lettering and typography.

InstagramBehanceFacebook

huge murals in Russia .

Sergey Akramov

Vova Nootk

Vova Nootk started out as a graffiti writer 20 years ago and has now developed his work into large scale murals.

FacebookInstagramWebsite

moscow murals street art

Vova Nootk

Vitae Viazi

Vitae Viazi are a street art crew (art-collective) from Moscow. The name “Vitae Viazi” comes from the Latin word “vitae” (“of life”) and “viazi,” which is the name of a special ornamental Cyrillic (old slavonic) script. This decorative script was their initial source of inspiration. The name of the crew should be written with characters of two keyboard layouts “VITAE ????” but it is too tricky to google, so they choose – “Vitae Viazi”.

InstagramFacebook

modern art and urban art in Russia

Vitae Viazi

Julia Volchkova

Discover Julia Volchkova’s artwork in the article I published a few month ago:Artist of the week: Julia Volchkova” 

street art masterpiece by julia volchkova

Julia Volchkova

MalenkieLydi

Ivan Simonov. Artist from Russia

Instagram

street art in street of moscow

MalenkieLydi

Ilya Slak

Urban artist from Russia

Instagram

huge mural by russian urban art

Ilya Slak

Link to Ing & John’s Street Art & The International Street Art Part 14

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Ing & John’s & The International Street Art Part 11 & 12

Ing & John’s Street Art and The International Street Art-Part 11

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA- Part 11

Kai, The Artist, and Ing and John’s Artwork

September 9 – 13, 2019

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

Left:        Midnight – John Watts’ Artwork

Middle: Vincent van Gogh’s Broken Frames– Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts’ Artwork

Right:    Homage to the Dragon – John Watts’ Artwork

John Watts’ Sculptures

Kai, The Artist, our grandson, who just turned four years old.

Kai’s Painting on Friday, September 13, 2019

John and our old friend and neighbor, Trifon

After working very hard with his painting, the artist spends time to exam the flowers.

We are happy to display our artworks in public.  There seems to be a positive reaction from the people who view them.  People comment about the beautiful plants and unique artwork.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Monday, January 10, 2020,

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art-Part 11

Ing & John’s Street Art and The International Street Art-Part 12

The International Street Art-Part 12

PangeaSeed’s Sea Walls Program Works to Save Earth’s Oceans One Mural at a Time

June 2, 2019  Andrew LaSane

NYCHOS

Combining art and activism, the PangeaSeed Foundation is a Hawaii-based nonprofit organization tha is doing its part to help save Earth’s waters with its “Sea Walls: Artists For Oceans” international mural program. Since its inception in 2014, over 350 ocean-themed murals have been painted in 15 countries by the organization’s network of over 300 artists. With activations in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, Mexico, and several other locations around the globe, the initiative engages the public and educates the world about critical environmental issues threatening our most precious resources through art, film screenings, and discussions.

PangeaSeed founder and executive director Tré Packard tells Colossal that when it comes to choosing which artists to work with and what they should paint, balance and community are key. “We always aim to create a balance between international, national and local artists,” he said. “Over the years, with the Sea Walls: Artists for Oceans program being nomadic, we’ve learned the importance of community ownership of the murals once we’ve packed up and left town. There tends to be so many incredible local creatives in the areas we host projects, so we work hand in hand with the local project director to help identify local artists who we invite to participate in the project.” Artists are given a list of topics to choose from and together with the team narrow it down to one. The murals are site-specific in that they address issues relevant to the places where they are painted. Some artists have even connected with local scientists and activists during the planning stage to better inform their designs.

Aaron Glasson and Jason Botkin

“The beauty of public art lies in the fact that it is a public good where even ‘non-artsy’ folks can be touched and empowered by experiencing the process or the finished product,” Packard said about the mural  program. “In addition to encouraging other artists to create for a purpose, our chief goal is to effect positive behavioral change at the individual and community level, so we’re thrilled when fans who aren’t artistically inclined are moved.” As for ways that people can get involved and help, he suggests finding ways to use less plastic, eating sustainable seafood, and voting for politicians with ocean-minded ideas.

Packard says that there are some dream projects on the horizon for Sea Walls, but those details are still under wraps for now. To learn more about the foundation and its upcoming activations, follow @pangeaseed and @Seawalls_ on social media.

Seth Globepainter

Onur

Spok

Textiles and Board Games Inspire Large-Scale Murals that Span Sidewalks, Streets, and Staircases

June 7, 2019Kate Sierzputowski

Baltimore-based artists Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn, known as Jessie and Katey, started creating murals because of the sheer accessibility of public art. The pair have always created work with a big visual impact, but as their designs grew they began to consider the possibility of working on the ground in addition to large-scale walls. Their site-specific floor works combine inspirations from both textiles and board games to create interactive walkways that encourage play and exploration. Jessie and Katey explain to Colossal that “the compositions are inspired by the viewer and how they might travel through the work. It’s really fun watching little kids interact with the floor murals—they always know what to do.”

The math behind both textile design and quilting is an aspect that the pair must consider when painting their large-scale works, and have started to inform how the pair begins each piece’s early designs. “We approach our large-scale work a bit like screen printers, even though we don’t screen print,” the pair explains. “Our process of execution is very methodical and we tend to think in planes or layers. This is probably a result of having to develop concepts and adapt them to larger spaces in a short amount of time. It’s interesting that painting murals has informed how we paint murals.”

This summer Jessie and Katey are working with the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore to create a site-specific mural for the Foundation’s new community space. The artists will also be painting a piece in Sacramento in collaboration with Wide Open Walls and later this fall will be working on an immersive installation incorporating recycled materials at Baltimore’s Goucher College, a rare opportunity for the pair to work in three dimensions. You can view more of Jessie and Katey’s work on their website and Instagram

For more information please visit the following link:

Ing & John’s Street Art and International Street Art – Part 12

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Happy New Year Everyone from John and Ing in our Sculpture Garden

I went back to view my Blog and found our new year’s wish that I posted on January 1, 2016.  I like the poem I wrote, and our sculpture garden showing flowers blooming with bees and butterflies.  I decided to post the project again for our New Year’s wish to everyone around the world for Happiness and Peace for the year of 2020, and always.

Happy New Year Everyone from John and Ing in our Sculpture Garden

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Downtown Newark, New Jersey,

🙂 🙂 🙂 Happy New Year Everyone 🙂 🙂 🙂

I enjoyed cultivating our garden and John enjoyed producing his sculptures.  We produced our Sculpture Garden for ourselves and hope that the others will enjoy it also.

From spring to fall our garden was full of flower blossoms and buzzing with bees, Swallowtail, Monarchs and Red admiral butterflies.  They were drinking nectar from the flowers while John and I were busy with our garden. 

We hope that our first grandson Kai, who is 4 months old in January 2016 and now in 2020 he is 4 years old, will be able to see what his grandpa and grandma were doing when he is old enough to understand. 

We are quite satisfied and happy with the result of our Sculpture Garden last year, 2015.  We would like to share some of the scenery of our garden that John and I captured all year round.

May Peace and Happiness be with all of us for 2020 and always.

John lays cement blocks building patio for his sculptures in our backyard garden.

May 2015:  John is laying a brick floor in some area of the garden.

Lays the Basic Foundation to be Better and Firm

Brick by brick he lays

One’s foundation of love

Love to make a basic ground for better and firm

Love to use two hands and brain to create

From a lump of clay

Forming certain shapes

Love to put thought

And experience into creating

Sculpture to be born

Love to explore and share

What one does

The love of nature

And love of fellow mankind

Keeps us alive and well

Let love dominate the world

Let us be calm and peaceful

Let us lay a basic foundation

Brick by brick

To be better and firm

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Wednesday, January 06, 2016, 4:07 pm

My first poem for this year, 2016

John cut cement blocks building patio for his sculptures in our backyard garden.

John was cleaning the wall.

August 2015:  John assembling his new sculpture.

Top left:  Cutting an iron pole for the sculpture

Right:  Calculating the length of each section

Ing’s sculpture, Tower of Freedom

This is another one of my sculptures.  John insists on having my two sculptures in our garden.

I love taking photos in the garden and enjoy seeing my flower blooms.  I like to sneak taking pictures of John when he is working in the garden.  Once I caught myself taking photo with flowers in the reflection of the entrance door to the house.

October 2015:  John and I received very sad news from a friend, Arthur Rogoff, who told us that Steve Mace, one of John pottery students and a friend, passed away.  John and I went to a remembrance gathering at Steve’s family home.  His wife said that before Steve passed away, he said that he wanted to give John the above sculpture. 

John made the sculpture in 1980 and Steve exchanged an early version of a camcorder for this sculpture from John.  We are very appreciative for the gift of this sculpture from Steve.  Steve was a very kind and generous person.  Every time John had gathering for the pottery students each year, Steve would bring his home-made special bread filled with sausage, cheese, pepper, onion and other ingredients that tasted delicious.  He also brought other items for the occasions.  I wish to dedicate this project to Steve Mace who we all miss and we will always think of fondly for the rest of our lives.   

The top part of sculpture was broken in the process of transportation from Steve house to our backyard sculptures garden.  John had to repair it.

Earlier in 2015, John laid a cement block patio for his sculptures in our backyard garden.  By adding the gift from Steve this makes it more meaningful and sentimental.  We will always think of him every time we are present in our sculpture garden.

May Peace and Happiness be with all of us for 2020 and always.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Wednesday, January 1, 2020

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Ing, John’s and International Street Art- P1

Ing and John’s Street Art, Downtown Newark, New Jersey, USA Part 1

I love street art for many reasons. First of all, the artwork is there for the public.  It is for everyone who passes to their destination.  Without spending time visiting art galleries or museums, they can see art while they are going to work or getting lunch.  Some may pay attention to the artwork and some may not.  Some may ask questions about the artwork.  I hope, at least the artwork will activate the thought process of those passing by.

I love plants and flowers.  It makes me happy when I see the freshness of green leaves and beautiful flowers blooming.   Our shop is closed temporally, and the window gate is down. I thought that if I display our artwork and some of the plants from our backyard garden in front of the shop gate, it would make it more pleasant for the people who pass by.  I am happy to do it, and I hope the artwork and the plants will help the downtown office workers or others feel fresh and lively.       

My first day of Street art was on Friday, July 26, 2019.  I took some plants from our backyard garden to display in front of our shop.  I started my first display of artwork with “Elephants at the Water Lily Pond” I produced in 1999.  There are always people walking by our place, but more during lunch time.  Most of them are the office workers.  Also, in the evening, people walk by going home from work.  Some people are interested in the artwork, and ask questions, while others are oblivious to the artwork that I display.

One week later I changed my artwork to, “By the Water Lily Pond”, which produced in 1998.  I added more plants to my display, when the pink blossom flowers of Rose Queen were in full bloom.

This artwork of mine titled, “I Have A Dream – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr”, I displayed from, Wednesday, August 14, 2019, to August 21, 2019.  I produced this work in 2010.  I also added more plants to fill the front of shop space.

My Thai classical artwork was displayed on Thursday, August 22, 2019.  I produced this artwork in1994.

On Monday, August 28, 2019 John added his work to the display.  John’s artwork is on the far left, “Impossible Dreamer”.  “Gandhi Man of Peace”, in the middle is my artwork, which I produced in 2000.  The far right is John’s artwork “Beneath the Lake”.  Thanks to John Watts, my husband, for helping to display the artwork in a better presentation.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts and John Watts, Thursday, October 10, 2019

International Street Art

New Works from Banksy at the The Jungle Refugee Camp in Calais

December 11, 2015  Christopher Jobson

“The Son of a Migrant from Syria”

Based on an update to his website this morning it appears Banksy visited the Jungle Refugee Camp in Calais, France, one of the largest refugee camps in western Europe. The artist left behind four new artworks, most notably a piece featuring Steve Jobs carrying an early Macintosh computer and a sack over his shoulder noting his background as a “son of a migrant from Syria,” (Jobs was adopted, but his biological father was from Syria). In another piece he references Géricault’s famous Raft of Medusa painting, depicting an imperiled group of people on a sinking raft as they hail a modern cruise ship just on the horizon. The artist previously brought attention to the refuge crisis in a piece at Dismaland earlier this year.

In addition to the artworks, part of Banksy’s team installed 12 permanent structures and a makeshift playground inside the squalid Jungle camp using materials left behind from Dismaland, a project he refers to as Dismal Aid.

One of the best ways you can help Syrian refugees is through donations to the UN Refugee Agency.

New Solo Exhibition by Seth Globepainter Fills a Historic Chateau in Bordeaux, France

September 1, 2019  Andrew LaSane

Collaboration with Pascal Vilcollet

French artist Julien Malland, aka Seth Globepainter (previously), has spent the summer exhibiting a large body of work inside and outside of the Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez. Located in Bordeaux, France, the historic chateau was built in the 18th century and now doubles as a cultural center.

Malland’s takeover includes dozens of paintings, installations, and sculptures that have transformed the castle into a colorful record of his travels and a look into his mind.

Titled 1,2,3, Soleil, the exhibition features over 50 of the artist’s faceless characters. Each room in the chateau has a theme that represents one of Malland’s previous projects in countries around the world. Vibrant colors and geometrical shapes are complicated by themes of conflict and loneliness. The exhibition includes site-specific installations as well as collaborative pieces made with artists Mono Gonzalez and Pascal Vilcollet.

The walk through Malland’s world will remain on view in France through October 7, 2019. In addition to his solo show, Malland also recently completed two murals in Denmark as part of Kirk Gallery‘s annual Out in the Open mural initiative. To keep up with the artist’s latest projects, follow him on Instagram.

Seth | ‘Jack in the Box’ | Østerbro 41 | Aalborg | Denmark

For more artwork and information please visit the following link:

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John Watts’ Art Exhibition at The Dana Library Rutgers University 2018

THE EXHIBITION HAS BEEN EXTENDED THROUGH THE END OF OCTOBER, 2018

John Watts’ Art Exhibition at The Dana Library Rutgers University

 MONOLITHS IN CLAY

 An exhibition of ceramic sculptures

And Giclee Prints

by John Watts

May 3rd through October 31th, 2018

 The Dana Library Rutgers University, 4th Floor

185 University Ave, Newark, New Jersey

50th DANA LIBRARY ANNIVERSARY

John Watts’ Art Exhibition at The Dana Library Rutgers University

 Artwork by John Watts

Photographs by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John Watts, my husband, has his art exhibition on the fourth floor of the Dana Library, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ. Upon stepping out of the Library elevator, one walks thought a foyer where on the right side is the reception office of the famous, Jazz Institute. Beyond this is hallway to a study area.

The left side of the foyer however, opens into a long art gallery that lead to the library conference room. This library art gallery is where John has his seven feet tall and medium size sculptures displayed. All together there are thirteen pieces.

There are ten showcases lining the walls, which are filled with John’s pottery, small clay sculptures, and miniature bronze sculptures embedded with semiprecious stones. The showcases also hold John’s, “wearable art”, which are one of a kind pieces of jewelry. His two dimension artwork is hung above these pieces.

 There are twelve of his large canvas artwork prints on the walls outside of the display cases These are examples of a lifetime of artwork filling this space where students and educators pass though to the conference room allowing them to see and experience the work.

 I like this art gallery as it is it is just like street art, in that it is for everybody who passes by. While John and I were putting up the artwork some students stopped to take pictures with their i Phones.

 Some students asked questions about the art. Hopefully the exhibition will inspire some who pass by consciously, or subconsciously. This will make and artist happy and encourage everyone to express his or her ideas and share them with others.

The benefit of artwork is that it can provoke everyone to think for themselves, rather than becoming part of a flock of sheep led by the nose for those with power.

Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts, Saturday, May 26, 2018 (Posted on Google+)

The following message is John’s own words explaining his artwork:

 My clay sculpture reflects of a lifelong interest in monolithic structures. As a child in Wales in the early nineteen fifties, I was fascinated by old gravestone monuments, drawing them in detail. The stone circles of early Britons also influenced my childhood imagination, particularly Stonehenge, and the local Neolithic stone on the Gower Peninsular of South Wales called, Arthur’s Stone. I was also captivated by, Cleopatra’s Needle, a solitary Egyptian obelisk, at the edge of the River Thames in London, that I would view every summer when we would visit my aunt. My teenage years of the late nineteen fifties in Newark, New Jersey offered the red brick smoke stacks of factories surrounding my neighborhood. These towering hollow columns would bellow forth huge plumes of smoke, like offerings to ancient gods. Then at the ripe old age of twenty-six, in nineteen sixty-eight, the movie, 2001 A Space Odyssey, came out, and I went completely bonkers for the alien monoliths.

My giclee canvas prints in this exhibit are two-dimensional visions of my same artistic obsession with imagery steeped in symbolism, mythology. Each canvas holds out the possibility of where one might find such Monoliths. There is an attention to textural detail in all my work. This filling of empty space in art work is historically referred to as Horror Vacui. My source for this imagery is again my childhood in Wales, observing the Celtic crosses in graveyards, and the Pre Raphaelite, and Victorian illustrations of childrens books in heraldic epic stories like, King Arthur and The Knights Of The Round Table. Even my pottery and Jewelry suggests an affinity with unnamed civilizations lost in antiquity.

John Watts, Saturday, May 26, 2018

For more information please visit the following links:

https://ingpeaceproject.com/john-watts-plays-artwork-videos/

https://ingpeaceproject.com/john-watts-plays-artwork-videos/johns-pottery-student-exhibition/

Male and Female Figures by John Watts

Artwork by John Watts, Photograph by Ing-On Vibulbhan-Watts

John Watts, my husband, has his art exhibition on the fourth floor of the Dana Library, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ. Upon stepping out of the Library elevator, one walks thought a foyer where on the right side is the reception office of the famous, Jazz Institute. Beyond this is hallway to a study area.

Stone Clouds by John Watts

Sculptures Drawing by John Watts

Stones-2 by John Watts

Wedding by John Watts

Parade by John Watts

Dino Landscape by John Watts

Swansea Landscape by John Watts

Stones Twice by John Watts

Birth Of A Dragon by John Watts

Celtic Cross by John Watts

Blue Moon by John Watts

Cinderella At Midnight by John Watts

The Race by John Watts

Nanny by John Watts

Remember The Saleman by John Watts

I Wish by John Watts

Journey Into Night by John Watts

Impossible Dreamer by John Watts

Wedding by John Watts

Excalibur by John Watts

Invisible – Portrait of Ralph Allison

Milkwood – Portrait of Dylan Thomas

Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 – 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet and writer whose works include the poems “Do not go gentle into that good night” and “And death shall have no dominion“; the ‘play for voices’ Under Milk Wood; and stories and radio broadcasts such as A Child’s Christmas in Wales and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog. He became widely popular in his lifetime and remained so after his premature death at the age of 39 in New York City. By then he had acquired a reputation, which he had encouraged, as a “roistering, drunken and doomed poet”.[3]

Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales, in 1914. An undistinguished pupil, he left school at 16 and became a journalist for a short time. Many of his works appeared in print while he was still a teenager; however, it was the publication in 1934 of “Light breaks where no sun shines” that caught the attention of the literary world. While living in London, Thomas met Caitlin Macnamara, whom he married in 1937. Their relationship was defined by alcoholism and was mutually destructive.[3] In the early part of their marriage, Thomas and his family lived hand-to-mouth; they settled in the Welsh fishing village of Laugharne.

Thomas came to be appreciated as a popular poet during his lifetime, though he found earning a living as a writer difficult. He began augmenting his income with reading tours and radio broadcasts. His radio recordings for the BBC during the late 1940s brought him to the public’s attention, and he was frequently used by the BBC as a populist voice of the literary scene.

Thomas first travelled to the United States in the 1950s. His readings there brought him a degree of fame, while his erratic behaviour and drinking worsened. His time in America cemented his legend, however, and he went on to record to vinyl such works as A Child’s Christmas in Wales. During his fourth trip to New York in 1953, Thomas became gravely ill and fell into a coma, from which he never recovered. He died on 9 November 1953. His body was returned to Wales, where he was interred at the village churchyard in Laugharne on 25 November 1953.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dylan_Thomas

Statue of Dylan Thomas near the National Waterfront Museum

Under Milk Wood is a 1954 radio drama by Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, commissioned by the BBC and later adapted for the stage. A film version, Under Milk Wood directed by Andrew Sinclair, was released in 1972.

An omniscient narrator invites the audience to listen to the dreams and innermost thoughts of the inhabitants of the fictional small Welsh fishing village Llareggub (“bugger all” backwards).

They include Mrs. Ogmore-Pritchard, relentlessly nagging her two dead husbands; Captain Cat, reliving his seafaring times; the two Mrs. Dai Breads; Organ Morgan, obsessed with his music; and Polly Garter, pining for her dead lover. Later, the town awakens and, aware now of how their feelings affect whatever they do, we watch them go about their daily business.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Under_Milk_Wood

Invisible Man is a novel by Ralph Ellison, published by Random House in 1952. It addresses many of the social and intellectual issues facing African Americans early in the twentieth century, including black nationalism, the relationship between black identity and Marxism, and the reformist racial policies of Booker T. Washington, as well as issues of individuality and personal identity.

Invisible Man won the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction in 1953.[1] In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Invisible Man 19th on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[2]Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005, calling it “the quintessential American picaresque of the 20th century”, rather than a “race novel, or even a bildungsroman“.[3]Malcolm Bradbury and Richard Ruland recognize an existential vision with a “Kafka-like absurdity”.[4] According to The New York Times, former U.S. president Barack Obama modeled his memoir Dreams from My Father on Ellison’s novel.[5]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invisible_Man

Ellison says in his introduction to the 30th Anniversary Edition[6] that he started to write what would eventually become Invisible Man in a barn in Waitsfield, Vermont in the summer of 1945 while on sick leave from the Merchant Marine. The book took five years to complete with one year off for what Ellison termed an “ill-conceived short novel.”[7] Invisible Man was published as a whole in 1952. Ellison had published a section of the book in 1947, the famous “Battle Royal” scene, which had been shown to Cyril Connolly, the editor of Horizon magazine by Frank Taylor, one of Ellison’s early supporters.

In his speech accepting the 1953 National Book Award,[8] Ellison said that he considered the novel’s chief significance to be its experimental attitude. Before Invisible Man, many (even most) novels dealing with African Americans were seen and even written solely for social protest. Most notably, Native Son and Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and while Ellison dovetailed two movements, The Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement, neither defined his work completely, which reinforced his claim to a unique experimental narrative that broke with tradition. At the Federal Writers’ Project, Ellison had previously interviewed many older people who were living examples to the movement. Ellison once quipped that he needs to get real angry and start talking with the old folk again[further explanation needed].

Ellison was also not a Black Arts Movement writer. Many of the notable writers of black arts movement were disillusioned with Ellison[citation needed]. John Oliver Killens, denounced Invisible Man, like this: “The Negro people need Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man like we need a hole in the head or a stab in the back. . . . It is a vicious distortion of Negro life.” He and Amiri Baraka were always at odds[citation needed].

Ellison’s style has some basis in modern symbolism[further explanation needed]. In the poem The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot.[9], using one notable example, Ellison was immediately impressed with its ability to merge his two greatest passions, that of music and literature. When asked later what he had learned from the poem, Ellison responded: imagery, and also improvisation—techniques he had only before seen in jazz.[10] But Ellison’s influences run deep. The aforementioned WPA, and what he called his literary ancestors, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Mark Twain and others, along with books such as Dostoevsky‘s Notes From Underground, and even as broad-reaching as speculative writers such as Kenneth Burke, all of whom Ellison used to break away from classical African-American writing[clarification needed].

Ellison biographer Arnold Rampersad said that the character of the narrator “resembles no one else in previous fiction so much as he resembles Ishmael of Moby-Dick.” Ellison signals his debt in the prologue to the novel, where the narrator remembers a moment of truth under the influence of marijuana and evokes a church service: “Brothers and sisters, my text this morning is the ‘Blackness of Blackness.’ And the congregation answers: ‘That blackness is most black, brother, most black…'” In this scene Ellison “reprises a moment in the second chapter of Moby-Dick”, where Ishmael wanders around New Bedford looking for a place to spend the night and enters a black church: “It was a negro church; and the preacher’s text was about the blackness of darkness, and the weeping and wailing and teeth-gnashing there.” According to Rampersad, it was Melville who “empowered Ellison to insist on a place in the American literary tradition” by his example of “representing the complexity of race and racism so acutely and generously” in Moby-Dick.[11]

Ellison always believed that he would be a musician first and a writer second, and yet even so he had acknowledged that writing provided him a “growing satisfaction.” It was a “covert process”, according to Ellison: “a refusal of his right hand to let his left hand know what it was doing.”[12]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invisible_Man

Homage To The Dragon by John Watt

Pottery and Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Pottery and Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Pottery by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Pottery by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Pottery by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Jewelry by John Watts

Pottery by John Watts

John Watts’ Art Exhibition at The Dana Library Rutgers University

Photograph by John Watts

MONOLITHS IN CLAY

An exhibition of ceramic sculptures

And Giclee Prints

by John Watts

May 3rd through September 29th, 2018

The Dana Library Rutgers University, 4th Floor

185 University Ave, Newark, New Jersey

The following message is John’s own words explaining his artwork:

My clay sculpture reflects of a lifelong interest in monolithic structures. As a child in Wales in the early nineteen fifties, I was fascinated by old gravestone monuments, drawing them in detail. The stone circles of early Britons also influenced my childhood imagination, particularly Stonehenge, and the local Neolithic stone on the Gower Peninsular of South Wales called, Arthur’s Stone. I was also captivated by, Cleopatra’s Needle, a solitary Egyptian obelisk, at the edge of the River Thames in London, that I would view every summer when we would visit my aunt. My teenage years of the late nineteen fifties in Newark, New Jersey offered the red brick smoke stacks of factories surrounding my neighborhood. These towering hollow columns would bellow forth huge plumes of smoke, like offerings to ancient gods. Then at the ripe old age of twenty-six, in nineteen sixty-eight, the movie, 2001 A Space Odyssey, came out, and I went completely bonkers for the alien monoliths.

My giclee canvas prints in this exhibit are two-dimensional visions of my same artistic obsession with imagery steeped in symbolism, mythology. Each canvas holds out the possibility of where one might find such Monoliths. There is an attention to textural detail in all my work. This filling of empty space in art work is historically referred to as Horror Vacui. My source for this imagery is again my childhood in Wales, observing the Celtic crosses in graveyards, and the Pre Raphaelite, and Victorian illustrations of childrens books in heraldic epic stories like, King Arthur and The Knights Of The Round Table. Even my pottery and Jewelry suggests an affinity with unnamed civilizations lost in antiquity.

John Watts, Saturday, May 26, 2018

John Watts working on his pottery and sculptures.

For more information please visit the following link:

John Watts’ Plays, Artwork & Videos

https://ingpeaceproject.com/john-watts-plays-artwork-videos/johns-pottery-student-exhibition/

Exhibition arranged by Ann Veerlamd Walkins MSLS, AHIP-D

Art Coordinator, Life and Health Science Librarian, Collection Services Head, Collection Department coordinator

Rutgers University Libraries

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Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales –Part 9

Trip To Swansea In My Husband’s Motherland , Wales –Part 9

John Watts’ Artwork and Welsh history

Swansea Landscape: Artwork by John Watts, Welsh Artist

Oystermouth Castle (Welsh: Castell Ystum Llwynarth) is a Norman stone castle in Wales, overlooking Swansea Bay on the east side of the Gower Peninsula near the village of the Mumbles.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oystermouth_Castle

 

 Oystermouth castle, with its village and lighthouse, 1839

Newman and Co. (London, England), engraver. – This image is available from the National Library of Wales You can view this image in its original context on the NLW Catalogue

Abstract: A view of the ruins of Oystermouth castle with ships in the bay below and a lighthouse in the background.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oystermouth_Castle

Oystermouth Castle, showing the gatehouse and the chapel window

The first castle was founded by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle soon after 1106 following the capture of Gower by the Normans. In 1116 the Welsh of Deheubarth retook the Gower Peninsula and forced William to flee his castle which was put to the torch. The castle was rebuilt soon afterwards, but was probably destroyed again in 1137 when Gower was once more retaken by the princes of Deheubarth. The Londres or London family finally died out in 1215 when Gower was again taken by the Welsh under the leadership of Llywelyn the Great. In 1220 the Welsh were expelled from the peninsula and the government of Henry III of England returned the barony of Gower to John de Braose who rebuilt both Swansea Castle and Oystermouth.                                                       For more information please visit the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oystermouth_Castle

Cross and Creature 2: Artwork by John Watts

Celtic art is associated with the peoples known as Celts; those who spoke the Celtic languages in Europe from pre-history through to the modern period, as well as the art of ancient peoples whose language is uncertain, but have cultural and stylistic similarities with speakers of Celtic languages.

Celtic art is a difficult term to define, covering a huge expanse of time, geography and cultures. A case has been made for artistic continuity in Europe from the Bronze Age, and indeed the preceding Neolithic age; however archaeologists generally use “Celtic” to refer to the culture of the European Iron Age from around 1000 BC onwards, until the conquest by the Roman Empire of most of the territory concerned, and art historians typically begin to talk about “Celtic art” only from the La Tène period (broadly 5th to 1st centuries BC) onwards.[1] Early Celtic art is another term used for this period, stretching in Britain to about 150 AD.[2] The Early Medieval art of Britain and Ireland, which produced the Book of Kells and other masterpieces, and is what “Celtic art” evokes for much of the general public in the English-speaking world, is called Insular art in art history. This is the best-known part, but not the whole of, the Celtic art of the Early Middle Ages, which also includes the Pictish art of Scotland.[3]

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_art

 

Muiredach’s High Cross, Ireland, early 10th century

High cross. A tall stone standing cross, usually of Celtic cross form. Decoration is abstract often with figures in carved relief, especially crucifixions, but in some cases complex multi-scene schemes. Most common in Ireland, but also in Great Britain and near continental mission centres.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_art

The Ancient Art of the Celtic People

From The Daily Beast, written by William O’Connor

Boston Celtics, Celtic pride, Celtic crosses, Celtic tattoos. St. Patrick’s Day is far from the only time we remind ourselves that being Irish has something to do with the Celts. Today, the word Celtic conjures up the aforementioned items and perhaps some vague notions of Druids and art featuring complicated, interwoven lines. In reality, the Celtic history is far older, richer, and more significant than most realize. A new book from Phaidon, Celtic Art, by Venceslas Kruta, takes a deep dive into the impressive artistic history of a people who, as the books notes, in Greek and Roman times “were the largest known family of European peoples outside the Mediterranean.” At its peak, the people who spoke Celtic languages and practiced Celtic culture stretched from the Atlantic to Asia Minor. While that is impressive, what is more impressive is the artwork left behind—the impossibly detailed jewelry, weaponry, and decorative items that show an extraordinary mastery of craft.

To the left is the famous illuminated “Chi-Rho” page of the Book of Kells from about 700–900. While Celtic religion forbade the writing down of pretty much anything, Christianity’s spread ensured that traditional Celtic imagery survived in stunning manuscripts.

Richly illuminated manuscript on parchment, dimensions: 33 x 25 cm, Dublin, Trinity College Library.”

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-ancient-art-of-the-celtic-people-photos?ref=scroll

 

 Birth of Dragon: Artwork by John Watts

The Welsh Dragon (Welsh: Y Ddraig Goch, meaning the red dragon, pronounced [? ?ðrai? ??o??]) appears on the national flag of Wales. The oldest recorded use of the dragon to symbolise Wales is in the Historia Brittonum, written around AD 829, but it is popularly supposed to have been the battle standard of King Arthur and other ancient Celtic leaders. Its association with these leaders along with other evidence from archaeology, literature, and documentary history led many to suppose that it evolved from an earlier Romano-British national symbol.[1] During the reigns of the Tudor monarchs, the red dragon was used as a supporter in the English Crown’s coat of arms (one of two supporters, along with the traditional English lion).[2] The red dragon is often seen as symbolising all things Welsh, and is used by many public and private institutions. These include the Welsh Government, Visit Wales, the dragon’s tongue is in use with the Welsh Language Society and numerous local authorities including Blaenau Gwent, Cardiff, Carmarthenshire, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Swansea, and sports bodies, including the Sport Wales National Centre, the Football Association of Wales, Wrexham A.F.C., Newport Gwent Dragons, and London Welsh RFC.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Dragon

 

King Arthur: Artwork by John Watts

The Arthurian Legend

Geoffrey of Monmouth is known as the Father of the Arthurian Legend for developing the character of King Arthur, adding mythical elements to his story, and introducing many of the central characters and motifs which would later be expanded upon by other writers.

The phrase Arthurian Legend encompasses a number of different versions of the tale but, in the present day, mainly refers to the English work of Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D’Arthur (Death of Arthur) published by William Caxton in 1485 CE. The legend developed from History of The Kings of Britain, passing over to France, to Germany, to Spain and Portugal, and back to England with numerous additions and versions proliferating, until Malory compiled, edited, revised, and rewrote a prose version in 1469 CE while he was in prison

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.ancient.eu/King_Arthur/

Ing & John’s Art Exhibition, June 2013 at 194 Market Street, Second floor, Newark, New Jersey

For more information please visit the following link:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/ing-johns-art-exhibition-6-2013/

 

King Arthur & the Lady of the Lake

The basic story goes that, once upon a time, there was a wizard named Merlin who arranged for a mighty king named Uther Pendragon to sleep with a queen named Igrayne who was another king’s wife. Merlin’s stipulation was that, when the child of their union was born, it would be given to him. All of this happens as it should, the child is named Arthur, and he is given to another lord, Sir Hector, to raise with his own son Kay. Many years later, when Arthur is grown, he accompanies Kay and Hector to a tournament in which Kay is to compete, finds that he forgot Kay’s sword at home, and so takes one he finds in the forest stuck in a stone. This is the Sword in the Stone which can only be drawn from the rock by the true king of Britain.

Merlin returns at this point to explain the situation to Arthur, who had no idea he was adopted, and helps him fight the other lords who contest his claim to the throne. Although the Sword in the Stone is frequently associated with the famous weapon Excalibur, they are two different swords. The sword Arthur draws from the stone is broken in a fight with Sir Pellinore and Merlin brings Arthur to a mystical body of water where the Lady of the Lake gives him Excalibur.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.ancient.eu/King_Arthur/

 

Knights of the Round Table

In the enchanted lands of the Arthurian realm aNything can happen, at any time, but goodness will always triumph over evil & darkness can never put out the light.

Excalibur is more than just a sword; it is a symbol of Arthur’s greatness. In some versions of the legend Arthur gives the sword to Sir Gawain but, in most, it is exclusively Arthur’s. This is in keeping with many ancient tales and legends in which a great hero has some kind of magical weapon. Once Arthur has forced the other lords to recognize his legitimacy, he marries the beautiful queen Guinevere and sets up his court at Camelot.

He invites the greatest knights of the realm to come and dine in his banquet hall but, when they do, they begin fighting over who will get the best seat. Arthur severely punishes the knight who began the trouble and, to avert any repeat in the future, accepts a round table from his father-in-law. From this time on, he explains, everyone sitting at the table will be equal, including himself, and everyone’s opinions will be weighed seriously no matter their social standing. Further, anyone requiring assistance will be welcomed in the hall to request it and every wrong shall be righted by Arthur and his knights.

The motif of the Round Table, along with the magical weapon, sets Arthur above the kings who have preceded him who believed that their position of power dictated what was right or wrong; Arthur believes that everyone’s opinion is valid and that might should be used to support right, not define it. Arthur again sends out invitations to noble knights to join him but this time his messengers are to go even farther, beyond the boundaries of Britain.

Knights of the Round Table

Among the knights who answer his call is Lancelot of the Lake, a French knight who is unrivaled in combat. He and Arthur become friends at the same time that he falls in love with Guinevere and she with him. While this affair is going on behind the scenes, the Knights of the Round Table are engaging in all kinds of fantastic adventures. If there is no apparent adventure, Arthur will go off and find one. In the famous story of Gawain and the Green Knight, a challenger comes to court to start the adventure. In the story of Jaufre (also known as Girflet) he arrives at the court to be knighted and then proceeds on his own adventures before returning and involving the others.

The greatest adventure the knights undertake is the quest for the Holy Grail. The grail is originally a platter in the French version of the legend or cauldron in the Welsh. It is transformed, however, into the cup of Christ used at the Last Supper by the time Malory revises the story and this is how it is generally understood. The grail quest can only be completed by a knight pure of heart and this is finally accomplished by Galahad, son of Lancelot.

Arthur remains a good & noble king until the affair of his queen & best friend is revealed by his son Mordred.

Throughout all these adventures there are a number of times Guinevere is kidnapped by some menacing lord and has to be rescued or other ladies are in distress and also need the assistance of a noble knight. There are dragons, giants, invisible spirits, sacred wells, unending waters to cross, inanimate objects which move and speak, courageous heroes, scheming villains, women who are beautiful and noble and others whose beauty conceals their devious nature. Encountering all of these, Arthur remains a good and noble king until the affair of his queen and best friend is revealed by Arthur’s illegitimate son Mordred who then challenges Arthur’s right to rule.

In the final battle between Mordred and Arthur, Mordred is killed and Arthur mortally wounded. Guinevere retires to a convent and Lancelot to a hermitage. All of the other great knights of the court are killed. Sir Bedevere helps Arthur from the field and returns Excalibur to the Lady of the Lake. Once the sword has been returned, Arthur dies and is carried away on a ship to the isle of Avalon.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://www.ancient.eu/King_Arthur/

 

St. George & Dragon: Artwork by John Watts, Welsh Artist

John Watts, my husband said that “I support the dragon”

Ing & John’s Art Exhibition, June 2013 at 194 Market Street, Second floor, Newark, New Jersey

For more information please visit the following link:
https://ingpeaceproject.com/ing-johns-art-exhibition-6-2013/

 

Woodcut frontispiece of Alexander Barclay, Lyfe of Seynt George (Westminster, 1515).

Alexander Barclay (1476-1552) – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:St_GeorgeEnglish.JPG

Life of Saint George, Woodcut of St George Slaying the Dragon, 1515, by Alexander Barclay (1476-1552)

The Saint George and the Dragon legend describes the saint taming and slaying a dragon that demanded human sacrifices; the saint thereby rescues the princess chosen as the next offering.

Only a kernel of the legend occurs in the ancient hagiography of Saint George dating to the 7th century or earlier. Here, a monarch referred to as “dragon of the abyss” persecutes the saint. The dragon-slaying may have been transferred from the legend attached to St. Theodore.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_George_and_the_Dragon

  

Miniature from a Passio Sancti Georgii manuscript (Verona, second half of 13th century)

Saint George and the Dragon in medieval miniature.

The motif of Saint George as a knight on horseback slaying the dragon first appears in western art in the second half of the 13th century. The tradition of the saint’s arms being shown as the red-on-white St. George’s Cross develops in the 14th century.

The Saint George and the Dragon legend describes the saint taming and slaying a dragon that demanded human sacrifices; the saint thereby rescues the princess chosen as the next offering.

Only a kernel of the legend occurs in the ancient hagiography of Saint George dating to the 7th century or earlier. Here, a monarch referred to as “dragon of the abyss” persecutes the saint. The dragon-slaying may have been transferred from the legend attached to St. Theodore.

For more information please visit the following link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_George_and_the_Dragon

 

 Vortigern and Ambros watch the fight between the red and white dragons: an illustration from a 15th-century manuscript of Geoffrey of Monmouth‘s

Welsh Dragon: Mabinogion

In the Mabinogion story Lludd and Llefelys, the red dragon fights with an invading White Dragon. His pained shrieks cause women to miscarry, animals to perish and plants to become barren. Lludd, king of Britain, goes to his wise brother Llefelys in France. Llefelys tells him to dig a pit in the centre of Britain, fill it with mead, and cover it with cloth. Lludd does this, and the dragons drink the mead and fall asleep. Lludd imprisons them, still wrapped in their cloth, in Dinas Emrys in Snowdonia (Welsh: Eryri).

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_Dragon

 

Dylan Thomas: Artwork by John Watts, Welsh Artist

Poem by Dylan Thomas

Do not go gentle into that good night

Dylan Thomas, 1914 – 1953

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/do-not-go-gentle-good-night

 

 Memorial:Statue of Thomas in Swansea, Wales, UK

Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 – 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet and writer whose works include the poems “Do not go gentle into that good night” and “And death shall have no dominion“; the ‘play for voices’ Under Milk Wood; and stories and radio broadcasts such as A Child’s Christmas in Wales and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog. He became widely popular in his lifetime and remained so after his premature death at the age of 39 in New York City. By then he had acquired a reputation, which he had encouraged, as a “roistering, drunken and doomed poet”.[3]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dylan_Thomas

 

 Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales, in 1914. An undistinguished pupil, he left school at 16 and became a journalist for a short time. Many of his works appeared in print while he was still a teenager; however, it was the publication in 1934 of “Light breaks where no sun shines” that caught the attention of the literary world. While living in London, Thomas met Caitlin Macnamara, whom he married in 1937. Their relationship was defined by alcoholism and was mutually destructive.[3] In the early part of their marriage, Thomas and his family lived hand-to-mouth; they settled in the Welsh fishing village of Laugharne.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dylan_Thomas

Stone Clouds: Artwork by John Watts

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) west of Amesbury. It consists of a ring of standing stones, with each standing stone around 13 feet (4.0 m) high, 7 feet (2.1 m) wide and weighing around 25 tons. The stones are set within earthworks in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.[1]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

 

Stonehenge in 2007

Stonehenge: garethwiscombe – https://www.flickr.com/photos/garethwiscombe/1071477228/in/photostream/

CC BY 2.0, File:Stonehenge2007 07 30.jpg, Created: 30 July 2007

Archaeologists believe it was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC. The surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. Radiocarbon dating suggests that the first bluestones were raised between 2400 and 2200 BC,[2] although they may have been at the site as early as 3000 BC.[3][4][5]

One of the most famous landmarks in the UK, Stonehenge is regarded as a British cultural icon.[6] It has been a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument since 1882 when legislation to protect historic monuments was first successfully introduced in Britain. The site and its surroundings were added to UNESCO‘s list of World Heritage Sites in 1986. Stonehenge is owned by the Crown and managed by English Heritage; the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.[7][8]

Stonehenge could have been a burial ground from its earliest beginnings.[9] Deposits containing human bone date from as early as 3000 BC, when the ditch and bank were first dug, and continued for at least another five hundred years.[10]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

The Sun rising over Stonehenge on the morning of the Summer Solstice (21st June 2005).

Photograph by Andrew Dunn, 21 June 2005.

A crowd of between 14,000 and 19,000 people watched the sunrise from the ground, along with three paramotor pilots who watched the events from the air.

This photograph was taken a couple of minutes after sunrise, and a little to the right of the solar alignment line. A more perfectly aligned photograph taken immediately after sunrise can be seen at Image:Summer Solstice 2005 Sunrise over Stonehenge 01.jpg.

Description of the solar alignment

If you look at an aerial view, north is approximately along the path to the right. On the morning of the solstice, the sun rises from behind the Heel Stone in the bottom right hand corner, and can be observed on an alignment running from the Heel stone, passing between the two Slaughter Stones (only one remains fallen on the outer bank), through the outer Sarsen ring, across the centre of the henge, then between the tallest trilith at the back of the Sarsen horseshoe. If you continue the line onward to the bank and ditch top left, that’s the point from which this photo is taken.

Tallest stone

Today the tallest trilith at the back of the Sarsen horseshoe is largely collapsed. Only one of its three stones remains standing, which is the tallest stone just left of the sun in this photograph.

The lintel stones on the triliths and the outer Sarsen circle are held in place with mortise and tenon joints. I believe the triangular spike on top of the tallest stone, is the tenon exposed after its neighbouring stones had fallen.

Photograph Andrew Dunn, 21 June 2005.

Website: htt://www.andrewdunphoto.com/

For more information please visit the following link:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Summer_Solstice_Sunrise_over_Stonehenge_2005.jpg

 

Stones 2: Artwork by John Watts, Welsh Artist

“Heel Stone”, “Friar’s Heel”, or “Sun-Stone”

The Heel Stone lies north east of the sarsen circle, beside the end portion of Stonehenge Avenue.[41] It is a rough stone, 16 feet (4.9 m) above ground, leaning inwards towards the stone circle.[41] It has been known by many names in the past, including “Friar’s Heel” and “Sun-stone”.[42][43] At summer solstice an observer standing within the stone circle, looking north-east through the entrance, would see the Sun rise in the approximate direction of the heel stone, and the sun has often been photographed over it.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

The Heel Stone

“Heel Stone”, “Friar’s Heel”, or “Sun-Stone”

A folk tale relates the origin of the Friar’s Heel reference.[44][45]

The Devil bought the stones from a woman in Ireland, wrapped them up, and brought them to Salisbury plain. One of the stones fell into the Avon, the rest were carried to the plain. The Devil then cried out, “No-one will ever find out how these stones came here!” A friar replied, “That’s what you think!”, whereupon the Devil threw one of the stones at him and struck him on the heel. The stone stuck in the ground and is still there.[46] Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable attributes this tale to Geoffrey of Monmouth, but though book eight of Geoffrey’s Historia Regum Britanniae does describe how Stonehenge was built, the two stories are entirely different.

The name is not unique; there was a monolith with the same name recorded in the nineteenth century by antiquarian Charles Warne at Long Bredy in Dorset.[47]

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

Dancing inside the stones, 1984 Stonehenge Free Festival

Salix alba at en.wikipedia                                            Photo of the en:Stonehenge Free Festival in 1984

CC BY-SA 3.0, File:Stonehenge84.jpg, Created: 31 December 1983

The earlier rituals were augmented by the Stonehenge Free Festival, loosely organised by the Politantric Circle, held between 1972 and 1984, during which time the number of midsummer visitors had risen to around 30,000.[67] However, in 1985 the site was closed to festivalgoers by English Heritage and the National Trust. A consequence of the end of the festival in 1985 was the violent confrontation between the police and New Age travellers that became known as the Battle of the Beanfield when police blockaded a convoy of travellers to prevent them from approaching Stonehenge. Beginning in 1985, the year of the Battle of the Beanfield, no access was allowed into the stones at Stonehenge for any religious reason. This ‘exclusion zone’ policy continued for almost fifteen years and until just before the arrival of the twenty-first century, visitors were not allowed to go into the stones at times of religious significance: the two Solstices (Winter and Summer) and two Equinoxes (Vernal and Autumnal).[68]

However, now due to the Roundtable process and the ‘Court of Human Rights’ rulings gained by picketing by campaigners such as Brian “Viziondanz” Felstein and King Arthur Pendragon, some access had been gained four times a year. The ‘Court of Human Rights’ rulings recognises that members of any genuine religion have a right to worship in their own church, and Stonehenge is a place of worship to Neo-Druids, Pagans and other ‘Earth based’ or ‘old’ religions. The Roundtable meetings include members of the Wiltshire Police force, National Trust, English Heritage, Pagans, Druids, Spiritualists and others.

At the Summer Solstice 2003, which fell over a weekend, over 30,000 people attended a gathering at and in the stones. The 2004 gathering was smaller (around 21,000 people).

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

 

Stones twice: Artwork by John Watts, Welsh Artist

On 18 December 2011, geologists from University of Leicester and the National Museum of Wales announced the discovery of the exact source of some of the rhyolite fragments found in the Stonehenge debitage. These fragments do not seem to match any of the standing stones or bluestone stumps. The researchers have identified the source as a 70-metre (230 ft) long rock outcrop called Craig Rhos-y-Felin (51°59?30.07?N 4°44?40.85?W), near Pont Saeson in north Pembrokeshire, located 220 kilometres (140 mi) from Stonehenge.[85][86]

On 10 September 2014 the University of Birmingham announced findings including evidence of adjacent stone and wooden structures and burial mounds, overlooked previously, that may date as far back as 4000 BC.[17] An area extending to 12 square kilometres (1,200 ha) was studied to a depth of three metres with ground-penetrating radar equipment. As many as seventeen new monuments, revealed nearby, may be Late Neolithic monuments that resemble Stonehenge. The interpretation suggests a complex of numerous related monuments. Also included in the discovery is that the cursus track is terminated by two five-meter wide extremely deep pits,[87] whose purpose is still a mystery.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

Seventeenth century depiction of Stonehenge from the Atlas van Loon

1600–1900

Throughout recorded history, Stonehenge and its surrounding monuments have attracted attention from antiquarians and archaeologists. John Aubrey was one of the first to examine the site with a scientific eye in 1666, and recorded in his plan of the monument the pits that now bear his name. William Stukeley continued Aubrey’s work in the early eighteenth century, but took an interest in the surrounding monuments as well, identifying (somewhat incorrectly) the Cursus and the Avenue. He also began the excavation of many of the barrows in the area, and it was his interpretation of the landscape that associated it with the Druids.[69] Stukeley was so fascinated with Druids that he originally named Disc Barrows as Druids’ Barrows. The most accurate early plan of Stonehenge was that made by Bath architect John Wood in 1740.[70] His original annotated survey has recently been computer redrawn and published.[71][page?needed] Importantly Wood’s plan was made before the collapse of the southwest trilithon, which fell in 1797 and was restored in 1958.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

 

An early photograph of Stonehenge taken July 1877

William Cunnington was the next to tackle the area in the early nineteenth century. He excavated some 24 barrows before digging in and around the stones and discovered charred wood, animal bones, pottery and urns. He also identified the hole in which the Slaughter Stone once stood. Richard Colt Hoare supported Cunnington’s work and excavated some 379 barrows on Salisbury Plain including on some 200 in the area around the Stones, some excavated in conjunction with William Coxe. To alert future diggers to their work they were careful to leave initialled metal tokens in each barrow they opened. Cunnington’s finds are displayed at the Wiltshire Museum. In 1877 Charles Darwin dabbled in archaeology at the stones, experimenting with the rate at which remains sink into the earth for his book The Formation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms.

For more information please visit the following link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stonehenge

The following are more of John Watts’artworks:

Prey small: Artwork by John Watts

Alice Final: Artwork by John Watts

 

Ameba: Artwork by John Watts

 

 Cinderella: Artwork by John Watts

Dino Landscape: Artwork by John Watts

 

 Don Q: Artwork by John Watts

 

Portrait of Joyce: Artwork by John Watts

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